2010 Pro Bowl

The 2010 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2009 season. It took place at 8:00 PM EST on Sunday, January 31, 2010, at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida, the home stadium of the Miami Dolphins and host site of Super Bowl XLIV.[1] The television broadcasters were Mike Tirico, Ron Jaworski and Jon Gruden.

The AFC won the game 41–34.[2]

2010 NFL Pro Bowl
2010 Pro Bowl logo
AFC NFC
41 34
Head coach:
Norv Turner
(San Diego Chargers)
Head coach:
Wade Phillips
(Dallas Cowboys)
1234 Total
AFC 143177 41
NFC 107143 34
DateJanuary 31, 2010
StadiumSun Life Stadium, Miami Gardens, Florida
MVPMatt Schaub (Houston Texans)
RefereeJeff Triplette
Attendance70,697
Ceremonies
National anthemHonor Society
Coin tossDon Shula
TV in the United States
NetworkESPN
AnnouncersMike Tirico, Ron Jaworski, Jon Gruden, Michele Tafoya, and Suzy Kolber

Site & date changes

The 2010 Pro Bowl was held on the weekend before the Super Bowl, the first time ever that the Pro Bowl was held before the championship game, and the first time that the Pro Bowl was held somewhere other than Aloha Stadium in Honolulu since 1980 (1979 season).[1] NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said the move was made after looking at alternatives to strengthen the Pro Bowl.[3]

The game was moved up in order to prevent a conflict that would have taken place if the game had taken place on February 13 or 14, with the game facing against the NBA All-Star Game, Winter Olympics, and Daytona 500. Due to the change, players from the conference championship teams, who were going to play in the Super Bowl the following week—the Indianapolis Colts and New Orleans Saints—did not participate. As a result, for the first time in Pro Bowl history, rosters for the AFC and NFC teams were not allowed to include any players from the teams that would be playing in the Super Bowl to avoid major injuries to members of either team. However, these players were still required to be on site for the Pro Bowl to collect a bonus payment from the NFL.

Several NFL players spoke out against the decision regarding timing of the game; ten-time Pro Bowl quarterback Peyton Manning raised issue with the possibility that if the concept of rotating the location of the game were to continue, the 2012 game could be held in a cold-weather city (Indianapolis) not seen as a winter vacation destination.[4] NBC sportscaster Al Michaels was skeptical of the changes, telling the Honolulu Star-Bulletin that "the [NFL] thinks playing it before the Super Bowl will add to the buzz. It won't."[5] Indianapolis Colts president Bill Polian also came out against the change, explaining that it seemed disruptive and "stupid" to have players voted to the Pro Bowl, only to have to sit out because they're playing in the Super Bowl, but still have to show up to the game to collect a bonus payment.[6]

Broadcasting

ESPN aired the game instead of CBS, which aired the 52nd Grammy Awards that evening.[1]

The game was the first Pro Bowl to be legally broadcast on internet radio. As part of a catch in the league's broadcast contracts, the Pro Bowl has, to this point, never been broadcast on the NFL's FieldPass system due to it being broadcast exclusively by Westwood One. The NFL had negotiated internet broadcast rights with all 32 of its teams, but never did so with Westwood One (since it was seen as redundant); since none of the 32 teams actually play in the Pro Bowl, FieldPass did not hold rights. When contracts were renegotiated in 2009, Westwood One's broadcasts were added to FieldPass, and along with it, play-by-play of the Pro Bowl.[7] The Sports USA Radio Network provided the commentary for Westwood One, with SUSA's Larry Kahn on play-by-play and Dan Fouts sharing color commentary with Westwood One's Boomer Esiason.

