2012 National League Wild Card Game

The 2012 National League Wild Card Game was a play-in game during Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2012 postseason played between the National League's (NL) two wild card teams, the St. Louis Cardinals and the Atlanta Braves. It was held at Turner Field in Atlanta, on October 5, 2012, at 5:07 p.m. EDT.[1][2] The Cardinals won by a 6–3 score and advanced to play the Washington Nationals in the NL Division Series. In addition to being the inaugural NL Wild Card Game, it is notable for being the final game of Chipper Jones's career, as well as for a controversial infield fly rule call made by umpire Sam Holbrook. The game was televised on TBS.[3]

2012 National League Wild Card Game
2012MLBWildCard
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis Cardinals 0 0 0 3 0 1 2 0 0 6 6 0
Atlanta Braves 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 12 3
DateOctober 5, 5:07 p.m. (EDT)
VenueTurner Field
CityAtlanta, Georgia
Managers
UmpiresLineup
Attendance52,631
TelevisionTBS
TV announcersBrian Anderson, Joe Simpson, and Ron Darling
RadioESPN
Radio announcersJon Sciambi and Chris Singleton

The game

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis Cardinals 0 0 0 3 0 1 2 0 0 6 6 0
Atlanta Braves 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 12 3
WP: Kyle Lohse (1–0)   LP: Kris Medlen (0–1)   Sv: Jason Motte (1)
Home runs:
STL: Matt Holliday (1)
ATL: David Ross (1)

The Braves started Kris Medlen, who had a 9–0 win–loss record and 0.97 earned run average (ERA) in 12 games started during the 2012 season.[4] The Cardinals selected Kyle Lohse, who had a 16–3 win–loss record and 2.86 ERA during the season, as their starting pitcher.[5]

Lohse allowed a two-run home run to David Ross in the second inning. The Cardinals scored three runs in the fourth inning, in which Chipper Jones committed a throwing error, taking a 3–2 lead. Medlen allowed a home run to Matt Holliday in the sixth inning. After the Cardinals scored two more runs in the top of the seventh inning, the Braves scored one in the bottom of the seventh.[4]

In the bottom of the eighth inning, Andrelton Simmons hit a fly ball to left field that dropped in between Cardinals shortstop Pete Kozma and left fielder Holliday. Left field umpire Sam Holbrook called Simmons out, citing the infield fly rule.[6][a] Had an infield fly not been called, Simmons would have been credited with a single and Atlanta would have had the bases loaded with one out, trailing 6–3. Fans littered the field with trash, delaying the game for 19 minutes before a message over the Turner Field public address system advised fans the game was subject to forfeiture by the umpires if the field continued to remain unplayable due to the thrown debris.[4][9][10] Atlanta manager Fredi González announced that the Braves would play the rest of the game under protest. The protest was denied shortly after the game by Joe Torre, MLB executive vice president for baseball operations, saying it was a judgment call—which cannot be protested under MLB rules.[11]

In the bottom of the ninth inning, batting against Cardinals closer Jason Motte, Chipper Jones reached first base on an infield single in his final Major League at-bat. Freddie Freeman hit a ground rule double, bringing Dan Uggla to bat as the potential tying run. Motte retired Uggla with a groundout to record the save, then both teams rushed off the field after fans resumed throwing debris.[12]

Notes

  1. ^ The infield fly rule states, in part, that the batter is out when, with first and second base occupied with less than two out, the batter hits a fair fly ball which is not a line drive nor bunt, and this fly ball can be caught by an infielder with ordinary effort.[7][8]

References

  1. ^ Bowman, Mark (October 1, 2012). "Braves fall to Pirates, will be Wild Card team". MLB.com.
  2. ^ "2012 MLB postseason schedule". MLB.com.
  3. ^ Bloom, Barry M. (March 2, 2012). "Addition of Wild Card berths finalized for 2012". MLB.com.
  4. ^ a b c "Cardinals overcome ugly delay, Braves – Chicago Tribune". Chicago Tribune. October 5, 2012. Retrieved October 7, 2012.
  5. ^ "Cardinals-Braves Preview". Yahoo! Sports. October 4, 2012. Retrieved October 7, 2012.
  6. ^ "STL-ATL Infield Fly (NL Wild Card): Why Call was Correct". Close Call Sports. October 6, 2012.
  7. ^ "MLB Official Rules: 2.00 Definitions". October 5, 2012.
  8. ^ Snyder, Matt (June 11, 2008). "Infield fly rule call mars Cardinals-Braves wild-card game". CBS Sports. Retrieved October 7, 2012.
  9. ^ "Fan Protest/Throwing Trash on the Field". YouTube.com.
  10. ^ "Call of the Wild: Cards earn berth in NLDS: St. Louis takes advantage of three Atlanta errors, infield fly ruling". MLB.com. October 5, 2012.
  11. ^ "Wild-card game stopped after call". Associated Press/ESPN. October 5, 2012.
  12. ^ Goold, Derrick (October 5, 2012). "Cards survive wild Wild Card playoff". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved October 7, 2012.

External links

Carlos Beltrán

Carlos Chester Beltrán (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkaɾloz βelˈtɾan]; born April 24, 1977) is a Puerto Rican former professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1998 to 2017 for the Kansas City Royals, Houston Astros, New York Mets, San Francisco Giants, St. Louis Cardinals, New York Yankees, and Texas Rangers. A right-handed thrower and switch hitter, Beltrán stands 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall and weighs 215 pounds (98 kg).

Beltrán was the American League (AL) Rookie of the Year in 1999 while with the Royals. He was named to nine MLB All-Star Games, and won three Gold Glove Awards and two Silver Slugger Awards. Beltrán was the fifth player to reach both 400 home runs and 300 stolen bases and just the fourth switch hitter with 400 home runs. He has the highest success rate in stealing bases (88.3%) of any major league player with 300 or more career attempts. He is also a member of the 30–30 club, as he has hit 30 home runs and stolen 30 bases in the same season. Beltrán retired after the 2017 season, winning a World Series title with the Houston Astros.

Beltrán is among the best all-time statistical hitters in postseason games, which has earned him nicknames such as "the new Mr. October", "Mr. October, Jr.", "Señor Octubre", and "the real Mr. October" from the media. He broke the 1.000 OPS mark in four different playoff series. Beltrán also had a 100% stolen base percentage (11-for-11) during the playoffs, which are the most stolen bases without being caught.

Fredi González

Fredi Jesus González (born January 28, 1964) is a Cuban-born American baseball coach and manager. He is currently the third base coach for the Miami Marlins of Major League Baseball (MLB). He managed the Florida Marlins from 2007 to 2010 and the Atlanta Braves from 2011 to 2016. González was fired from both managing positions. For four seasons prior to 2007, he was the third base coach for the Atlanta Braves. Despite never reaching the playoffs with Florida, González nearly led the Braves to a playoff berth in his first season as manager in 2011. He then guided the Braves to the postseason in 2012 and 2013.

Infield fly rule

The infield fly rule is a rule of baseball that treats certain fly balls as though caught, before the ball is caught, even if the infielder fails to catch it or drops it on purpose. The umpire's declaration of an infield fly means that the batter is out (and all force plays are removed) regardless of whether the ball is caught. The rule exists solely to prevent the defense from executing a double play or triple play by deliberately failing to catch a ball that an infielder could catch with ordinary effort.

Sports-related curses

A sports-related curse is a superstitious belief in the effective action of some power or evil, that is used to explain the failures or misfortunes of specific sports teams, players, or even cities. Teams, players, and cities often cite a "curse" for many negative things, such as their inability to win a sports championship, or unexpected injuries.

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