2013 National League Wild Card Game

The 2013 National League Wild Card Game was a play-in game during Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2013 postseason played between the National League's (NL) two wild card teams, the Cincinnati Reds and the Pittsburgh Pirates. It was held at PNC Park in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on October 1, 2013.[1] The Pirates won by a 6–2 score and advanced to play the St. Louis Cardinals in the NL Division Series. The game was televised on TBS, and was also broadcast on ESPN Radio.[2]

The game marked the first postseason appearance by the Pirates since 1992 and the Pirates' victory gave the team their first postseason series win since the 1979 World Series.[3] This was the third postseason appearance for the Reds in four seasons. It was the sixth postseason meeting between the Pirates and Reds (the others being in the NLCS in 1970, 1972, 1975, 1979, and 1990). Pirates manager Clint Hurdle made his first postseason appearance since competing in the 2007 World Series as manager of the Colorado Rockies, while Dusty Baker fell to 0–3 in postseason appearances as manager of the Reds, a position from which he was relieved three days after the loss.[4] The loss continued the Reds' postseason win drought, active since their last World Series championship in 1990.[5]

2013 National League Wild Card Game
Wildcard2013logo
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Cincinnati Reds 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 6 1
Pittsburgh Pirates 0 2 1 2 0 0 1 0 X 6 13 0
DateOctober 1, 2013, 8:07 p.m. (EDT)
VenuePNC Park
CityPittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Managers
UmpiresLineup
Attendance40,487
TelevisionTBS
TV announcersErnie Johnson Jr., Ron Darling, Cal Ripken Jr., and Craig Sager
RadioESPN
Radio announcersDan Shulman and Orel Hershiser

The game

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Cincinnati Reds 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 6 1
Pittsburgh Pirates 0 2 1 2 0 0 1 0 X 6 13 0
WP: Francisco Liriano (1–0)   LP: Johnny Cueto (0–1)
Home runs:
CIN: Shin-Soo Choo (1)
PIT: Marlon Byrd (1), Russell Martin 2 (2)

After a scoreless first inning and a half, the Pirates secured the first runs of the game with home runs by Marlon Byrd and Russell Martin in the bottom of the 2nd inning.[6] Martin's home run came after Reds starting pitcher Johnny Cueto, having his name chanted mockingly by over 40,000 Pirates fans, dropped the baseball from the mound. Martin hit a home run on the next pitch. In the bottom of the third, Pedro Alvarez hit a sacrifice-fly to Shin-Soo Choo, which allowed Andrew McCutchen to score. In the top of the fourth, with Choo and Ryan Ludwick on base, Jay Bruce hit a groundball single to Pirates left-fielder Starling Marte, allowing Choo to score. In the bottom of the fourth, Marte and Neil Walker scored off RBI hits by Walker and Byrd, respectively. In the bottom of the 7th inning, Russell Martin hit another home run. The Reds could only further respond with a Choo home run off of Tony Watson. The Pirates would maintain their lead and go on to win, with Jason Grilli closing the game.[7][8]

References

  1. ^ Singer, Tom (September 28, 2013). "Behind six homers, Bucs to host NL Wild Card Game". MLB.com. Retrieved September 28, 2013.
  2. ^ "Pirates beat Cincinnati". New York Times. October 2, 2013. Retrieved October 2, 2013.
  3. ^ "Blackout for Reds, as Pirates Move On". New York Times. October 2, 2013. Retrieved October 2, 2013.
  4. ^ "Reds dismiss manager Dusty Baker". ESPN. October 4, 2013. Retrieved October 5, 2013.
  5. ^ Sheldon, Mark (October 2, 2013). "Reds' curtain closes with Wild Card loss in Pittsburgh". MLB.com. Retrieved October 2, 2013.
  6. ^ "Meet me in St. Louis! Pirates roll into NLDS after ripping Reds 6-2 in wild-card win". Washington Post. October 2, 2013. Retrieved October 2, 2013.
  7. ^ "Pirates cruise past Reds in playoff return". USA Today. October 2, 2013. Retrieved October 2, 2013.
  8. ^ "Pirates advance to NLDS". MLB.com. October 2, 2013. Retrieved October 2, 2013.

