2013 National League Division Series

The 2013 National League Division Series were two best-of-five-game series to determine the baseball teams to participate in the 2013 National League Championship Series. The three divisional winners (seeded 1-3 based on record) and a fourth team — the winner of a one-game Wild Card playoff — played in two series. TBS carried most of the games, with some on MLB Network.

These matchups were:

The restriction on teams from the same division meeting in the Division Series was removed prior to the 2012 season. Therefore, the Cardinals and Pirates, both from the Central Division, were able to meet in the Division Series. Under the format used from 1998-2011, (1) St. Louis would have faced (3) Los Angeles in one Division Series, and (2) Atlanta would have faced (4) Pittsburgh in the other.

This was the first postseason meeting between the current National League Central division rivals St. Louis and Pittsburgh. The Pirates made their first postseason appearance since 1992, and their first appearance in the Division Series in franchise history.

This was the second postseason meeting between the Dodgers and Braves. The Braves previously defeated the Dodgers 3–0 in the 1996 NLDS.

2013 National League Division Series
2013NLDS
Teams
Team (Wins) Manager Season
St. Louis Cardinals (3) Mike Matheny 97–65, .599, 3 GA
Pittsburgh Pirates (2) Clint Hurdle 94–68, .580 3 GB
DatesOctober 3–9
TelevisionTBS (Games 1, 3–5)
MLB Network (Game 2)
TV announcersDick Stockton, Bob Brenly and Matt Winer (TBS)
Bob Costas, Jim Kaat and Sam Ryan (MLBN)
RadioESPN
Radio announcersDave Flemming and Rick Sutcliffe
UmpiresJerry Layne (crew chief), Jim Joyce, Sam Holbrook, Paul Nauert, Wally Bell, Tony Randazzo
Teams
Team (Wins) Manager Season
Los Angeles Dodgers (3) Don Mattingly 92–70, .568, 11 GA
Atlanta Braves (1) Fredi González 96–66, .593, 10 GA
DatesOctober 3–7
TelevisionTBS
TV announcersErnie Johnson, Ron Darling, Cal Ripken, Jr. and Craig Sager
RadioESPN
Radio announcersDan Shulman and Orel Hershiser
UmpiresJohn Hirschbeck (crew chief), Laz Diaz, Marvin Hudson, Bill Miller, Tim Welke, Hunter Wendelstedt
NL Wild Card GamePittsburgh Pirates over Cincinnati Reds, 6–2

Matchups

St. Louis Cardinals vs. Pittsburgh Pirates

St. Louis won the series, 3–2.

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 3 Pittsburgh Pirates – 1, St. Louis Cardinals – 9 Busch Stadium 2:57 45,693[3] 
2 October 4 Pittsburgh Pirates – 7, St. Louis Cardinals – 1 Busch Stadium 3:03 45,999[4] 
3 October 6 St. Louis Cardinals – 3, Pittsburgh Pirates – 5 PNC Park 2:58 40,489[5] 
4 October 7 St. Louis Cardinals – 2, Pittsburgh Pirates – 1 PNC Park 2:36 40,493[6] 
5 October 9 Pittsburgh Pirates – 1, St. Louis Cardinals – 6 Busch Stadium 2:40 47,231[7]

Atlanta Braves vs. Los Angeles Dodgers

Los Angeles won the series, 3–1.

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 3 Los Angeles Dodgers – 6, Atlanta Braves – 1 Turner Field 3:24 43,021[8] 
2 October 4 Los Angeles Dodgers – 3, Atlanta Braves – 4 Turner Field 3:29 48,966[9] 
3 October 6 Atlanta Braves – 6, Los Angeles Dodgers – 13 Dodger Stadium 4:01 54,646[10] 
4 October 7 Atlanta Braves – 3, Los Angeles Dodgers – 4 Dodger Stadium 3:19 54,438[11]

Pittsburgh vs. St. Louis

Game 1, October 3

5:07 p.m. (EDT) at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri[12]

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Pittsburgh 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 4 3
St. Louis 0 0 7 0 1 1 0 0 X 9 10 0
WP: Adam Wainwright (1–0)   LP: A. J. Burnett (0–1)
Home runs:
PIT: Pedro Álvarez (1)
STL: Carlos Beltrán (1)

The Cardinals set a new NLDS record with seven runs in the third inning.[13] Adam Wainwright drew a leadoff walk, then Matt Carpenter singled before Carlos Beltrán's towering three-run home run (443 feet), his 15th in post-season play tying Babe Ruth for eighth place on the list, put the Cardinals up 3–0. Only Derek Jeter (20) and Albert Pujols (18) among active players have more.[14] A double, hit-by-pitch and walk loaded the bases before Jon Jay walked to force in another run, then David Freese cleared the bases with a single aided by an error to knock starter A. J. Burnett out of the game. Pedro Alvarez's leadoff home run in the fifth off Wainwright provided the only run for the Pirates. The Cardinals added a run in the bottom of the inning off Jeanmar Gomez on Daniel Descalso's forceout with runners on first and second aided by an error. Next inning Matt Adams walked with two outs before scoring the Cardinals' last run on Yadier Molina's double. Wainwright pitches seven innings allowing just one run, three hits while striking out nine. Carlos Martinez and Trevor Rosenthal pitched a scoreless eighth and ninth respectively as the Cardinals took a 1–0 series lead.

