2011 Census of India

The 15th Indian Census was conducted in two phases, house listing and population enumeration. House listing phase began on 1 April 2010 and involved collection of information about all buildings. Information for National Population Register was also collected in the first phase, which will be used to issue a 12-digit unique identification number to all registered Indian residents by Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI). The second population enumeration phase was conducted between 9 and 28 February 2011. Census has been conducted in India since 1872 and 2011 marks the first time biometric information was collected. According to the provisional reports released on 31 March 2011, the Indian population increased to 1.21 billion with a decadal growth of 17.70%.[2] Adult literacy rate increased to 74.04% with a decadal growth of 9.21%. The motto of the census was 'Our Census, Our future'.

Spread across 29 states[a] and 7 union territories, the census covered 640 districts, 5,924 sub-districts, 7,935 towns and more than 600,000 villages. A total of 2.7 million officials visited households in 7,935 towns and 600,000 villages, classifying the population according to gender, religion, education and occupation.[3] The cost of the exercise was approximately 2,200 crore (US$310 million)[4] – this comes to less than $0.50 per person, well below the estimated world average of $4.60 per person.[3] Conducted every 10 years, this census faced big challenges considering India's vast area and diversity of cultures and opposition from the manpower involved.

Information on castes was included in the census following demands from several ruling coalition leaders including Lalu Prasad Yadav, Sharad Yadav and Mulayam Singh Yadav supported by opposition parties Bharatiya Janata Party, Akali Dal, Shiv Sena and Anna Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam.[5] Information on caste was last collected during the British Raj in 1931. During the early census, people often exaggerated their caste status to garner social status and it is expected that people downgrade it now in the expectation of gaining government benefits.[6] There was speculation that there would be a caste-based census conducted in 2011, the first time for 80 years (last was in 1931), to find the exact population of the "Other Backward Classes" (OBCs) in India.[7][8][9][10] This was later accepted and the Socio Economic and Caste Census 2011 was conducted whose first findings were revealed on 3 July 2015 by Union Finance Minister Arun Jaitley.[11] Mandal Commission report of 1980 quoted OBC population at 52%, though National Sample Survey Organisation (NSSO) survey of 2006 quoted OBC population at 41%[12]

There is only one instance of a caste-count in post-independence India. It was conducted in Kerala in 1968 by the Communist government under E M S Namboodiripad to assess the social and economic backwardness of various lower castes. The census was termed Socio-Economic Survey of 1968 and the results were published in the Gazetteer of Kerala, 1971.[13]

15th Census
of India
General information
CountryIndia
Date taken2010–2011
Total population1,210,193,422
Percent changeIncrease 17.70%[1]
Most populous stateUttar Pradesh (199,812,341)
Least populous stateSikkim (610,577)

Census

C M Chandramauli was the Registrar General and Census Commissioner of India for the 2011 Indian Census. Census data was collected in 16 languages and the training manual was prepared in 18 languages. In 2011, India and Bangladesh also conducted their first-ever joint census of areas along their border.[14][15] The census was conducted in two phases. The first, the house-listing phase, began on 1 April 2010 and involved collection of data about all the buildings and census houses.[16] Information for the National Population Register was also collected in the first phase. The second, the population enumeration phase, was conducted from 9 – 28 February 2011 all over the country. The eradication of epidemics, the availability of more effective medicines for the treatment of various types of diseases and the improvement in the standard of living were the main reasons for the high decadal growth of population in India.

Information

House-listings

The House-listing schedule contained 35 questions.[17]

Building number
Census house number
Predominant material of floor, wall and roof of the census house
Ascertain use of actual house
Condition of the census house
Household number
Total number of persons in the household
Name of the head of the household
Sex of the head
Caste status (SC or ST or others)
Ownership status of the house
Number of dwelling rooms
Number of married couple the household
Main source of drinking water
Availability of drinking water source
Main source of lighting
Latrine within the premises
Type of latrine facility
Waste water outlet connection
Bathing facility within the premises
Availability of kitchen
Fuel used for cooking
Radio/Transistor
Television
Computer/Laptop
Telephone/Mobile phone
Bicycle
Scooter/Motor cycle/Moped
Car/Jeep/Van
Availing Banking services.

