2011–12 UEFA Champions League

The 2011–12 UEFA Champions League was the 57th season of Europe's premier club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 20th season in its current Champions League format. As part of a trial that started in the 2009–10 UEFA Europa League, two extra officials – one behind each goal – were used in all matches of the competition from the play-off round.[1]

The final was held at the Allianz Arena in Munich, Germany.[2] Chelsea's caretaker manager Roberto Di Matteo led the club to win their first Champions League title after beating Bayern Munich 4–3 on penalties in the final.[3] As tenants of the Allianz Arena (known as Fußball Arena München for the final), this meant that Bayern were the first finalists to have home advantage since 1984. By winning the tournament, Chelsea earned a berth at the 2012 FIFA Club World Cup and 2012 UEFA Super Cup. Barcelona were the defending champions, but were eliminated by the eventual winners Chelsea in the semi-finals.

2011–12 UEFA Champions League
Allianz Arena - panoramio (6)
Allianz Arena in Munich hosted the final.
Tournament details
Dates28 June 2011 – 19 May 2012
Teams32 (group stage)
75 (total) (from 52 associations)
Final positions
ChampionsEngland Chelsea (1st title)
Runners-upGermany Bayern Munich
Tournament statistics
Matches played125
Goals scored345 (2.76 per match)
Top scorer(s)Argentina Lionel Messi (14 goals)

Association team allocation

A total of 76 teams participated in the 2011–12 Champions League from 52 UEFA associations (Liechtenstein organises no domestic league competition). Associations are allocated places according to their 2010 UEFA country coefficients, which takes into account their performance in European competitions from 2005–06 to 2009–10.[4]

Below is the qualification scheme for the 2011–12 UEFA Champions League:[5]

  • Associations 1–3 each have four teams qualify
  • Associations 4–6 each have three teams qualify
  • Associations 7–15 each have two teams qualify
  • Associations 16–53 each have one team qualify (excluding Liechtenstein)

Association ranking

Rank Association Coeff. Teams
1 England England 81.856 4
2 Spain Spain 79.757
3 Italy Italy 64.338
4 Germany Germany 64.207 3
5 France France 53.740
6 Russia Russia 43.791
7 Ukraine Ukraine 39.550 2
8 Romania Romania 39.491
9 Portugal Portugal 38.296
10 Netherlands Netherlands 36.546
11 Turkey Turkey 34.450
12 Greece Greece 29.899
13 Switzerland Switzerland 28.375
14 Belgium Belgium 27.900
15 Denmark Denmark 27.350
16 Scotland Scotland 25.791 1
17 Bulgaria Bulgaria 22.000
18 Czech Republic Czech Republic 21.975
Rank Association Coeff. Teams
19 Austria Austria 19.575 1
20 Israel Israel 18.875
21 Cyprus Cyprus 17.999
22 Norway Norway 17.400
23 Slovakia Slovakia 15.832
24 Sweden Sweden 14.191
25 Serbia Serbia 14.000
26 Poland Poland 12.541
27 Croatia Croatia 12.332
28 Belarus Belarus 11.541
29 Republic of Ireland Republic of Ireland 9.541
30 Finland Finland 9.499
31 Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnia and Herzegovina 8.749
32 Lithuania Lithuania 8.416
33 Latvia Latvia 8.248
34 Moldova Moldova 7.290
35 Slovenia Slovenia 6.957
36 Hungary Hungary 6.750
Rank Association Coeff. Teams
37 Georgia (country) Georgia 5.748 1
38 Azerbaijan Azerbaijan 5.498
39 Iceland Iceland 5.415
40 North Macedonia Macedonia 5.332
41 Liechtenstein Liechtenstein 4.500 0
42 Kazakhstan Kazakhstan 4.499 1
43 Estonia Estonia 4.374
44 Albania Albania 3.999
45 Armenia Armenia 2.999
46 Wales Wales 2.581
47 Montenegro Montenegro 2.125
48 Faroe Islands Faroe Islands 1.832
49 Northern Ireland Northern Ireland 1.624
50 Luxembourg Luxembourg 1.249
51 Andorra Andorra 1.000
52 Malta Malta 0.916
53 San Marino San Marino 0.750

Distribution

Since the winners of the 2010–11 UEFA Champions League, Barcelona, obtained a place in the group stage through their domestic league placing, the reserved title holder spot in the group stage was effectively vacated. To compensate:[6]

  • The champions of association 13 (Switzerland) were promoted from the third qualifying round to the group stage.
  • The champions of association 16 (Scotland) were promoted from the second qualifying round to the third qualifying round.
  • The champions of associations 48 and 49 (Faroe Islands and Northern Ireland) were promoted from the first qualifying round to the second qualifying round.
Teams entering in this round Teams advancing from previous round
First qualifying round
(4 teams)
  • 4 champions from associations 50–53
Second qualifying round
(34 teams)
  • 32 champions from associations 17–49 (except Liechtenstein)
  • 2 winners from the first qualifying round
Third qualifying round Champions Route
(20 teams)
  • 3 champions from associations 14–16
  • 17 winners from the second qualifying round
League Route
(10 teams)
  • 9 runners-up from associations 7–15
  • 1 third-placed team from association 6
Play-off round Champions Route
(10 teams)
  • 10 winners from the third qualifying round Champions Route
League Route
(10 teams)
  • 2 third-placed teams from associations 4 and 5
  • 3 fourth-placed teams from associations 1–3
  • 5 winners from the third qualifying round League Route
Group stage
(32 teams)
  • 13 champions from associations 1–13
  • 6 runners-up from associations 1–6
  • 3 third-placed teams from associations 1–3
  • 5 winners from the play-off round Champions Route
  • 5 winners from the play-off round League Route
Knockout phase
(16 teams)
  • 8 group winners from the group stage
  • 8 group runners-up from the group stage