Game 2, October 4

1:07 p.m. (EDT) at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri[15]

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Pittsburgh 0 1 2 0 2 0 1 1 0 7 10 0
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 4 1
WP: Gerrit Cole (1–0)   LP: Lance Lynn (0–1)
Home runs:
PIT: Pedro Álvarez (2), Starling Marte (1)
STL: Yadier Molina (1)

The Pirates scored first with two outs in the second inning off Lance Lynn as Gerrit Cole drove in Pedro Álvarez with a single after Jordy Mercer was intentionally walked. Alvarez hit his second home run of the series in the third, a two-run line drive. The Pirates added to their lead in the fifth when Justin Morneau doubled with one out and scored on Marlon Byrd's double. After Alvarez walked, Seth Maness relieved Lynn and Russell Martin plated Byrd with a single. The Cardinals got on the board with a home run from Yadier Molina in the bottom of the fifth off Gerrit Cole. It was his third post-season home run. The Pirates added to their lead in the seventh inning as Martin plated Byrd again, this time via a sacrifice fly off Kevin Siegrist, then Starling Marte's lead off home run next inning off Shelby Miller capped the game's scoring at 7–1. Cole pitched six innings and three relievers held the Cardinals scoreless in the last three innings as the Pirates tied the series heading to Pittsburgh.

Game 3, October 6

4:37 p.m. (EDT) at PNC Park in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania[16]

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 3 7 1
Pittsburgh 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 X 5 8 0
WP: Mark Melancon (1–0)   LP: Carlos Martínez (0–1)   Sv: Jason Grilli (1)
Home runs:
STL: Carlos Beltrán (2)
PIT: None

The Pirates opened up their first non-Wild Card postseason home game in 21 years by scoring two runs in the first inning on Marlon Byrd's single with runners on second and third off Joe Kelly. The Cardinals tied the game in the fifth with a two-out two-run single by Carlos Beltrán off Francisco Liriano. The Pirates loaded the bases with one out in the sixth on a double and two walks off Kelly, who was relieved by Seth Maness, and took the lead on Russell Martin's sacrifice fly. Beltran's home run in the eighth off Mark Melancon tied the game again. The home run was Beltran's 16th playoff home run, which moved him past Babe Ruth for eighth place in postseason history. In the bottom of the inning, the Pirates got two on with one out off Carlos Martinez, who was relieved by Kevin Siegrist. Back-to-back RBI singles by Pedro Alvarez and Martin put the Pirates up 5–3. Jason Grilli pitched a scoreless ninth for the save as the Pirates took a 2–1 series lead. In the four playoff games since this one, the Pirates have failed to score 5 runs yet.

Game 4, October 7

3:07 p.m. (EDT) at PNC Park in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania[17]

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 3 0
Pittsburgh 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
WP: Michael Wacha (1–0)   LP: Charlie Morton (0–1)   Sv: Trevor Rosenthal (1)
Home runs:
STL: Matt Holliday (1)
PIT: Pedro Álvarez (3)

Game 4 featured a pitching gem from St. Louis Cardinals rookie Michael Wacha. Wacha held the Pirates to just three base runners (one hit, two walks) through 713 innings pitched. It was the longest no-hitter length by a rookie pitcher since Jeff Tesreau went 513 innings with no hits allowed for the 1912 New York Giants. Wacha was acquired in the 2012 draft with the 19th overall pick, from the Los Angeles Angels as compensation for losing Albert Pujols.[18] Pedro Alvarez broke up Wacha's no-hitter in the eighth with his third home run of the series. That was the only hit the Pirates got in the whole game. Matt Holliday provided all the runs the Cardinals needed with his two-run homer in the sixth. Charlie Morton, the opposing starting pitcher, went 523 innings pitched, allowing just those two runs. With the Game 4 win, the Cardinals guaranteed a Game 5, making it the third straight NLDS Game 5 in as many years. Trevor Rosenthal picked up his first career post-season save.

Game 5, October 9

8:07 p.m. (EDT) at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri[19]

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Pittsburgh 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 8 1
St. Louis 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 3 X 6 9 0
WP: Adam Wainwright (2–0)   LP: Gerrit Cole (1–1)
Home runs:
PIT: None
STL: David Freese (1), Matt Adams (1)

Game 5 pivoted Game 1 winner Adam Wainwright against the Pirates' rookie and Game 2 winner Gerrit Cole. The Cardinals got on the board first in the bottom of the second inning as Jon Jay walked with two-outs and David Freese broke the tie with a two-run home run. The Cardinals added to their lead in the sixth as Jay singled home Matt Holliday to make it 3–0 off Justin Wilson. The Pirates made some two-out noise in the top of the seventh as Justin Morneau, Marlon Byrd and Pedro Alvarez all singled (the last driving home Morneau), but Wainwright was able to get Russell Martin to ground out to end the threat. As of 2018, this is the last run the Pirates have scored in the postseason. Entering the bottom of the eighth and with the Cardinals leading 3–1, they put the game out of reach as Matt Adams hit a two-run home run off Mark Melancon to make it 5–1. After allowing a walk and single, Adams was relieved by Jason Grilli, who allowed an RBI single to Pete Kozma. Wainwright finished the complete game by striking out Alvarez with two runners on base to send the Cardinals to the National League Championship Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers. Wainwright joins John Smoltz as the only pitchers in postseason history with three or more wins as a starter and at least three saves.[20] Adam Wainwright also became the 5th Cardinal to pitch a CG with one ER in a winner-take-all postseason game. This was umpire Wally Bell's final MLB game as he died five days later of a heart attack.[21]

