2012 (film)

2012 is a 2009 American epic science fiction disaster film directed by Roland Emmerich and starring John Cusack, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Amanda Peet, Oliver Platt, Thandie Newton, Danny Glover and Woody Harrelson. The film was produced by Centropolis Entertainment and distributed by Columbia Pictures.[1]

Filming, originally planned for Los Angeles, began in Vancouver in August 2008.[4] The plot follows novelist Jackson Curtis as he attempts to bring his family to safety amid a worldwide geological disaster. The film refers to Mayanism and the 2012 phenomenon in its portrayal of cataclysmic events.

After a lengthy advertising campaign which included the creation of a website from its main character's point of view[5] and a viral marketing website on which filmgoers could register for a lottery number to save them from the ensuing disaster,[6] 2012 was released internationally on November 13, 2009. Critics gave the film mixed reviews, praising its special effects and dark tone relative to Emmerich's other work and criticizing its screenplay and length. It was a commercial success and one of 2009's highest-grossing films.

2012
2012 Poster
Theatrical release poster
Directed byRoland Emmerich
Produced byHarald Kloser
Mark Gordon
Larry J. Franco
Written byHarald Kloser
Roland Emmerich
Starring
Music byHarald Kloser
Thomas Wander
CinematographyDean Semler
Edited byDavid Brenner
Peter Elliott
Production
company
Distributed byColumbia Pictures
Release date
  • November 13, 2009
Running time
158 minutes
CountryUnited States[1]
LanguageEnglish
Budget$200 million[2]
Box office$800 million[3]

Plot

In 2009, American geologist Adrian Helmsley visits astrophysicist Satnam Tsurutani in India and learns that neutrinos from a huge solar flare are heating Earth's core. Helmsley presents his information to White House Chief of Staff Carl Anheuser, who brings him to meet the president.

The following year, U.S. President Thomas Wilson and other world leaders begin a secret project to ensure the survival of humanity. China and the G8 nations begin building nine arks, each capable of carrying 100,000 people, in the Himalayas near Cho Ming, Tibet. Nima, a Buddhist monk, is evacuated and his brother Tenzin joins the ark project. Funding is raised by selling tickets at 1 billion per person. By 2011, articles of value are moved to the arks with the help of art expert and First Daughter Laura Wilson.

In 2012, struggling Los Angeles science-fiction writer Jackson Curtis is a chauffeur for Russian billionaire Yuri Karpov. Jackson's former wife Kate and their children Noah and Lilly live with Kate's boyfriend, plastic surgeon and pilot Gordon Silberman. Jackson takes Noah and Lilly camping in Yellowstone National Park. When they find an area fenced off by the Army, Jackson and his children climb over the fence. They are caught and brought to Adrian, who has read Jackson's books. After they are released they meet conspiracy theorist Charlie Frost, who hosts a radio show from the park.

That night, after the military evacuates Yellowstone, Jackson watches Charlie's video of Charles Hapgood's theory that polar shifts and the Mesoamerican Long Count calendar predict a 2012 phenomenon and the end of the world as we know it. According to Charlie, anyone who attempted to inform the public was killed. Soon after Jackson and his children return home, earthquakes begin in California; Jackson heeds Charlie's warning, and rents a private plane. He rescues his family as the Earth-crust displacement begins, causing a 10.9 magnitude earthquake, and Jackson and his family escape from Los Angeles by air as the city collapses and sinks into the Pacific Ocean, killing millions of residents.

They fly to Yellowstone to retrieve a map from Charlie with the arks' location. As they leave, the Yellowstone Caldera erupts; Charlie is killed when he stays behind to cover the eruption. The group lands in Las Vegas to find a larger plane and meet Yuri, his twin sons Alec and Oleg, his girlfriend Tamara and their pilot Sasha. Sasha and Gordon fly them out in an Antonov An-500 as the Yellowstone ash cloud envelops Las Vegas. An attempted refueling stop in Hawaii is abandoned after seeing the islands consumed by flows of lava as a result of the erupting volcanos.

Adrian, Carl, and Laura fly to the arks on Air Force One. Knowing that his daughter will survive, President Wilson remains in Washington, D.C. to address the nation for the last time while millions of people die in earthquakes and megatsunamis worldwide, including himself. With the presidential line of succession gone, Carl assumes the position of acting commander-in-chief.

