2010 Pulitzer Prize

The 2010 Pulitzer Prizes were awarded on Monday, April 12, 2010. In journalism, The Washington Post won four awards while The New York Times won three.[1] For the first time, an online source, ProPublica, won in what had previously been the sole province of print.[1] A musical, Next to Normal, won the Drama award for the first time in 14 years.[2] Country singer-songwriter Hank Williams, who died at age 29 in 1953, received a special citation.[3] Below, the winner(s) in each category are listed.

Journalism

Letters, Drama and Music

Special Citation

Hank Williams "for his craftsmanship as a songwriter who expressed universal feelings with poignant simplicity and played a pivotal role in transforming country music into a major musical and cultural force in American life."[25]

Controversy

Next to Normal, the winner of the Drama Prize, was not on the list of three candidates submitted to the twenty-member Pulitzer Prize board by the five-member Drama jury.[26] It was added to the candidate pool after several of the board members attended a performance of the musical the night before the voting deadline and was selected as the winner by at least three-quarters of the board members.[27] Jury chairman Charles McNulty publicly criticized the Board for its "geographic myopia" and "failure to appreciate new directions in playwriting" for overlooking the three plays that were not running on Broadway at the time of the Award in favor of one that was.[28]

References

  1. ^ a b Pérez-Peña, Richard (April 12, 2010). "Washington Post Wins 4 Pulitzers, New York Times Gets 3". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 15 April 2010. Retrieved April 12, 2010.
  2. ^ Adam Hetrick (April 12, 2010). "Next to Normal Wins 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Drama". Playbill. Archived from the original on 15 April 2010. Retrieved 13 April 2010.
  3. ^ "Pulitzer Prize Board Awards Special Citation to Hank Williams, Country Music Icon" (PDF) (Press release). Columbia University. April 12, 2010. Retrieved April 12, 2010.
  4. ^ "Pulitzer Prize for Public Service". Pulitzer.org. Archived from the original on 15 April 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.
  5. ^ "Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News". Pulitzer.org. Archived from the original on 15 April 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.
  6. ^ "Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting". Pulitzer.org. Archived from the original on 15 April 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.
  7. ^ "Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting". Pulitzer.org. Archived from the original on 15 April 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.
  8. ^ "Pulitzer Prize for Local Reporting". Pulitzer.org. Archived from the original on 15 April 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.
  9. ^ "Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting". Pulitzer.org. Archived from the original on 15 April 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.
  10. ^ "Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting". Pulitzer.org. Archived from the original on 15 April 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.
  11. ^ "Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing". Pulitzer.org. Archived from the original on 15 April 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.
  12. ^ "Pulitzer Prize for Commentary". Pulitzer.org. Archived from the original on 15 April 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.
  13. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation
  14. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation
  15. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation
  16. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation
  17. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation
  18. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation
  19. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation
  20. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation
  21. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation
  22. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation
  23. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation
  24. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes | Citation
  25. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes | Pulitzer Prize luncheon honors 2011 winners
  26. ^ Healy, Patrick (April 13, 2010). "Pulitzer Juror Criticizes Choice for Drama Prize". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 17 April 2010. Retrieved 13 April 2010.
  27. ^ Healy, Patrick (April 13, 2010). "Pulitzer Board Members Saw 'Normal' Night Before Vote". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 15 April 2010. Retrieved 13 April 2010.
  28. ^ [1] Archived April 15, 2010, at the Wayback Machine

External links

Asbury Park Press

The Asbury Park Press is a daily newspaper in Monmouth and Ocean counties of New Jersey and has the third largest circulation in the state. Its investigative staff, led by editor Paul D'Ambrosio, has been awarded numerous national honors in journalism, including the Selden Ring Award for Investigative Reporting, two the Associated Press Managing Editors' Award for Public Service, the National Headliner Award for Public Service and two National Headliner Awards for Best Series (large papers). The Press' investigative team was a finalist for the 2010 Pulitzer Prize in Public Service.

The newspaper was also the home to editorial cartoonist Steve Breen when he won the Pulitzer Prize in that category in 1998.

Gannett purchased the paper in 1997.

Barbara Laker

Barbara Laker is an American journalist for the Philadelphia Daily News. She won with Wendy Ruderman the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting.

