2013 National League Championship Series

The 2013 National League Championship Series, the 44th NLCS, was a best-of-seven playoff pitting the St. Louis Cardinals against the Los Angeles Dodgers for Major League Baseball's National League pennant. The Cardinals beat the Dodgers in six games.

This was the fourth postseason meeting between the Cardinals and Dodgers, after the 1985 NLCS (Cardinals won 4–2), 2004 NLDS (Cardinals won 3–1), and 2009 NLDS (Dodgers won 3–0).

The Cardinals would go on to lose to the Boston Red Sox in the 2013 World Series in six games.

2013 National League Championship Series
2013NLCS
Teams
Team (Wins) Manager Season
St. Louis Cardinals (4) Mike Matheny 97–65, .599, 3 GA
Los Angeles Dodgers (2) Don Mattingly 92–70, .568, 11 GA
DatesOctober 11–18
MVPMichael Wacha (St. Louis)
UmpiresGerry Davis (crew chief), Mark Carlson, Mike Everitt, Bruce Dreckman, Ted Barrett, Greg Gibson
NLDS
Broadcast
TelevisionTBS
MLB International
TV announcersErnie Johnson, Ron Darling, Cal Ripken Jr., and Craig Sager (TBS)
Gary Thorne and Rick Sutcliffe (MLB International)
RadioESPN
Radio announcersDan Shulman and Orel Hershiser

Matchup

St. Louis Cardinals vs. Los Angeles Dodgers

St. Louis won the series, 4–2.

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 11 Los Angeles Dodgers – 2, St. Louis Cardinals – 3 (13 inn.) Busch Stadium 4:47 46,691[1] 
2 October 12 Los Angeles Dodgers – 0, St. Louis Cardinals – 1 Busch Stadium 2:40 46,872[2] 
3 October 14 St. Louis Cardinals – 0, Los Angeles Dodgers – 3 Dodger Stadium 2:54 53,940[3] 
4 October 15 St. Louis Cardinals – 4, Los Angeles Dodgers – 2 Dodger Stadium 3:17 53,992[4] 
5 October 16 St. Louis Cardinals – 4, Los Angeles Dodgers – 6 Dodger Stadium 3:10 53,183[5] 
6 October 18 Los Angeles Dodgers – 0, St. Louis Cardinals – 9 Busch Stadium 2:59 46,899[6]

Los Angeles vs. St. Louis

Game 1

Friday, October 11, 2013 – 8:37 p.m. (EDT) at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri[7]

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 R H E
Los Angeles 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 9 0
St. Louis 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 7 0
WP: Lance Lynn (1–0)   LP: Chris Withrow (0–1)

The Dodgers loaded the bases with two outs off of Joe Kelly on a double and two walks in the third inning when Juan Uribe's single scored two, but in the bottom of the inning, Zack Greinke allowed a two-out single to Kelly and walked Matt Carpenter before both men scored on Carlos Beltrán's double tying the game. Greinke allowed only two runs in eight innings, while striking out a season high ten batters, the first pitcher to strike out ten Cardinals in a post-season game since Denny Galehouse in the 1944 World Series.[8] The game went into extra innings and in the top of the tenth, Mark Ellis tripled with one out and tried to score on Michael Young's sacrifice fly, but was tagged out by Beltran to end the inning. In the bottom of the 13th, Beltran drove in the winning run with a line drive into the right-field corner that scored Daniel Descalso from second off of Kenley Jansen. The game was the third longest NLCS game ever (after game six in 1986 and game five in 1999), the Dodgers' longest post-season game since game two of the 1916 World Series and the Cardinals' longest ever. It was the longest NLCS Game 1 ever.[9]

Game 2

Saturday, October 12, 2013 – 4:07 p.m. (EDT) at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri[10]

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 X 1 2 1
WP: Michael Wacha (1–0)   LP: Clayton Kershaw (0–1)   Sv: Trevor Rosenthal (1)