When Jackson's group reaches China, their plane runs out of fuel. Sasha continues flying the plane as the others escape on a Bentley Continental Flying Spur stored in the cargo hold. Sasha is killed when the plane crashes, and the others are spotted by Chinese Air Force helicopters. Yuri and his sons (who have tickets) are brought to the arks and the Curtis family, Tamara and Gordon are left behind as Sasha and Tamara were having an affair. The remaining group is picked up by Nima and brought to the arks with his grandparents. With Tenzin's help, they stow away on Ark 4, where the U.S. contingent is located. As a megatsunami breaches the Himalayas and approaches the site, an impact driver lodges in the ark-door gears. This keeps a boarding gate open, which prevents the ship's engines from starting. In the ensuing chaos, Yuri, Tamara, and Gordon are killed. Tenzin is injured, the ark begins filling with water and is set adrift. Jackson and Noah dislodge the tool and the crew regains control of the Ark before it strikes Mount Everest. Jackson is reunited with his family and reconciles with Kate.

Twenty-seven days later, the waters are receding. The arks approach the Cape of Good Hope, where the Drakensberg (now the tallest mountain range on Earth) is emerging. Adrian and Laura begin a relationship, and Jackson and Kate rekindle their romance.

Alternate ending

An alternate ending appears in the film's DVD version. After Captain Michaels (the Ark 4 captain) announces that they are heading for the Cape of Good Hope, Adrian learns by phone that his father (Harry) is still alive. Harry tells him that he, Tony (whose arm is in a sling) and some passengers and crew survived the megatsunami which struck the Genesis, and Captain Michaels says that they should soon see the ocean liner. Kate thanks Laura for taking care of Lily, and Laura tells Jackson that she enjoyed his book. Jackson returns Noah's cell phone, which he recovered during the Ark 4 flood. Lily says that she sees an island, and the ark finds the shipwrecked Genesis and her survivors on a beach.[7][8]

Cast

Production

Graham Hancock's Fingerprints of the Gods was listed in 2012's credits as the film's inspiration,[13] and Emmerich said in a Time Out interview: "I always wanted to do a biblical flood movie, but I never felt I had the hook. I first read about the Earth's Crust Displacement Theory in Graham Hancock's Fingerprints of the Gods."[14] He and composer-producer Harald Kloser worked closely together, co-writing a spec script (also entitled 2012) which was marketed to studios in February 2008. A number of studios heard a budget projection and story plans from Emmerich and his representatives, a process repeated by the director after Independence Day (1996) and The Day After Tomorrow (2004).[15]

Later that month, Sony Pictures Entertainment received the rights to the spec script. Planned for distribution by Columbia Pictures,[16] 2012 cost less than its budget; according to Emmerich, the film was produced for about $200 million.[2]

Filming, originally scheduled to begin in Los Angeles in July 2008,[4] began in Kamloops, Savona, Cache Creek and Ashcroft, British Columbia.[17] With a Screen Actors Guild strike looming, the film's producers made a contingency plan to salvage it.[18] Uncharted Territory, Digital Domain, Double Negative, Scanline, and Sony Pictures Imageworks were hired to create 2012's computer-animated visual effects.

The film depicts the destruction of several cultural and historical icons around the world. Emmerich said that the Kaaba was considered for selection, but Kloser was concerned about a possible fatwā against him.[19][20]

Marketing

2012 was marketed by the fictional Institute for Human Continuity, featuring a book by Jackson Curtis (Farewell Atlantis),[5] streaming media, blog updates and radio broadcasts from zealot Charlie Frost on his website, This Is The End.[5] On November 12, 2008, the studio released the first trailer for 2012. With a tsunami surging over the Himalayas and a purportedly-scientific message that the world would end in 2012, the trailer's message was that international governments were not preparing their populations for the event. The trailer ended with a suggestion to viewers to "find out the truth" by entering "2012" on a search engine. The Guardian called the film's marketing "deeply flawed", associating it with "websites that make even more spurious claims about 2012".[21]

The studio introduced a viral marketing website operated by the Institute for Human Continuity, where filmgoers could register for a lottery number to be part of a small population which would be rescued from the global destruction.[6] David Morrison of NASA, who received over 1,000 inquiries from people who thought the website was genuine, condemned it. "I've even had cases of teenagers writing to me saying they are contemplating suicide because they don't want to see the world end", Morrison said. "I think when you lie on the internet and scare children to make a buck, that is ethically wrong."[22] Another marketing website promoted Farewell Atlantis, the fictional novel about the events of 2012.[5]