Population enumeration

The Population enumeration schedule contained 30 questions.[18][19]

Name of the person
Relationship to head
Sex
Date of birth and age
Current marital status
Age at marriage
Religion
Scheduled Caste/Scheduled Tribe
Disability
Mother tongue
Other languages known
Literacy status
Status of attendance (Education)
Highest educational level attained
Working any time during last year
Category of economic activity
Occupation Nature of industry
Trade or service
Class of worker
Non economic activity
Seeking or available for work
Travel to place of work
Birthplace
Place of last residence
Reason for migration
Duration of stay in the place of migration
Children surviving
Children ever born
Number of children born alive during last one year

National Population Register

The National Population Register household schedule contained 9 questions.[20]

Name of the person and resident status
Name of the person as should appear in the population register
Relationship to head
gender
Date of birth
Marital status
Educational qualification
Occupation/Activity
Names of father, mother and spouse

Once the information was collected and digitised, fingerprints were taken and photos collected. Unique Identification Authority of India was to issue a 12-digit identification number to all individuals and the first ID was to have been issued in 2011.[21][22][23]

Census report

India population increase
Decadal growth of Indian population (1901–2011).

Provisional data from the census was released on 31 March 2011 (and was updated on 20 May 2013).[24][25][26][27][28] Transgender population was counted in population census in India for first time in 2011.[29][30] The overall sex ratio of the population is 940 females for every 1,000 males in 2011.[31] The official count of the third gender in India is 490,000[32]

Population Total 1,210,854,977
Males 623,724,568
Females 586,469,294
Literacy Total 74%
Males 82.10%
Females 65.46%
Density of population per km2 382
Sex ratio per 1000 males 940 females
Child sex ratio (0–6 age group) per 1000 males 914

Population

The population of India as per 2011 census was 1,210,193,422.[33] India added 181.5 million to its population since 2001, slightly lower than the population of Brazil. India, with 2.4% of the world's surface area, accounts for 17.5% of its population. Uttar Pradesh is the most populous state with roughly 200 million people. Over half the population resided in the six most populous states of Uttar Pradesh, Maharashtra, Bihar, West Bengal, Andhra Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh.[34] Of the 1.21 billion Indians, 833 million (68.84%) live in rural areas while 377 million stay in urban areas.[35][36] 453.6 million people in India are migrants, which is 37.8% of total population.[37][38][39]

India is the homeland of major belief systems such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Jainism, while also being home to several indigenous faiths and tribal religions which have survived the influence of major religions for centuries.

Ever since its inception, the Census of India has been collecting and publishing information about the religious affiliations as expressed by the people of India. In fact, population census has the rare distinction of being the only instrument that collects this diverse and important characteristic of the Indian population.

Religious demographics

The religious data on India Census 2011 was released by the Government of India on 25 August 2015.[45][46][47] Hindus are 79.8% (966.3 million),[48] while Muslims are 14.23% (172.2 million) in India.[49][49][50][51] and Christians are 2.30% (28.7 million). According to the 2011 Census of India, there are 57,264 Parsis in India.[52][53] For the first time, a "No religion" category was added in the 2011 census.[54][55] 2.87 million were classified as people belonging to "No Religion" in India in the 2011 census[56][57] 0.24% of India's population of 1.21 billion.[58][59] Given below is the decade-by-decade religious composition of India until the 2011 census.[60][61][62] There are six religions in India that have been awarded "National Minority" status - Muslims, Christians, Sikhs, Jains, Buddhists and Parsis.[63][64] Sunnis, Shias, Bohras, Agakhanis and Ahmadiyyas were identified as sects of Islam in India.[65][66][67] As per 2011 census, six major faiths- Hindus, Muslims, Christians, Sikhs, Buddhists, Jains make up over 99.4% of India's 1.21 billion population, while "other religions, persuasions" (ORP) count is 8.2 million. Among the ORP faiths, six faiths- 4.957 million-strong Sarnaism, 1.026 million-strong Gond, 506,000-strong Sari, Donyi-Polo (302,000) in Arunachal Pradesh, Sanamahism (222,000) in Manipur, Khasi (138,000) in Meghalaya dominate.[68] Maharashtra is having the highest number of atheists in the country with 9,652 such people, followed by Kerala.[69]

Population trends for major religious groups in India (1951–2011)
Religious
group
Population
% 1951
Population
% 1961
Population
% 1971
Population
% 1981
Population
% 1991
Population
% 2001
Population
% 2011[70]
Hinduism 84.1% 83.45% 82.73% 82.30% 81.53% 80.46% 79.80%
Islam 9.8% 10.69% 11.21% 11.75% 12.61% 13.43% 14.23%
Christianity 2.3% 2.44% 2.60% 2.44% 2.32% 2.34% 2.30%
Sikhism 1.79% 1.79% 1.89% 1.92% 1.94% 1.87% 1.72%
Buddhism 0.74% 0.74% 0.70% 0.70% 0.77% 0.77% 0.70%
Jainism 0.46% 0.46% 0.48% 0.47% 0.40% 0.41% 0.37%
Zoroastrianism 0.13% 0.09% 0.09% 0.09% 0.08% 0.06% n/a
Other religions / No religion 0.43% 0.43% 0.41% 0.42% 0.44% 0.72% 0.9%

