2010 National League Division Series

The 2010 National League Division Series (NLDS) were two best-of-five game series to determine the participating teams in the 2010 National League Championship Series. The three divisional winners and a fourth team—a "Wild Card"—played in two series from October 6 to 11. TBS televised all games in the United States.[2]

Under MLB's playoff format, no two teams from the same division were matched up in the Division Series, regardless of whether their records would normally indicate such a matchup. Home field advantage went to the team with the better regular-season record with the exception of the wild card team, which defers home field advantage regardless of record. The matchups were:

The Phillies and Reds had met in the postseason once before: in the 1976 NLCS, which the Reds won 3–0. The Giants and Braves also had one prior postseason series—the 2002 NLDS—which the Giants won 3–2.

2010 National League Division Series
2010 NLDS
Teams
Team (Wins) Manager Season
Philadelphia Phillies (3) Charlie Manuel 97–65, .599, GA: 6
Cincinnati Reds (0) Dusty Baker 91–71, .562, GA: 5
DatesOctober 6–10
TelevisionTBS
TV announcersBrian Anderson and Joe Simpson
RadioESPN
Radio announcersJon Sciambi and Dave Campbell
UmpiresJohn Hirschbeck, Bruce Dreckman, Sam Holbrook, Ed Rapuano, Gary Cederstrom and Rob Drake[1]
Teams
Team (Wins) Manager Season
San Francisco Giants (3) Bruce Bochy 92–70, .568, GA: 2
Atlanta Braves (1) Bobby Cox 91–71, .562, GB: 6
DatesOctober 7–11
TelevisionTBS
TV announcersDick Stockton and Bob Brenly
RadioESPN
Radio announcersChris Berman (Games 1–2), Dave O'Brien (Games 3–4) and Rick Sutcliffe
UmpiresDana DeMuth, Paul Nauert, Paul Emmel, Mike Winters, Jerry Layne and Ed Hickox[1]

Matchups

Philadelphia Phillies vs. Cincinnati Reds

Philadelphia won the series, 3–0.

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 6 Cincinnati Reds – 0, Philadelphia Phillies – 4 Citizens Bank Park 2:34 46,411[3] 
2 October 8 Cincinnati Reds – 4, Philadelphia Phillies – 7 Citizens Bank Park 3:39 46,511[4] 
3 October 10 Philadelphia Phillies – 2, Cincinnati Reds – 0 Great American Ball Park 3:00 44,599[5]

†: No-hitter by Roy Halladay

San Francisco Giants vs. Atlanta Braves

San Francisco won the series, 3–1.

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 7 Atlanta Braves – 0, San Francisco Giants – 1 AT&T Park 2:26 43,936[6] 
2 October 8 Atlanta Braves – 5, San Francisco Giants – 4 (11 innings) AT&T Park 3:47 44,046[7] 
3 October 10 San Francisco Giants – 3, Atlanta Braves – 2 Turner Field 3:23 53,284[8] 
4 October 11 San Francisco Giants – 3, Atlanta Braves – 2 Turner Field 2:56 44,532[9]

Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati

Game 1, October 6

5:00 p.m. (EDT) at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Cincinnati 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Philadelphia 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 4 5 0
WP: Roy Halladay (1–0)   LP: Edinson Vólquez (0–1)

In his first career postseason start, Phillies ace Roy Halladay hurled a no-hitter, giving up only one walk (to Jay Bruce in the fifth inning). Halladay's was only the second postseason no-hitter in Major League Baseball history, and the first since Don Larsen's perfect game in the 1956 World Series.[10] He threw only 104 pitches.

During the 2010 regular season, Halladay had thrown a perfect game on the road against the Florida Marlins on May 29. He thus became the first and only pitcher to throw a no-hitter in the regular season and a no-hitter in the postseason in the same year. Halladay is also the fifth major league pitcher to throw two no-hitters in the same year, and the first since Nolan Ryan in 1973.

The Phillies' offense got started early when Shane Victorino sliced a double down the left field line in the first inning. After stealing third base, Chase Utley brought him home with a sacrifice fly. Victorino went 2-for-4 in the game and also had two RBIs on a single in the second inning that scored Wilson Valdez and Halladay. Halladay had reached earlier in the inning on an RBI single of his own, helping his own cause and becoming the first pitcher in major league history to outhit the opposing team in a postseason game.

Cincinnati starter Edinson Vólquez lasted only ​1 23 innings before Travis Wood was called upon in relief by manager Dusty Baker. Volquez gave up four hits, four runs (all earned), and two walks. He faced eleven batters, retiring only five.

Game 2, October 8

6:00 p.m. (EDT) at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Cincinnati 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 4 6 4
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 2 1 3 1 X 7 8 2
WP: José Contreras (1–0)   LP: Aroldis Chapman (0–1)   Sv: Brad Lidge (1)
Home runs:
CIN: Brandon Phillips (1), Jay Bruce (1)
PHI: None

On the fourth pitch he saw, Brandon Phillips hit a home run to lead off the first inning. This was both the first hit and first run since 1995 for the Reds in the postseason.[11] Laynce Nix scored another run in the top of the second inning on two throwing errors and a wild pitch.

Jay Bruce hit a lead-off homer in the fourth inning to increase the lead to 3–0. In the top of the fifth inning, Phillips hit a lead-off double, advanced to third base on a sacrifice bunt, then scored on Joey Votto's sacrifice fly.

The Phillies mounted their attack in the bottom of the fifth inning. Pinch-hitter Domonic Brown reached first base on a fielder's choice, then the Phillies loaded the bases on two consecutive defensive errors. Chase Utley delivered a two-out RBI single to get the Phillies on board, but Arroyo struck out Ryan Howard to limit the damage at two.

The Phillies scored again in the sixth inning. Jayson Werth walked, stole second, then scored after two batters were hit by pitches and a bases-loaded walk by Reds relievers Arthur Rhodes and Logan Ondrusek.