David Philipps

David Nathaniel Philipps, born in 1977, is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American journalist and author whose work has largely focused on the human impact of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He is a national correspondent for the New York Times and is the author of two books. The most recent is Wild Horse Country.

At the New York Times, Philipps covers the military, veterans and breaking news.

Philipps won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 2014 for his three-day series "Other Than Honorable" in The Gazette of Colorado Springs on the treatment of injured American soldiers being discharged without military benefits. He has also been named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize twice. The first was the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for local reporting, which cited "his painstaking stories on the spike in violence within the Band of Brothers, a battered combat brigade returning to Fort Carson after bloody deployments to Iraq, leading to increased mental health care for soldiers." The second was the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news, which he shared with the New York Times staff for coverage of a mass shooting in Las Vegas.

Philipps won the 2009 Livingston Award for his reporting on violence in infantry troops returning from Iraq. His book, Lethal Warriors chronicles how the 4th Brigade Combat Team of the 12th Infantry Regiment, stationed at Fort Carson, Colorado, produced a high number of murders after soldiers returned from unusually violent combat tours. Philipps worked for eight years as an enterprise reporter at the Colorado Springs Gazette.

Philipps has written extensively about wild horses in the West, and gained attention in 2012 when U.S. Secretary of Interior Ken Salazar threatened to punch him while Philipps was asking about troubles in the department's wild horse program. Philipps' subsequent reporting led to state and federal investigation of the wild horse program and its largest horse buyer. His latest book, Wild Horse Country, traces the culture and history that created modern wild horse management. Philipps' writing on wild horse management has faced criticism as being based on unsound science.Philipps graduated from Middlebury College in 2000 and earned a master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in 2002.

Liaquat Ahamed

Liaquat Ahamed (born November 14, 1952 in Kenya) is an American author.

Lords of Finance

Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World is a nonfiction book by Liaquat Ahamed about events leading up to and culminating in the Great Depression as told through the personal histories of the heads of the Central Banks of the world's four major economies at the time: Benjamin Strong Jr. of the New York Federal Reserve, Montagu Norman of the Bank of England, Émile Moreau of the Banque de France, and Hjalmar Schacht of the Reichsbank. The text was published on January 22, 2009 by Penguin Press. The book was generally well received by critics and won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for History. Because the book was published during the midst of the financial crisis of 2007–2010, the book subject matter was seen as very relevant to current financial events.

Matt Richtel

Matt Richtel (born October 2, 1966 in Los Angeles) is an American writer and journalist for The New York Times. He was awarded the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for a series on distracted driving.Richtel obtained a bachelor's degree from the University of California at Berkeley and an MS from the Columbia School of Journalism.He is the author of A Deadly Wandering, a New York Times-bestselling nonfiction narrative that intertwines the story of a car crash caused by a texting driver with a study of the science of attention. It was named one of the best books of 2014 by The Christian Science Monitor, San Francisco Chronicle, and Amazon, among others.

Richtel also writes fiction and has authored several mystery/thrillers, including Dead on Arrival (William Morrow, 2017), called by the New York Times Book Review "An intellectual thrill ride that tucks searing social critique into the Trojan horse of a save-the-world page-turner." He also wrote Doomsday Equation (2015), The Cloud, and Devil's Plaything. His first book, called Hooked, is about a reporter whose life is turned upside down when he escapes a cafe explosion after a stranger hands him a note in his dead fiancée's handwriting warning him to leave.He co-created and formerly wrote the syndicated comic Rudy Park under the pen name Theron Heir. Since 2012, the strip is now written by its longtime illustrator Darrin Bell.In 2010, Richtel wrote, and was interviewed, about the impact on the human brain of living with "a deluge of data" from digital devices. In the interview, he previewed his current investigation into the idea that "[t]here is some thought that the way kids' brains ... and frontal lobes ... are developing" differently from those of their parents and others of older generations. He said he expected to publish his work on this subject in early December.

Paul Harding (author)

Paul Harding (born 1967) is an American musician and author, best known for his debut novel Tinkers (2009), which won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the 2010 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize among other honors. Harding was the drummer in the band Cold Water Flat throughout its existence from 1990 to 1996.

Rae Armantrout

Rae Armantrout (born April 13, 1947) is an American poet generally associated with the Language poets. She has published ten books of poetry and has also been featured in a number of major anthologies. Armantrout currently teaches at the University of California, San Diego, where she is Professor of Poetry and Poetics.