Language demographics

Hindi is the most widely spoken language in northern parts of India. The Indian census takes the widest possible definition of "Hindi" as a broad variety of "Hindi languages".[71] According to 2011 Census, 57.1% of Indian population know Hindi,[72] in which 43.63% of Indian people have declared Hindi as their native language or mother tongue.[73][74] The language data was released on 26 June 2018.[75] Bhili/Bhilodi was the most spoken unscheduled language with 10.4 million speakers, followed by Gondi with 2.9 million speakers. 96.71% of India's population speaks one of the 22 scheduled languages as their mother tongue in the 2011 census.

The 2011 census report on bilingualism and trilingualism, which provides data on the two languages in order of preference in which a person is proficient other than the mother tongue, was released in September 2018.[76][77][78] The number of bilingual speakers in India is 31.49 crore, which is 26% of the population in 2011.[79] 7% of Indian population is trilingual.[80] Hindi, Bengali speakers are India's least multilingual groups.[81]

First, Second, and Third languages by number of speakers in India (2011 Census)
Language First language
speakers
[82]
First language
speakers
as a percentage

of total population

Second language
speakers
(in crores)
Third language
speakers
(in crores)
Total speakers (in crores)[72][83] Total speakers as a

percentage of total

population

Hindi 52,83,47,193 43.63 13.9 2.4 69.2 57.10
English 2,59,678 0.02 8.3 4.6 12.9 10.60
Bengali 9,72,37,669 8.30 0.9 0.1 10.7 8.90
Marathi 8,30,26,680 7.09 1.3 0.3 9.9 8.20
Telugu 8,11,27,740 6.93 1.2 0.1 9.5 7.80
Tamil 6,90,26,881 5.89 0.7 0.1 7.7 6.30
Gujarati 5,54,92,554 4.74 0.4 0.1 6.0 5.00
Urdu 5,07,72,631 4.34 1.1 0.1 6.3 5.20
Kannada 4,37,06,512 3.73 1.4 0.1 5.9 4.94
Odia 3,75,21,324 3.20 0.5 0.03 4.3 3.56
Malayalam 3,48,38,819 2.97 0.05 0.02 3.3 3.28
Punjabi 3,31,24,726 2.83 0.33 0.03 3.7 3.56
Sanskrit 24,821 <0.01 0.1 0.4 0.5 0.49

Literacy

Any one above age 7 who can read and write in any language with an ability to understand was considered a literate. In censuses before 1991, children below the age 5 were treated as illiterates. The literacy rate taking the entire population into account is termed as "crude literacy rate", and taking the population from age 7 and above into account is termed as "effective literacy rate". Effective literacy rate increased to a total of 74.04% with 82.14% of the males and 65.46% of the females being literate.[84]

S.No. Census year Total (%) Male (%) Female (%)
1 1901 5.35 9.83 0.60
2 1911 5.92 10.56 1.05
3 1921 7.16 12.21 1.81
4 1931 9.50 15.59 2.93
5 1941 16.10 24.90 7.30
6 1951 16.67 24.95 9.45
7 1961 24.02 34.44 12.95
8 1971 29.45 39.45 18.69
9 1981 36.23 46.89 24.82
10 1991 42.84 52.74 32.17
11 2001 64.83 75.26 53.67
12 2011 74.04 82.14 65.46
  • The table lists the "effective literacy rate" in India from 1901 to 2011.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b Prior to the creation of Telangana.