Composite line score

2013 NLDS (3–2): St. Louis Cardinals over Pittsburgh Pirates

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Pittsburgh Pirates 2 1 2 0 3 1 2 4 0 15 31 4
St. Louis Cardinals 0 2 7 0 4 4 0 4 0 21 33 2
Total attendance: 219,905   Average attendance: 43,981

Los Angeles vs. Atlanta

Game 1, October 3

8:07 p.m. (EDT) at Turner Field in Atlanta, Georgia

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles 0 2 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 6 11 0
Atlanta 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 0
WP: Clayton Kershaw (1–0)   LP: Kris Medlen (0–1)
Home runs:
LAD: Adrián González (1)
ATL: None

Game 1 of the series featured a pitching match-up of Kris Medlen against Clayton Kershaw. Kershaw would go on to strike out 12 Atlanta Braves batters in seven innings, while Kris Medlen was forced out after just four innings pitched. Kershaw's 12 strikeouts was the third most strikeouts by a Dodger pitcher in the playoffs, behind only Sandy Koufax (15 in the 1963 World Series) and Carl Erskine (14 in the 1953 World Series).[22] His six straight strikeouts in the game tied an MLB post-season record set by Tim Belcher in game 2 of the 1988 NLCS. Yasiel Puig and Juan Uribe hit one-out singles in the second, then Skip Schumaker's sacrifice fly and A.J. Ellis's double scored a run each. Next inning, Adrián González's two-run home run made it 4–0 Dodgers. Mark Ellis's RBI double next inning made it 5–0 Dodgers. The Braves scored their only run of the game in the bottom of the fourth on Chris Johnson's RBI single with two on. The Dodgers scored their last run in the sixth when Ellis singled with one out off Jordan Walden and scored on Hanley Ramirez's double. Brian Wilson and Kenley Jansen pitched a scoreless eighth and ninth, respectively for the Dodgers, who took a 1–0 series lead.[23]

Game 2, October 4

6:07 p.m. (EDT) at Turner Field in Atlanta, Georgia

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3 10 0
Atlanta 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 X 4 6 0
WP: Mike Minor (1–0)   LP: Zack Greinke (0–1)   Sv: Craig Kimbrel (1)
Home runs:
LAD: Hanley Ramírez (1)
ATL: None

In Game 2, the Dodgers struck first when Mark Ellis walked with one out in the first and scored on Hanley Ramírez's double off Mike Minor, but the Braves tied the score in the second when Evan Gattis hit a leadoff single off Zack Greinke and scored on Andrelton Simmons's two-out double. Freddie Freeman doubled to lead off the fourth and scored on Chris Johnson's two-out single to put the Braves up 2–1. In the bottom of the seventh, Brian McCann drew a leadoff walk, then Johnson singled off Chris Withrow. After a sacrifice bunt and strikeout, Paco Rodriguez relieved Withrow and intentionally walked Reed Johnson before Jason Heyward's two-run single made it 4–1 Braves. Ramirez's home run in the eighth after a walk off David Carpenter cut the lead to 4–3. [24] Craig Kimbrel recorded the four out save and the Braves evened the series at one game each.[25] Braves shortstop Andrelton Simmons and Braves catcher Gerald Laird combined for a huge defensive play in the ninth inning throwing out Dodger's base runner Dee Gordon when he attempted to steal second base. [26] This would end up being the final postseason game at Turner Field, as the Braves would not reach the postseason again before moving to SunTrust Park in 2017.

Game 3, October 6

8:07 p.m. (EDT) at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Atlanta 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 10 2
Los Angeles 0 4 2 4 0 0 0 3 X 13 14 0
WP: Chris Capuano (1–0)   LP: Julio Teherán (0–1)
Home runs:
ATL: Jason Heyward (1)
LAD: Carl Crawford (1), Juan Uribe (1)
NLDS Game 3 Atlanta at LAD
Dodger Stadium during Game 3 of the 2013 NLDS

Game 3 featured two rookies, Hyun-Jin Ryu of the Dodgers and Julio Teheran for the Braves, starting a playoff game for the first time since 2007 and was an offensive explosion from both teams in the early innings. In the top of the first, Justin Upton double with one out and scored on Evan Gattis's single. After a walk, Gattis scored on Chris Johnson's single. The Dodgers loaded the bases in the second inning on two singles and a walk before Hyun-jin Ryu's sacrifice fly scored a run, then Carl Crawford's three-run home run put them up 4–2. The Braves loaded the bases in the third on three straight leadoff singles before Brian McCann's groundout and Johnson's fielder's choice scored a run each to tie the game. In the bottom of the inning, Hanley Ramírez hit a leadoff double then scored on Adrián González's single. Two outs later, Skip Schumaker's RBI single made it 6–4 Dodgers and knock Teheran out of the game. Next inning, Carl Crawford reached on an error, then scored on Ramirez's triple off Alex Wood. After González struck out, Ramirez scored on Yasiel Puig's single before Juan Uribe's home run made it 10–4, all four runs unearned. In the eighth, Ramirez hit an RBI single with two on and two outs off Jordan Walden, who was relieved by Luis Avilan. González and Puig then hit back-to-back RBI singles to make it 13–4. In the ninth, Jason Heyward's two-run home run off Paco Rodriguez made it 13–6 Dodgers. After allowing a walk and single, Rodriguez was relieved by Kenley Jansen, who struck out Brian McCann to end the game and give the Dodgers a 2–1 series lead. Hanley Ramirez continued his torrid NLDS by hitting two more extra base hits, tying a Dodgers franchise record for extra-base hits in a playoff series set by Steve Garvey and Duke Snider.[27] Additionally, the 13 runs scored was a Dodgers record for a playoff game.[28]