Teams

League positions of the previous season shown in parentheses.[7] [8]

Group stage
Spain BarcelonaTH (1st) Italy Milan (1st) France Marseille (2nd) Portugal Porto (1st)
England Manchester United (1st) Italy Internazionale (2nd) Russia Zenit St. Petersburg (1st) Netherlands Ajax (1st)
England Chelsea (2nd) Italy Napoli (3rd) Russia CSKA Moscow (2nd) Turkey Trabzonspor (2nd)Note TUR
England Manchester City (3rd) Germany Borussia Dortmund (1st) Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk (1st) Greece Olympiacos (1st)
Spain Real Madrid (2nd) Germany Bayer Leverkusen (2nd) Romania Oțelul Galați (1st) Switzerland Basel (1st)
Spain Valencia (3rd) France Lille (1st)
Play-off round
Champions Route League Route
England Arsenal (4th) Italy Udinese (4th) France Lyon (3rd)
Spain Villarreal (4th) Germany Bayern Munich (3rd)
Third qualifying round
Champions Route League Route
Belgium Genk (1st) Russia Rubin Kazan (3rd) Netherlands Twente (2nd) Switzerland Zürich (2nd)
Denmark Copenhagen (1st) Ukraine Dynamo Kyiv (2nd) Turkey Trabzonspor (2nd)Note TUR Belgium Standard Liège (2nd)
Scotland Rangers (1st) Romania Vaslui (3rd)Note ROU Greece Panathinaikos (2nd) Denmark Odense (2nd)
Portugal Benfica (2nd)
Second qualifying round
Bulgaria Litex Lovech (1st) Serbia Partizan (1st) Latvia Skonto (1st) Kazakhstan Tobol Kostanay (1st)
Czech Republic Viktoria Plzeň (1st) Poland Wisła Kraków (1st) Moldova Dacia Chişinău (1st) Estonia Flora Tallinn (1st)
Austria Sturm Graz (1st) Croatia Dinamo Zagreb (1st) Slovenia Maribor (1st) Albania Skënderbeu (1st)
Israel Maccabi Haifa (1st) Belarus BATE Borisov (1st) Hungary Videoton (1st) Armenia Pyunik (1st)
Cyprus APOEL (1st) Republic of Ireland Shamrock Rovers (1st) Georgia (country) Zestafoni (1st) Wales Bangor City (1st)
Norway Rosenborg (1st) Finland HJK (1st) Azerbaijan Neftchi Baku (1st) Montenegro Mogren (1st)
Slovakia Slovan Bratislava (1st) Bosnia and Herzegovina Borac Banja Luka (1st) Iceland Breiðablik (1st) Faroe Islands HB Tórshavn (1st)
Sweden Malmö FF (1st) Lithuania Ekranas (1st) North Macedonia Škendija (1st) Northern Ireland Linfield (1st)
First qualifying round
Luxembourg F91 Dudelange (1st) Andorra FC Santa Coloma (1st) Malta Valletta (1st) San Marino Tre Fiori (1st)
Notes
  • th Title Holder
  • Romania (ROU): Because Politehnica Timișoara, the 2010–11 Liga I runners-up, were denied a domestic licence for the 2011–12 season, Vaslui, the third-placed team of the league, claimed the Champions League spot in the third qualifying round League Route.[9]
  • Turkey (TUR): Fenerbahçe, the 2010–11 Süper Lig champions, was banned by the Turkish Football Federation on 24 August 2011 from participating in the 2011–12 UEFA Champions League due to the ongoing investigation into match-fixing.[10][11] UEFA decided to replace them in the group stage with Trabzonspor, the league runners-up, who had lost in the Champions League third qualifying round and were participating in the Europa League play-off round at that time.[12]

Round and draw dates

All draws held at UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland unless stated otherwise.[6]

Phase Round Draw date First leg Second leg
Qualifying First qualifying round 20 June 2011 28–29 June 2011 5–6 July 2011
Second qualifying round 12–13 July 2011 19–20 July 2011
Third qualifying round 15 July 2011 26–27 July 2011 2–3 August 2011
Play-off Play-off round 5 August 2011 16–17 August 2011 23–24 August 2011
Group stage Matchday 1 25 August 2011
(Monaco)
13–14 September 2011
Matchday 2 27–28 September 2011
Matchday 3 18–19 October 2011
Matchday 4 1–2 November 2011
Matchday 5 22–23 November 2011
Matchday 6 6–7 December 2011
Knockout phase Round of 16 16 December 2011 14–15 & 21–22 February 2012 6–7 & 13–14 March 2012
Quarter-finals 16 March 2012 27–28 March 2012 3–4 April 2012
Semi-finals 17–18 April 2012 24–25 April 2012
Final 19 May 2012 at Fußball Arena München, Munich

Qualifying rounds

In the qualifying rounds and the play-off round, teams were divided into seeded and unseeded teams based on their 2011 UEFA club coefficients,[13][14] and then drawn into two-legged home-and-away ties. Teams from the same association cannot be drawn against each other.