References

  1. ^ "Decadal Growth :www.censusindia.gov.in" (PDF).
  2. ^ "India's population — 127,42,39,769 and growing".
  3. ^ a b C Chandramouli (23 August 2011). "Census of India 2011 – A Story of Innovations". Press Information Bureau, Government of India.
  4. ^ "Do we really need the census?".
  5. ^ Demand for caste census rocks Lok Sabha
  6. ^ "Login".
  7. ^ "OBC data not in 2011 Census, says Moily". Indian Express. 18 December 2009. Retrieved 24 July 2016.
  8. ^ "No data since 1931, will 2011 Census be all-caste inclusive? – The Times of India". The Times Of India. 11 March 2010.
  9. ^ "Caste in Census 2011: Is it necessary?". The Times Of India. 28 May 2010.
  10. ^ "OBCs form 41% of population: Survey – The Times of India". The Times Of India. 1 September 2007.
  11. ^ "Govt releases socio-economic and caste census for better policy-making".
  12. ^ "OBc count: 52 or 41%? – The Times of India". The Times Of India. 1 November 2006.
  13. ^ G.O.K dew1971: Appendix XVIII
  14. ^ "Bangladesh and India begin joint census of border areas".
  15. ^ "Census in Indian and Bangladesh enclaves ends".
  16. ^ Kumar, Vinay (4 April 2010). "House listing operations for Census 2011 progressing well". The Hindu. Chennai, India. Retrieved 16 April 2011.
  17. ^ "Census of India 2011; Houselisting and Housing Census Schedule" (PDF). Government of India. Retrieved 22 January 2011.
  18. ^ "Census of India 2011; Household Schedule-Side A" (PDF). Government of India. Retrieved 22 January 2011.
  19. ^ "Census of India 201a1; Household Schedule-Side B" (PDF). Government of India. Retrieved 22 January 2011.
  20. ^ "National population register; Household Schedule" (PDF). Government of India. Retrieved 22 January 2011.
  21. ^ "Census operation in history kicks off". The Hindu. 1 April 2010. Retrieved 1 April 2010.
  22. ^ "India launches new biometric census". Yahoo news. 1 April 2010. Retrieved 1 April 2010.
  23. ^ "India launches biometric census". BBC. 1 April 2010. Archived from the original on 1 April 2010. Retrieved 1 April 2010.
  24. ^ "India's total population is now 121 crore". LiveMint. Retrieved 30 April 2013.
  25. ^ "India at Glance – Population Census 2011". Census Organisation of India. 2011. Archived from the original on 8 January 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  26. ^ "It's official. We are the second most populous nation in the world at 1.2 billion".
  27. ^ "India's total population is now 1.21 billion".
  28. ^ "India's total population is 1.21 billion, final census reveals".
  29. ^ "Pakistan counts transgender people in national census for first time".
  30. ^ Over 70,000 transgenders in rural India, UP tops list: Census 2011
  31. ^ "Sex ratio worsens in small families, improves with 3 or more children".
  32. ^ "First count of third gender in census: 4.9 lakh".
  33. ^ "Why activists are upset with Census disability numbers".
  34. ^ "Indian States Census 2011". Census Organization of India. 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  35. ^ "About 68.84 per cent Indians live in rural areas: Census report".
  36. ^ "Rural Urban".
  37. ^ "Every 3rd Indian migrant, most headed south".
  38. ^ http://blogs.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/minorityview/migration-in-india-is-still-largely-remains-a-social-rather-than-an-economic-phenomenon/
  39. ^ http://blogs.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/minorityview/migration-in-india-is-slowly-becoming-more-urban-and-driven-by-economic-factors/
  40. ^ "List of states with Population, Sex Ratio and Literacy Census 2011". 2011 Census of India. Retrieved 23 January 2013.
  41. ^ "Ranking of States and Union territories by population size: 1991 and 2001" (PDF). Government of India (2001). Census of India. pp. 5–6. Retrieved 12 December 2008.
  42. ^ "Population" (PDF). Government of India (2011). Census of India. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 January 2012.
  43. ^ a b "Provisional Population Totals". Government of India (2011). Census of India. Retrieved 23 July 2011.
  44. ^ "Area ofIndia/state/district". Government of India (2001). Census of India. Retrieved 27 October 2008.
  45. ^ Abantika Ghosh, Vijaita Singh (24 January 2015). "Census 2011: Muslims record decadal growth of 24.6 pc, Hindus 16.8 pc". Indian Express. Indian Express. Retrieved 27 January 2015.
  46. ^ "Hindus 79.8%, Muslims 14.2% of population: census data".
  47. ^ "India Census 2011". Censusindia.gov.in. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  48. ^ "India's religions by numbers".
  49. ^ a b "Muslim population growth slows".
  50. ^ "Muslim representation on decline". The Times of India. 31 August 2015. Retrieved 31 August 2015.
  51. ^ Share on Twitter (26 August 2015). "Muslim share of population up 0.8%, Hindus' down 0.7% between 2001 and 2011 - Times of India". Timesofindia.indiatimes.com. Retrieved 24 July 2016.
  52. ^ "Where we belong: The fight of Parsi women in interfaith marriages".
  53. ^ "Parsi population dips by 22 per cent between 2001-2011: study".
  54. ^ "The tradition of atheism in India goes back 2,000 years. I'm proud to be a part of that".
  55. ^ "Why a Tinder date is better than 72 virgins in paradise".
  56. ^ "Against All Gods: Meet the league of atheists from rural Uttar Pradesh".
  57. ^ "People without religion have risen in Census 2011, but atheists have nothing to cheer about".
  58. ^ "2.87 million Indians have no faith, census reveals for first time".
  59. ^ "1.88 lakh people in Tamil Nadu state 'no religion' in 2011 census".
  60. ^ "Muslim politics:At a crossroads". livemint.com. Livemint. Retrieved 28 October 2014.
  61. ^ Aariz Mohammed (1–15 May 2013). "Demographic Dividend and Indian Muslims - i". Milli Gazette. Milli Gazette. Retrieved 15 May 2013.
  62. ^ Aariz Mohammed (1–15 May 2013). "Demographic Dividend and Indian Muslims - i" (PDF). Milli Gazette. Milli Gazette. Retrieved 15 May 2013.
  63. ^ "National minority status for Jains".
  64. ^ Jains become sixth minority community
  65. ^ "Sunnis, Shias, Bohras, Agakhanis and Ahmadiyyas were identified as sects of Islam".
  66. ^ "Protest against inclusion of Ahmediyyas in Muslim census".
  67. ^ "Minority in a minority".
  68. ^ "Fewer minor faiths in India now, finds Census; number of their adherents up".
  69. ^ "God versus Atheism, Bengal vouches for believers".
  70. ^ "Population by religious community - 2011". 2011 Census of India. Office of the Registrar General & Census Commissioner. Archived from the original on 25 August 2015. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  71. ^ "Abstract speakers languages India 2011" (PDF).
  72. ^ a b "How languages intersect in India". Hindustan Times.
  73. ^ "What India speaks: South Indian languages are growing, but not as fast as Hindi".
  74. ^ "Surging Hindi, shrinking South Indian languages: Nine charts that explain the 2011 language census".
  75. ^ "Hindi mother tongue of 44% in India, Bangla second most spoken".
  76. ^ "C-17 POPULATION BY BILINGUALISM AND TRILINGUALISM".
  77. ^ "After mother tongue, city more proficient in English".
  78. ^ "C-18 POPULATION BY BILINGUALISM, TRILINGUALISM, AGE AND SEX" (PDF).
  79. ^ "Hindi migrants speaking Marathi rise to 60 lakh".
  80. ^ "52% of India's urban youth are now bilingual, 18% speak three languages".
  81. ^ "Hindi, Bengali speakers India's least multilingual groups".
  82. ^ ORGI. "Census of India: Comparative speaker's strength of Scheduled Languages-1951, 1961, 1971, 1981, 1991 ,2001 and 2011" (PDF).
  83. ^ "How many Indians can you talk to?".
  84. ^ "Census Provional Population Totals". The Registrar General & Census Commissioner, India. Retrieved 14 February 2013.