Comcast organized a "roadblock campaign" to promote the film in which a two-minute scene was broadcast on 450 American commercial television networks, local English-language and Spanish-language stations, and 89 cable outlets during a ten-minute window between 10:50 and 11:00 pm Eastern and Pacific Time on October 1, 2009.[23] The scene featured the destruction of Los Angeles and ended with a cliffhanger, with the entire 5:38 clip available on Comcast's Fancast website. According to Variety, "The stunt will put the footage in front of 90% of all households watching ad-supported TV, or nearly 110 million viewers. When combined with online and mobile streams, that could increase to more than 140 million".[23]

Soundtrack

2012: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
Soundtrack album by
ReleasedNovember 10, 2009
Length57:48
LabelRCA Victor
Singles from 2012: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
  1. "Time for Miracles"
    Released: October 18, 2009

The film's score was composed by Harald Kloser and Thomas Wander. Singer Adam Lambert contributed a song to the film, "Time for Miracles", and expressed his gratitude in an MTV interview.[24] The 24-song soundtrack includes "Fades Like a Photograph" by Filter and "It Ain't the End of the World" by George Segal and Blu Mankuma.[25] The trailer track was "Master of Shadows" by Two Steps From Hell.

Release

2012 was released to cinemas on November 13, 2009 in Sweden, Canada, Denmark, Mexico, India, the United States, and Japan.[26] According to the studio, the film could have been completed for a summer release but the delay allowed more time for production.

The DVD and Blu-ray versions were released on March 2, 2010. The two-disc Blu-ray edition includes over 90 minutes of features, including Adam Lambert's music video for "Time for Miracles" and a digital copy for PSP, PC, Mac, and iPod.[27] A 3D version was released in Cinemex theaters in Mexico in February 2010.[28]

Reception

Box office

2012 grossed $166.1 million in North America and $603.6 million in other territories for a worldwide total of $769.7 million against a production budget of $200 million,[3] making it the first film to gross over $700 million worldwide without crossing $200 million domestically.[29] Worldwide, it was the fifth-highest-grossing 2009 film[30] and the fifth-highest-grossing film distributed by Sony-Columbia, (behind Sam Raimi's Spider-Man trilogy and Skyfall).[31] 2012 is the second-highest-grossing film directed by Roland Emmerich, behind Independence Day (1996).[32] It earned $230.5 million on its worldwide opening weekend, the fourth-largest opening of 2009 and for Sony-Columbia.[33]

2012 ranked number one on its opening weekend, grossing $65,237,614 on its first weekend (the fourth-largest opening for a disaster film).[34] Outside North America it is the 28th-highest-grossing film, the fourth-highest-grossing 2009 film,[35] and the second-highest-grossing film distributed by Sony-Columbia, after Skyfall. 2012 earned $165.2 million on its opening weekend, the 20th-largest overseas opening.[36] Its largest opening was in France and the Maghreb ($18.0 million). In total earnings, the film's three highest-grossing territories after North America were China ($68.7 million), France and the Maghreb ($44.0 million), and Japan ($42.6 million).[37]

Critical response

2012 received mixed reviews from critics. On Rotten Tomatoes the film has an approval rating of 40% based on 240 reviews with an average rating of 5/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "Roland Emmerich's 2012 provides plenty of visual thrills, but lacks a strong enough script to support its massive scope and inflated length."[38] On Metacritic, the film has a score 49 out of 100 based on 34 critics, indicating "mixed or average reviews".[39] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "B+" on an A+ to F scale.[40]

Roger Ebert praised 2012, giving it ​3 12 stars out of 4 and saying that it "delivers what it promises, and since no sentient being will buy a ticket expecting anything else, it will be, for its audiences, one of the most satisfactory films of the year".[41] Ebert and Claudia Puig of USA Today called the film the "mother of all disaster movies".[41][42] But Peter Travers of Rolling Stone compared it to Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen: "Beware 2012, which works the dubious miracle of almost matching Transformers 2 for sheer, cynical, mind-numbing, time-wasting, money-draining, soul-sucking stupidity."[43]