The Reds sent flame-thrower Aroldis Chapman to the mound in the bottom of the seventh inning. He hit Chase Utley, the third time by Reds' relievers in the night, then struck out Ryan Howard. Werth hit a ground ball to Reds third baseman Scott Rolen, but Utley was called safe at second base. The next batter, Jimmy Rollins, hit a fly ball to right field, but Reds right fielder Jay Bruce lost it in the lights; Reds second baseman Phillips also missed the relay catch. These two crucial errors—the third and fourth on the night—let both Utley and Werth score. Rollins scored later on Raúl Ibañez's single and Carlos Ruiz's RBI force-out. Reds reliever Nick Masset replaced Chapman and got Shane Victorino to ground out to end the inning. The Phillies took a 6–4 lead on Reds' errors into the eighth inning.

In the bottom of the eighth inning, Utley hit a one-out single then stole second. Masset intentionally walked Howard to set up a potential double play for the next batter. However, Werth hit an RBI single to left field to score Utley.

Phillies closer Brad Lidge closed the ninth for the save.

The six combined errors tied an LDS record previously set by the Athletics and Red Sox in the 2003 ALDS.[12]

Game 3, October 10

8:00 p.m. (EDT) at Great American Ball Park in Cincinnati, Ohio

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 8 1
Cincinnati 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 2
WP: Cole Hamels (1–0)   LP: Johnny Cueto (0–1)
Home runs:
PHI: Chase Utley (1)
CIN: None

Cincinnati was again dominated by Phillies' starting pitching. Cole Hamels pitched a complete game shutout, striking out nine while allowing five hits. Plácido Polanco scored for the Phillies on Orlando Cabrera's throwing error in the top of the first inning. Chase Utley added another run to the lead by hitting a home run in the fifth inning. With one out in the top of the ninth inning, Carlos Ruiz hit a double off Aroldis Chapman on a pitch that was clocked by PITCH f/x at 103.5 mph, making it the fastest pitched ball ever to result in a hit.[13] For the series, Cincinnati was shut out two times and scored just four runs, making them among the very few teams to lose in a shutout twice (the 1966 Los Angeles Dodgers lost in three shutouts to the Baltimore Orioles in the World Series in a sweep). This was the Great American Ball Park's first playoff game.

Composite line score

2010 NLDS (3–0): Philadelphia Phillies over Cincinnati Reds

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Philadelphia Phillies 2 3 0 0 3 1 3 1 0 13 21 3
Cincinnati Reds 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 4 11 7
Total attendance: 137,521   Average attendance: 45,840

San Francisco vs. Atlanta

Game 1, October 7

9:30 p.m. (EDT) at AT&T Park in San Francisco, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Atlanta 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2
San Francisco 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 X 1 5 0
WP: Tim Lincecum (1–0)   LP: Derek Lowe (0–1)

Game 1 was a pitching duel that matched the Giants' two-time Cy Young Award winner Tim Lincecum, in his first postseason start, against the Braves' Derek Lowe, a seasoned veteran of postseason play.

The game's only run came in the fourth inning. Giants rookie catcher Buster Posey singled to left, stole second in a controversial play where he was called safe while appearing to be out, and then scored on a two-out single by Cody Ross. That run was the only one Lincecum needed, as the Giants' ace was dominant, pitching a complete game shutout, allowing only two hits and striking out a franchise record 14 while walking only one.

Game 2, October 8

9:30 p.m. (EDT) at AT&T Park in San Francisco, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 R H E
Atlanta 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 1 5 11 0
San Francisco 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 10 2
WP: Kyle Farnsworth (1–0)   LP: Ramón Ramírez (0–1)
Home runs:
ATL: Rick Ankiel (1)
SF: Pat Burrell (1)
Braves celebrate winning 2010 NLDS Game 2
The Braves celebrate winning Game 2

The Giants took a quick 3–0 lead as Pat Burrell hit a three-run home run, following Freddy Sanchez's single and Buster Posey's walk in the bottom of the first inning.

Braves manager Bobby Cox was ejected from the game in the top of the second inning, arguing that Giants first baseman Aubrey Huff's foot did not stay on base on Álex González's ground-out.

Giants starter Matt Cain also hit an RBI single in the bottom of the second inning, scoring Cody Ross, who had doubled earlier.

Braves first baseman Derrek Lee hit a lead-off single in the top of the sixth inning and advanced to second base on Pat Burrell's error. Brian McCann singled him home in the next at-bat to end the 14 scoreless innings streak for the Braves in this series.

The Braves struck back in the top of the eighth inning. After consecutive singles by Lee and McCann, the Giants brought in closer Brian Wilson for a six-out save. However, the next hitter, Melky Cabrera, hit an RBI ground ball that scored Lee from third base and Cabrera beat the throw to first base due to Giants' third baseman Pablo Sandoval's throwing error. Following Brooks Conrad's sacrifice bunt, Álex González's RBI double scored both runners and tied the game at 4–4.

The game remained tied and went to extra innings. In the bottom of the tenth inning, two consecutive bunts—one single, one sacrifice—knocked Braves closer Billy Wagner out of the game because of injury. Braves reliever Kyle Farnsworth hit the next batter, Freddy Sanchez, then walked Huff to load the bases. However, Posey grounded into a double play to end the inning.

In the top of the eleventh inning, Rick Ankiel hit a go-ahead home run into McCovey Cove on the fly to give the Braves a 5–4 lead. At the time Ankiel was the only player in postseason history besides Barry Bonds to hit a home run into McCovey Cove.[14] Farnsworth threw a scoreless eleventh inning for the win and the series was tied at 1–1.