At the age of 35 years, Chris Capuano picked up his first career post-season victory.

Game 4, October 7

9:37 p.m. (EDT) at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Atlanta 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 3 7 0
Los Angeles 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 X 4 11 2
WP: Brian Wilson (1–0)   LP: David Carpenter (0–1)   Sv: Kenley Jansen (1)
Home runs:
ATL: None
LAD: Carl Crawford 2 (3), Juan Uribe (2)

The Dodgers brought Clayton Kershaw back on short rest in Game 4 and he pitched six innings. Carl Crawford hit homers in his first two at-bats off Freddy García in the first and third, the first Dodger to do so in the playoffs since Shawn Green in the 2004 National League Division Series.[29] The Braves put runners on second and third with one out on a single and error by Adrián González, who committed another error in the first, when Chris Johnson's single and Andrelton Simmons's groundout scored a run each, tying the game, both runs unearned. Elliot Johnson tripled with one out, then an RBI single by José Constanza off Ronald Belisario in the seventh gave the Braves the lead, but the Dodgers went back up through a two-run homer by Juan Uribe in the eighth off David Carpenter.[30] Kenley Jansen struck out the side in the ninth to preserve the 4–3 series clinching victory for the Dodgers.[31][32]

Composite line score

2013 NLDS (3–1): Los Angeles Dodgers over Atlanta Braves

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles Dodgers 2 6 5 5 0 1 0 7 0 26 46 2
Atlanta Braves 2 1 2 4 0 0 3 0 2 14 28 2
Total attendance: 201,071   Average attendance: 50,268

References

  1. ^ "Pirates v Cardinals". ESPN. October 2, 2013. Retrieved October 3, 2013.
  2. ^ "Dodgers v Braves". ESPN. October 2, 2013. Retrieved October 3, 2013.
  3. ^ "Boxscore:Pittsburgh vs. St. Louis - October 3, 2013". MLB.com. October 3, 2013. Retrieved October 4, 2013.
  4. ^ "Boxscore:Pittsburgh vs. St. Louis - October 4, 2013". MLB.com. October 4, 2013. Retrieved October 4, 2013.
  5. ^ "Boxscore:St. Louis vs. Pittsburgh - October 6, 2013". MLB.com. October 6, 2013. Retrieved October 6, 2013.
  6. ^ "Boxscore:St. Louis vs. Pittsburgh - October 7, 2013". MLB.com. October 7, 2013. Retrieved October 7, 2013.
  7. ^ "Boxscore:Pittsburgh vs. St. Louis - October 9, 2013". MLB.com. October 9, 2013. Retrieved October 9, 2013.
  8. ^ "Boxscore:LA Dodgers vs. Atlanta - October 3, 2013". MLB.com. October 3, 2013. Retrieved October 4, 2013.
  9. ^ "Boxscore:LA Dodgers vs. Atlanta - October 4, 2013". MLB.com. October 4, 2013. Retrieved October 4, 2013.
  10. ^ "Boxscore:Atlanta vs. LA Dodgers - October 6, 2013". MLB.com. October 6, 2013. Retrieved October 6, 2013.
  11. ^ "Boxscore:Atlanta vs. LA Dodgers - October 7, 2013". MLB.com. October 7, 2013. Retrieved October 7, 2013.
  12. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates at St. Louis Cardinals – October 3, 2013 | MLB.com Play-by-Play". MLB.com. October 3, 2013. Retrieved October 3, 2013.
  13. ^ KMOX announcer John Rooney
  14. ^ "Beltran ties Ruth with 15th postseason homer: Cardinals All-Star belts three-run shot to ignite seven-run third inning". MLB.com. October 3, 2013.
  15. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates at St. Louis Cardinals – October 4, 2013 | MLB.com Play-by-Play". MLB.com. October 4, 2013. Retrieved October 4, 2013.
  16. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals at Pittsburgh Pirates – October 6, 2013 | MLB.com Play-by-Play". MLB.com. October 6, 2013. Retrieved October 6, 2013.
  17. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals at Pittsburgh Pirates – October 7, 2013 | MLB.com Play-by-Play". MLB.com. October 7, 2013. Retrieved October 7, 2013.
  18. ^ Bernie Miklasz (October 8, 2013). "Bernie: Wacha delivers incredible show of poise". St. Louis Post-Dispatch.
  19. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates at St. Louis Cardinals – October 9, 2013 | MLB.com Play-by-Play". MLB.com. October 9, 2013. Retrieved October 9, 2013.
  20. ^ ESPN - Elias Says: Sports Statistics - Stats from the Elias Sports Bureau - ESPN
  21. ^ MLB mourns the passing of umpire Wally Bell | MLB.com
  22. ^ "Clayton Kershaw fans 12 as Dodgers drub Braves in Game 1". ESPN. October 3, 2013. Retrieved October 8, 2013.
  23. ^ Stephen, Eric (October 3, 2013). "Dodgers 6, Braves 1: Clayton Kershaw strikes out 12 in Game 1 win". truebluela.com. Retrieved October 3, 2013.
  24. ^ "Braves hold on against Dodgers to knot division series". ESPN. October 4, 2013. Retrieved October 8, 2013.
  25. ^ Gurnick, Ken (October 4, 2013). "Offense subdued as Dodgers fall into NLDS tie". mlb.com. Retrieved October 4, 2013.
  26. ^ http://www.espn.com/mlb/recap?gameId=331004115
  27. ^ "Dodgers score 13 runs, thump Braves for 2-1 lead in NLDS". ESPN. October 6, 2013. Retrieved October 8, 2013.
  28. ^ Saxon, Mark (October 6, 2013). "Ramirez epitomizes Dodgers' talent". ESPN.com. Retrieved October 6, 2013.
  29. ^ "Juan and done: Dodgers stun Braves". USA Today. October 7, 2013. Retrieved October 8, 2013.
  30. ^ "Juan Uribe's 2-run homer sends Dodgers past Braves, into NLCS". ESPN. October 7, 2013. Retrieved October 8, 2013.
  31. ^ Gurnick, Ken (October 8, 2013). "Juan and done: Uribe powers Dodgers to NLCS". mlb.com. Retrieved October 8, 2013.
  32. ^ "Dodgers defeat Atlanta, win NLDS thanks to the power of Juan Uribe". Los Angeles Times. October 7, 2013. Retrieved October 8, 2013.