First qualifying round

The draw for the first and second qualifying rounds was held on 20 June 2011.[15] The first legs were played on 28 June, and the second legs were played on 5 and 6 July 2011.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Tre Fiori San Marino 1–5 Malta Valletta 0–3 1–2
FC Santa Coloma Andorra 0–4 Luxembourg F91 Dudelange 0–2 0–2

Second qualifying round

The first legs were played on 12 and 13 July, and the second legs were played on 19 and 20 July 2011.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Maccabi Haifa Israel 7–4 Bosnia and Herzegovina Borac Banja Luka 5–1 2–3
Mogren Montenegro 1–5 Bulgaria Litex Lovech 1–2 0–3
Maribor Slovenia 5–1 Luxembourg F91 Dudelange 2–0 3–1
Skënderbeu Albania 0–6 Cyprus APOEL 0–2 0–4
Slovan Bratislava Slovakia 3–1 Kazakhstan Tobol Kostanay 2–0 1–1
Sturm Graz Austria 4–3 Hungary Videoton 2–0 2–3
Zestafoni Georgia (country) 3–2 Moldova Dacia Chișinău 3–0 0–2
Dinamo Zagreb Croatia 3–0 Azerbaijan Neftchi Baku 3–0 0–0
Pyunik Armenia 1–9 Czech Republic Viktoria Plzeň 0–4 1–5
Partizan Serbia 5–0 North Macedonia Shkëndija 4–0 1–0
Valletta Malta 2–4 Lithuania Ekranas 2–3 0–1
Malmö FF Sweden 3–1 Faroe Islands HB Tórshavn 2–0 1–1
Shamrock Rovers Republic of Ireland 1–0 Estonia Flora Tallinn 1–0 0–0
Rosenborg Norway 5–2 Iceland Breiðablik 5–0 0–2
Bangor City Wales 0–131 Finland HJK 0–3 0–10
Skonto Latvia 0–3 Poland Wisła Kraków 0–1 0–2
Linfield Northern Ireland 1–3 Belarus BATE Borisov 1–1 0–2
Notes
  • Note 1: Order of legs reversed after original draw.

Third qualifying round

The draw for the third qualifying round was held on 15 July 2011.[16] The first legs were played on 26 and 27 July, and the second legs were played on 2 and 3 August 2011.

The third qualifying round was split into two separate sections: one for champions (called the Champions Route) and one for non-champions (called the League Route). The losing teams in both sections entered the play-off round of the 2011–12 UEFA Europa League.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Champions Route
Litex Lovech Bulgaria 2–5 Poland Wisła Kraków 1–2 1–3
Maccabi Haifa Israel 3–2 Slovenia Maribor 2–1 1–1
HJK Finland 1–3 Croatia Dinamo Zagreb 1–2 0–1
APOEL Cyprus 2–0 Slovakia Slovan Bratislava 0–0 2–0
Copenhagen Denmark 3–0 Republic of Ireland Shamrock Rovers 1–0 2–0
Genk Belgium 3–2 Serbia Partizan 2–1 1–1
Rosenborg Norway 2–4 Czech Republic Viktoria Plzeň 0–1 2–3
Zestafoni Georgia (country) 1–2 Austria Sturm Graz 1–1 0–1
Ekranas Lithuania 1–3 Belarus BATE Borisov 0–0 1–3
Rangers Scotland 1–2 Sweden Malmö FF 0–1 1–1
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
League Route
Standard Liège Belgium 1–2 Switzerland Zürich 1–1 0–1
Twente Netherlands 2–0 Romania Vaslui 2–0 0–0
Benfica Portugal 3–1 Turkey Trabzonspor 2–0 1–1
Dynamo Kyiv Ukraine 1–4 Russia Rubin Kazan 0–2 1–2
Odense Denmark 5–4 Greece Panathinaikos 1–1 4–3

Play-off round

The draw for the play-off round was held on 5 August 2011.[17] The first legs were played on 16 and 17 August, and the second legs were played on 23 and 24 August 2011.

The play-off round was split into two separate sections: one for champions (called the Champions Route) and one for non-champions (called the League Route). The losing teams in both sections entered the group stage of the 2011–12 UEFA Europa League.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Champions Route
Wisła Kraków Poland 2–3 Cyprus APOEL 1–0 1–3
Maccabi Haifa Israel 3–3 (1–4 p) Belgium Genk 2–1 1–2 (a.e.t.)
Dinamo Zagreb Croatia 4–3 Sweden Malmö FF 4–1 0–2
Copenhagen Denmark 2–5 Czech Republic Viktoria Plzeň 1–3 1–2
BATE Borisov Belarus 3–1 Austria Sturm Graz 1–1 2–0
Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
League Route
Odense Denmark 1–3 Spain Villarreal 1–0 0–3
Twente Netherlands 3–5 Portugal Benfica 2–2 1–3
Arsenal England 3–1 Italy Udinese 1–0 2–1
Bayern Munich Germany 3–0 Switzerland Zürich 2–0 1–0
Lyon France 4–2 Russia Rubin Kazan 3–1 1–1

Group stage

Location of teams of the 2011–12 UEFA Champions League group stage.
Brown pog.svg Brown: Group A; Red pog.svg Red: Group B; Orange pog.svg Orange: Group C; Yellow pog.svg Yellow: Group D;
Green pog.svg Green: Group E; Blue pog.svg Blue: Group F; Purple pog.svg Purple: Group G; Pink pog.svg Pink: Group H.