On March 11, 2010, Armantrout was awarded the 2009 National Book Critics Circle Award for her book of poetry Versed published by the Wesleyan University Press, which had also been nominated for the National Book Award. The book later earned the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. She is the recipient of numerous other awards for her poetry, including an award in poetry from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts in 2007 and a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2008.

Sarah Kaufman (critic)

Sarah Kaufman (born 1963) is an American author and the dance critic for the Washington Post. She was the recipient of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Criticism. Her most recent work, The Art of Grace, was published by W.W. Norton and Company in fall of 2015.

Sheri Fink

Sheri Fink is an American journalist who writes about health, medicine and science.

She received the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting, "for a story that chronicles the urgent life-and-death decisions made by one hospital’s exhausted doctors when they were cut off by the floodwaters of Hurricane Katrina.". She was also a member of The New York Times reporting team that received the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for coverage of the 2014 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa.

Team members named by The Times were Pam Belluck, Helene Cooper, Fink, Adam Nossiter, Norimitsu Onishi, Kevin Sack, and Ben C. Solomon.As of April 2014, Fink is a staff reporter for The New York Times.

Steel Hammer

Steel Hammer is a 2009 composition for three sopranos and chamber ensemble by the American composer Julia Wolfe. It was first performed on November 21, 2009, at Zankel Hall by the contemporary classical music groups Bang on a Can and Trio Mediæval. The piece is based on the ballad of the African-American tall tale John Henry. The composition was a finalist for the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Music.

T. J. Stiles

T. J. Stiles (born 1964 in Foley, Minnesota) is an American biographer who lives in Berkeley, California. His book The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2009) won a National Book Award and the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography. His book Custer's Trials: A Life on the Frontier of a New America received the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for History.

The Dead Hand

The Dead Hand: The Untold Story of the Cold War Arms Race and its Dangerous Legacy is the winner of the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction written by Washington Post contributing editor David E. Hoffman.

The book is based on a large number of published and unpublished sources, including interviews with political leaders, scientists, military officials and diplomats. The Russian automatic nuclear-control system known as "Dead Hand" is described in detail.

The First Tycoon

The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt is a 2009 biography of Cornelius Vanderbilt, a 19th-century American industrialist and philanthropist who built his fortune in the shipping and railroad industries, becoming one of the wealthiest Americans in the history of the U.S. It was written by American biographer T. J. Stiles. The book was honored with the 2009 National Book Award for Nonfiction and the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography.

Tinkers (novel)

Tinkers (2009) is the first novel by American author, Paul Harding. The novel tells the stories of George Washington Crosby, an elderly clock repairman, and of his father, Howard. On his deathbed, George remembers his father, who was a tinker selling household goods from a donkey-drawn cart and who struggled with epilepsy. The novel was published by Bellevue Literary Press, a sister organization of the Bellevue Literary Review.

Tinkers won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, and other awards and honors. The Pulitzer board called the novel "a powerful celebration of life in which a New England father and son, through suffering and joy, transcend their imprisoning lives and offer new ways of perceiving the world and mortality."

Tom Kitt (musician)

Thomas Robert Kitt (born February 28, 1974) is an American composer, conductor, orchestrator, and musician. For his score for the musical Next to Normal, he shared the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Drama with Brian Yorkey. He also won the Tony Award and 2008 Outer Critics Circle Award, and was nominated for a Drama Desk Award for American Idiot and Everyday Rapture.

Versed

Versed is a book of poetry written by Rae Armantrout and published by Wesleyan University Press in 2009 (see 2009 in poetry). It won the 2009 National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry and the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry after being named a finalist for the National Book Award. Armantrout is only the third poet to win two out of these three awards in one year.

Violin Concerto (Higdon)

Jennifer Higdon's Concerto for Violin and Orchestra was written in 2008. The work was jointly commissioned by the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, and the Curtis Institute of Music. It was composed for the violinist Hilary Hahn and was given its world premiere by Hahn and the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra under the conductor Mario Venzano on February 6, 2009. The piece was later awarded the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Music.

Wendy Ruderman

Wendy Ruderman (born in 1969 on Long Island, N.Y.) is an American journalist for the Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News. She won with Barbara Laker the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting.

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