External links

2013 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 2013 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the franchise's 127th season as a member of the National League, 132nd season overall, and 13th season at PNC Park. The regular season began at home with a loss against the Chicago Cubs on April 1 and ended with a win at Great American Ball Park against the Cincinnati Reds on September 29. In their first winning season since 1992, the Pirates finished in second place in the National League Central Division with 94 wins and 68 losses.

The Pirates earned their 82nd win of the season on September 9, ensuring the team's first winning season since 1992 and ending the longest stretch of losing seasons—20—in North American professional sports history. Although the St. Louis Cardinals won the NL Central Division, the Pirates clinched a playoff berth for the first time since 1992 in one of two NL Wild Card spots on September 23. In the Wild Card Game, the Pirates secured their first postseason win since Game 6 of the 1992 National League Championship Series by defeating the Cincinnati Reds. In doing so, the team advanced to the 2013 National League Division Series, where they were defeated in five games by the eventual National League champion Cardinals, eliminating them from the 2013 postseason.

Five members of the 2013 Pirates were selected to represent the National League in the All-Star Game. In addition, team manager Clint Hurdle won the 2013 NL Manager of the Year Award in his third year with the Pirates, center fielder Andrew McCutchen was named NL Most Valuable Player, pitcher Francisco Liriano was named NL Comeback Player of the Year, and third baseman Pedro Álvarez tied for first place in home runs hit in the National League at 36.

2013 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 2013 season was the 132nd for the baseball team in St. Louis, Missouri, the 122nd season in the National League (NL), and the eighth at Busch Stadium III. On Opening Day, April 1, the St. Louis Cardinals played the 20,000th game in franchise history against the Arizona Diamondbacks, dating back to the start of their American Association (AA) play in 1882. Heading into the 2013 season, St. Louis had an all-time winning percentage of .518.Early in the season, the Cardinals navigated around the loss of key players Chris Carpenter, Jason Motte, Rafael Furcal and Jaime García due to season-ending injuries. To offset these depletions, the St. Louis tapped heavily into their farm system. In a May game against the Colorado Rockies, rookie starting pitcher Shelby Miller set an all-time franchise record for a nine-inning game score of 98. Starter Adam Wainwright accumulated a franchise-record ​34 2⁄3 innings (IP) before issuing his first walk on April 23 and earned NL Pitcher of the Month honors in June. First baseman Allen Craig produced the third-highest individual batting average with runners in scoring position at .454 as the Cardinals set an all-time Major League team record at .330. Rookie Matt Adams led the team in slugging percentage at .503. Second baseman Matt Carpenter, playing his first season at the position since turning professional, earned an All-Star selection as he led the Major Leagues in hits (199), runs scored (126), and doubles (55). In all, 20 rookies appeared in a game and the Cardinals collected 36 victories from their rookie pitchers. The 2013 edition set franchise records in fielding percentage (.988), pitching strikeouts (1254) and strikeouts per 9 innings pitched (7.73).Holding off fierce competition from the Cincinnati Reds and Pittsburgh Pirates, the Cardinals clinched the division crown as each team won at least 90 games. The Cardinals finished the season with an NL-best 97–65 won–loss record. They opened the playoffs by defeating the Pirates in five games in the NL Division Series (NLDS). Advancing to their third straight National League Championship Series, they defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers in six games for their 19th NL pennant. Rookie Michael Wacha, who had nearly no-hit the Washington Nationals late in September, continued his dominance throughout the postseason as he allowed no runs against the Dodgers in 13 IP, earning the NLCS MVP. It was the second straight NLCS appearance to which manager Mike Matheny guided the Cardinals, who became the first manager to appear in an LCS in his first two seasons. Rookie closer Trevor Rosenthal extended a 20-inning postseason scoreless streak that started in the 2012 NLDS. The Cardinals met the Boston Red Sox in the World Series, only to lose the series in six games.