Scoring summary

Scoring Play Score
1st Quarter
AFC – Andre Johnson 33-yard pass from Matt Schaub (Dan Carpenter kick), 12:00 AFC 7–0
NFC – David Akers 47-yard field goal, 9:29 AFC 7–3
AFC – Brandon Marshall 23-yard pass from Matt Schaub (Dan Carpenter kick), 7:07 AFC 14–3
NFC – Steve Smith 48-yard pass from Aaron Rodgers (David Akers kick), 3:37 AFC 14–10
2nd Quarter
NFC – DeSean Jackson 7-yard pass from Aaron Rodgers (David Akers kick), 11:31 NFC 17–14
AFC – Dan Carpenter 30-yard field goal, 5:31 17–17
3rd Quarter
NFC – DeSean Jackson 58-yard pass from Donovan McNabb (David Akers kick), 14:22 NFC 24–17
AFC – Vincent Jackson 48-yard pass from David Garrard (Dan Carpenter kick), 13:33 24–24
AFC – Maurice Jones-Drew 4-yard run (Dan Carpenter kick), 11:27 AFC 31–24
AFC – Dan Carpenter 26-yard field goal, 5:13 AFC 34–24
NFC – DeAngelo Williams 7-yard run (David Akers kick), 1:27 AFC 34–31
4th Quarter
NFC – David Akers 39-yard field goal, 11:48 34–34
AFC – Chris Johnson 2-yard run (Dan Carpenter kick), 6:03 AFC 41–34

AFC roster

Offense

Position: Starter(s): Reserve(s): Alternate(s):
Quarterback 18 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis[e] 17 Philip Rivers, San Diego[b]
12 Tom Brady, New England[b]
  8 Matt Schaub, Houston[a][c][g]
10 Vince Young, Tennessee[a][h]
  9 David Garrard, Jacksonville[a]
Running back 28 Chris Johnson, Tennessee 32 Maurice Jones-Drew, Jacksonville
27 Ray Rice, Baltimore
Fullback 33 Le'Ron McClain, Baltimore
Wide receiver 80 Andre Johnson, Houston
87 Reggie Wayne, Indianapolis[e]
15 Brandon Marshall, Denver[c]
83 Wes Welker, New England[b]
85 Chad Ochocinco, Cincinnati[a]
83 Vincent Jackson, San Diego[a]
Tight end 44 Dallas Clark, Indianapolis[e] 85 Antonio Gates, San Diego[c] 83 Heath Miller, Pittsburgh[a]
Offensive tackle 77 Jake Long, Miami[b]
78 Ryan Clady, Denver
73 Joe Thomas, Cleveland[c] 60 D'Brickashaw Ferguson, N.Y. Jets[a]
Offensive guard 70 Logan Mankins, New England
66 Alan Faneca, N.Y. Jets
68 Kris Dielman, San Diego
Center 74 Nick Mangold, N.Y. Jets 63 Jeff Saturday, Indianapolis[e] 68 Kevin Mawae, Tennessee[a]

Defense

Position: Starter(s): Reserve(s): Alternate(s):
Defensive end 93 Dwight Freeney, Indianapolis[e]
98 Robert Mathis, Indianapolis[e]
90 Mario Williams, Houston[c] 93 Kyle Vanden Bosch, Tennessee[a][c]
92 Shaun Ellis, N.Y. Jets[a]
Defensive tackle 92 Haloti Ngata, Baltimore
75 Vince Wilfork, New England
98 Casey Hampton, Pittsburgh
Outside linebacker 92 Elvis Dumervil, Denver
92 James Harrison, Pittsburgh
56 Brian Cushing, Houston[b] 56 LaMarr Woodley, Pittsburgh[a]
Inside linebacker 52 Ray Lewis, Baltimore 59 DeMeco Ryans, Houston
Cornerback 24 Darrelle Revis, N.Y. Jets
21 Nnamdi Asomugha, Oakland
24 Champ Bailey, Denver
Free safety 20 Ed Reed, Baltimore[b] 31 Jairus Byrd, Buffalo[b] 31 Brandon Meriweather, New England[a][c]
41 Antoine Bethea, Indianapolis[a][e]
Strong safety 20 Brian Dawkins, Denver 37 Yeremiah Bell, Miami[a]

Special teams

Position: Starter(s): Reserve(s): Alternate(s):
Punter   9 Shane Lechler, Oakland
Placekicker 10 Nate Kaeding, San Diego[b]   5 Dan Carpenter, Miami[a]
Kick returner 16 Joshua Cribbs, Cleveland
Special teamer 81 Kassim Osgood, San Diego
Long snapper 59 Jon Condo, Oakland[d]