The group stage features 32 teams, which were allocated into pots based on their 2011 UEFA club coefficients (except the title holders, Barcelona, who were placed in Pot 1 automatically),[13][14] and then drawn into eight groups of four. Teams from the same association cannot be drawn against each other. The draw was held on 25 August 2011 in Monaco.[18]

In each group, teams play against each other home-and-away in a round-robin format. The matchdays are 13–14 September, 27–28 September, 18–19 October, 1–2 November, 22–23 November, and 6–7 December 2011. The group winners and runners-up advanced to the round of 16, while the third-placed teams entered the round of 32 of the 2011–12 UEFA Europa League.

If two or more teams are equal on points on completion of the group matches, the following criteria are applied to determine the rankings (in descending order):[5]

  1. higher number of points obtained in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  2. superior goal difference from the group matches played among the teams in question;
  3. higher number of goals scored in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  4. higher number of goals scored away from home in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  5. If, after applying criteria 1) to 4) to several teams, two teams still have an equal ranking, the criteria 1) to 4) will be reapplied to determine the ranking of these teams;
  6. superior goal difference from all group matches played;
  7. higher number of goals scored from all group matches played;
  8. higher number of coefficient points accumulated by the club in question, as well as its association, over the previous five seasons.

The 32 teams contain eleven former winners of the European Cup/Champions League (40 titles combined), and five teams (Manchester City, Napoli, Trabzonspor, Viktoria Plzeň and Oțelul Galați) which made their début appearance in the group stage.[19] Eighteen UEFA member associations are represented in this group stage: England and Spain by four clubs, Italy, Germany and France by three, Russia and Portugal by two, while eleven associations are represented by one club, which are all domestic champions except Trabzonspor, which replaced Fenerbahçe due to match-fixing allegations.

Key to colours in group tables
Group winners and runners-up advance to the round of 16
Third-placed teams enter the UEFA Europa League at the round of 32

Group A

Team Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Germany Bayern Munich 6 4 1 1 11 6 +5 13
Italy Napoli 6 3 2 1 10 6 +4 11
England Manchester City 6 3 1 2 9 6 +3 10
Spain Villarreal 6 0 0 6 2 14 −12 0
  BAY MC NAP VIL
Bayern Munich 2–0 3–2 3–1
Manchester City 2–0 1–1 2–1
Napoli 1–1 2–1 2–0
Villarreal 0–2 0–3 0–2

Group B

Team Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Italy Internazionale 6 3 1 2 8 7 +1 10
Russia CSKA Moscow 6 2 2 2 9 8 +1 8
Turkey Trabzonspor 6 1 4 1 3 5 −2 7
France Lille 6 1 3 2 6 6 0 6
  CSK INT LIL TRA
CSKA Moscow 2–3 0–2 3–0
Internazionale 1–2 2–1 0–1
Lille 2–2 0–1 0–0
Trabzonspor 0–0 1–1 1–1

Group C

Team Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Portugal Benfica 6 3 3 0 8 4 +4 12
Switzerland Basel 6 3 2 1 11 10 +1 11
England Manchester United 6 2 3 1 11 8 +3 9
Romania Oțelul Galați 6 0 0 6 3 11 −8 0
  BAS BEN MU OG
Basel 0–2 2–1 2–1
Benfica 1–1 1–1 1–0
Manchester United 3–3 2–2 2–0
Oțelul Galați 2–3 0–1 0–2

Group D

Team Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Spain Real Madrid 6 6 0 0 19 2 +17 18
France Lyon 6 2 2 2 9 7 +2 8
Netherlands Ajax 6 2 2 2 6 6 0 8
Croatia Dinamo Zagreb 6 0 0 6 3 22 −19 0
  AJA DZ OL RM
Ajax 4–0 0–0 0–3
Dinamo Zagreb 0–2 1–7 0–1
Lyon 0–0 2–0 0–2
Real Madrid 3–0 6–2 4–0

Group E

Team Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
England Chelsea 6 3 2 1 13 4 +9 11
Germany Bayer Leverkusen 6 3 1 2 8 8 0 10
Spain Valencia 6 2 2 2 12 7 +5 8
Belgium Genk 6 0 3 3 2 16 −14 3
  LEV CHE GNK VAL
Bayer Leverkusen 2–1 2–0 2–1
Chelsea 2–0 5–0 3–0
Genk 1–1 1–1 0–0
Valencia 3–1 1–1 7–0

Group F

Team Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
England Arsenal 6 3 2 1 7 6 +1 11
France Marseille 6 3 1 2 7 4 +3 10
Greece Olympiacos 6 3 0 3 8 6 +2 9
Germany Borussia Dortmund 6 1 1 4 6 12 −6 4
  ARS DOR OM OLY
Arsenal 2–1 0–0 2–1
Borussia Dortmund 1–1 2–3 1–0
Marseille 0–1 3–0 0–1
Olympiacos 3–1 3–1 0–1