Game 3, October 10

4:30 p.m. (EDT) at Turner Field in Atlanta, Georgia

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 8 0
Atlanta 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 4 3
WP: Sergio Romo (1–0)   LP: Craig Kimbrel (0–1)   Sv: Brian Wilson (1)
Home runs:
SF: None
ATL: Eric Hinske (1)

Game 3 was yet another dramatic matchup of strong pitching. The Giants sent lefty Jonathan Sánchez to the mound, who turned in a strong performance, pitching a no-hitter through six innings. The Braves countered with right-hander Tim Hudson, who matched Sánchez for seven innings, allowing only one unearned run.

The Giants took an early lead in the second inning after leaving the bases loaded in the first. Third baseman Mike Fontenot started the inning by driving a triple off the right field wall. The next batter, Cody Ross, lofted a pop fly that was dropped by Atlanta second baseman Brooks Conrad, giving San Francisco a 1–0 lead. That run seemed to be all Sánchez would need, as he shut out the Braves for ​7 13 innings.

With a runner at first and one out in the bottom of the eighth inning, and the Giants still nursing their 1–0 lead, Giants setup man Sergio Romo, a right-hander, relieved Sánchez to face the right-handed Troy Glaus as a pinch-hitter. Braves manager Bobby Cox countered by sending left-handed batter Eric Hinske to the plate instead. With two strikes on him, Hinske turned on a hanging slider from Romo and drove it just inside the right field foul pole for a home run, giving the Braves a 2–1 lead, and electrifying the crowd at Turner Field.

Rookie right-hander Craig Kimbrel came out of the bullpen to start the top of the ninth for the Braves, relieving Jonny Venters, who had struck out the side the previous inning. Kimbrel retired Ross on a popout to Conrad, for the first out. Travis Ishikawa then pinch-hit for Romo and drew a walk. After striking out leadoff man Andrés Torres, Kimbrel gave up a single to second baseman Freddy Sanchez, and was removed from the game, leaving runners on first and second base, with two outs. Another rookie Brave, lefty Michael Dunn, came on and gave up a game-tying single to Aubrey Huff. Dunn was then pulled for a right-hander, Peter Moylan, who induced a grounder from Buster Posey, which proceeded to bounce through the legs of Conrad, the second baseman's third error of the game. Sanchez scored on the play, giving the Giants a 3–2 lead. Kyle Farnsworth came on and got the third out, but the damage was done. The Giants brought in their closer Brian Wilson for the bottom of the ninth. He held the lead, giving up a single to Brian McCann, but retiring Nate McLouth on a grounder to end the game.

Game 4, October 11

7:30 p.m. (EDT) at Turner Field in Atlanta, Georgia

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 3 5 1
Atlanta 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 7 2
WP: Madison Bumgarner (1–0)   LP: Derek Lowe (0–2)   Sv: Brian Wilson (2)
Home runs:
SF: Cody Ross (1)
ATL: Brian McCann (1)

With their backs against the wall, the Braves sent Derek Lowe to the mound on three days' rest. The Braves scored first in the bottom of the third inning when Brian McCann's sacrifice fly drove in Omar Infante.

Lowe took a no-hitter into the sixth inning, but the Giants tied the game with one out on Cody Ross' first-pitch homer off a cutter. McCann answered with another in the bottom of the inning off the Giants' rookie starter, Madison Bumgarner, to take back the lead.

Lowe was relieved after ​6 13 innings. After walking Aubrey Huff and allowing an infield single to Buster Posey, Bobby Cox made his way out to the mound, apparently to remove Lowe from the game. However, after talking to him, Cox elected to leave Lowe in, prompting huge cheers from the Atlanta fans. The next batter, Pat Burrell, walked on a 3–1 pitch near the inside corner and Lowe's night was done. He struck out eight while allowing only two hits and walking two. Braves' relievers Peter Moylan and Jonny Venters could not hold the lead as the Giants scored two runs in the top of the seventh inning on Juan Uribe's RBI fielder's choice and Cody Ross' RBI single. The Braves might have been able to escape the one-out, bases-loaded jam, but Álex González's throwing error, his second in the game, cost them. Both errors were debatable. The first was a ball hit in the hole he didn't field cleanly with the speedy Andrés Torres running. The second was, again, another crucial controversial call that went against the Braves in the series. With two on and one out and a weakly hit groundball, González elected to go to second, throwing it high, causing Omar Infante to edge up, however, the umpire ruled he came off the base.

Left-handed Giants reliever Javier López entered the game with two outs in the eighth, and pinch-runner Nate McLouth as the tying run at second base, and struck out Jason Heyward. In the bottom of the ninth inning, the Braves had one last chance to rally. With one out, Giants closer Brian Wilson walked Rick Ankiel and Eric Hinske to put the winning run on base. However, Omar Infante struck out swinging and Melky Cabrera grounded out to end the game and the series.

This was Braves manager Bobby Cox's last game. After the game ended, he came out of the dugout briefly to acknowledge the fans. He was greeted with loud cheers from the entire stadium, as well as an ovation from the Giants' players and coaches.

Composite line score

2010 NLDS (3–1): San Francisco Giants over Atlanta Braves

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 R H E
San Francisco Giants 3 2 0 1 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 11 28 3
Atlanta Braves 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 5 0 0 1 9 24 7
Total attendance: 185,798   Average attendance: 46,449