Accolades

Danny Glover portrait, January 14, 2008
Danny Glover was nominated for an NAACP Image Award for his role as President Thomas Wilson[44]
Award Category Nominee(s) Result
Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards[45] Best Visual Effects Volker Engel, Marc Weigert, Mike Vézina Nominated
NAACP Image Award[44] Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture Chiwetel Ejiofor Nominated
Danny Glover Nominated
Motion Picture Sound Editors[46] Best Sound Editing – Music in a Feature Film Fernand Bos, Ronald J. Webb Nominated
Best Sound Editing – Sound Effects and Foley in a Feature Film Fernand Bos, Ronald J. Webb Nominated
Satellite Awards[47] Best Sound (Editing and Mixing) Paul N.J. Ottosson, Michael McGee, Rick Kline, Jeffrey J. Haboush, Michael Keller Won
Best Visual Effects Volker Engel, Marc Weigert, Mike Vézina Won
Best Art Direction and Production Design Barry Chusid, Elizabeth Wilcox Nominated
Best Film Editing David Brenner, Peter S. Elliot Nominated
Saturn Awards[48] Saturn Award for Best Action, Adventure, or Thriller Film 2012 Nominated
Best Special Effects Volker Engel, Marc Weigert, Mike Vézina Nominated
Visual Effects Society Awards[49] Outstanding Visual Effects in a Visual Effects-Driven Feature Motion Picture Volker Engel, Marc Weigert, Josh Jaggars Nominated
Best Single Visual Effect of the Year Volker Engel, Marc Weigert, Josh R. Jaggars, Mohen Leo for "Escape from L.A." Nominated
Outstanding Created Environment in a Feature Motion Picture Haarm-Pieter Duiker, Marten Larsson, Ryo Sakaguchi, Hanzhi Tang for "Los Angeles Destruction" Nominated

North Korean ban

North Korea reportedly banned the possession or viewing of 2012. The year was the 100th anniversary of the birth of the nation's founder, Kim Il-sung, and was designated as "the year for opening the grand gates to becoming a rising superpower"; a film depicting the year negatively was deemed offensive by the North Korean government. Several people in North Korea were reportedly arrested for possessing (or viewing) imported copies of 2012 and charged with "grave provocation against the development of the state".[50][51]

Canceled television spin-off

In 2010 Entertainment Weekly reported a planned spin-off television series, 2013, which would have been a sequel to the film.[52] 2012 executive producer Mark Gordon told the magazine, "ABC will have an opening in their disaster-related programming after Lost ends, so people would be interested in this topic on a weekly basis. There's hope for the world despite the magnitude of the 2012 disaster as seen in the film. After the movie, there are some people who survive, and the question is how will these survivors build a new world and what will it look like. That might make an interesting TV series."[52] However, plans were later canceled for budgetary reasons.[52] It would have been Emmerich's third film to spawn a spin-off; the first was Stargate (followed by Stargate SG-1, Stargate Infinity, Stargate Atlantis, Stargate Universe), and the second was Godzilla (followed by the animated Godzilla: The Series).

References

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External links

Argo (2012 film)

Argo is a 2012 American historical drama film directed by Ben Affleck. Screenwriter Chris Terrio adapted the screenplay from the book by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency operative Tony Mendez, The Master of Disguise, and the

2007 Wired article by

Joshuah Bearman, "The Great Escape: How the CIA Used a Fake Sci-Fi Flick to Rescue Americans from Tehran". The latter deals with the "Canadian Caper", in which Mendez led the rescue of six U.S. diplomats from Tehran, Iran, under the guise of filming a science fiction film during the 1979–1981 Iran hostage crisis.The film, starring Affleck as Mendez, and Bryan Cranston, Alan Arkin, and John Goodman in supporting roles, was released in the United States on October 12, 2012. It was produced by Grant Heslov, Affleck and George Clooney.

Upon release, Argo received widespread acclaim, with praise directed towards the acting (particularly Arkin's), Affleck's direction, Terrio's screenplay, the editing, and Desplat's score. The film received seven nominations at the 85th Academy Awards and won three, for Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Film Editing. The film also earned five Golden Globe Award nominations: it won Best Motion Picture – Drama and Best Director, and was nominated for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture for Alan Arkin. It won Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture at the 19th Screen Actors Guild Awards, and Arkin was nominated for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role. It also won Best Film, Best Editing and Best Director at the 66th British Academy Film Awards, and 37th Hochi Film Award for Best International Picture.

Despite its praise, Argo has been criticized for some specific inaccuracies, in particular for minimizing the role of the Canadian embassy in the rescue, for falsely showing that the Americans were turned away by the British and New Zealand embassies, and for exaggerating the danger the group faced during events preceding their escape from the country.

Brave (2012 film)

Brave is a 2012 American computer-animated fantasy drama adventure film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. It was directed by Mark Andrews and Brenda Chapman and co-directed by Steve Purcell. The story is by Chapman, with the screenplay by Andrews, Purcell, Chapman and Irene Mecchi. The film was produced by Katherine Sarafian, with John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, and Pete Docter as executive producers. The film's voice cast features Kelly Macdonald, Billy Connolly, Emma Thompson, Julie Walters, Robbie Coltrane, Kevin McKidd, and Craig Ferguson. Set in the Scottish Highlands, the film tells the story of a princess named Merida who defies an age-old custom, causing chaos in the kingdom by expressing the desire not to be betrothed.