Group G

Team Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Cyprus APOEL 6 2 3 1 6 6 0 9
Russia Zenit Saint Petersburg 6 2 3 1 7 5 +2 9
Portugal Porto 6 2 2 2 7 7 0 8
Ukraine Shakhtar Donetsk 6 1 2 3 6 8 −2 5
  APO POR SHA ZEN
APOEL 2–1 0–2 2–1
Porto 1–1 2–1 0–0
Shakhtar Donetsk 1–1 0–2 2–2
Zenit Saint Petersburg 0–0 3–1 1–0

Group H

Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
Spain Barcelona 6 5 1 0 20 4 +16 16
Italy Milan 6 2 3 1 11 8 +3 9
Czech Republic Viktoria Plzeň 6 1 2 3 4 11 −7 5
Belarus BATE Borisov 6 0 2 4 2 14 −12 2
  BAR BAT MIL PLZ
Barcelona 4–0 2–2 2–0
BATE Borisov 0–5 1–1 0–1
Milan 2–3 2–0 2–0
Viktoria Plzeň 0–4 1–1 2–2

Knockout phase

In the knockout phase, teams play against each other over two legs on a home-and-away basis, except for the one-match final. The draw for the round of 16 was held on 16 December 2011.[20] The draws for the quarter-finals, semi-finals and final (to determine the "home" team) were held on 16 March 2012.[21] Both draws were assisted by German footballer Paul Breitner, the ambassador for the 2012 final.

In the draw for the round of 16, the eight group winners were seeded, and the eight group runners-up were unseeded. The seeded teams were drawn against the unseeded teams, with the seeded team hosting the second leg. Teams from the same group or the same association could not be drawn against each other. In the draws for the quarter-finals onwards, there are no seedings, and teams from the same group or the same association may be drawn with each other.

Bracket

  Round of 16 Quarter-finals Semi-finals Final
                                         
 France Marseille (a) 1 1 2  
 Italy Internazionale 0 2 2  
   France Marseille 0 0 0  
   Germany Bayern Munich 2 2 4  
 Switzerland Basel 1 0 1
 Germany Bayern Munich 0 7 7  
   Germany Bayern Munich (p) 2 1 3(3)  
   Spain Real Madrid 1 2 3(1)  
 France Lyon 1 0 1(3)  
 Cyprus APOEL (p) 0 1 1(4)  
   Cyprus APOEL 0 2 2
   Spain Real Madrid 3 5 8  
 Russia CSKA Moscow 1 1 2
 Spain Real Madrid 1 4 5  
   Germany Bayern Munich 1(3)
   England Chelsea (p) 1(4)
 Russia Zenit St. Petersburg 3 0 3  
 Portugal Benfica 2 2 4  
   Portugal Benfica 0 1 1
   England Chelsea 1 2 3  
 Italy Napoli 3 1 4
 England Chelsea (a.e.t.) 1 4 5  
   England Chelsea 1 2 3
   Spain Barcelona 0 2 2  
 Italy Milan 4 0 4  
 England Arsenal 0 3 3  
   Italy Milan 0 1 1
   Spain Barcelona 0 3 3  
 Germany Bayer Leverkusen 1 1 2
 Spain Barcelona 3 7 10  

Round of 16

The first legs were played on 14, 15, 21 and 22 February, and the second legs were played on 6, 7, 13 and 14 March 2012.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Lyon France 1–1 (3–4 p) Cyprus APOEL 1–0 0–1 (a.e.t.)
Napoli Italy 4–5 England Chelsea 3–1 1–4 (a.e.t.)
Milan Italy 4–3 England Arsenal 4–0 0–3
Basel Switzerland 1–7 Germany Bayern Munich 1–0 0–7
Bayer Leverkusen Germany 2–10 Spain Barcelona 1–3 1–7
CSKA Moscow Russia 2–5 Spain Real Madrid 1–1 1–4
Zenit Saint Petersburg Russia 3–4 Portugal Benfica 3–2 0–2
Marseille France 2–2 (a) Italy Internazionale 1–0 1–2

Quarter-finals

The first legs were played on 27 and 28 March, and the second legs were played on 3 and 4 April 2012.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
APOEL Cyprus 2–8 Spain Real Madrid 0–3 2–5
Marseille France 0–4 Germany Bayern Munich 0–2 0–2
Benfica Portugal 1–3 England Chelsea 0–1 1–2
Milan Italy 1–3 Spain Barcelona 0–0 1–3

Semi-finals

The first legs were played on 17 and 18 April, and the second legs were played on 24 and 25 April 2012.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Bayern Munich Germany 3–3 (3–1 p) Spain Real Madrid 2–1 1–2 (a.e.t.)
Chelsea England 3–2 Spain Barcelona 1–0 2–2

Final

The final was played on 19 May 2012 at the Allianz Arena in Munich, Germany.