The Dodgers' offense was short-handed in game two because Hanley Ramírez sat out with injured ribs, the result of getting hit with a pitch in game one, and with Andre Ethier getting a day off for playing the entirety of Game 1's 13-inning affair. The game was a pitchers' duel as the Cardinals only got two hits off of Clayton Kershaw and two relievers. Jon Jay's sacrifice fly scored David Freese (after he doubled to lead off the inning) for the game's only run, in the bottom of the fifth. Due to a passed ball, Freese's run was unearned. The Dodgers managed five hits off Michael Wacha but were unable to get any runs. They loaded the bases in the sixth inning with one out, but Wacha struck out Yasiel Puig and Juan Uribe to end the threat. Trevor Rosenthal struck out the side (Puig, Uribe, and pinch hitter Ethier) in the ninth inning for the save and the Dodgers fell behind 2–0 in the series. Kershaw was the first starting pitcher in postseason history to allow no earned runs and two or fewer hits and lose the game.[11]

Game 3

Monday, October 14, 2013 – 8:07 p.m. (EDT) at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0
Los Angeles 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 X 3 9 0
WP: Hyun-Jin Ryu (1–0)   LP: Adam Wainwright (0–1)   Sv: Kenley Jansen (1)

In Game 3, Hyun-jin Ryu pitched seven shutout innings and the Dodgers managed to score off Adam Wainwright to take the game 3–0. In the fourth, Mark Ellis hit a leadoff double, then scored on Adrián González's double one out later. González then scored on Yasiel Puig's triple, his first hit of the series, after 11 hitless at-bats. Hanley Ramírez had two hits and an RBI single in the seventh in his return to the Dodgers lineup, despite a fractured rib.[12] It was the first postseason series since the 1948 World Series in which neither team hit a home run in the first three games.[13]

Game 4

Tuesday, October 15, 2013 – 8:07 p.m. (EDT) at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 6 0
Los Angeles 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 8 1
WP: Lance Lynn (2–0)   LP: Ricky Nolasco (0–1)   Sv: Trevor Rosenthal (2)
Home runs:
STL: Matt Holliday (1), Shane Robinson (1)
LAD: None

Ramirez was still hobbled by the rib injury and struggled at the plate and in the field before leaving the game in the sixth inning. In the third, Daniel Descalso hit a leadoff single, moved to second on a sacrifice bunt, then scored on Matt Carpenter's double. One out later, Matt Holliday's home run, the first of the series, put the Cardinals up 3−0. The Dodgers cut the lead to 3–2 on RBI singles by Yasiel Puig and A.J. Ellis off of Lance Lynn, but Shane Robinson's home run in the seventh off of J.P. Howell padded the Cardinals' lead to 4−2 as they took a commanding 3–1 series lead.[14]

Game 5

Wednesday, October 16, 2013 – 4:07 p.m. (EDT) at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 10 0
Los Angeles 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 1 X 6 9 0
WP: Zack Greinke (1–0)   LP: Joe Kelly (0–1)
Home runs:
STL: None
LAD: Carl Crawford (1), A.J. Ellis (1), Adrián González 2 (2)

The Dodgers staved off elimination in Game 5 as Zack Greinke pitched seven strong innings and the bats came alive. In the second, the Dodgers hit four singles off of Joe Kelly, the last two of which by Juan Uribe and Greinke scored a run each. The Cardinals tied the game in the third when Matt Carpenter singled, then scored on Carlos Beltrán's triple before Beltran scored on Matt Holliday's double. Adrián González's home run in the bottom of the inning put the Dodgers up 3−2. They added to their lead on home runs by Carl Crawford in the fifth, A. J. Ellis in the seventh off of Edward Mujica and González in the eighth off of John Axford. The four homers tied a Dodger post-season record that had previously been accomplished in Game 2 of the 1977 World Series and Game 1 of the 1978 NLCS.[15] The Cardinals managed two runs off Kenley Jansen in the ninth on RBI singles by Matt Adams and Pete Kozma, but the Dodgers held on to win 6–4 and send the series back to St. Louis.[16]

Game 6

Friday, October 18, 2013 – 8:37 p.m. (EDT) at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2
St. Louis 0 0 4 0 5 0 0 0 X 9 13 0
WP: Michael Wacha (2–0)   LP: Clayton Kershaw (0–2)

Hoping to force a game seven, the Dodgers sent their ace Clayton Kershaw to the mound to face the St. Louis Cardinals rookie Michael Wacha in a rematch of Game two's matchup. This time, Kershaw had his worst outing of the season, as he struggled through the third inning with 48 total pitches and surrendered a total of seven earned runs, ten hits, and two walks in four innings of work.[17] Dodgers phenom Yasiel Puig committed two costly throwing errors that epitomized the frustration of that night. By contrast, Michael Wacha, backed up by solid defense and timely hits, stymied the Dodgers' offense, going seven innings and allowing just two hits and no runs.