External links

Arambakkam

Arambakkam is a village in the Tiruvallur district of Tamil Nadu, India. It is located in the Gummidipoondi taluk. Fishing is the main occupation here, within a short distance lies Bheemavarai Palyam where a creek locally called Uppankali juts out from the Pulicat-Arambakkam lagoon. It has a railway station.

Chinchghar

Chinchghar is a small village in Ratnagiri district, Maharashtra state in Western India. The 2011 Census of India recorded a total of 1,534 residents in the village. Chinchghar's geographical area is 602 hectares (1,490 acres).

Demographics of Tamil Nadu

According to the 2011 census, the total population stood at 72,147,039, with 36,137,975 males, 36,009,055 females, a sex ratio of 996 females per 1000 males, literacy rate of 80.09%, 10.51% of the population below seven years and a population density of 555.

Elavur

Elavur is a village in the Tiruvallur district of Tamil Nadu, India. It is located in the Gummidipoondi taluk.

It is located in the Andhra Pradesh Border..It is the Gateway of Tamil Nadu.

Faridabad district

Faridabad district is one of the 22 districts of the Indian state of Haryana with Faridabad city being the district headquarters. The Delhi-Mathura-Agra National Highway 2 (Grand Trunk Road) passes through the centre of the district, which occupies an area of 741 square kilometres (286 sq mi) and as of the 2011 census of India had a population of 1,809,733. Haryana government has created a new Faridabad division which would cover the districts – Faridabad, Nuh and Palwal.As of 2011 it was the second most populous district of Haryana after Gurugram district.

