2008 Pro Bowl

The 2008 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2007 season. It was played at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii on February 10, 2008. The game was televised in the United States by Fox and began shortly after 11:40am local time (4:40pm EST) following Pole Qualyfiling for 2008 Daytona 500. The NFC won, 42–30, despite a 17-point first half AFC lead. NFC running back Adrian Peterson rushed 16 times for 129 yards and was named the game's MVP, winning a Cadillac CTS in recognition of his efforts.

The starting rosters for the game were released on December 18, 2007, with New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady starting for the AFC and the Green Bay Packers' Brett Favre for the NFC. However, Brett Favre withdrew due to an ankle injury. Notable Pro Bowl selections included the late Sean Taylor. The Dallas Cowboys had a record thirteen players named to the Pro Bowl roster, while five teams, including all four members of the NFC South, had no players initially named (Jeff Garcia of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers was later chosen as a replacement quarterback for Brett Favre.) On February 4, 2008, Brady, Patriots receiver Randy Moss, Chargers tight end Antonio Gates, and Chargers defensive lineman Jamal Williams decided to pull out of the 2008 Pro Bowl. Brady was replaced by Cleveland Browns quarterback Derek Anderson, Moss was replaced by Cincinnati Bengals receiver Chad Johnson, Gates was replaced by Browns tight end Kellen Winslow, and Williams was replaced by Pittsburgh Steelers defensive lineman Casey Hampton.[3]

The AFC was coached by Norv Turner of the San Diego Chargers staff, while Mike McCarthy and the staff of the Green Bay Packers coached the NFC. Three Washington Redskins players (Chris Cooley, Chris Samuels and Ethan Albright) wore #21 in memory of Taylor, their deceased teammate.[4] The game featured 41 players appearing in their first Pro Bowl (out of 86 total players), the most in eight years.[5] In addition, the NFC played their first defensive play with only ten players on the field, lacking a free safety, in Taylor's honor.

The game was the most watched Pro Bowl since 2000, pulling in a Nielsen rating of 6.3 and a 12 share.[6] It also marked the first ever Pro Bowl to be televised by Fox. The 2008 Pro Bowl also marked the fewest players represented by a Super Bowl winning team, with Osi Umenyiora being the lone representative of the New York Giants, winners of Super Bowl XLII.

2008 NFL Pro Bowl
2008 Pro Bowl
AFC NFC
30 42
Head coach:
Norv Turner
(San Diego Chargers)
Head coach:
Mike McCarthy
(Green Bay Packers)
1234 Total
AFC 171030 30
NFC 714714 42
DateFebruary 10, 2008
StadiumAloha Stadium, Honolulu, Hawaii
MVPAdrian Peterson (Minnesota Vikings)
RefereeBill Carollo
Attendance50,044[1]
Ceremonies
National anthemKelly Rowland
Coin tossWill Shields and United States Navy Admiral Timothy J. Keating
TV in the United States
NetworkFox
AnnouncersKenny Albert, Daryl Johnston, Tony Siragusa, and Brian Baldinger[2]

Scoring summary

Coin toss at 2008 Pro Bowl 080210-N-4965F-004
Pre-game coin toss

AFC roster

Offense

Position Starter(s) Reserve(s) Alternate(s)
Quarterback 12 Tom Brady, New England[b] 18 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis[c]
  7 Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh
  3 Derek Anderson, Cleveland[a]
Running back 21 LaDainian Tomlinson, San Diego[b] 29 Joseph Addai, Indianapolis[c]
39 Willie Parker, Pittsburgh[b]
28 Fred Taylor, Jacksonville[a]
23 Willis McGahee, Baltimore[a]
Fullback 41 Lorenzo Neal, San Diego
Wide receiver 81 Randy Moss, New England[b]
87 Reggie Wayne, Indianapolis
17 Braylon Edwards, Cleveland[c]
84 T.J. Houshmandzadeh, Cincinnati
85 Chad Johnson, Cincinnati[a]
Tight end 85 Antonio Gates, San Diego[b] 88 Tony Gonzalez, Kansas City[c] 80 Kellen Winslow II, Cleveland[a]
Offensive tackle 72 Matt Light, New England
71 Jason Peters, Buffalo [b]
75 Jonathan Ogden, Baltimore [b] 73 Joe Thomas, Cleveland [a][c]
73 Marcus McNeill, San Diego [a]
Offensive guard 66 Alan Faneca, Pittsburgh
70 Logan Mankins, New England
68 Kris Dielman, San Diego
Center 63 Jeff Saturday, Indianapolis 67 Dan Koppen, New England