NFC roster

Offense

Position: Starter(s): Reserve(s): Alternate(s):
Quarterback   9 Drew Brees, New Orleans[e]   4 Brett Favre, Minnesota[b]
12 Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay[c]
  5 Donovan McNabb, Philadelphia[a]
  9 Tony Romo, Dallas[a]
Running back 28 Adrian Peterson, Minnesota 39 Steven Jackson, St. Louis[b]
34 DeAngelo Williams, Carolina
21 Frank Gore, San Francisco[a]
Fullback 43 Leonard Weaver, Philadelphia 30 John Kuhn, Green Bay
Wide receiver 11 Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona[b]
10 DeSean Jackson, Philadelphia[f]
18 Sidney Rice, Minnesota[b]
19 Miles Austin, Dallas[c]
12 Steve Smith, N.Y. Giants[a]
84 Roddy White, Atlanta[a]
Tight end 85 Vernon Davis, San Francisco 82 Jason Witten, Dallas
Offensive tackle 71 Jason Peters, Philadelphia
74 Bryant McKinnie, Minnesota[j]
78 Jon Stinchcomb, New Orleans[e] 66 David Diehl N.Y. Giants[a][c]
Offensive guard 76 Steve Hutchinson, Minnesota
73 Jahri Evans, New Orleans[e]
70 Leonard Davis, Dallas[c] 76 Chris Snee N.Y. Giants[a]
Center 65 Andre Gurode, Dallas[b] 60 Shaun O'Hara, N.Y. Giants[c] 76 Jonathan Goodwin, New Orleans[a][e]
67 Ryan Kalil, Carolina[a]

Defense

Position: Starter(s): Reserve(s): Alternate(s):
Defensive end 69 Jared Allen, Minnesota
90 Julius Peppers, Carolina
58 Trent Cole, Philadelphia
Defensive tackle 93 Kevin Williams, Minnesota[b]
90 Darnell Dockett, Arizona
90 Jay Ratliff, Dallas[c] 94 Justin Smith, San Francisco[a]
Outside linebacker 94 DeMarcus Ware, Dallas
55 Lance Briggs, Chicago[b]
98 Brian Orakpo, Washington[c] 52 Clay Matthews, Green Bay[a]
Inside linebacker 52 Patrick Willis, San Francisco[b] 51 Jonathan Vilma, New Orleans[e] 59 London Fletcher, Washington[a][c]
52 Jon Beason, Carolina[a]
Cornerback 21 Charles Woodson, Green Bay[b]
22 Asante Samuel, Philadelphia
29 Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie, Arizona[b] 26 Antoine Winfield, Minnesota[a][b]
41 Terence Newman, Dallas[a][c][i]
21 Mike Jenkins, Dallas[a]
Free safety 42 Darren Sharper, New Orleans[e] 36 Nick Collins, Green Bay[c] 21 Antrel Rolle, Arizona[a]
Strong safety 24 Adrian Wilson, Arizona[b] 41 Roman Harper, New Orleans[a][e]
27 Quintin Mikell, Philadelphia[a][c]

Special teams

Position: Starter(s): Reserve(s): Alternate(s):
Punter   4 Andy Lee, San Francisco
Placekicker   2 David Akers, Philadelphia
Kick returner 10 DeSean Jackson, Philadelphia[f] 12 Percy Harvin, Minnesota[a][b]
13 Johnny Knox, Chicago[a]
Special teamer 59 Heath Farwell, Minnesota
Long snapper 46 Jon Dorenbos, Philadelphia[d]

Notes:

bold denotes player who participated in game
a Replacement selection due to injury or vacancy
b Injured player; selected but did not play
c Replacement starter; selected as reserve
d "Need player"; named by coach
e Selected but did not play since his team advanced to Super Bowl XLIV
f Jackson was selected at both wide receiver and kick returner; he was replaced at kick returner by Percy Harvin
g Ben Roethlisberger was the first alternate, but declined due to injury[8]
h Carson Palmer was the third alternate, but declined due to injury[9]
i Sheldon Brown was the second alternate, but declined citing personal reasons[10]
j McKinnie did not play in the Pro Bowl due to unexplained absences from practices
k Randy Moss was the first AFC alternate, but did not play citing injury and was replaced.