External links

1979 World Series

The 1979 World Series was the 76th edition of Major League Baseball's championship series and the conclusion of the 1979 Major League Baseball season. A best-of-seven playoff, it was played between the National League (NL) champion Pittsburgh Pirates (98–64) and the American League (AL) champion Baltimore Orioles (102–57), with the Pirates becoming the fourth team in World Series history to come back from a three games to one deficit to win the Series in seven games. This marked the second time in the 1970s the Pirates won a World Series Game 7 on the road against Baltimore Orioles, the previous time being in the 1971 World Series. The Pirates were famous for adopting Sister Sledge's hit anthem "We Are Family" as their theme song.

Willie Stargell, pitcher Bruce Kison, and catcher Manny Sanguillén were the only players left over from the Pirates team that defeated the Orioles in the 1971 World Series, and Orioles' pitcher Jim Palmer, shortstop Mark Belanger, and manager Earl Weaver were the only remaining Orioles from the 1971 team. Grant Jackson pitched for the Orioles in the 1971 series and for the Pirates in the 1979 series.

In this Series, it was the American League team's "turn" to play by National League rules, meaning no designated hitter and the Orioles' pitchers would have to bat. While this resulted in Tim Stoddard getting his first major league hit and RBI in Game 4, overall, it hurt the Orioles because Lee May, their designated hitter for much of the season and a key part of their offense, was only able to bat three times in the whole series.

Willie Stargell, the series MVP, hit .400 with a record seven extra-base hits and matched Reggie Jackson's record of 25 total bases, set in 1977.

The 1979 Pirates were the last team to win Game 7 of a World Series on the road until the San Francisco Giants defeated the Royals in Kansas City to win Game 7 of the 2014 Series. They were also the last road team to win Game 7 of a championship round, in any major league sport, until the Pittsburgh Penguins defeated the Detroit Red Wings 2–1 at Joe Louis Arena to win the 2009 Stanley Cup Finals. With the Steelers having already won Super Bowl XIII, Pittsburgh also became the second city to win both the Super Bowl and the World Series in the same year, with the New York Jets and the New York Mets winning titles in 1969. New York repeated the feat in 1986 (New York Mets and New York Giants), as did the New England area in the 2004 season (Boston Red Sox and New England Patriots) and the 2018 season (Red Sox and Patriots).

2013 Cincinnati Reds season

The 2013 Cincinnati Reds season was the 124th season for the franchise in Major League Baseball, and their 11th at Great American Ball Park. During the 2013 season, the Reds returned to the playoffs for a second straight season, after a 97–65 season in 2012, in which they lost in 5 games in the NLDS. On September 23, due to the Washington Nationals' loss to the St. Louis Cardinals, the Reds clinched a spot in the post-season. They entered the playoffs as a Wild Card team, becoming the first team to qualify for the postseason after finishing third in their respective division. They lost in the 2013 National League Wild Card Game to the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Clint Hurdle

Clinton Merrick Hurdle (born July 30, 1957) is an American former professional baseball outfielder and current manager of the Pittsburgh Pirates of Major League Baseball. Hurdle played in MLB for the Kansas City Royals, Cincinnati Reds, New York Mets, and St. Louis Cardinals, and has also managed for the Colorado Rockies.

Labeled a "phenom" by Sports Illustrated at age twenty, Hurdle played 515 games at the major league level. After retiring from playing baseball, Hurdle became a manager. His eight seasons with the Colorado Rockies included leading the 2007 club to the franchise's first National League (NL) pennant. On November 14, 2010, the Pirates hired him to be their manager. In 2013, Hurdle led them to their first winning season and playoff appearance since 1992. He was named the NL Manager of the Year that season.