References

  1. ^ a b Mayo, Jonathan (October 5, 2010). "Veteran umpires assigned to Division Series". MLB.com. Archived from the original on October 8, 2010. Retrieved October 5, 2010.
  2. ^ 2010 MLB Postseason Schedule
  3. ^ "Boxscore:Cincinnati vs. Philadelphia - October 6, 2010". MLB.com. October 6, 2010. Archived from the original on October 10, 2010. Retrieved October 6, 2010.
  4. ^ "Boxscore:Cincinnati vs. Philadelphia - October 8, 2010". MLB.com. October 8, 2010. Archived from the original on October 12, 2010. Retrieved October 8, 2010.
  5. ^ "Boxscore:Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati - October 10, 2010". MLB.com. October 10, 2010. Archived from the original on October 13, 2010. Retrieved October 10, 2010.
  6. ^ "Boxscore:Atlanta vs. San Francisco - October 7, 2010". MLB.com. October 7, 2010. Archived from the original on October 11, 2010. Retrieved October 7, 2010.
  7. ^ "Boxscore:Atlanta vs. San Francisco - October 8, 2010". MLB.com. October 8, 2010. Archived from the original on October 12, 2010. Retrieved October 8, 2010.
  8. ^ "Boxscore:San Francisco vs. Atlanta - October 10, 2010". MLB.com. October 10, 2010. Archived from the original on October 13, 2010. Retrieved October 10, 2010.
  9. ^ "Boxscore:San Francisco vs. Atlanta - October 11, 2010". MLB.com. October 11, 2010. Archived from the original on October 15, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2010.
  10. ^ Zolecki, Todd (October 6, 2010). "Doctober! No-no for Halladay in playoff debut". MLB.com. Archived from the original on October 9, 2010. Retrieved October 6, 2010.
  11. ^ Tanier, Mike (October 8, 2010). "Live Analysis: Reds at Phillies, Game 2". The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 9, 2010. Retrieved October 8, 2010.
  12. ^ "Errors give Phillies late life, bury Reds in 2-0 hole". ESPN. Associated Press. October 8, 2010. Archived from the original on October 10, 2010. Retrieved October 8, 2010.
  13. ^ "Chooch Hits 103 MPH Fastballs". "Crossing Broad". October 11, 2010. Archived from the original on October 15, 2010. Retrieved October 12, 2010.
  14. ^ http://www.espn.com/mlb/recap?gameId=301008126

External links

2010 Atlanta Braves season

The 2010 Atlanta Braves season was the franchise's 45th season in Atlanta along with the 135th season in the National League and 140th overall. It featured the Braves' attempt to reclaim a postseason berth for the first time since 2005. The Braves once again were skippered by Bobby Cox, in his 25th and final overall season managing the team. It was their 45th season in Atlanta, and the 135th of the franchise. Finishing the season with a 91–71 record, the Braves won the NL Wild Card, only to be eliminated in the NLDS by the San Francisco Giants in four games.

2010 Major League Baseball season

The 2010 Major League Baseball season began April 4, with the regular season ending on October 3. The 2010 All-Star Game was played on July 13 at Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Anaheim, California. The National League ended a 13-game winless streak with a 3–1 victory. Due to this result, the World Series began October 27 in the city of the National League Champion, the San Francisco Giants, and ended November 1 when the Giants defeated the American League Champion Texas Rangers, four games to one.

2010 National League Championship Series

The 2010 National League Championship Series (NLCS) was a best-of-seven game Major League Baseball playoff series that pitted the winners of the 2010 National League Division Series—the Philadelphia Phillies and San Francisco Giants—against each other for the National League Championship. The Giants won the series, 4–2, and went on to win the 2010 World Series. The series, the 41st in league history, began on October 16 and ended on October 23. The Phillies had home field advantage as a result of their better regular-season record. The Phillies hosted Games 1, 2 and 6, while the Giants were at home for Games 3, 4 and 5.

The Giants would go on to defeat the Texas Rangers in the World Series in five games, winning their first World Series championship since 1954, and their first since relocating to San Francisco from New York City back in 1958, ending the Curse of Coogan's Bluff.

Best Moment ESPY Award

The Best Moment ESPY Award has been conferred annually since 2001 on the moment or series of moments transpiring in a play in a single game or individual match or event, across a single regular season or playoff game, or across a season, irrespective of specific sport, contested, in all cases, professionally under the auspices of one of the four major North American leagues, collegiately under the auspices of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or internationally under the auspices of a sport federation, adjudged to the most remarkable or best in a given calendar year; the primary participant in the moment is generally regarded as the award's recipient.

Between 2001 and 2004, the award voting panel comprised variously fans; sportswriters and broadcasters, sports executives, and retired sportspersons, termed collectively experts; and ESPN personalities, but balloting thereafter has been exclusively by fans over the Internet from amongst choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee. In 2001, the ESPY Awards ceremony was conducted in February and awards conferred reflected performance and achievement over the twelve months previous to presentation; since 2002, awards have been presented in July to reflect performance and achievement also over a twelve-month period. There was no voting in 2015, 2016, and 2017, but the 2018 winner was determined by voting. There was no voting in 2019.

Brian Anderson (sportscaster)

Brian Anderson (born June 7, 1971) is an American sportscaster. Since 2007, he has called play-by-play for the Milwaukee Brewers' telecasts on FSN Wisconsin. As a part of his work on the 2007 Brewers Preview Show, Anderson and the FSN team were awarded a regional Emmy Award.

Anderson also calls NFL games and NCAA Tournament basketball for CBS Sports, regular season NCAA basketball for FOX Sports and the Big Ten Network, MLB games for TBS and NBA games for TNT, TBS, NBC and CBS.

Don Larsen's perfect game

On October 8, 1956, in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series, Don Larsen of the New York Yankees threw a perfect game against the Brooklyn Dodgers. Larsen's perfect game is the only perfect game in the history of the World Series; it was the first perfect game thrown in 34 years and is one of only 23 perfect games in MLB history. His perfect game remained the only no-hitter of any type ever pitched in postseason play until Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Roy Halladay threw a no-hitter against the Cincinnati Reds on October 6, 2010, in Game 1 of the National League Division Series, and the only postseason game in which any team faced the minimum 27 batters until Kyle Hendricks and Aroldis Chapman of the Chicago Cubs managed to combine for the feat in the decisive sixth game of the 2016 National League Championship Series.

Ed Rapuano

Edward Stephen Rapuano, Jr. (born September 30, 1957) is an umpire supervisor in Major League Baseball who previously worked as an on-field umpire in the National League from 1990 to 1999 and throughout both major leagues from 2000 to 2012.