Number of selections per team

AFC Team Selections NFC Team Selections
Indianapolis Colts 7 Minnesota Vikings 10
New England Patriots 6 Dallas Cowboys 9
San Diego Chargers 6 Philadelphia Eagles 9
Baltimore Ravens 5 New Orleans Saints 7
Denver Broncos 5 Arizona Cardinals 5
Houston Texans 5 San Francisco 49ers 5
New York Jets 5 Carolina Panthers 4
Pittsburgh Steelers 4 Green Bay Packers 4
Tennessee Titans 4 New York Giants 4
Miami Dolphins 3 Chicago Bears 2
Oakland Raiders 3 Washington Redskins 2
Cleveland Browns 2 Atlanta Falcons 1
Jacksonville Jaguars 2 St. Louis Rams 1
Buffalo Bills 1 Detroit Lions 0
Cincinnati Bengals 1 Seattle Seahawks 0
Kansas City Chiefs 0 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 0

References

  1. ^ a b c "Pro Bowl to precede Super Bowl". ESPN. December 30, 2008. Retrieved December 30, 2008.
  2. ^ "Offenses light up soggy Pro Bowl scoreboard as AFC comes out on top". ESPN. 2010-01-31. Archived from the original on 4 February 2010. Retrieved 2010-02-02.
  3. ^ "2010 Pro Bowl moving to Miami, will be played before Super Bowl". NFL.com. December 30, 2008. Archived from the original on 2 January 2009. Retrieved December 31, 2008.
  4. ^ "Players prefer the league's all-star game to stay in Hawaii". NFL.com. February 4, 2009. Archived from the original on 2009-03-07. Retrieved 20 March 2009.
  5. ^ "Williams' success at MU doesn't surprise Crean". JSOnline.com. February 9, 2009. Archived from the original on 16 March 2009. Retrieved 20 March 2009..
  6. ^ Colts’ Polian calls new Pro Bowl setup ’stupid’. NFL.com. Retrieved 2010-01-27.
  7. ^ Best, Neil (March 12, 2009). "NFL eschews ESPN, sticks with Westwood One radio". Newsday. Retrieved 20 March 2009.
  8. ^ "Shoulder keeps Big Ben out of Pro Bowl". Fox Sports. Associated Press. 2010-01-20. Archived from the original on 23 January 2010. Retrieved 2010-01-20.
  9. ^ Wilson, Aaron (2010-01-21). "Wilson: Palmer could have gone to the Pro Bowl". National Football Post. Archived from the original on 2010-01-30. Retrieved 2010-01-21.
  10. ^ "Sheldon Brown turns down Pro Bowl". Philadelphia Daily News. January 26, 2010. Archived from the original on 29 January 2010. Retrieved 2010-01-27.

External links

1979 Pro Bowl

The 1979 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 29th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1978 season. The game was played on Monday, January 29, 1979, at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California before a crowd of 38,333. The final score was NFC 13, AFC 7.Bum Phillips of the Houston Oilers lead the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Los Angeles Rams head coach Ray Malavasi. The referee was Jerry Markbreit in his second year as a referee.Ahmad Rashād of the Minnesota Vikings was named the game's Most Valuable Player. Players on the winning NFC team received $5,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $2,500.As of 2012 this was the last Pro Bowl to be played on a Monday, and the last one to be played in Los Angeles. It was the last one to be played outside Hawaii until the 2010 Pro Bowl which was in Miami Gardens, Florida.

This was also the first Pro Bowl to have players sport their respective team helmets, a custom that still stands today.

1989 Pro Bowl

The 1989 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 39th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1988 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 29, 1989, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,113. The final score was NFC 34, AFC 3.Marv Levy of the Buffalo Bills led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Chicago Bears head coach Mike Ditka. The referee was Ben Dreith.Randall Cunningham of the Philadelphia Eagles was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.It was the last Pro Bowl game played in January for two decades, until the 2010 Pro Bowl.

2009 Cleveland Browns season

The 2009 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 61st season as a professional sports franchise and its 57th season as a member of the National Football League (NFL). The team placed fourth in the AFC North with a record of 5–11, improving upon its 2008 record of 4–12. This season marked George Kokinis and Eric Mangini's first seasons as the team's general manager and head coach, respectively; however, Kokinis was fired on November 2 during the team's Week 9 bye week. The Browns played all of their home games at Cleveland Browns Stadium in Cleveland, Ohio.

The Browns missed the playoffs for the seventh straight season, tying a record set between 1973–79.

2011 Pro Bowl

The 2011 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2010 season. It took place at 7:00 p.m. EST (2:00 p.m. local time) on Sunday, January 30, 2011 at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The NFC defeated the AFC, 55–41.