The Cardinals scored in the third inning when Matt Carpenter lined a double into right field after an eleven-pitch battle with Kershaw. Carlos Beltrán scored Carpenter from second with a line drive single, again to right field, and advanced to second. Kershaw struck out Matt Holliday but yielded another single to Yadier Molina, which scored Beltran from second to make it 2–0 Cardinals. David Freese singled to center field to move Molina to second and Kershaw, already having an uncharacteristic night, walked Matt Adams to load the bases for Shane Robinson. Robinson drove in two runs with a single to right Puig, extending the Cardinals' lead to 4–0. Puig committed a throwing error by tossing the ball on a misstep and slinging it all the way to backstop over the head of catcher A.J. Ellis. Kershaw ended the inning by intentionally walking Pete Kozma and striking out Wacha.

The Cardinals added five runs in the fifth inning. Molina singled to right field and reached second base on Puig's second throwing error of the night. David Freese singled to advance Molina to third base and Adams drove him home with a double in to make it 5–0 Cardinals. Kershaw left the game with runners on second and third after throwing 98 pitches and was replaced by reliever Ronald Belisario. Shane Robinson came up to the plate and reached second base on a choice out by shortstop Hanley Ramírez to catcher A.J. Ellis, who tagged out David Freese in a rundown between third and home. With runners still on second and third, Kozma was intentionally walked for the second time that night. Then Wacha hit Belisario's pitch and reached first base on a fielder's choice by second baseman Mark Ellis, who allowed Matt Adams to score after hesitating on a throw to home, making the score 6–0 Cardinals. Belisario was replaced by relief pitcher J.P. Howell, who allowed Robinson and Kozma to score on a sacrifice fly by Carpenter and a wild pitch to Molina respectively, stretching the lead to 8–0. Carlos Beltran closed the door on the Dodgers' postseason by singling to left field and scoring Wacha for the final run of the game, giving the Cardinals a commanding 9-0 lead. The Dodgers had one more hit, a double by catcher A.J. Ellis. The Cardinals pitching staff retired the next 12 batters to end the game.

Winning pitcher Michael Wacha was named the NLCS MVP after winning both of his starts with a 0.00 ERA, holding the Dodgers to a .149 batting average against (BAA), two walks and 13 SO in ​13 23 scoreless IP. He became the fourth rookie to win a postseason series MVP award, following Larry Sherry (1959 World Series), Mike Boddicker (1983 NLCS), and Liván Hernández (1997 NLCS and 1997 World Series).[18][19]

The victory earned the Cardinals their 19th pennant as a franchise and their second World Series appearance in three years.

Composite line score

2013 NLCS (4–2): St. Louis Cardinals over Los Angeles Dodgers

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 R H E
Los Angeles Dodgers 0 2 3 4 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 13 40 3
St. Louis Cardinals 0 0 11 0 6 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 21 42 1
Total attendance: 301,577   Average attendance: 50,263