Bayern Munich Germany1–1 (a.e.t.)England Chelsea
Müller Goal 83' Report Drogba Goal 88'
Penalties
Lahm Penalty scored
Gómez Penalty scored
Neuer Penalty scored
Olić Penalty missed
Schweinsteiger Penalty missed
3–4 Penalty missed Mata
Penalty scored David Luiz
Penalty scored Lampard
Penalty scored Cole
Penalty scored Drogba

Statistics

Statistics exclude qualifying rounds and play-off round.

Top goalscorers

Rank Player Team Goals Minutes played
1 Argentina Lionel Messi Spain Barcelona 14 990
2 Germany Mario Gómez Germany Bayern Munich 12 1003
3 Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo Spain Real Madrid 10 930
4 France Karim Benzema Spain Real Madrid 7 760
5 Ivory Coast Didier Drogba England Chelsea 6 670
6 Spain José Callejón Spain Real Madrid 5 307
Spain Roberto Soldado Spain Valencia 515
France Bafétimbi Gomis France Lyon 530
Switzerland Alexander Frei Switzerland Basel 611
Ivory Coast Seydou Doumbia Russia CSKA Moscow 611
Russia Roman Shirokov Russia Zenit Saint Petersburg 658
Uruguay Edinson Cavani Italy Napoli 701
Sweden Zlatan Ibrahimović Italy Milan 720

Source:[22]

Top assists

Rank Player Team Assists Minutes played
1 Brazil Kaká Spain Real Madrid 5 440
France Karim Benzema Spain Real Madrid 761
Argentina Nicolás Gaitán Portugal Benfica 810
Argentina Lionel Messi Spain Barcelona 990
France Franck Ribéry Germany Bayern Munich 1030
6 Spain Isaac Cuenca Spain Barcelona 4 347
Brazil Marcelo Spain Real Madrid 539
Spain Fernando Torres England Chelsea 635
Sweden Zlatan Ibrahimović Italy Milan 720
10 Brazil Vágner Love Russia CSKA Moscow 3 540
France Aly Cissokho France Lyon 660
Spain Cesc Fàbregas Spain Barcelona 661
Argentina Ezequiel Lavezzi Italy Napoli 700
Cyprus Constantinos Charalambidis Cyprus APOEL 769
Germany Mesut Özil Spain Real Madrid 806
England Frank Lampard England Chelsea 843
Brazil Dani Alves Spain Barcelona 855
Portugal Cristiano Ronaldo Spain Real Madrid 930
Spain Juan Mata England Chelsea 948
Germany Toni Kroos Germany Bayern Munich 1073

Source:[23]

See also

References

  1. ^ UEFA welcomes IFAB referee trial decision, UEFA.com.
  2. ^ "UEFA announces 2011 and 2012 final venues". UEFA.com. UNIAN. 28 April 2010. Retrieved 28 April 2010.
  3. ^ Daniel Taylor (19 May 2012). "Chelsea win Champions League on penalties over Bayern Munich". The Guardian. Retrieved 19 December 2018.
  4. ^ "UEFA Country Ranking 2010". Bert Kassies.
  5. ^ a b "Regulations of the UEFA Champions League 2011/12" (PDF). Nyon: UEFA. March 2011. Retrieved 1 June 2011.
  6. ^ a b "2011/12 UEFA Champions League access list and calendar". UEFA.com. 24 August 2011.
  7. ^ "2011/12 UEFA Champions League list of participants". UEFA.com. 26 August 2011.
  8. ^ "Qualification for European Cup Football 2011/2012". Bert Kassies. Archived from the original on 29 May 2012. Retrieved 15 May 2011.
  9. ^ "Timisoara si Bistrita nu au primit licenta si sunt retrogradate". Onlinesport.ro. Archived from the original on 29 May 2012. Retrieved 31 May 2011.
  10. ^ "Fenerbahce withdrawn from Europe because of match-fix probe". BBC. 25 August 2011. Retrieved 24 August 2011.
  11. ^ "Fenerbahçe is out from UEFA Champions League for this season". Turkish Football Federation. 24 August 2011.
  12. ^ "Fenerbahçe replaced in UEFA Champions League". UEFA.com. 24 August 2011.
  13. ^ a b "UEFA Team Ranking 2011". Bert Kassies.
  14. ^ a b "Seeding in the Champions League 2011/2012". Bert Kassies. Archived from the original on 26 June 2011. Retrieved 19 May 2011.
  15. ^ "Newcomers Skendija meet Partizan in second round". UEFA. 20 June 2011. Retrieved 24 August 2011.
  16. ^ "Draw throws up Dynamo-Rubin rematch". UEFA. 15 July 2011. Retrieved 24 August 2011.
  17. ^ "Bayern face Zürich, Arsenal draw Udinese". UEFA. 5 August 2011. Retrieved 24 August 2011.
  18. ^ "Barcelona get Milan in group stage draw". UEFA.com. 25 August 2011.
  19. ^ "Eleven former winners grace group stage draw". UEFA.com. 24 August 2011.
  20. ^ "Barcelona handed Leverkusen tie". UEFA.com. 16 December 2011.
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  22. ^ "Statistics — Tournament phase — Goals scored". UEFA.com. UEFA. Retrieved 28 September 2011.
  23. ^ "Statistics — Tournament phase — Assists". UEFA.com. UEFA. Retrieved 15 March 2012.