Chapman drew inspiration for the film's story from her relationship with her own daughter. Co-directing with Mark Andrews, Chapman became Pixar's first female director of a feature-length film. To create the most complex visuals possible, Pixar completely rewrote their animation system for the first time in 25 years. Brave is the first film to use the Dolby Atmos sound format.

Brave premiered on June 10, 2012, at the Seattle International Film Festival, and was released in North America on June 22, 2012, to both positive reviews and box office success. The film won the Academy Award, the Golden Globe, and the BAFTA Award for Best Animated Feature Film. Preceding the feature theatrically was a short film entitled La Luna, directed by Enrico Casarosa.

Flight (2012 film)

Flight is a 2012 American drama film directed by Robert Zemeckis and written by John Gatins. It stars Denzel Washington as William "Whip" Whitaker Sr., an alcoholic airline pilot who miraculously crash-lands his plane after it suffers an in-flight mechanical failure, saving nearly everyone on board. Immediately following the crash, he is hailed a hero, but an investigation soon leads to questions that put the captain in a different light.

This film is inspired by the plane crash of Alaska Airlines Flight 261. A box office success generating positive reviews, Flight is the first live-action film directed by Zemeckis since Cast Away and What Lies Beneath in 2000, and his first R-rated film since Used Cars in 1980. The film was nominated twice at the 85th Academy Awards, for Best Actor (Washington) and Best Original Screenplay (Gatins).

Les Misérables (2012 film)

Les Misérables is a 2012 musical drama film directed by Tom Hooper and scripted by William Nicholson, Alain Boublil, Claude-Michel Schönberg, and Herbert Kretzmer, based on the 1862 French novel of the same name by Victor Hugo, which also inspired a 1980 musical by Boublil and Schönberg. The film is a British and American venture distributed by Universal Pictures. The film stars an ensemble cast led by Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Anne Hathaway, Eddie Redmayne, Amanda Seyfried, Helena Bonham Carter, and Sacha Baron Cohen.

The film takes place in France during the early 19th century and tells the story of Jean Valjean who, while being hunted for decades by the ruthless policeman Javert after breaking parole, agrees to care for a factory worker's daughter. The story reaches resolution against the background of the June Rebellion.

Following the release of the 1980 musical, a film adaptation was mired in "development hell" for over ten years, as the rights were passed on to several major studios, and various directors and actors considered. In 2011, producer Cameron Mackintosh sold the film rights to Eric Fellner, who financed the film through his Working Title Films. In June 2011, production of the film officially began, with Hooper and Mackintosh serving as director and producer, and the main characters were cast later that year. Principal photography commenced in March 2012, with a budget of $61 million. Filming took place on locations in Greenwich, London, Chatham, Winchester, Bath, and Portsmouth, England; in Gourdon, France; and on soundstages in Pinewood Studios.

Les Misérables held its world premiere at Leicester Square in London on 5 December 2012, and was released 25 December 2012 in the United States and 11 January 2013 in the United Kingdom. It grossed over $441 million worldwide. The film received generally favourable reviews, with many critics praising the cast, with Jackman, Hathaway, Redmayne and Samantha Barks being the most often singled out for praise. The film won the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy for Jackman, and the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture for Hathaway. It also won four British Academy Film Awards (BAFTA), including for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Hathaway. Additionally, it received eight Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture (the first musical nominated since 2002's winner Chicago) and Best Actor for Jackman, and won three, for Best Sound Mixing, Best Makeup and Hairstyling, and Best Supporting Actress for Hathaway.

Lincoln (film)

Lincoln is a 2012 American historical drama film directed and produced by Steven Spielberg, starring Daniel Day-Lewis as U.S. President Abraham Lincoln. The film also features Sally Field, David Strathairn, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, James Spader, Hal Holbrook, and Tommy Lee Jones in supporting performances. The screenplay by Tony Kushner was loosely based on Doris Kearns Goodwin's biography Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, and covers the final four months of Lincoln's life, focusing on his efforts in January 1865 to have the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution passed by the United States House of Representatives.

