2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification (UEFA)

In the UEFA qualification for 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup, 41 entrants were drawn into eight groups, from which the group winners advanced to a play-off round. The four winners of the play-off round advanced directly to join Germany (the hosts) in the finals tournament, while the four play-off losers played two further knock-out rounds to determine a nation to play-off with the third-placed CONCACAF nation for a finals place.

This scheme was a significant change from previous editions of qualification as all entrants had the ability to advance to the final tournament. In previous years only those nations belonging to the First Category of European women's football were able to qualify, with a system approximating promotion and relegation between qualification tournaments operating.

Qualifying round

The groups were drawn on 17 March 2009, with the matches held from 15 August 2009 to 25 August 2010. The eight group winners advanced to the play-off stages.

Seeding

Seeding was based on results in 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup and UEFA Women's Euro 2009 qualifying. There were five seeding pots, each containing eight teams except for the fifth, Pot E, which had nine and provided two nations for Group 1.[1]

Pot A Pot B Pot C Pot D Pot E

 Sweden
 Norway
 Denmark
 England
 France
 Russia
 Ukraine
 Italy

 Finland
 Iceland
 Spain
 Czech Republic
 Netherlands
 Scotland
 Republic of Ireland
 Poland

  Switzerland
 Austria
 Serbia
 Belarus
 Belgium
 Greece
 Portugal
 Hungary

 Slovenia
 Slovakia
 Israel
 Wales
 Romania
 Northern Ireland
 Turkey
 Bulgaria

 Croatia
 Armenia
 Bosnia and Herzegovina
 Kazakhstan
 Azerbaijan
 Estonia
 Malta
 Macedonia
 Georgia

Group 1

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts France Iceland Northern Ireland Estonia Serbia Croatia
 France 10 10 0 0 50 0 +50 30 2–0 6–0 12–0 7–0 3–0
 Iceland 10 8 0 2 33 3 +30 24 0–1 2–0 12–0 5–0 3–0
 Northern Ireland 10 3 2 5 8 16 −8 11 0–4 0–1 3–0 0–0 3–1
 Estonia 10 3 1 6 7 44 −37 10 0–6 0–5 2–1 1–0 1–1
 Serbia 10 2 3 5 7 19 −12 9 0–2 0–2 0–0 4–0 1–1
 Croatia 10 0 2 8 4 27 −23 2 0–7 0–3 0–1 0–3 1–2

Group 2

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Norway Netherlands Belarus Slovakia North Macedonia
 Norway 8 7 1 0 39 2 +37 22 3–0 3–0 1–0 14–0
 Netherlands 8 5 2 1 30 7 +23 17 2–2 1–1 2–0 13–1
 Belarus 8 4 1 3 17 14 +3 13 0–5 0–4 2–0 6–0
 Slovakia 8 2 0 6 15 13 +2 6 0–4 0–1 0–2 9–0
 Macedonia 8 0 0 8 3 68 −65 0 0–7 0–7 1–6 1–6

Group 3

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Denmark Scotland Greece Bulgaria Georgia (country)
 Denmark 8 6 2 0 45 0 +45 20 0–0 7–0 9–0 15–0
 Scotland 8 6 1 1 24 5 +19 19 0–1 4–1 8–1 3–1
 Greece 8 3 0 5 11 20 −9 9 0–6 0–1 1–2 5–0
 Bulgaria 8 2 2 4 9 25 −16 8 0–0 0–5 0–1 5–0
 Georgia 8 0 1 7 3 42 −39 1 0–7 1–3 0–3 1–1

Group 4

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Ukraine Poland Hungary Romania Bosnia and Herzegovina
 Ukraine 8 5 2 1 24 9 +15 17 3–1 4–2 3–1 7–0
 Poland 8 5 1 2 18 9 +9 16 4–1 0–0 2–0 1–0
 Hungary 8 4 3 1 15 10 +5 15 1–1 4–2 1–1 2–0
 Romania 8 2 2 4 14 13 +1 8 0–0 1–4 2–3 4–0
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 8 0 0 8 0 30 −30 0 0–5 0–4 0–2 0–5

Group 5

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts England Spain Austria Turkey Malta
 England 8 7 1 0 30 2 +28 22 1–0 3–0 3–0 8–0
 Spain 8 6 1 1 37 4 +33 19 2–2 2–0 5–1 9–0
 Austria 8 3 1 4 14 12 +2 10 0–4 0–1 4–0 6–0
 Turkey 8 2 1 5 10 23 −13 7 0–3 0–5 2–2 5–1
 Malta 8 0 0 8 1 51 −50 0 0–6 0–13 0–2 0–2

Group 6

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Switzerland Russia Republic of Ireland Israel Kazakhstan
  Switzerland 8 7 0 1 28 6 +22 21 1–2 2–0 6–0 8–0
 Russia 8 6 1 1 30 6 +24 19 0–3 3–0 4–0 8–0
 Republic of Ireland 8 4 1 3 12 10 +2 13 1–2 1–1 3–0 2–1
 Israel 8 2 0 6 4 24 −20 6 1–2 1–6 0–3 1–0
 Kazakhstan 8 0 0 8 4 32 −28 0 2–4 0–6 1–2 0–1

Group 7

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Italy Finland Portugal Slovenia Armenia
 Italy 8 7 1 0 38 3 +35 22 1–1 2–0 6–0 7–0
 Finland 8 6 1 1 25 6 +19 19 1–3 4–1 4–1 7–0
 Portugal 8 4 0 4 17 10 +7 12 1–3 0–1 1–0 7–0
 Slovenia 8 2 0 6 7 27 −20 6 0–8 0–3 0–4 1–0
 Armenia 8 0 0 8 1 42 −41 0 0–8 0–4 0–3 1–5