2014 Pro Bowl

The 2014 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2013 season. It took place at 2:30 pm local time on January 26 at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The game was televised nationally by NBC and was the final Pro Bowl on network television before ABC’s airing in 2018 as part of a simulcast with sister network ESPN, whose parent company Disney currently holds domestic TV rights to the game.

Significant changes to the Pro Bowl format were adopted in an attempt to make the game more "fan-friendly". These changes were proposed by National Football League Players Association president Dominique Foxworth and developed in partnership between the league and the player's union.The most significant change was a switch to a "fantasy draft" format rather than pitting AFC all-stars against NFC all-stars. Hall of Fame players Jerry Rice and Deion Sanders were chosen as honorary team captains, and joined by two active players each to assist in their selections. Chuck Pagano of the AFC South winning Indianapolis Colts coached Team Sanders, while Ron Rivera of the NFC South winning Carolina Panthers coached Team Rice. These coaches were selected for coaching the highest seeded teams to lose in the Divisional round of the playoffs, which has been the convention since the 2010 Pro Bowl.

Team Rice won the game 22–21.

2015 Pro Bowl

The 2015 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2014 season. It began at 6 pm local time on January 25 at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona, and it was the first Pro Bowl to be held outside Hawaii since 2010. The game was televised nationally by ESPN.The game continued the "unconferenced" format that was debuted in the 2014 Pro Bowl. The game was the third Pro Bowl that took place in the same site as that year's Super Bowl. It was also the sixth consecutive year where the Pro Bowl took place prior to the Super Bowl.Hall of Fame wide receivers Cris Carter and Michael Irvin were selected as the alumni captains of the game. Jason Garrett of the Dallas Cowboys and John Harbaugh of the Baltimore Ravens were the game's coaches. The coaches were to come from the higher seeded teams in each conference to lose in the Divisional Round of the 2014–15 NFL playoffs, which has been the convention since the 2010 Pro Bowl. However, the Denver Broncos (the highest seeded Divisional Round loser in the AFC) and head coach John Fox mutually agreed to part ways following their playoff loss, so Harbaugh (who coached the Ravens, the other Divisional Round loser from the AFC) was selected instead.

2016 Pro Bowl

The 2016 Pro Bowl (branded as the 2016 Pro Bowl presented by USAA for sponsorship reasons) was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2015 season, which was played at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii on January 31, 2016.

Andy Reid of the Kansas City Chiefs and Mike McCarthy of the Green Bay Packers were selected to coach the teams due to their teams being the highest seeded teams from each conference to lose in the Divisional Round of 2015–16 NFL playoffs, which has been the convention since the 2010 Pro Bowl. On January 27, Mike McCarthy announced that he would not be coaching the Pro Bowl due to an illness and also announced that assistant head coach Winston Moss would take over head coaching duties. This was also the sixth consecutive year that the Pro Bowl took place prior to the Super Bowl. At the Pro Bowl Draft, the Chiefs' coaching staff was assigned to Team Rice, and the Packers' coaching staff was assigned to Team Irvin.The game continued the fantasy draft format that debuted with the 2014 Pro Bowl. The two teams were to be drafted and captained by two Hall of Famers, Jerry Rice (winning 2014 Pro Bowl captain) and Michael Irvin (winning 2015 Pro Bowl captain). Darren Woodson and Eric Davis served as defensive co-captains for Irvin and Rice respectively, in both cases reuniting two former teammates (Irvin and Woodson were teammates on the Dallas Cowboys from 1992 to 1999, while Rice and Davis played together with the San Francisco 49ers from 1990 to 1995). The Fantasy draft was held January 27 at 7:30 P.M. EST on ESPN2 at Wheeler Army Airfield in Wahiawa, Hawaii as part of an extension to the NFL's military appreciation campaign.

Asante Samuel

Asante T. Samuel (born January 6, 1981) is a former American football cornerback. He played college football at UCF, and was drafted by the New England Patriots in the fourth round of the 2003 NFL Draft. Samuel also played for the Philadelphia Eagles and Atlanta Falcons.

Casey Hampton

Casey Hampton Jr. (born September 3, 1977), nicknamed "Big Snack," is a former American football nose tackle who played twelve seasons for the Pittsburgh Steelers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Texas, and received All-American recognition. The Pittsburgh Steelers picked him in the first round of the 2001 NFL Draft. Hampton was selected for the Pro Bowl five times.