Edinson Vólquez

Edinson Vólquez (Spanish: [ˈeðinsom ˈbolkes]; born July 3, 1983) is a Dominican professional baseball pitcher for the Texas Rangers of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played in MLB for the Rangers, Cincinnati Reds, San Diego Padres, Los Angeles Dodgers, Pittsburgh Pirates, Kansas City Royals, and Miami Marlins.

Vólquez signed with the Rangers in 2001 under the name of Julio Reyes. He went by Edison Vólquez after 2003, before adding an n to his first name in 2007.

Jim Bunning

James Paul David Bunning (October 23, 1931 – May 26, 2017) was an American professional baseball pitcher and politician who represented Kentucky in both chambers of the United States Congress. He is the sole Major League Baseball athlete to have been elected to both the United States Senate and the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Bunning pitched from 1955 to 1971 for the Detroit Tigers, Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Los Angeles Dodgers. When Bunning retired, he had the second-highest total career strikeouts in Major League history; he currently ranks 18th. As a member of the Phillies, Bunning pitched the seventh perfect game in Major League Baseball history on June 21, 1964, the first game of a Father's Day doubleheader at Shea Stadium, against the New York Mets. The perfect game was the first since 1880 in the National League. Bunning was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in 1996 after election by the Hall's Veterans Committee.

After retiring from baseball, Bunning returned to his native northern Kentucky and was elected to the Fort Thomas city council, then the Kentucky Senate, in which he served as minority leader. In 1986, Bunning was elected to the United States House of Representatives from Kentucky's 4th congressional district, and served in the House from 1987 to 1999. He was elected to the United States Senate from Kentucky in 1998 and served two terms as the Republican junior U.S. Senator. In July 2009, he announced that he would not run for re-election in 2010. Bunning gave his farewell speech to the Senate on December 9, 2010, and was succeeded by Rand Paul on January 3, 2011.

Jim Bunning's perfect game

On June 21, 1964, Jim Bunning of the Philadelphia Phillies pitched the seventh perfect game in Major League Baseball history, defeating the New York Mets 6-0 in the first game of a doubleheader at Shea Stadium. A father of seven children at the time, Bunning pitched his perfect game on Father's Day. One of Bunning's daughters, Barbara, was in attendance, as was his wife, Mary.

Needing only 90 pitches to complete his masterpiece, Bunning struck out 10 batters, including six of the last nine he faced; the last two strikeouts were of the last two batters he faced: George Altman and John Stephenson.

The perfect game was the first regular season perfect game since Charlie Robertson's perfect game in 1922 (Don Larsen had pitched a perfect game in between, in the 1956 World Series), as well as the first in modern-day National League history (two perfect games had been pitched in 1880). It was also the first no-hitter by a Phillies pitcher since Johnny Lush no-hit the Brooklyn Superbas on May 1, 1906.

Bunning, who no-hit the Boston Red Sox while with the Detroit Tigers in 1958, joined Cy Young as the only pitchers to throw no-hitters in both the National and American Leagues; he has since been joined by Nolan Ryan, Hideo Nomo and Randy Johnson. The perfect game also made Bunning the third pitcher, after Young and Addie Joss, to throw a perfect game and an additional no-hitter; Sandy Koufax, Johnson, Mark Buehrle and Roy Halladay have since joined him (the latter of these pitchers pitched his additional no-hitter in the 2010 National League Division Series after pitching his perfect game earlier in the season).

As the perfect game developed, Bunning defied the baseball superstition that no one should talk about a no-hitter in progress, speaking to his teammates about the perfect game to keep himself relaxed and loosen up his teammates. Bunning had abided by the tradition during a near-no hitter a few weeks before, determining afterwards that keeping quiet didn’t help.Gus Triandos, Bunning's catcher, had also caught Hoyt Wilhelm's no-hitter on September 20, 1958 while with the Baltimore Orioles, becoming the first catcher to catch no-hitters in both leagues.

List of Major League Baseball no-hitters

This is a list of no-hitters in Major League Baseball history. In addition, all no-hitters that were broken up in extra innings or were in shortened games are listed, although they are not currently considered official no-hitters. (Prior to 1991, a performance in which no hits were surrendered through nine innings or in a shortened game was considered an official no-hit game.) The names of those pitchers who threw a perfect game no-hitter are italicized. For combined no-hitters by two or more pitchers on the same team, each is listed with his number of innings pitched. Games which were part of a doubleheader are noted as either the first game or second game. The most recent no-hitter was pitched by Aaron Sanchez, Will Harris, Joe Biagini, and Chris Devenski of the Houston Astros on August 3, 2019.

An official no-hit game occurs when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings thrown by the pitcher(s). In a no-hit game, a batter may still reach base via a walk, an error, a fielder's choice, an intentional walk, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference. Also, due to these methods of reaching base, it is possible for a team to score runs without getting any hits.

While the vast majority of no-hitters are shutouts, no-hit teams have managed to score runs in their respective games a number of times. Five times a team has been no-hit and still won the game: two notable victories occurred when the Cincinnati Reds defeated the Houston Colt .45s (now called the Houston Astros) 1–0 on April 23, 1964 even though they were no-hit by Houston starter Ken Johnson, and the Detroit Tigers defeated the Baltimore Orioles 2–1 on April 30, 1967 even though they were no-hit by Baltimore starter Steve Barber and reliever Stu Miller. In another four games, the home team won despite gaining no hits through eight innings, but these are near no-hitters under the 1991 rule that nine no-hit innings must be completed in order for a no-hitter to be credited.