The film was produced by Spielberg and frequent collaborator Kathleen Kennedy, through their respective production companies, Amblin Entertainment and the Kennedy/Marshall Company. Filming began October 17, 2011, and ended on December 19, 2011. Lincoln premiered on October 8, 2012 at the New York Film Festival. The film was co-produced by DreamWorks Pictures, 20th Century Fox, and Participant Media, and released theatrically by Touchstone Pictures in North America on November 9, 2012. The film was distributed by Fox in international territories.Lincoln received significant praise for the acting, especially Day-Lewis's performance, as well as Spielberg's direction, and production values. In December 2012, the film was nominated for seven Golden Globe Awards including Best Motion Picture – Drama, Best Director for Spielberg and winning Best Actor (Motion Picture – Drama) for Day-Lewis. At the 85th Academy Awards, the film was nominated for twelve Academy Awards including Best Picture and Best Director; it won for Best Production Design and Best Actor for Day-Lewis. The film was also a commercial success, grossing over $275 million at the box office.

Man of Steel (film)

Man of Steel is a 2013 superhero film featuring the DC Comics character Superman. It is a British-American venture produced by DC Entertainment, Legendary Pictures and Syncopy, and distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures. It is the first installment in the DC Extended Universe (DCEU). The film is directed by Zack Snyder, written by David S. Goyer, and stars Henry Cavill, Amy Adams, Michael Shannon, Kevin Costner, Diane Lane, Laurence Fishburne, Antje Traue, Ayelet Zurer, Christopher Meloni, and Russell Crowe. Man of Steel is a reboot of the Superman film series that portrays the character's origin story. In the film, Clark Kent learns that he is a superpowered alien from the planet Krypton. He assumes the role of mankind's destructive protector as Superman when faced with the threat of humanity's destruction from General Zod and wrestles with saving the world while remaining emotionally distant.

Development began in 2008, when Warner Bros. took pitches from comic book writers, screenwriters, and directors, opting to reboot the franchise. In 2009, a court ruling resulted in Jerry Siegel's family recapturing the rights to Superman's origins and Siegel's copyright. The decision stated that Warner Bros. did not owe the families additional royalties from previous films, but if they did not begin production on a Superman film by 2011, then the Shuster and Siegel estates would be able to sue for lost revenue on an unproduced film. Producer Christopher Nolan pitched Goyer's idea after story discussion on The Dark Knight Rises, and Snyder was hired as the film's director in October 2010. Principal photography began in August 2011 in West Chicago, Illinois, before moving to Vancouver and Plano, Illinois.

Man of Steel was released in theaters on June 14, 2013, in conventional 2D, 3D, and IMAX formats. Despite receiving mixed reviews, the film became a box office success, grossing more than $668 million worldwide. Critics praised the film's visuals and Hans Zimmer's score, but criticized its pacing and lack of character development. A follow-up entitled Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice was released on March 25, 2016.

Percy Jackson

Perseus "Percy" Jackson is a fictional character, the title character and narrator of Rick Riordan's Percy Jackson & the Olympians series. He is also one of seven main protagonists of the sequel series The Heroes of Olympus, appearing in every book except The Lost Hero, and appears in the ongoing Trials of Apollo series, making him one of the few characters to appear in all three series of the Camp Half-Blood chronicles. He has also been a narrator and protagonist in Riordan's Greco-Roman/Egyptian crossover stories, part of the Demigods and Magicians collection. The character serves as the narrator in Percy Jackson's Greek Gods and Percy Jackson's Greek Heroes, also by Rick Riordan.

Percy Jackson is played by Logan Lerman in the film adaptations of the novels and by Chris McCarrell on the musical.

Salman Khan

Abdul Rashid Salim Salman Khan born 27 December 1965, is an Indian film actor, producer, occasional playback singer and television personality. In a film career spanning almost thirty years, Khan has received numerous awards, including two National Film Awards as a film producer, and two Filmfare Awards for acting. He has a significant following in Asia and the Indian diaspora worldwide, and is cited in the media as one of the most commercially successful actors of both world and Indian cinema. According to the Forbes 2018 list of Top-Paid 100 Celebrity Entertainers in world, Khan was the highest ranked Indian with 82nd rank with earnings of $37.7 million.The eldest son of screenwriter Salim Khan, Khan began his acting career with a supporting role in Biwi Ho To Aisi (1988) and achieved breakthrough with a leading role in Maine Pyar Kiya (1989). Khan went on to establish himself in Bollywood in the 1990s with roles in several top-grossing productions, including the romantic drama Hum Aapke Hain Koun..! (1994), the action thriller Karan Arjun (1995), the comedy Biwi No.1 (1999), and the family drama Hum Saath-Saath Hain (1999). After a brief period of decline in the 2000s, Khan achieved greater stardom in the 2010s by playing the lead role in successful films Dabangg (2010), Ready (2011), Ek Tha Tiger (2012), Kick (2014), Sultan (2016) and Tiger Zinda Hai (2017), all of which rank among the highest-grossing Indian films of all time. He's the only actor to star in the highest-grossing Bollywood films of ten separate years. According to the Forbes 2015 list of Top-Paid 100 Celebrity Entertainers in world, Khan was the highest ranked Indian with 71st rank with earnings of $33.5 million.In addition to his acting career, Khan is a stage performer and a philanthropist through his charity, Being Human Foundation. Khan's off-screen life is marred by controversy and legal troubles. In 2015 he was convicted of culpable homicide for a negligent driving case in which he ran over five people with his car, killing one, but his conviction was set aside on appeal. On 5 April 2018, Khan was convicted in a blackbuck poaching case and sentenced to five years imprisonment. He is currently out on bail while an appeal is being heard.