References

  1. ^ "Boxscore:Los Angeles vs. St. Louis - October 11, 2013". MLB.com. October 11, 2013. Retrieved October 11, 2013.
  2. ^ "Boxscore:Los Angeles vs. St. Louis - October 12, 2013". MLB.com. October 12, 2013. Retrieved October 12, 2013.
  3. ^ "Boxscore:St. Louis vs. Los Angeles - October 14, 2013". MLB.com. October 14, 2013. Retrieved October 14, 2013.
  4. ^ "Boxscore:St. Louis vs. Los Angeles - October 15, 2013". MLB.com. October 15, 2013. Retrieved October 15, 2013.
  5. ^ "Boxscore:St. Louis vs. Los Angeles - October 16, 2013". MLB.com. October 16, 2013. Retrieved October 16, 2013.
  6. ^ "Boxscore:Los Angeles vs. St. Louis - October 18, 2013". MLB.com. October 18, 2013. Retrieved October 18, 2013.
  7. ^ "Los Angeles at St. Louis Cardinals – October 11, 2013 | MLB.com Play-by-Play". MLB.com. October 11, 2013. Retrieved October 11, 2013.
  8. ^ "Carlos Beltran sends Cards past Dodgers in 13th to open NLCS". ESPN. November 11, 2013. Retrieved October 15, 2013.
  9. ^ Stark, Jayson (October 12, 2013). "Carlos Beltran does it again". ESPN.com. Retrieved October 12, 2013.
  10. ^ "Los Angeles at St. Louis Cardinals – October 12, 2013 | MLB.com Play-by-Play". MLB.com. October 12, 2013. Retrieved October 12, 2013.
  11. ^ "Michael Wacha, Cardinals blank Dodgers for 2-0 NLCS lead". ESPN. November 12, 2013. Retrieved October 15, 2013.
  12. ^ "Hyun-Jin Ryu outduels Adam Wainwright as Dodgers win Game 3". ESPN. October 14, 2013. Retrieved October 15, 2013.
  13. ^ Stark, Jayson (October 16, 2013). "Matt Holliday delivers a timely gift". ESPN. Retrieved August 1, 2017.
  14. ^ "Matt Holliday, Cardinals bring Dodgers to brink". ESPN. October 15, 2013. Retrieved October 17, 2013.
  15. ^ "Cardinals 4 Dodgers 6". USA Today. October 16, 2013. Retrieved October 17, 2013.
  16. ^ "Adrian González, Zack Greinke help Dodgers stay alive". ESPN. October 16, 2013. Retrieved October 17, 2013.
  17. ^ "Kershaw, Dodgers stunned by rare ugly start". Anthony DiComo. Retrieved October 19, 2013.
  18. ^ Kruth, Cash (October 18, 2013). "St. Louis Cardinals rookie Michael Wacha named NLCS MVP". www.stlouis.cardinals.mlb.com. Retrieved October 18, 2013.
  19. ^ Hummel, Rick (October 18, 2013). "Cardinals reach Series for 4th time in 10 season". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved October 18, 2013.

External links

2013 Boston Red Sox season

The 2013 Boston Red Sox season was the 113th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. Under new manager John Farrell, the Red Sox finished first in the American League East with a record of 97 wins and 65 losses. In the postseason, the Red Sox first defeated the AL wild card Tampa Bay Rays in the ALDS. In the ALCS, the Red Sox defeated the American League Central champion Detroit Tigers in six games. Advancing to the World Series, the Red Sox defeated the National League champion St. Louis Cardinals in six games, to capture the franchise's eighth championship overall and third in ten years. The Red Sox became the second team to win the World Series the season after finishing last in their division; the first had been the 1991 Minnesota Twins. Amazing postseasons offensively from David Ortiz and Jacoby Ellsbury helped lead the way along with great pitching from Jon Lester, John Lackey and Jake Peavy.

2013 National League Division Series

The 2013 National League Division Series were two best-of-five-game series to determine the baseball teams to participate in the 2013 National League Championship Series. The three divisional winners (seeded 1-3 based on record) and a fourth team — the winner of a one-game Wild Card playoff — played in two series. TBS carried most of the games, with some on MLB Network.

These matchups were:

(1) St. Louis Cardinals (Central Division champions, 97–65) vs. (4) Pittsburgh Pirates (Wild Card Game winner, 94–68)

(2) Atlanta Braves (East Division champions, 96–66) vs. (3) Los Angeles Dodgers (West Division champions, 92–70)The restriction on teams from the same division meeting in the Division Series was removed prior to the 2012 season. Therefore, the Cardinals and Pirates, both from the Central Division, were able to meet in the Division Series. Under the format used from 1998-2011, (1) St. Louis would have faced (3) Los Angeles in one Division Series, and (2) Atlanta would have faced (4) Pittsburgh in the other.

This was the first postseason meeting between the current National League Central division rivals St. Louis and Pittsburgh. The Pirates made their first postseason appearance since 1992, and their first appearance in the Division Series in franchise history.

This was the second postseason meeting between the Dodgers and Braves. The Braves previously defeated the Dodgers 3–0 in the 1996 NLDS.