DeSean Jackson

DeSean William Jackson (born December 1, 1986) is an American football wide receiver for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of California, Berkeley, where he was recognized as a consensus All-American. He was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in the second round of the 2008 NFL Draft, and has also played for the Washington Redskins and Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Jackson has been selected to the Pro Bowl three times, and was the first player selected to the Pro Bowl at two different positions in the same year when he was named to the 2010 Pro Bowl as a wide receiver and return specialist.

Hard Rock Stadium

Hard Rock Stadium is a multipurpose football stadium located in Miami Gardens, Florida, a city north of Miami. It is the home stadium of the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL). Hard Rock Stadium also plays host to the Miami Hurricanes football team during their regular season. The facility also hosts the Orange Bowl, an annual college football bowl game. It was the home to the Florida Marlins of Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1993 to 2011. From 2019, the stadium is home to the Miami Open tennis tournament, played in March.

The stadium has hosted five Super Bowls (XXIII, XXIX, XXXIII, XLI and XLIV), the 2010 Pro Bowl, two World Series (1997 and 2003), four BCS National Championship Games (2001, 2005, 2009, 2013), the second round of the 2009 World Baseball Classic, and WrestleMania XXVIII. The stadium will host Super Bowl LIV in 2020 and the College Football Playoff National Championship in 2021.The facility opened in 1987 as Joe Robbie Stadium and has been known by a number of names since: Pro Player Park, Pro Player Stadium, Dolphins Stadium, Dolphin Stadium, Land Shark Stadium, and Sun Life Stadium. In August 2016 the team sold the naming rights to Hard Rock Cafe Inc. for $250 million over 18 years.

Heath Farwell

Heath Charles Farwell (born December 31, 1981) is a former American football linebacker and special teamer who is currently the special teams coordinator for the Buffalo Bills. He played college football for San Diego State University, and was signed by the Minnesota Vikings as an undrafted free agent in 2005. He was the special teams captain during his tenure with the Seattle Seahawks.

Josh Cribbs

Joshua Cribbs (born June 9, 1983) is a former American football return specialist and wide receiver. He played college football for Kent State University, and was signed by the Cleveland Browns as an undrafted free agent in 2005. He has tied the NFL career record with eight kickoff returns for touchdowns, and also the NFL record with two kickoffs of 100 yards or more returned for touchdowns in a single game. He has also played for the New York Jets, Oakland Raiders and Indianapolis Colts. He was most recently a special teams coaching intern for the Cleveland Browns.

List of Pro Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast the National Football League's Pro Bowl throughout the years.

London Fletcher

London Levi Fletcher (born May 19, 1975) is a former American football linebacker who played in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at John Carroll, and signed with the St. Louis Rams as an undrafted free agent in 1998. Fletcher also played for the Buffalo Bills and Washington Redskins.

Fletcher was well known for never missing a game in his career, being one of only five players in NFL history to play in over 250 consecutive games. Fletcher also holds the record for consecutive starts at the linebacker position. He eventually finished his career with 215 consecutive games started, which ties him for 6th all time along with Alan Page and Ronde Barber.

Matt Light

Matthew Charles "Matt" Light (born June 23, 1978) is a former American football offensive tackle who spent his entire eleven-year career playing for the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Purdue University. He was picked by the Patriots in the second round of the 2001 NFL Draft.

Montell Owens

Montell Ernest Owens (born May 4, 1984) is a former American football fullback. He played college football at Maine. Owens was signed by the Jacksonville Jaguars as an undrafted free agent in 2006. He has also played for the Detroit Lions and Chicago Bears.

National Football League 2000s All-Decade Team

The NFL 2000s All-Decade Team is composed of outstanding performers in the National Football League in the ten years spanning 2000–2009. Only a player or coach's performance in the 2000s is used as criteria for voting.

The full team was announced on January 31, 2010 during the pregame show for the 2010 Pro Bowl. The names of the twelve all-decade honorees who participated in the 2010 Pro Bowl had been released earlier in the week.

Steve Smith (wide receiver, born 1985)

Steven Smith (born May 6, 1985) is a former American football wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Southern California (USC), and earned All-American honors. He was drafted by the New York Giants in the second round of the 2007 NFL Draft, and has also played for the Philadelphia Eagles, St. Louis Rams, and Tampa Bay Buccaneers. He is often mistaken for Steve Smith Sr., the Carolina Panthers and Baltimore Ravens wide receiver of the same name.

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