That's My Boy (2012 film)

That's My Boy is a 2012 American satirical dark comedy film directed by Sean Anders and starring Adam Sandler and Andy Samberg. The film is about an alcoholic slacker named Donny Berger (Sandler) who fathered a son (Samberg) with his teacher as a teenager. Donny owes $43,000 in back taxes and will have to serve a three-year prison sentence if he does not pay it off by the end of the weekend, which happens to be his son's wedding weekend.

Released on June 15, 2012 by Columbia Pictures, it was a critical and financial failure, grossing just $57 million against a $70 million budget. many have considered this to be one of the worst films of all-time.

The Amazing Spider-Man (2012 film)

The Amazing Spider-Man is a 2012 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character Spider-Man, and sharing the title of the character's longest-running comic book. It is the fourth theatrical Spider-Man film produced by Columbia Pictures and Marvel Entertainment, and a reboot of Sam Raimi's Spider-Man 2002–2007 trilogy preceding it.

The film was directed by Marc Webb. It was written by James Vanderbilt, Alvin Sargent and Steve Kloves, and it stars Andrew Garfield as Peter Parker / Spider-Man, alongside Emma Stone, Rhys Ifans, Denis Leary, Campbell Scott, Irrfan Khan, Martin Sheen and Sally Field. The film tells the story of Peter Parker, an introverted teenager from New York City, who takes up the alias of a masked vigilante: Spider-Man, after being bitten by a genetically engineered spider, and gaining spider-like superhuman abilities as a result, in order to hunt down his adoptive father/uncle's murderer. Eventually, Parker is compelled to stop his father's former scientific partner: Dr. Curt Connors, one of OsCorp's top biological researchers, who has accidentally exposed himself to an experimental mutagen, which has hampered his sanity and imbued him with a monstrous reptilian alter-ego, from spreading a mutation serum to the city's human population.

Development of the film began with the cancellation of Spider-Man 4 in 2010, ending director Sam Raimi's Spider-Man film series that originally featured Tobey Maguire as the titular superhero. Columbia Pictures opted to reboot the franchise with the same production team along with Vanderbilt to stay on with writing the next Spider-Man film, while Sargent and Kloves helped with the script as well. During pre-production, the main characters were cast in 2010. New designs were introduced from the comics, such as artificial web-shooters. Using Red Digital Cinema Camera Company's RED Epic camera, principal photography started in December 2010 in Los Angeles before moving to New York City. The film entered post-production in April 2011. 3ality Technica provided 3D image processing, and Sony Pictures Imageworks handled CGI. This was also the final American film to be scored by James Horner and released during his lifetime, before his death in 2015 from an aircraft accident.

Sony Pictures Entertainment built a promotional website, releasing many previews and launched a viral marketing campaign, among other moves. Tie-ins included a video game by Beenox. The film premiered on June 30 in Tokyo, and was released in the United States on July 3, ten years after release of Spider-Man (2002), in 2D, 3D and IMAX 3D and released in home media in November 2012. The reboot received generally favorable reviews, with critics praising mostly Andrew Garfield's performance, the visual style, James Horner's musical score, and the realistic portrayal of the title character, but criticized some underdeveloped story-lines, noting the film's deleted scenes, and the introduction of the Lizard as the villain for being too surreal for the film. The film was a box office success, grossing over $757 million worldwide, becoming the seventh highest-grossing film of 2012. The film's sequel, The Amazing Spider-Man 2, was released on May 2, 2014.