2014 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 2014 Los Angeles Dodgers season was the 125th for the franchise in Major League Baseball, and their 57th season in Los Angeles. On April 30, the Dodgers picked up their 10,000th win since joining the National League in 1890. They proceeded to win their second straight NL West championship but lost in four games to the St. Louis Cardinals in the Division Series.

Several players had excellent years: Adrián González led the major leagues in runs batted in; Dee Gordon led the major leagues in stolen bases and triples and Clayton Kershaw led the major leagues in earned run average and wins. In addition, both Kershaw and Josh Beckett pitched no-hitters during the season. Kershaw won the NL Cy Young Award and the NL MVP Award, making him the first National League player to win both awards in the same season since Bob Gibson in 1968.

2016 National League Championship Series

The 2016 National League Championship Series was a best-of-seven playoff in which the Chicago Cubs defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers for the National League (NL) pennant and the right to play in the 2016 World Series against the Cleveland Indians. As winners of one of the Division Series and the team with the best regular season record in the National League, the Cubs earned home-field advantage regardless of opponent. The series was the 47th in league history. FS1 televised all of the games in the United States.The Cubs would go on to defeat the Cleveland Indians in the World Series in seven games, after overcoming a 3–1 series deficit, winning their first World Series championship for the first time in 108 years, ending the Curse of the Billy Goat.

Adron Chambers

Adron Lamar Chambers (born October 8, 1986) is an American professional baseball outfielder who is currently a free agent. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Bruce Dreckman

Bruce Michael Dreckman (born August 7, 1970) is an umpire in Major League Baseball. He wears number 1.Dreckman began his career in 1996 as a National League umpire, but has umpired in both Major Leagues since 2002. Prior to reaching the MLB, Dreckman umpired in the Appalachian League, Midwest League, Carolina League, Southern League, and American Association. Dreckman has worked the 2004, 2005, 2010, and 2011 National League Division Series, the 2009 and 2013 National League Championship Series, and the 2010 All-Star Game.

Dreckman was among the 54 umpires who were part of the 1999 Major League Umpires Association mass resignation, a labor negotiating tactic that backfired when the major leagues accepted 22 of the resignations (and allowed others to be rescinded). Dreckman was among those who lost his job, and did not return to the major league diamond as an arbiter until being rehired in 2002.

He was the first base umpire for Roy Halladay's no-hitter in Game 1 of the 2010 NLDS and the home plate umpire for Francisco Liriano's no-hitter in 2011. Dreckman represented the MLB in the 2006 Japan All-Star Series, and worked the Miami round of the 2009 World Baseball Classic. He also was the first base umpire who, on May 13, 2010, called San Francisco Giants catcher Eli Whiteside safe on a bang-bang play at first base after Whiteside hit a line drive off the side of San Diego Padres pitcher Mat Latos. The hit would wind up being the only hit or walk Latos allowed in the game, as an error was committed by second baseman Lance Zawadzki but the error would not have happened because it occurred while trying to complete a double play, something that would have been impossible if Whiteside had been called out. The Padres are the only team in MLB history to have never thrown a no-hitter, let alone a perfect game. Replays, however, seem to indicate that Dreckman had made the correct call by calling Whiteside safe.

Dreckman was the third base umpire on July 30, 2017 when Adrián Beltré of the Texas Rangers got his 3000th career hit against the Baltimore Orioles.

Dreckman lives in Marcus, Iowa with his wife and three children.

Carlos Beltrán

Carlos Chester Beltrán (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkaɾloz βelˈtɾan]; born April 24, 1977) is a Puerto Rican former professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1998 to 2017 for the Kansas City Royals, Houston Astros, New York Mets, San Francisco Giants, St. Louis Cardinals, New York Yankees, and Texas Rangers. A right-handed thrower and switch hitter, Beltrán stands 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall and weighs 215 pounds (98 kg).

Beltrán was the American League (AL) Rookie of the Year in 1999 while with the Royals. He was named to nine MLB All-Star Games, and won three Gold Glove Awards and two Silver Slugger Awards. Beltrán was the fifth player to reach both 400 home runs and 300 stolen bases and just the fourth switch hitter with 400 home runs. He has the highest success rate in stealing bases (88.3%) of any major league player with 300 or more career attempts. He is also a member of the 30–30 club, as he has hit 30 home runs and stolen 30 bases in the same season. Beltrán retired after the 2017 season, winning a World Series title with the Houston Astros.