Group 8

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Sweden Czech Republic Belgium Wales Azerbaijan
 Sweden 8 7 1 0 36 3 +33 22 0–0 2–1 5–1 17–0
 Czech Republic 8 4 1 3 19 6 +13 13 0–1 1–2 2–1 8–0
 Belgium 8 3 1 4 18 13 +5 10 1–4 0–3 2–3 11–0
 Wales 8 3 0 5 23 16 +7 9 0–4 2–0 0–1 15–0
 Azerbaijan 8 1 1 6 2 60 −58 4 0–3 0–5 0–0 2–1

Play-off stages

Seeding

The eight UEFA qualification group winners qualified for the play-offs. The play-off draw was seeded according to results in this qualifying competition and those for UEFA Women's EURO 2009.[2]

Legend
Seeded teams
Unseeded teams
Group Team Seeding coefficient
8  Sweden 2.875
1  France 2.833
2  Norway 2.750
5  England 2.625
3  Denmark 2.563
7  Italy 2.500
4  Ukraine 2.250
6   Switzerland 2.000

Direct qualification

Each seeded team was drawn against an unseeded opponent to play a two-legged tie. The four winners advanced to the finals in Germany. The four losers advanced to the repechage rounds for a chance to qualify against a CONCACAF opponent.

Ties were drawn on 30 August with the first legs scheduled for 11–12 September and the return legs on 15–16 September.[3]

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
France  3–2  Italy 0–0 3–2
England  5–2   Switzerland 2–0 3–2
Ukraine  0–3  Norway 0–1 0–2
Sweden  4–3  Denmark 2–1 2–2

Repechage I

The four losers from the direct qualification play-offs met in two sets of two-legged ties on 2 and 6 October. The winners advanced to the second repechage round.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Denmark  1–3   Switzerland 1–3 0–0
Ukraine  0–3  Italy 0–3 0–0

Repechage II

The two winners from the first repechage round met in a two-legged tie on 23 and 27 October. The winner advanced to play the third-placed team from the CONCACAF qualification for a spot in the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup finals.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Italy  5–2   Switzerland 1–0 4–2

Italy won 5–2 on aggregate and advanced to the UEFA-CONCACAF play-off.

References and notes

  1. ^ Women's World Cup hopefuls await draw, from uefa.com, retrieved 26 August 2010
  2. ^ Play-off race reaches final stretch
  3. ^ Denmark and Ukraine complete play-off lineup
2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification (UEFA–CONCACAF play-off)

In the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification process, one spot was allocated to the winner of a two-legged play-off between the winner of the UEFA repechage play-offs and the winner of the third-place qualification match in the 2010 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup.

The order of play for these matches was announced following a draw held at the FIFA headquarters in Zürich on 17 March 2010.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 1

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA Group 1 was a UEFA qualifying group for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. The group comprised France, Iceland, Serbia, Northern Ireland, Croatia and Estonia. It was the only six-team group (the other seven having only five teams each).

The group was won by France who advanced to the play-off rounds.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 2

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA Group 2 was a UEFA qualifying group for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. The group comprised Norway, the Netherlands, Macedonia, Belarus and Slovakia.

Norway won the group and advanced to the play-off rounds.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 3

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA Group 3 was a UEFA qualifying group for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. The group comprised Denmark, Scotland, Greece, Bulgaria and Georgia.

Denmark won the group and advanced to the play-off rounds.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 4

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA Group 4 was a UEFA qualifying group for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. The group comprised Ukraine, Poland, Hungary, Romania and Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Ukraine advanced to the play-off rounds after winning the group.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 5

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA Group 5 was a UEFA qualifying group for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. The group comprised England, Spain, Austria, Turkey and Malta.

England won the group and advanced to the play-off rounds.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 6

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA Group 6 was a UEFA qualifying group for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. The group comprised Russia, the Republic of Ireland, Switzerland, Israel and Kazakhstan.

Switzerland won the group and advanced to the play-off rounds.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 7

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA Group 7 was a UEFA qualifying group for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. The group comprised Italy, Finland, Portugal, Slovenia and Armenia.

Italy won the group and advanced to the play-off rounds.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 8

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA Group 8 was a UEFA qualifying group for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. The group comprised Sweden, the Czech Republic, Belgium, Wales and Azerbaijan.

Sweden won the group and advanced to the play-off rounds.

2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA play-offs

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification UEFA play-offs were a series of two-legged ties determining qualification for the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. They involved the eight group winners from the first stage of European qualification.

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Picarelli is an Italian American, born in Downey, California; her father Angelo Picarelli and uncle Joe Picarelli both became restaurateurs in Long Beach. Her paternal grandparents Mario and Maria Picarelli had migrated from Calabria to Downey in 1966.As a senior in her successful four-year career playing varsity soccer at Pepperdine University, Picarelli was called into a training camp for the United States women's national under-23 soccer team. However, coach Jill Ellis quickly deemed Picarelli too small to be an effective goalkeeper at international level.

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After Italy's win over England, Picarelli's partner Cameron Thomas made her a marriage proposal inside the Lahti Stadium, which she accepted.After leaving Bardolino and playing her club football in America, Picarelli continued to be selected by the Italian national team. She played against the country of her birth in the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification (UEFA–CONCACAF play-off), which Italy lost 2–0 on aggregate.

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