2018 National League Division Series

The 2018 National League Division Series were two best-of-five-game series to determine the participating teams of the 2018 National League Championship Series. The three divisional winners (seeded first through third) and a fourth team—the Wild Card Game winner—played in two series.

These matchups were:

(1) Milwaukee Brewers (Central Division champions) vs. (5) Colorado Rockies (Wild Card Game winner)

(2) Los Angeles Dodgers (West Division champions) vs. (3) Atlanta Braves (East Division champions)Under sponsorship agreements with Doosan, the series was formally known as the National League Division Series presented by Doosan. The Brewers and the Dodgers won their respective series to advance to the Championship Series.

Carlos Beltrán

Carlos Chester Beltrán (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkaɾloz βelˈtɾan]; born April 24, 1977) is a Puerto Rican former professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1998 to 2017 for the Kansas City Royals, Houston Astros, New York Mets, San Francisco Giants, St. Louis Cardinals, New York Yankees, and Texas Rangers. A right-handed thrower and switch hitter, Beltrán stands 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall and weighs 215 pounds (98 kg).

Beltrán was the American League (AL) Rookie of the Year in 1999 while with the Royals. He was named to nine MLB All-Star Games, and won three Gold Glove Awards and two Silver Slugger Awards. Beltrán was the fifth player to reach both 400 home runs and 300 stolen bases and just the fourth switch hitter with 400 home runs. He has the highest success rate in stealing bases (88.3%) of any major league player with 300 or more career attempts. He is also a member of the 30–30 club, as he has hit 30 home runs and stolen 30 bases in the same season. Beltrán retired after the 2017 season, winning a World Series title with the Houston Astros.

Beltrán is among the best all-time statistical hitters in postseason games, which has earned him nicknames such as "the new Mr. October", "Mr. October, Jr.", "Señor Octubre", and "the real Mr. October" from the media. He broke the 1.000 OPS mark in four different playoff series. Beltrán also had a 100% stolen base percentage (11-for-11) during the playoffs, which are the most stolen bases without being caught.

Carlos Martínez (pitcher, born 1991)

Carlos Ernesto Martínez (born September 21, 1991), nicknamed "Tsunami", is a Dominican professional baseball pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball (MLB). Originally signed by the Boston Red Sox as an international free agent in 2009, MLB voided his contract due to discrepancies over his name and date of birth after revelations that he was also known as Carlos Matias. However, he was eventually cleared of wrongdoing, as it was found that the inconsistencies arose due to poor record-keeping. The St. Louis Cardinals signed him in 2010, and he made his MLB debut May 3, 2013.

Martínez became a consensus top-100 prospect in all of Minor League Baseball, and one of the Cardinals' highest-rated prospects. A starter in the minor leagues, he performed mainly in relief roles in his first two seasons in the major leagues, but earned a spot in the Cardinals' rotation in 2015. During the 2013 MLB season, fans gave him the nickname "Little Pedro," due to the similarities in physique and pitching mechanics to former Cy Young Award winner Pedro Martínez.

Clayton Kershaw

Clayton Edward Kershaw (born March 19, 1988) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). A left-handed starting pitcher, Kershaw has played in the major leagues since 2008, and his career earned run average (ERA) and walks and hits per innings pitched average (WHIP) are the lowest among starters in the live-ball era with a minimum of 1,000 innings pitched. Kershaw has a career hits allowed per nine innings pitched average of 6.61—the second-lowest in MLB history—along with three Cy Young Awards and the 2014 National League Most Valuable Player Award. He has been described throughout the majority of his career as the best pitcher in baseball.Kershaw was drafted seventh overall in the 2006 MLB draft. He worked his way through the Dodgers' farm system in just one full season, and reached the majors at 20 years old. When he debuted in 2008, he was the youngest player in MLB, a title he held for one full year. In 2011, he won the pitching Triple Crown and the National League Cy Young Award, becoming the youngest pitcher to accomplish either of these feats since Dwight Gooden in 1985.

During the 2013 off-season, the Dodgers signed Kershaw to a franchise record seven-year, $215 million contract extension. Kershaw pitched a no-hitter on June 18, 2014, becoming the 22nd Dodger to do so. Being a left-handed strikeout pitcher and playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Kershaw has often been compared to Hall of Fame pitcher Sandy Koufax. He became the first pitcher in history to lead MLB in ERA for four consecutive years when he did so in the 2011 through 2014 seasons.Off the field, Kershaw is an active participant in volunteer work. He and his wife, Ellen, launched "Kershaw's Challenge" and wrote the book Arise to raise money to build an orphanage in Zambia. He has been honored with the Roberto Clemente Award and the Branch Rickey Award for his humanitarian work.