Gondi people

The Gondi (Gōndi) or Gond people are Adivasi (indigenous people) of India who speak Dravidian language and are listed as a Scheduled Tribe for the purpose of India's system of positive discrimination. They are spread over the states of Madhya Pradesh, eastern Maharashtra (Vidarbha), Chhattisgarh, Uttar Pradesh, Telangana, Andhra Pradesh, Bihar and Orissa.

The Gond are also known as the Raj Gond. The term was widely used in 1950s, but has now become almost obsolete, probably because of the political eclipse of the Gond Rajas. The Gondi language is closely related to the Telugu, belonging to the Dravidian family of languages. The 2011 Census of India recorded about 2.98 million Gondi speakers.According to the 1971 census, their population was 5.01 million. By the 1991 census, this had increased to 9.3 million and by the 2001 census the figure was nearly 11 million. For the past few decades they have been witnesses to the Naxalite–Maoist insurgency in the central part of India. Gondi people, at the behest of the Chhattisgarh government, formed the Salwa Judum, an armed militant group to fight the Naxalite insurgency.

Hmar language

The Hmar language belongs to the Kukish branch of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. The speakers of the language are also known as Hmar. According to the official 2011 Census of India, there are 50,561 Hmar speakers in Assam, 48,375 in Manipur, 69,175 in Tripura, 1,700 in Meghalaya, 29,587 in Mizoram although Majority of the Hmars in Mizoram speak Duhlian.

Hmar is a recognised language in the School curriculum of Assam, Manipur and Mizoram, and also recently recognised as one of the Modern Indian Languages (MIL) at Manipur University. Board of Secondary Education, Assam has also included Hmar as an MIL in its matriculation syllabus from 2005. Both Manipur University and Assam University, Silchar has also permitted HMAR LANGUAGE to be studied as Modern Indian Language in the Graduation level.

Jatav

Jatav, also known as Jatva/ Jatan/ Jatua/ Jatia, is a social group that in India are considered to be a part of the Chamar caste, one of the untouchable communities (now often termed Dalit), who are classified as a Scheduled Caste under modern India's system of positive discrimination.According to the 2011 Census of India, the Jatav community of Uttar Pradesh comprised 54% of that state's total 22,496,047 Scheduled Caste population. In Rajasthan, the Jatavs form 24% of the Scheduled Caste population.

Kalyani Nagar

Kalyani Nagar is a predominantly residential neighbourhood located in eastern Pune, India. It has a population of 25,272 according to the 2011 Census of India. The locality is administered by the Nagar Road-Vadgaonsheri Ward Office of the Pune Municipal Corporation.

The neighbourhood is the location of the Aga Khan Palace, a historical landmark of national importance, where Mahatma Gandhi was imprisoned between 1942 and 1944.

List of cities in Andhra Pradesh

This article is about list of cities in Andhra Pradesh state of India. The statistical data is based on 2011 Census of India, conducted by The Office of the Registrar General and Census Commissioner, under Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India.

List of cities in Uttar Pradesh by population

}}

The Indian state of Uttar Pradesh borders with Nepal and the Indian states of Bihar, Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Haryana, Uttarakhand, Himachal Pradesh and National Capital Territory of Delhi. The Himalayas lies in the north of the state and the Deccan Plateau is at the south. In between them, the river Ganges, Yamuna, Ghaghra flow eastwards. Uttar Pradesh can be divided into two distinct regions, Southern hills and Gangetic plain. Uttar Pradesh is divided into 75 districts under 18 divisions. As of 2011, with an estimated population of 199,581,477. Uttar Pradesh is the most populous state in India. Uttar Pradesh occupies 6.88 percent of the India's land surface area but is home to 16.49 percent of the India's population. As of 2011, 64 cities in the state had a population of over 100,000 people. Kanpur is the largest city of Uttar Pradesh with 1,640 square kilometres (630 sq mi) area having an approximate population of over 3 million which comes under Kanpur metropolitan area.Kanpur is also the most literate city of Uttar Pradesh with 88.98 literacy rate. The smallest city with a population over 100,000 people was Kakrala in Badaun district with a population of 100,080 people according to 2011 census figures.

List of states and union territories of India by households having electricity

This is a list of the states and union territories of India ranked in order of percentage of households having electricity as the source of lighting. This information is based on 2011 and 2001 data as published by 2011 census of India and 2015-16 National Family Health Survey (NFHS). In default display, the ranking is based on 2015-16 NFHS data.