The pitcher who holds the record for the shortest time between no-hitters is Johnny Vander Meer, the only pitcher in history to throw no-hitters in consecutive starts, while playing for the Cincinnati Reds in 1938. Besides Vander Meer, Allie Reynolds (in 1951), Virgil Trucks (in 1952), Nolan Ryan (in 1973), and Max Scherzer (in 2015) are the only other major leaguers to throw two no-hitters in the same regular season. Jim Maloney technically threw two no-hitters in the 1965 season, but his first one ended after he allowed a home run in the top of the 11th inning. According to the rules interpretation of the time, this was considered a no-hitter. Later that season, Maloney once again took a no-hitter into extra innings, but this time he managed to preserve the no-hitter after the Reds scored in the top half of the tenth, becoming the first pitcher to throw a complete game extra inning no-hitter since Fred Toney in 1917.Roy Halladay threw two no-hitters in 2010: a perfect game during the regular season and a no-hitter in the 2010 National League Division Series. He is the only major leaguer to have thrown no-hitters in regular season and postseason play.

The first black pitcher to toss a no-hitter was Sam Jones who did it for the Chicago Cubs in 1955. The first Latin pitcher to throw one was San Francisco Giant Juan Marichal in 1963. The first Asian pitcher to throw one was Los Angeles Dodger Hideo Nomo in 1996.

Through August 3, 2019, there have been 302 no-hitters officially recognized by Major League Baseball, 259 of them in the modern era (starting in 1901, with the formation of the American League). Joe Borden's no-hitter in 1875 is also noted, but is not recognized by Major League Baseball (see note in the chart).

List of New York Yankees no-hitters

The New York Yankees are a Major League Baseball franchise based in the New York City borough of The Bronx. Also known in their early years as the "Baltimore Orioles" (1901–02) and the "New York Highlanders" (1903–12), the Yankees have had ten pitchers throw eleven no-hitters in franchise history. A no-hitter is officially recognized by Major League Baseball only "...when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings. In a no-hit game, a batter may reach base via a walk, an error, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference". No-hitters of less than nine complete innings were previously recognized by the league as official; however, several rule alterations in 1991 changed the rule to its current form. A no-hitter is rare enough that the San Diego Padres have never had a pitcher accomplish the feat. Three perfect games, a special subcategory of no-hitter, have been pitched in Yankees history. As defined by Major League Baseball, "in a perfect game, no batter reaches any base during the course of the game." This feat was achieved by Don Larsen in 1956, David Wells in 1998, and David Cone in 1999. Wells later claimed he was a "little hung-over" while throwing his perfect game.Ironically, given the Yankees' celebrated history, none of the eleven pitchers who tossed no-hitters for the franchise is in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

George Mogridge threw the first no-hitter in Yankees history, beating their rival Boston Red Sox 2–1, their only no-hitter in which the opposition scored. Their most recent no-hitter was David Cone's perfect game in 1999, the seventh Yankees no-hitter thrown by a right-handed pitcher and their third perfect game. The Yankees' first perfect game was also thrown by a right-handed pitcher, Don Larsen, and came in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series. Larsen's perfect game was the only no-hitter in MLB postseason play until Roy Halladay of the Philadelphia Phillies pitched a no-hitter in Game 1 of the 2010 National League Division Series. Coincidentally, Cone's perfect game came on "Yogi Berra Day" at Yankee Stadium. Berra had caught Larsen's perfect game and both he and Larsen were in the stands for the game. Of the eleven no-hitters pitched by Yankees players, three each have been won by the scores 4–0 and 2–0, more common than any other result. The largest margin of victory in a Yankees no-hitter was 13 runs, in a 13–0 win by Monte Pearson.

Andy Hawkins lost a game on July 1, 1990 to the Chicago White Sox while on the road by the score of 4–0 without allowing a hit. Because the White Sox were winning entering the ninth inning at home, they did not bat, and thus Hawkins pitched only 8 innings, but the game was considered a no-hitter at the time. However, following rules changes in 1991, the game is no longer counted as a no-hitter. Additionally, Tom L. Hughes held the Cleveland Indians without a hit through the first nine innings of a game on August 6, 1910 but the game went into extra innings and he lost the no-hitter in the tenth inning and ultimately lost the game 5–0.The longest interval between Yankees no-hitters was between the game pitched by Larsen on October 8, 1956 and Dave Righetti's no hitter on July 4, 1983, encompassing 26 years, 8 months, and 26 days. The shortest gap between such games fell between Allie Reynolds' two no-hitters in 1951, a gap of just 2 months and 16 days from July 12 till September 28. Reynolds is the only Yankees pitcher to throw multiple no-hitters in his career, and one of only six pitchers in Major League history to throw multiple no-hitters in a season along with Max Scherzer in 2015, Roy Halladay in 2010, Nolan Ryan in 1973, Virgil Trucks in 1952, and Johnny Vander Meer in 1938. The Red Sox and the Cleveland Indians have been no-hit by the Yankees more than any other franchise, each doing so three times. Notably, Reynolds' two no-hit victims in 1951 were the Red Sox and the Indians.

The umpire is also an integral part of any no-hitter. The task of the umpire in a baseball game is to make any decision "which involves judgment, such as, but not limited to, whether a batted ball is fair or foul, whether a pitch is a strike or a ball, or whether a runner is safe or out... [the umpire's judgment on such matters] is final." Part of the duties of the umpire making calls at home plate includes defining the strike zone, which "is defined as that area over homeplate (sic) the upper limit of which is a horizontal line at the midpoint between the top of the shoulders and the top of the uniform pants, and the lower level is a line at the hollow beneath the kneecap." These calls define every baseball game and are therefore integral to the completion of any no-hitter. No umpire has called multiple Yankee no-hitters. Bill Dinneen, the umpire who called Sad Sam Jones' 1923 no-hitter, is the only person in MLB history to both pitch (for the Red Sox in 1905) and umpire (five total, including Jones') a no-hitter. The plate umpire for Larsen's perfect game, Babe Pinelli, apocryphally "retired" after that game, but that is mere legend; in reality, since Larsen's perfecto was only Game 5 of the seven-game Series, Pinelli didn't officially retire until two days later, concluding his distinguished umpiring career at second base during Game 7, not at home plate during Game 5.