Jason Grilli

Jason Michael Grilli (born November 11, 1976) is an American former professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Florida Marlins, Chicago White Sox, Detroit Tigers, Colorado Rockies, Pittsburgh Pirates, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, Atlanta Braves, Toronto Blue Jays, and Texas Rangers. Taken as the fourth overall selection of the 1997 MLB draft by the San Francisco Giants, Grilli was one of the top starting pitcher prospects in all of Minor League Baseball, ranked 54th in 1998 and 44th in 1999. The Giants traded him to the Florida Marlins in 1999, for whom he debuted on May 11, 2000.

In 2011, Grilli's career took off as a relief pitcher with the Pittsburgh Pirates. That year, he carried a 2.48 earned run average (ERA) and 10.2 strikeouts per nine innings (K/9) rate in 32 innings pitched (IP), and further improved in 2012, when his strikeout rate climbed to 13.8. In 2013, Grilli made his first All-Star team and became Pittsburgh's closer at the age of 36. From 2011–14, he compiled a 3.09 ERA with 11.9 K/9, 3.3 BB/9 and a 34.2 percent ground-ball rate in ​195 1⁄3 IP.

Marlon Byrd

Marlon Jerrard Byrd (born August 30, 1977) is an American former professional baseball outfielder, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies, Washington Nationals, Texas Rangers, Chicago Cubs, Boston Red Sox, New York Mets, Pittsburgh Pirates, San Francisco Giants, Cincinnati Reds, and Cleveland Indians. He was suspended twice for using performance-enhancing drugs.

Mat Latos

Mathew Adam Latos ( LAY-tohs; born December 9, 1987) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Southern Maryland Blue Crabs of the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Diego Padres from 2009 through 2011, the Cincinnati Reds from 2012 through 2014, and the Miami Marlins, Los Angeles Dodgers and Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in 2015, the Chicago White Sox and Washington Nationals in 2016, and the Toronto Blue Jays in 2017.

Born in Alexandria, Virginia, Latos' family moved to Florida when he was young. He played baseball at Coconut Creek High School, where he became one of the best high school players in the state. Highly regarded for his talent before the 2006 MLB draft, he fell to the 11th round due to questions about his maturity. After pitching at Broward College for a season, he was signed by the San Diego Padres for a $1.25 million bonus. He debuted for the Padres in 2009, and established himself in their starting rotation. The Reds traded four players, including three prospects, to acquire Latos before the 2012 season.

Latos suffered a knee injury in 2014, which reduced his effectiveness. The Marlins traded for Latos before the 2015 season and then traded him to the Dodgers in July 2015. He signed with the White Sox for 2016, but was released during the season, and finished the year with the Nationals. He briefly appeared with the Blue Jays in 2017.

National League Division Series

In Major League Baseball, the National League Division Series (NLDS) determines which two teams from the National League will advance to the National League Championship Series. The Division Series consists of two best-of-five series, featuring the three division winners and the winner of the wild-card play-off.

PNC Park

PNC Park is a baseball park located on the North Shore of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It is the fifth home of the Pittsburgh Pirates, the city's Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise. It opened during the 2001 MLB season, after the controlled implosion of the Pirates' previous home, Three Rivers Stadium. PNC Park stands just east of its predecessor along the Allegheny River with a view of the Downtown Pittsburgh skyline. The ballpark is sponsored by PNC Financial Services, which purchased the naming rights in 1998. PNC Park features a natural grass playing surface and seats 38,747 people for baseball.

Plans to build a new stadium for the Pirates originated in 1991, but did not come to fruition for five years. Funded in conjunction with Heinz Field and the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, the park was constructed for $216 million over a 24-month span, faster than most modern stadiums. Built in the "retro-classic" style modeled after past venues like Pittsburgh's Forbes Field, PNC Park also introduced unique features, such as the use of limestone in the building's facade. The park also features a riverside concourse, steel truss work, an extensive out-of-town scoreboard, and local eateries. Several tributes to former Pirate Roberto Clemente were incorporated into the ballpark, which included renaming the Sixth Street Bridge behind it in his honor.

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