As of 2019, 14 states and UTs have achieved 100% household electrification:

West Bengal: 1,50,57,882 households

Bihar: 1,39,73,122 households

Madhya Pradesh: 1,26,21,007 households

Andhra Pradesh: 1,14,25,248 households

Gujarat: 1,14,14,532 households

Tamil Nadu: 1,02,85,848 households

Kerala: 98,13,032 households

Telangana: 65,13,375 households

Punjab: 36,89,970 households

Jammu & Kashmir: 24,39,547 households

Tripura: 7,88,783 households

Mizoram: 2,41,682 households

Goa: 1,28,208 households

Puducherry: 95,616 households

Mathura

Mathura (pronunciation ) is a city in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. It is located approximately 50 kilometres (31 mi) north of Agra, and 145 kilometres (90 mi) south-east of Delhi; about 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) from the town of Vrindavan, and 22 kilometres (14 mi) from Govardhan. It is the administrative centre of Mathura district of Uttar Pradesh. In ancient times, Mathura was an economic hub, located at the junction of important caravan routes. The 2011 Census of India estimated the population of Mathura at 441,894.

In Hinduism, Mathura is believed to be the birthplace of Krishna, which is located at the Krishna Janmasthan Temple Complex. It is one of the Sapta Puri, the seven cities considered holy by Hindus. The Kesava Deo Temple was built in ancient times on the site of Krishna's birthplace (an underground prison). Mathura was the capital of the kingdom of Surasena, ruled by Kansa, the maternal uncle of Krishna.

Mathura has been chosen as one of the heritage cities for the Heritage City Development and Augmentation Yojana scheme of Government of India.

Panchkula district

Panchkula district was formed as the 17th district of Haryana state in India on 15 August 1995. It comprises two sub divisions and two tehsils: Panchkula and Kalka. It has 264 villages out of which twelve are un-inhabited and ten wholly merged with towns or treated as census towns according to the 1991 census. There are five towns in the district: Barwala, Kalka, Panchkula, Pinjore and Raipur Rani. The total population of the district is 319,398 out of which 173,557 are males and 145,841 are females.

As of the 2011 Census of India, it was the least populous district of Haryana.Panchkula city is the headquarters of this district. Chandimandir Cantonment is located in this district, adjoining the Panchkula Urban Estate.

Quimoh

Quimoh is a town situated between two districts, Kulgam district and Anantnag district, towards North of Dachnipora located in Jammu and Kashmir state of India. The distance between Kulgam and Quimoh is 11 KM where its headquarters are located. It is bounded by Devsar towards west, Anantnag city towards East, Qazigund town towards South, and Kulgam city towards west.

Sakharoli

Sakharoli is a small village in Ratnagiri district, Maharashtra state in Western India. The 2011 Census of India recorded a total of 962 residents in the village. Sakharoli's geographical area is 773 hectares (1,910 acres).Sakharoli Kh. is a small village in the same region. The 2011 Census of India recorded a total of 587 residents in the village. Sakharoli Kh.'s geographical area is 41 hectares (100 acres).

Tulshi

Tulshi is a small village in Ratnagiri district, Maharashtra state in Western India. The 2011 Census of India recorded a total of 966 residents in the village. Tulshi's geographical area is 885 hectares (2,190 acres).

Usgaon

Usgaon is a small village in Ratnagiri district, Maharashtra state in Western India. The 2011 Census of India recorded a total of 1,450 residents in the village. Usgaon is 471.32 hectares in size.

Walajabad taluk

Walajabad taluk is a taluk in the Kanchipuram district of Tamil Nadu, India. At the 2011 Census of India, the taluk covered an area of 339.03 square kilometres (130.90 sq mi) with a population of 125,868. The headquarters of the taluk is the town of Walajabad.