Clint Hurdle

Clinton Merrick Hurdle (born July 30, 1957) is an American former professional baseball outfielder and current manager of the Pittsburgh Pirates of Major League Baseball. Hurdle played in MLB for the Kansas City Royals, Cincinnati Reds, New York Mets, and St. Louis Cardinals, and has also managed for the Colorado Rockies.

Labeled a "phenom" by Sports Illustrated at age twenty, Hurdle played 515 games at the major league level. After retiring from playing baseball, Hurdle became a manager. His eight seasons with the Colorado Rockies included leading the 2007 club to the franchise's first National League (NL) pennant. On November 14, 2010, the Pirates hired him to be their manager. In 2013, Hurdle led them to their first winning season and playoff appearance since 1992. He was named the NL Manager of the Year that season.

Gerrit Cole

Gerrit Alan Cole (born September 8, 1990), nicknamed Cole Train, is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Houston Astros of Major League Baseball (MLB). He attended the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where he played college baseball for the UCLA Bruins. Cole previously pitched in MLB for the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Cole played for the baseball team at Orange Lutheran High School, and was selected by the New York Yankees in the first round of the 2008 MLB Draft. Cole opted not to sign and instead attended UCLA. After his college baseball career, the Pirates made Cole the first overall selection in the 2011 MLB draft. Cole made his MLB debut in 2013 and was named the National League (NL) Rookie of the Month in September 2013. He was named the NL Pitcher of the Month for April 2015, and an MLB All-Star in 2015. The Pirates traded Cole to the Astros in the 2017–18 offseason.

Hanley Ramírez

Hanley Ramírez (born December 23, 1983) is a Dominican-American professional baseball infielder and designated hitter who is currently a free agent. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Boston Red Sox, Florida / Miami Marlins, Los Angeles Dodgers, and Cleveland Indians. Ramírez is a three-time MLB All-Star, and received the 2006 National League Rookie of the Year Award.

Ramírez established himself as an elite threat at the plate over his prime years, with a high career batting average (.290) and a high isolated power (.198). However, he was rated a poor defensive shortstop, which is why when he returned to the Red Sox the team played him in left field for the first time in his career, with even poorer results. For the 2016 season, he was switched to the first base position, a move that yielded good results both offensively and defensively. His hitting declined in 2017 and 2018, as he had the lowest batting average and the lowest OPS of his MLB career.

Jason Grilli

Jason Michael Grilli (born November 11, 1976) is an American former professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Florida Marlins, Chicago White Sox, Detroit Tigers, Colorado Rockies, Pittsburgh Pirates, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, Atlanta Braves, Toronto Blue Jays, and Texas Rangers. Taken as the fourth overall selection of the 1997 MLB draft by the San Francisco Giants, Grilli was one of the top starting pitcher prospects in all of Minor League Baseball, ranked 54th in 1998 and 44th in 1999. The Giants traded him to the Florida Marlins in 1999, for whom he debuted on May 11, 2000.

In 2011, Grilli's career took off as a relief pitcher with the Pittsburgh Pirates. That year, he carried a 2.48 earned run average (ERA) and 10.2 strikeouts per nine innings (K/9) rate in 32 innings pitched (IP), and further improved in 2012, when his strikeout rate climbed to 13.8. In 2013, Grilli made his first All-Star team and became Pittsburgh's closer at the age of 36. From 2011–14, he compiled a 3.09 ERA with 11.9 K/9, 3.3 BB/9 and a 34.2 percent ground-ball rate in ​195 1⁄3 IP.

Joe Kelly (pitcher)

Joseph William Kelly Jr. (born June 9, 1988) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the St. Louis Cardinals and Boston Red Sox. He has served as both a starter as well as a reliever. Listed at 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) and 190 pounds (86 kg), Kelly throws and bats right-handed. He made his MLB debut in 2012 for the Cardinals.

Kelly has also gained publicity for his comical repertoire, such as skillfully dancing in the outfield during practice, disguising himself while interviewing the unwitting rapper Nelly, and engaging in a lengthy staredown with Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder Scott Van Slyke before a 2013 National League Championship Series game.

Kenley Jansen

Kenley Geronimo Jansen (born September 30, 1987) is a Curaçaoan professional baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). He converted from a catcher to a relief pitcher in the minor leagues, and made his major league debut in 2010. Jansen has served as the Dodgers' closer since 2012, and led the National League (NL) in saves in 2017. He is a three-time MLB All-Star and two-time NL Reliever of the Year (2016, 2017).

Mark Melancon

Mark David Melancon ( mə-LAN-sən; born March 28, 1985) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Atlanta Braves of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the New York Yankees, Houston Astros, Boston Red Sox, Pittsburgh Pirates, Washington Nationals, and San Francisco Giants. Melancon was an MLB All-Star in 2013, 2015 and 2016. He led the National League in saves in 2015, and won the Trevor Hoffman Award that year.

Michael Wacha

Michael Joseph Wacha (; born July 1, 1991) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball (MLB). He played college baseball for the Texas A&M Aggies.

The Cardinals selected Wacha in the first round of the 2012 Major League Baseball draft from out of Texas A&M. With just one year in the minor leagues, he made his MLB debut on May 30, 2013. Following a strong regular season, Wacha earned the 2013 National League Championship Series Most Valuable Player Award, after yielding one run and eight hits in his first 21 postseason innings pitched.