External links

2010–11 Ekstraklasa

The 2010–11 Ekstraklasa was the 77th season of the highest level of football leagues in Poland since its establishment in 1927. It began on 6 August 2010 and concluded on 29 May 2011. A total of 16 teams participated, 14 of which competed in the league during the 2009–10 season, while the remaining two were promoted from the I Liga. Each team played a total of 30 matches, half at home and half away.

Wisła Kraków won the title, which marked their 13th title in total.Wisła Kraków qualified as champions for the 2nd qualifying round of the 2011-12 UEFA Champions League, while Śląsk Wrocław, as the runner-up, entered the 2nd qualifying round of the 2011-12 UEFA Europa League, followed by the fourth placed Jagiellonia Białystok team that earned a place in the 1st qualifying round of the Europa League. Legia Warsaw, the winner of the 2010–11 Polish Cup, also earned a place in European competition by qualifying to the 3rd qualifying round of the Europa League.

The defending champions were Lech Poznań, who won their sixth Polish championship last season.

2011 Ukrainian Cup Final

The 2011 Ukrainian Cup Final was a football match that was played at the Yuvileiny Stadium, Sumy, on 25 May 2011. The match was the 20th Ukrainian Cup Final and was contested by Dynamo Kyiv and Shakhtar Donetsk. This was the first time a Ukrainian Cup final was played in Sumy.

Since this match was between two teams that had qualified for the 2011–12 UEFA Champions League, the sixth-placed team in the 2010–11 Ukrainian Premier League season would qualify for the 2011–12 UEFA Europa League. In the draw, Dynamo was selected as the home team. After a goalless first half, Shakhtar's superiority prevailed and they won the match 2–0, enabling them to win the Ukrainian treble of the Ukrainian Super Cup, the Premier League and the Ukrainian Cup.

2011–12 Bayer 04 Leverkusen season

The 2011–12 Bayer Leverkusen season is the club's 108th year of existence.

2011–12 Borussia Dortmund season

The 2011–12 Borussia Dortmund season began on 23 July 2011 with a Revierderby loss against FC Schalke 04 in the DFL-Supercup. It ended with Dortmund completing the league and cup double with Bayern Munich as runners-up.

2011–12 FC Porto season

The 2011–12 season is the Futebol Clube do Porto's 78th season in the Primeira Liga, officially known as the Liga ZON Sagres for sponsorship reasons. Porto captured their 25th league title last season with their 3 April defeat of rivals Benfica. Manager André Villas-Boas became their manager on 2 July 2010 and won the league with no losses in their domestic campaign. On 20 June 2011, Villas-Boas quit Porto to join Chelsea in England. The next day, Porto named Vítor Pereira as their new head coach.

2011–12 GNK Dinamo Zagreb season

This article shows statistics of individual players and lists all matches that Dinamo Zagreb will play in the 2011–12 season.

2011–12 Lille OSC season

The 2011–12 season was Lille OSC's sixty-eighth season in existence and the club's twelfth consecutive season in the top flight of French football.

2011–12 Olympiacos F.C. season

The 2011–12 season was Olympiacos's' 53rd consecutive season in the Super League Greece.

The season was one of the best of the club's history. The club reached UEFA Europa's League Round of 16, and won both titles (SuperLeague and Greek Cup), while performing beautiful football.

Olympiacos finished 1st in the Greek SuperLeague, winning the title for a second consecutive season.

2011–12 S.S.C. Napoli season

Società Sportiva Calcio Napoli contested the Serie A, the UEFA Champions League (for the first time) and won the 2011–12 Coppa Italia during the 2011–12 season.

2011–12 Trabzonspor season

This article shows statistics of the club's players in the season.

In the 2011–2012 season Trabzonspor arrived 3rd in Süper Lig.

The top goalscorer of the team was Burak Yılmaz who scored 35 goals.

2011–12 UEFA Champions League group stage

This article details the 2011–12 UEFA Champions League group stage.

The group stage featured 32 teams: the 22 automatic qualifiers and the 10 winners of the play-off round (five through the Champions Route, five through the League Route).The teams were drawn into eight groups of four, and played each other home-and-away in a round-robin format. The matchdays were 13–14 September, 27–28 September, 18–19 October, 1–2 November, 22–23 November, and 6–7 December 2011.The top two teams in each group advanced to the first knockout round, while the third-placed teams dropped down to the Europa League round of 32.

2011–12 UEFA Champions League knockout phase

The knockout phase of the 2011–12 UEFA Champions League began on 14 February with the round of 16, and concluded on 19 May 2012 with the final at Allianz Arena in Munich, Germany.

Times up to 24 March 2012 (round of 16) are CET (UTC+01:00), thereafter (quarter-finals and beyond) times are CEST (UTC+02:00).

2011–12 UEFA Champions League qualifying phase and play-off round

This article details the 2011–12 UEFA Champions League qualifying phase and play-off round.

All times are CEST (UTC+02:00).

2011–12 Villarreal CF season

The 2011–12 season will be the 72nd season in Villarreal Club de Fútbol's history and their 13th season in La Liga, the top division of Spanish football. It covers a period from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012.