Population distribution in India by states
Rank State /
Union Territory
(UT)
Type Population[40] % of total population[41] Males Females Sex Ratio
[42]
Literacy rate (%) Rural[43]
Population
Urban[43]
Population
Area[44]
(km²)
Density
(/km²)
Decadal Growth% (2001-2011)
1 Uttar Pradesh State 199,812,341 16.5 104,480,510 95,331,831 930 67.68 155,111,022 44,470,455 240,928 828 20.1%
2 Maharashtra State 112,374,333 9.28 58,243,056 54,131,277 929 82.34 61,545,441 50,827,531 307,713 365 16.0%
3 Bihar State 104,099,452 8.6 54,278,157 49,821,295 918 61.80 92,075,028 11,729,609 94,163 1,102 25.1%
4 West Bengal State 91,276,115 7.54 46,809,027 44,467,088 950 76.26 62,213,676 29,134,060 88,752 1,030 13.9%
5 Andhra Pradesh[a] State 84,580,777 6.99 42,442,146 42,138,631 993 67.02% 56,361,702 28,219,075 275,045 308 10.98%
6 Madhya Pradesh State 72,626,809 6.00 37,612,306 35,014,503 931 69.32 52,537,899 20,059,666 308,245 236 20.3%
7 Tamil Nadu State 72,147,030 5.96 36,137,975 36,009,055 996 80.09 37,189,229 34,949,729 130,058 555 15.6%
8 Rajasthan State 68,548,437 5.66 35,550,997 32,997,440 928 66.11 51,540,236 17,080,776 342,239 201 21.4%
9 Karnataka State 61,095,297 5.05 30,966,657 30,128,640 973 75.36 37,552,529 23,578,175 191,791 319 15.7%
10 Gujarat State 60,439,692 4.99 31,491,260 28,948,432 919 78.03 34,670,817 25,712,811 196,024 308 19.2%
11 Odisha State 41,974,218 3.47 21,212,136 20,762,082 979 72.87 34,951,234 6,996,124 155,707 269 14.0%
12 Kerala State 33,406,061 2.76 16,027,412 17,378,649 1,084 94.00 17,445,506 15,932,171 38,863 859 4.9%
13 Jharkhand State 32,988,134 2.72 16,930,315 16,057,819 948 66.41 25,036,946 7,929,292 79,714 414 22.3%
14 Assam State 31,205,576 2.58 15,939,443 15,266,133 958 72.19 26,780,526 4,388,756 78,438 397 16.9%
15 Punjab State 27,743,338 2.29 14,639,465 13,103,873 895 75.84 17,316,800 10,387,436 50,362 550 13.7%
16 Chhattisgarh State 25,545,198 2.11 12,832,895 12,712,303 991 70.28 19,603,658 5,936,538 135,191 189 22.6%
17 Haryana State 25,351,462 2.09 13,494,734 11,856,728 879 75.55 16,531,493 8,821,588 44,212 573 19.9%
18 Delhi UT 16,787,941 1.39 8,887,326 7,800,615 868 86.21 944,727 12,905,780 1,484 11,297 21%
19 Jammu and Kashmir State 12,541,302 1.04 6,640,662 5,900,640 889 67.16 9,134,820 3,414,106 222,236 56 23.7%
20 Uttarakhand State 10,086,292 0.83 5,137,773 4,948,519 963 79.63 7,025,583 3,091,169 53,483 189 19.2%
21 Himachal Pradesh State 6,864,602 0.57 3,481,873 3,382,729 972 82.80 6,167,805 688,704 55,673 123 12.8%
22 Tripura State 3,673,917 0.30 1,874,376 1,799,541 960 87.22 2,710,051 960,981 10,486 350 14.7%
23 Meghalaya State 2,966,889 0.25 1,491,832 1,475,057 989 74.43 2,368,971 595,036 22,429 132 27.8%
24 Manipur State 2,721,756 0.21 1,290,171 1,280,219 992 79.21 1,899,624 822,132 22,327 122 18.7%
25 Nagaland State 1,978,502 0.16 1,024,649 953,853 931 79.55 1,406,861 573,741 16,579 119 -0.5%
26 Goa State 1,458,545 0.12 739,140 719,405 973 88.70 551,414 906,309 3,702 394 8.2%
27 Arunachal Pradesh State 1,383,727 0.11 713,912 669,815 938 65.38 1,069,165 313,446 83,743 17 25.9%
28 Puducherry UT 1,247,953 0.10 612,511 635,442 1,037 85.85 394,341 850,123 479 2,598 27.7%
29 Mizoram State 1,097,206 0.09 555,339 541,867 976 91.33 529,037 561,997 21,081 52 22.8%
30 Chandigarh UT 1,055,450 0.09 580,663 474,787 818 86.05 29,004 1,025,682 114 9,252 17.1%
31 Sikkim State 610,577 0.05 323,070 287,507 890 81.42 455,962 151,726 7,096 86 12.4%
32 Andaman and Nicobar Islands UT 380,581 0.03 202,871 177,710 876 86.63 244,411 135,533 8,249 46 6.7%
33 Dadra and Nagar Haveli UT 343,709 0.03 193,760 149,949 774 76.24 183,024 159,829 491 698 55.5%
34 Daman and Diu UT 243,247 0.02 150,301 92,946 618 87.10 60,331 182,580 112 2,169 53.5%
35 Lakshadweep UT 64,473 0.01 33,123 31,350 946 91.85 14,121 50,308 32 2,013 6.2%
TOTAL India 35 1,210,854,977 100 623,724,248 586,469,174 943 74.04 833,087,662 377,105,760 3,287,240 382 17.64%
Pre-Independence
Post-Independence

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.