The Avengers (2012 film)

Marvel's The Avengers (classified under the name Marvel Avengers Assemble in the United Kingdom and Ireland), or simply The Avengers, is a 2012 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics superhero team of the same name, produced by Marvel Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures. It is the sixth film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU). The film was written and directed by Joss Whedon and features an ensemble cast that includes Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Hemsworth, Scarlett Johansson, and Jeremy Renner as the titular Avengers team, alongside Tom Hiddleston, Clark Gregg, Cobie Smulders, Stellan Skarsgård, and Samuel L. Jackson. In the film, Nick Fury, director of the spy agency S.H.I.E.L.D., recruits Tony Stark, Steve Rogers, Bruce Banner, and Thor to form a team that must stop Thor's brother Loki from subjugating Earth.

The film's development began when Marvel Studios received a loan from Merrill Lynch in April 2005. After the success of the film Iron Man in May 2008, Marvel announced that The Avengers would be released in July 2011. With the signing of Johansson in March 2009, the film was pushed back for a 2012 release. Whedon was brought on board in April 2010 and rewrote the original screenplay by Zak Penn. Production began in April 2011 in Albuquerque, New Mexico, before moving to Cleveland, Ohio, in August and New York City in September. The film was converted to 3D in post-production.

The Avengers premiered on April 11, 2012, at Hollywood's El Capitan Theatre and was released in the United States on May 4, 2012. The film received positive reviews from critics, as well as numerous awards and nominations including Academy Award and BAFTA nominations for achievements in visual effects. It set or tied numerous box office records, including the biggest opening weekend in the United States and Canada. The Avengers grossed over $1.5 billion worldwide and became the third-highest-grossing film of all time, as well as the highest-grossing film of 2012. It is the first Marvel production to generate $1 billion in ticket sales.

Two sequels, titled Avengers: Age of Ultron and Avengers: Infinity War, were released in May 2015 and April 2018, respectively, while Avengers: Endgame is scheduled for release in April 2019.

The Dark Knight Rises

The Dark Knight Rises is a 2012 American-British superhero film directed by Christopher Nolan, who co-wrote the screenplay with his brother Jonathan Nolan, and the story with David S. Goyer. Featuring the DC Comics character Batman, the film is the final installment in Nolan's The Dark Knight Trilogy, and the sequel to The Dark Knight (2008). Christian Bale reprises the lead role of Bruce Wayne/Batman, with a returning cast of allies: Michael Caine as Alfred Pennyworth, Gary Oldman as James Gordon, and Morgan Freeman as Lucius Fox. The film introduces Selina Kyle (Anne Hathaway) and Bane (Tom Hardy). Eight years after the events of The Dark Knight, merciless revolutionary Bane forces an older Bruce Wayne to resume his role as Batman and save Gotham City from nuclear destruction.

Christopher Nolan was hesitant about returning to the series for a second time, but agreed after developing a story with his brother and Goyer that he felt would conclude the series on a satisfactory note. Nolan drew inspiration from Bane's comic book debut in the 1993 "Knightfall" storyline, the 1986 series The Dark Knight Returns, and the 1999 storyline "No Man's Land". Filming took place from May to November 2011 in locations including Jodhpur, London, Nottingham, Glasgow, Los Angeles, New York City, Newark, and Pittsburgh. Nolan used IMAX 70 mm film cameras for much of the filming, including the first six minutes of the film, to optimize the quality of the picture. A vehicle variation of the Batplane and Batcopter termed the "Bat", an underground prison set, and a new Batcave set were created specifically for the film. As with The Dark Knight, viral marketing campaigns began early during production. When filming concluded, Warner Bros. refocused its campaign: developing promotional websites, releasing the first six minutes of the film, screening theatrical trailers, and sending out information regarding the film's plot.

The Dark Knight Rises premiered in New York City on July 16, 2012. The film was released in the United States and the United Kingdom on July 20, 2012. It received positive reviews; the consensus at Rotten Tomatoes calls it "ambitious, thoughtful, and potent". The film has grossed over $1 billion worldwide, making it the second film in the Batman film series to earn $1 billion. In addition to being Nolan's highest-grossing film, it is the 24th highest-grossing film of all time (7th at the time of release), the third highest-grossing film of 2012, the highest-grossing DC Comics film to date, the highest-grossing Batman film of all time, and the eighth highest-grossing superhero film.

The Impossible (2012 film)

The Impossible (Spanish: Lo Imposible) is a 2012 disaster drama film directed by J. A. Bayona and written by Sergio G. Sánchez. It is based on the experience of María Belón and her family in the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. The cast includes Naomi Watts, Ewan McGregor and Tom Holland.

The film received positive reviews from critics for its direction and its acting, especially for Watts who was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress, the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama, and a Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role.

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