Paul Nauert

Paul Edward Nauert (born July 7, 1963) is an American professional baseball umpire who has umpired in Major League Baseball (MLB) since becoming a part-time National League (NL) umpire in 1995.Nauert previously worked in the Appalachian League (1988), the Midwest League (1989–1990), the Florida Instructional League (1988–1990), the Southern League (1991–1992), and the International League (1993–1998). He was the base umpire during the 27-inning, eight-hour-and-15-minute, Bluefield at Burlington game of June 24, 1988, that ended at 3:27 am on June 25.

Nauert umpired his first National League game on May 19, 1995, and was one of 22 umpires whose resignations were accepted in 1999 (the resignations were part of a failed union negotiating strategy). On being rehired in 2002, he became part of the Major League Baseball umpire staff. Nauert has worked the 2004 American League Division Series, the 2008 National League Division Series, the 2010 National League Division Series, the 2013 National League Division Series, the 2014 American League Division Series, the 2016 National League Championship Series, and the 2017 National League Division Series. He was a part of the crew that worked both the 2008 MLB China Series (the first MLB games ever played in China) and the 2008 Japan Opening Series. Nauert also worked the 2009 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

Pedro Álvarez (baseball)

Pedro Manuel Álvarez Jr. (born February 6, 1987) is a Dominican-American professional baseball designated hitter and infielder who is a free agent. He previously played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Pittsburgh Pirates and Baltimore Orioles.

Álvarez stands 6 feet 3 inches (1.91 m) and weighs 250 pounds (110 kg). A third baseman until late 2014, Alvarez transitioned to first base for the Pirates in 2015, and in 2016 became a designated hitter for the Orioles. On June 19, 2018, he was designated for assignment by the Orioles.

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh ( PITS-burg) is a city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in the United States, and is the county seat of Allegheny County. A population of about 301,048 residents live within the city limits, making it the 66th-largest city in the U.S. The metropolitan population of 2,324,743 is the largest in both the Ohio Valley and Appalachia, the second-largest in Pennsylvania (behind Philadelphia), and the 27th-largest in the U.S.

Pittsburgh is located in the south west of the state, at the confluence of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio rivers. Pittsburgh is known both as "the Steel City" for its more than 300 steel-related businesses and as the "City of Bridges" for its 446 bridges. The city features 30 skyscrapers, two inclined railways, a pre-revolutionary fortification and the Point State Park at the confluence of the rivers. The city developed as a vital link of the Atlantic coast and Midwest, as the mineral-rich Allegheny Mountains made the area coveted by the French and British empires, Virginians, Whiskey Rebels, and Civil War raiders.Aside from steel, Pittsburgh has led in manufacturing of aluminum, glass, shipbuilding, petroleum, foods, sports, transportation, computing, autos, and electronics. For part of the 20th century, Pittsburgh was behind only New York and Chicago in corporate headquarters employment; it had the most U.S. stockholders per capita. America's 1980s deindustrialization laid off area blue-collar workers and thousands of downtown white-collar workers when the longtime Pittsburgh-based world headquarters moved out. This heritage left the area with renowned museums, medical centers, parks, research centers, and a diverse cultural district.Today, Google, Apple Inc., Bosch, Facebook, Uber, Nokia, Autodesk, Microsoft and IBM are among 1,600 technology firms generating $20.7 billion in annual Pittsburgh payrolls. The area has served as the long-time federal agency headquarters for cyber defense, software engineering, robotics, energy research and the nuclear navy. The area is home to 68 colleges and universities, including research and development leaders Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Pittsburgh. The nation's eighth-largest bank, eight Fortune 500 companies, and six of the top 300 U.S. law firms make their global headquarters in the area, while RAND, BNY Mellon, Nova, FedEx, Bayer and NIOSH have regional bases that helped Pittsburgh become the sixth-best area for U.S. job growth.In 2015, Pittsburgh was listed among the "eleven most livable cities in the world"; The Economist's Global Liveability Ranking placed Pittsburgh as the first- or second-most livable city in the United States in 2005, 2009, 2011, 2012 and 2014. The region is a hub for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design and energy extraction.

Shelby Miller

Shelby Charles Miller (born October 10, 1990) is an American professional baseball pitcher in Milwaukee Brewers organization. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the St. Louis Cardinals, Atlanta Braves, Arizona Diamondbacks, Texas Rangers.

Drafted by the Cardinals out of Brownwood High School in the first round of the 2009 MLB draft, Miller became one of the sport's highest-rated prospects. He is a recipient of numerous awards, including the Cardinals' minor league pitcher of the year in 2010, Baseball America's number one Cardinals prospect from 2009–11, and selection to the All-Star Futures Game in 2010 and 2011. A fourth award, MLB.com's Pitching Performance of the Month, was the result of his first MLB complete game shutout in May 2013, a one-hitter against the Colorado Rockies.

After the 2014 season, the Cardinals traded Miller to the Braves. In 2015, Miller was named to the MLB All-Star Game. That offseason, the Braves traded Miller to the Diamondbacks.

Wally Bell

Wallace Robert Bell (January 10, 1965 – October 14, 2013) was an umpire in Major League Baseball (MLB) who worked in the National League from 1992 to 1999 and in both major leagues from 2000 to 2013. He wore the number 35.

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