List of Philadelphia Phillies no-hitters

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Philadelphia. They play in the National League East division. Also known in their early years as the "Philadelphia Quakers", pitchers for the Phillies have thrown thirteen separate no-hitters in franchise history. A no-hitter is officially recognized by Major League Baseball only "when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings", though one or more batters "may reach base via a walk, an error, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference". No-hitters of less than nine complete innings were previously recognized by the league as official; however, several rule alterations in 1991 changed the rule to its current form. A no-hitter is rare enough that one team in Major League Baseball has never had a pitcher accomplish the feat.Of the thirteen no-hitters pitched by Phillies players, three have been won by a score of 6–0, and three by a score of 1–0, more common than any other results. The largest margin of victory in a Phillies no-hitter was ten runs, in a 10–0 win by Chick Fraser. Charlie Ferguson's no-hitter, the first in franchise history, was a 1–0 victory, as were two of the more recent regular season no-hitters, thrown by Kevin Millwood in 2003 and Roy Halladay in 2010. Three pitchers to throw no-hitters for the Phillies have been left-handed: Johnny Lush (in 1906), Terry Mulholland (in 1990) and Cole Hamels (in 2015). The other eight pitchers were right-handed. Halladay is the only Phillies' pitcher to throw more than one no-hitter in a Phillies uniform, and others, including Hall of Famer Jim Bunning, have pitched more than one in their careers. The longest interval between Phillies no-hitters was between the games pitched by Lush and Bunning, encompassing 58 years, 1 month, and 20 days from May 1, 1906 to June 21, 1964. Conversely, the shortest interval between no-hitters was between Halladay's two 2010 no-hitters, with a total of merely four months and seven days from May 29 to October 6; the shortest gap between regular-season no-hitters was between Mulholland's and Tommy Greene's games (nine months and eight days from August 15, 1990 to May 23, 1991). Two opponents have been no-hit by the Phillies more than one time: the San Francisco Giants, who were defeated by Mulholland (in 1990) and Millwood (in 2003); and the Cincinnati Reds, who were no-hit by Rick Wise (in 1971) and Halladay (in 2010).

The umpire is also an integral part of any no-hitter. The task of the umpire in a baseball game is to make any decision "which involves judgment, such as, but not limited to, whether a batted ball is fair or foul, whether a pitch is a strike or a ball, or whether a runner is safe or out… [the umpire's judgment on such matters] is final." Part of the duties of the umpire making calls at home plate includes defining the strike zone, which "is defined as that area over homeplate (sic) the upper limit of which is a horizontal line at the midpoint between the top of the shoulders and the top of the uniform pants, and the lower level is a line at the hollow beneath the kneecap." These calls define every baseball game and are therefore integral to the completion of any no-hitter. A different umpire presided over each of the Phillies' thirteen no-hitters, including Wes Curry, who created Major League Baseball's catcher interference rule.Two perfect games, a special subcategory of no-hitter, have been pitched in Phillies history. This feat was achieved by Bunning in 1964, which was the first perfect game in the National League since 1880, and Halladay in 2010. As defined by Major League Baseball, "in a perfect game, no batter reaches any base during the course of the game."On July 25, 2015, Phillies left-hander Cole Hamels threw his first career no-hitter in a 5–0 win over the Chicago Cubs at the historic Wrigley Field. He narrowly missed completing a perfect game by walking two Cubs batters. Odubel Herrera, Phillies centerfielder, nearly dropped the game's final out at the warning track after he overran a long fly ball hit by Cubs rookie sensation Kris Bryant; Herrera, however, was able to snag the ball with an awkward sliding catch to close out the game and preserve Hamels's no-hitter. In addition to this being Cole Hamels's first no-hitter, this was the fourth no hitter caught by longtime Phillies catcher Carlos Ruiz, who now has tied the MLB record for no-hitters caught.

McCovey Cove

McCovey Cove is the unofficial name of a section of San Francisco Bay beyond the right field wall of Oracle Park, home of the San Francisco Giants, named after famed Giants first baseman Willie McCovey. The proper name for the cove is China Basin, which is the mouth of Mission Creek as it meets the bay. The cove is bounded along the north by Oracle Park, with a ferry landing and a breakwater at the northeast end. The southern shore is lined by China Basin Park and McCovey Point. To the east, it opens up to San Francisco Bay, while the west end of the cove is bounded by the Lefty O'Doul Bridge, named after San Francisco ballplayer and manager Lefty O'Doul.

Nate McLouth

Nathan Richard McLouth (born October 28, 1981) is an American former professional baseball outfielder. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Atlanta Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates, Baltimore Orioles and Washington Nationals. Primarily a center fielder, McLouth bats from the left side and throws from the right. He is 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and weighs 185 pounds (84 kg).

No-hitter

In baseball, a no-hitter (also known as a no-hit game and colloquially as a no-no) is a game in which a team was not able to record a single hit. Major League Baseball (MLB) officially defines a no-hitter as a completed game in which a team that batted in at least nine innings recorded no hits. A pitcher who prevents the opposing team from achieving a hit is said to have "thrown a no-hitter". This is a rare accomplishment for a pitcher or pitching staff: only 302 have been thrown in Major League Baseball history since 1876, an average of about two per year. In most cases in MLB, no-hitters are recorded by a single pitcher who throws a complete game; one thrown by two or more pitchers is a combined no-hitter. The most recent major league no-hitter by a single pitcher was thrown on May 7, 2019 by Mike Fiers of the Oakland Athletics against the Cincinnati Reds at the Oakland Coliseum; this was also the 300th no-hitter in MLB history. The most recent combined no-hitter was thrown on August 3, 2019 by Aaron Sanchez, Will Harris, Joe Biagini, and Chris Devenski of the Houston Astros against the Seattle Mariners at Minute Maid Park.