Villarreal will compete for their first La Liga title and will participate in the UEFA Champions League, entering in the play-off round due to their fourth-place finish in the 2010–11 La Liga. They will also enter the Copa del Rey in the Round of 32. This season was Villarreal's last in La Liga, on the final day of the season they lost 1–0 to Atlético Madrid, sending them down to 18th and relegating the side that once finished second in the La Liga.

2012 FIFA Club World Cup Final

The 2012 FIFA Club World Cup Final was the final match of the 2012 FIFA Club World Cup, a football tournament hosted by Japan. It was the ninth final of the FIFA Club World Cup, a FIFA-organised tournament between the winner clubs from each of the six continental confederations, as well as the league winner from the host nation.

The final was contested between CONMEBOL winners Corinthians and UEFA winners Chelsea, and took place at the International Stadium Yokohama in Yokohama on 16 December 2012. Corinthians defeated Chelsea 1–0 after a header from Paolo Guerrero, which meant Corinthians won their second FIFA Club World Cup, then known as FIFA Club World Championship, twelve years after winning their first in 2000. The match kick-offed at 19:30 JST and was officiated by Turkish referee Cüneyt Çakır.

Both clubs entered the competition after winning their respective club football competitions. Corinthians won the 2012 Copa Libertadores, following a 2–0 win against Boca Juniors in the final, while Chelsea won the 2011–12 UEFA Champions League, having defeated Bayern Munich 4–3 in a penalty shoot-out, after being held 1–1 in normal time. This was Corinthians's second time competing in the tournament, having won the competition in 2000, following a 4–3 penalty shoot-out win over Vasco da Gama.

2012 UEFA Champions League Final

The 2012 UEFA Champions League Final was a football match which took place on Saturday, 19 May 2012 between Bayern Munich of Germany and Chelsea of England at the Allianz Arena in Munich, Germany. The match was to decide the winner of the 2011–12 season of the UEFA Champions League, Europe's premier club football tournament. Bayern were making their ninth appearance in the competition's final, having won four and lost four, most recently losing in 2010. Chelsea were appearing in their second final, having lost their first in 2008.

It was the first Champions League final to be held at the Allianz Arena (known as Fußball Arena München for the final). As tenants of the Arena, this meant Bayern were the first finalists to have home advantage since 1984. Both teams progressed to the knockout stages by finishing top of their group. Bayern then beat Basel, Marseille and Real Madrid to reach the final, while Chelsea knocked out Napoli, Benfica and defending champions Barcelona.

Bayern took the lead late in the second half through Thomas Müller, but Didier Drogba equalised for Chelsea five minutes later to take the game to extra time, in which Arjen Robben missed an awarded penalty, Petr Čech saving the low drive. The teams stayed level at 1–1 and the match went to a penalty shoot-out, which Chelsea won 4–3 to clinch their first Champions League title. In doing so, they became the first London club to win the tournament, the fifth English club and 22nd overall.

As winners, Chelsea took part in the 2012 UEFA Super Cup, losing 4–1 to Atlético Madrid, the winners of the 2011–12 UEFA Europa League. The victory also allowed them to enter the following season's Champions League competition (having failed to qualify for it by their league finishing position) at the expense of London rivals Tottenham Hotspur, who would otherwise have entered the competition having finished fourth in the Premier League. Chelsea also represented UEFA at the 2012 FIFA Club World Cup, entering at the semi-final stage; however, they were beaten 1–0 by Corinthians in the final.

2012 UEFA Europa League Final

The 2012 UEFA Europa League Final was the final match of the 2011–12 UEFA Europa League, the 41st season of Europe's secondary club football tournament organised by UEFA (after the UEFA Champions League), and the 3rd season since it was renamed from the UEFA Cup to the UEFA Europa League. The match was played on 9 May 2012 at the Arena Națională in Bucharest, Romania, and was contested between two Spanish sides – Atlético Madrid and Athletic Bilbao. The match ended with Atlético Madrid winning 3–0, with Radamel Falcao scoring two goals and Diego scoring another. In doing so, Falcao was named man of the match, and became the first player to win back-to-back Europa League titles with different teams.

The winners earned the right to play against Chelsea, the winners of the 2011–12 UEFA Champions League, in the 2012 UEFA Super Cup.

2012 UEFA Super Cup

The 2012 UEFA Super Cup was the 37th UEFA Super Cup, an annual football match organised by UEFA and contested by the reigning champions of the two main European club competitions, the UEFA Champions League and the UEFA Europa League. It was played at the Stade Louis II in Monaco on 31 August 2012, between the 2011–12 UEFA Champions League winners Chelsea of England and the 2011–12 UEFA Europa League winners Atlético Madrid of Spain.This was the last Super Cup to be played at the Stade Louis II, which has hosted the match since 1998, as future editions will be hosted at different venues, starting from the 2013 edition, which will be played at Eden Arena in Prague.Atlético Madrid defeated Chelsea 4–1, winning their second UEFA Super Cup.

Kristina Chichkala

Kristina Chichkala is a Russian football defender, currently playing for Ryazan VDV in the Russian championship.She started her career in Kubanochka Krasnodar. In 2011, she moved to Energiya Voronezh, with whom she played in the 2011–12 UEFA Champions League. After Energiya withdrew from the championship for financial reasons in 2012 she returned to Kubanochka, and one year later she signed for FK Donchanka.

She was an Under-19 international, and played the 2011 Universiade.

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