Beltrán is among the best all-time statistical hitters in postseason games, which has earned him nicknames such as "the new Mr. October", "Mr. October, Jr.", "Señor Octubre", and "the real Mr. October" from the media. He broke the 1.000 OPS mark in four different playoff series. Beltrán also had a 100% stolen base percentage (11-for-11) during the playoffs, which are the most stolen bases without being caught.

Clayton Kershaw

Clayton Edward Kershaw (born March 19, 1988) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). A left-handed starting pitcher, Kershaw has played in the major leagues since 2008, and his career earned run average (ERA) and walks and hits per innings pitched average (WHIP) are the lowest among starters in the live-ball era with a minimum of 1,000 innings pitched. Kershaw has a career hits allowed per nine innings pitched average of 6.61—the second-lowest in MLB history—along with three Cy Young Awards and the 2014 National League Most Valuable Player Award. He has been described throughout the majority of his career as the best pitcher in baseball.Kershaw was drafted seventh overall in the 2006 MLB draft. He worked his way through the Dodgers' farm system in just one full season, and reached the majors at 20 years old. When he debuted in 2008, he was the youngest player in MLB, a title he held for one full year. In 2011, he won the pitching Triple Crown and the National League Cy Young Award, becoming the youngest pitcher to accomplish either of these feats since Dwight Gooden in 1985.

During the 2013 off-season, the Dodgers signed Kershaw to a franchise record seven-year, $215 million contract extension. Kershaw pitched a no-hitter on June 18, 2014, becoming the 22nd Dodger to do so. Being a left-handed strikeout pitcher and playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Kershaw has often been compared to Hall of Fame pitcher Sandy Koufax. He became the first pitcher in history to lead MLB in ERA for four consecutive years when he did so in the 2011 through 2014 seasons.Off the field, Kershaw is an active participant in volunteer work. He and his wife, Ellen, launched "Kershaw's Challenge" and wrote the book Arise to raise money to build an orphanage in Zambia. He has been honored with the Roberto Clemente Award and the Branch Rickey Award for his humanitarian work.

Hanley Ramírez

Hanley Ramírez (born December 23, 1983) is a Dominican-American professional baseball infielder and designated hitter who is currently a free agent. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Boston Red Sox, Florida / Miami Marlins, Los Angeles Dodgers, and Cleveland Indians. Ramírez is a three-time MLB All-Star, and received the 2006 National League Rookie of the Year Award.

Ramírez established himself as an elite threat at the plate over his prime years, with a high career batting average (.290) and a high isolated power (.198). However, he was rated a poor defensive shortstop, which is why when he returned to the Red Sox the team played him in left field for the first time in his career, with even poorer results. For the 2016 season, he was switched to the first base position, a move that yielded good results both offensively and defensively. His hitting declined in 2017 and 2018, as he had the lowest batting average and the lowest OPS of his MLB career.

History of the Los Angeles Dodgers

The history of the Los Angeles Dodgers begins in the 19th century when the team was based in Brooklyn, New York.

Joe Kelly (pitcher)

Joseph William Kelly Jr. (born June 9, 1988) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the St. Louis Cardinals and Boston Red Sox. He has served as both a starter as well as a reliever. Listed at 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) and 190 pounds (86 kg), Kelly throws and bats right-handed. He made his MLB debut in 2012 for the Cardinals.

Kelly has also gained publicity for his comical repertoire, such as skillfully dancing in the outfield during practice, disguising himself while interviewing the unwitting rapper Nelly, and engaging in a lengthy staredown with Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder Scott Van Slyke before a 2013 National League Championship Series game.

Michael Wacha

Michael Joseph Wacha (; born July 1, 1991) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball (MLB). He played college baseball for the Texas A&M Aggies.

The Cardinals selected Wacha in the first round of the 2012 Major League Baseball draft from out of Texas A&M. With just one year in the minor leagues, he made his MLB debut on May 30, 2013. Following a strong regular season, Wacha earned the 2013 National League Championship Series Most Valuable Player Award, after yielding one run and eight hits in his first 21 postseason innings pitched.

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