It is possible to reach base without a hit, most commonly by a walk, error, or being hit by a pitch. (Other possibilities include the batter reaching first after an uncaught third strike or catcher's interference.) A no-hitter in which no batters reach base at all is a perfect game, a much rarer feat. Because batters can reach base by means other than a hit, a pitcher can throw a no-hitter (though not a perfect game) and still give up runs, and even lose the game, although this is extremely uncommon and most no-hitters are also shutouts. One or more runs were given up in 25 recorded no-hitters in MLB history, most recently by Ervin Santana of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in a 3–1 win at the Cleveland Indians on July 27, 2011. On two occasions, a team has thrown a nine-inning no-hitter and still lost the game. On a further four occasions, a team has thrown a no-hitter for eight innings in a losing effort, but those four games are not officially recognized as no-hitters by Major League Baseball because the outing lasted fewer than nine innings. It is theoretically possible for opposing pitchers to throw no-hitters in the same game, although this has never happened in the majors. Two pitchers, Fred Toney and Hippo Vaughn, completed nine innings of a game on May 2, 1917 without either giving up a hit or a run; Vaughn gave up two hits and a run in the 10th inning, losing the game to Toney, who completed the extra-inning no-hitter.

Paul Nauert

Paul Edward Nauert (born July 7, 1963) is an American professional baseball umpire who has umpired in Major League Baseball (MLB) since becoming a part-time National League (NL) umpire in 1995.Nauert previously worked in the Appalachian League (1988), the Midwest League (1989–1990), the Florida Instructional League (1988–1990), the Southern League (1991–1992), and the International League (1993–1998). He was the base umpire during the 27-inning, eight-hour-and-15-minute, Bluefield at Burlington game of June 24, 1988, that ended at 3:27 am on June 25.

Nauert umpired his first National League game on May 19, 1995, and was one of 22 umpires whose resignations were accepted in 1999 (the resignations were part of a failed union negotiating strategy). On being rehired in 2002, he became part of the Major League Baseball umpire staff. Nauert has worked the 2004 American League Division Series, the 2008 National League Division Series, the 2010 National League Division Series, the 2013 National League Division Series, the 2014 American League Division Series, the 2016 National League Championship Series, and the 2017 National League Division Series. He was a part of the crew that worked both the 2008 MLB China Series (the first MLB games ever played in China) and the 2008 Japan Opening Series. Nauert also worked the 2009 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

Philadelphia Phillies

The Philadelphia Phillies are a professional baseball team based in Philadelphia, USA. The Phillies compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member of the National League (NL) East division. Since 2004, the team's home has been Citizens Bank Park, located in South Philadelphia. The Phillies are the oldest, continuous, one-name, one-city franchise in American professional sports.

The Phillies have won two World Series championships (against the Kansas City Royals in 1980 and the Tampa Bay Rays in 2008) and seven National League pennants, the first of which came in 1915. Since the first modern World Series was played in 1903, the Phillies played 77 consecutive seasons (and 97 seasons from the club's establishment) before they won their first World Series—longer than any other of the 16 teams that made up the major leagues for the first half of the 20th century. They are one of the more successful franchises since the start of the Divisional Era in Major League Baseball. The Phillies have won their division 11 times, which ranks 6th among all teams and 4th in the National League, including five consecutive division titles from 2007 to 2011.

The franchise was founded in Philadelphia in 1883, replacing the team from Worcester, Massachusetts in the National League. The team has played at several stadiums in the city, beginning with Recreation Park and continuing at Baker Bowl; Shibe Park, which was later renamed Connie Mack Stadium in honor of the longtime Philadelphia Athletics manager; Veterans Stadium, and now Citizens Bank Park.

The team's spring training facilities are located in Clearwater, Florida, where its Class-A minor league affiliate Clearwater Threshers plays at Spectrum Field. Another Class-A, affiliate, the Lakewood BlueClaws play in Lakewood, New Jersey. The Phillies' Double-A affiliate is the Reading Fightin Phils, which play in Reading, Pennsylvania. The Triple-A affiliate is the Lehigh Valley IronPigs, playing in Allentown, Pennsylvania.

Roger Clemens

William Roger Clemens (born August 4, 1962), nicknamed "Rocket", is an American former baseball pitcher who played 24 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for four teams. Clemens was one of the most dominant pitchers in major league history, tallying 354 wins, a 3.12 earned run average (ERA), and 4,672 strikeouts, the third-most all time. An 11-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion, he won seven Cy Young Awards during his career, more than any other pitcher in history. Clemens was known for his fierce competitive nature and hard-throwing pitching style, which he used to intimidate batters.

Clemens debuted in the major leagues in 1984 with the Boston Red Sox, whose pitching staff he anchored for 12 years. In 1986, he won the American League (AL) Cy Young Award, the AL Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award, and the All-Star Game MVP Award, and he struck out an MLB-record 20 batters in a single game (Clemens repeated the 20-strikeout feat 10 years later). After the 1996 season, Clemens left Boston via free agency and joined the Toronto Blue Jays. In each of his two seasons with Toronto, Clemens won a Cy Young Award, as well as the pitching triple crown by leading the league in wins, ERA, and strikeouts. Prior to the 1999 season, Clemens was traded to the New York Yankees where he won his two World Series titles. In 2003, he reached his 300th win and 4,000th strikeout in the same game. Clemens left for the Houston Astros in 2004, where he spent three seasons and won his seventh Cy Young Award. He rejoined the Yankees in 2007 for one last season before retiring. He is the only pitcher in major league history to record over 350 wins and strike out over 4,500 batters.

Clemens was alleged by the Mitchell Report to have used anabolic steroids during his late career, mainly based on testimony given by his former trainer, Brian McNamee. Clemens firmly denied these allegations under oath before the United States Congress, leading congressional leaders to refer his case to the Justice Department on suspicions of perjury. On August 19, 2010, a federal grand jury at the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., indicted Clemens on six felony counts involving perjury, false statements and Contempt of Congress. Clemens pleaded not guilty, but proceedings were complicated by prosecutorial misconduct, leading to a mistrial. The verdict from his second trial came in June 2012, when Clemens was found not guilty on all six counts of lying to Congress.

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