Defense

Position Starter(s) Reserve(s) Alternate(s)
Defensive end 69 Jared Allen, Kansas City
93 Kyle Vanden Bosch, Tennessee
99 Jason Taylor, Miami[b] 94 Aaron Schobel, Buffalo[a]
Defensive tackle 92 Albert Haynesworth, Tennessee
75 Vince Wilfork, New England
76 Jamal Williams, San Diego[b] 98 Casey Hampton, Pittsburgh[a]
Outside linebacker 92 James Harrison, Pittsburgh
50 Mike Vrabel, New England
56 Shawne Merriman, San Diego
Inside linebacker 59 DeMeco Ryans, Houston 52 Ray Lewis, Baltimore
Cornerback 24 Champ Bailey, Denver
22 Asante Samuel, New England
31 Antonio Cromartie, San Diego
Free safety 20 Ed Reed, Baltimore
Strong safety 21 Bob Sanders, Indianapolis[b] 43 Troy Polamalu, Pittsburgh[b] 47 John Lynch, Denver[a][c]
41 Antoine Bethea, Indianapolis[a]

Special teams

Position: Player:
Punter   9 Shane Lechler, Oakland
Placekicker   2 Rob Bironas, Tennessee
Kick returner 16 Joshua Cribbs, Cleveland
Special teamer 81 Kassim Osgood, San Diego
Long snapper 64 Ryan Pontbriand, Cleveland[d]

NFC roster

Offense

Position Starter(s) Reserve(s) Alternate(s)
Quarterback   4 Brett Favre, Green Bay[b]   9 Tony Romo, Dallas[c]
  8 Matt Hasselbeck, Seattle
  7 Jeff Garcia, Tampa Bay[a]
Running back 28 Adrian Peterson, Minnesota 24 Marion Barber III, Dallas
36 Brian Westbrook, Philadelphia
Fullback 49 Tony Richardson, Minnesota
Wide receiver 11 Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona
81 Terrell Owens, Dallas
80 Donald Driver, Green Bay
81 Torry Holt, St. Louis
Tight end 82 Jason Witten, Dallas 47 Chris Cooley, Washington[f]
Offensive tackle 76 Flozell Adams, Dallas
71 Walter Jones, Seattle[b]
60 Chris Samuels, Washington[c][f] 76 Chad Clifton, Green Bay[a]
Offensive guard 70 Leonard Davis, Dallas
76 Steve Hutchinson, Minnesota
73 Shawn Andrews, Philadelphia
Center 65 Andre Gurode, Dallas 78 Matt Birk, Minnesota

Defense

Position Starter(s) Reserve(s) Alternate(s)
Defensive end 74 Aaron Kampman, Green Bay
97 Patrick Kerney, Seattle[b]
72 Osi Umenyiora, N.Y. Giants[c] 58 Trent Cole, Philadelphia[a]
Defensive tackle 93 Kevin Williams, Minnesota
94 Pat Williams, Minnesota
91 Tommie Harris, Chicago[b] 90 Darnell Dockett, Arizona[a]
Outside linebacker 59 Julian Peterson, Seattle
94 DeMarcus Ware, Dallas
55 Lance Briggs, Chicago[b] 98 Greg Ellis, Dallas[a]
Inside linebacker 51 Lofa Tatupu, Seattle 52 Patrick Willis, San Francisco
Cornerback 31 Al Harris, Green Bay
23 Marcus Trufant, Seattle
41 Terence Newman, Dallas
Free safety 21 Sean Taylor, Washington[e] 26 Ken Hamlin, Dallas[c]
Strong safety 42 Darren Sharper, Minnesota 31 Roy Williams, Dallas[g]

Special teams

Position: Player:
Punter   4 Andy Lee, San Francisco
Placekicker   6 Nick Folk, Dallas
Kick returner 23 Devin Hester, Chicago
Special teamer 94 Brendon Ayanbadejo, Chicago
Long snapper 67 Ethan Albright, Washington[d][f]

Notes:

a Replacement selection due to injury or vacancy
b Injured player; selected but did not play
c Replacement starter; selected as reserve
d "Need player"; named by coach
e Posthumous selection
f Wore 21 in honor of Sean Taylor
g Replacement for posthumous selection Sean Taylor

Number of selections per team

AFC Team Selections NFC Team Selections
San Diego Chargers 9 Dallas Cowboys 13
New England Patriots 8 Minnesota Vikings 7
Cleveland Browns 6 Seattle Seahawks 6
Indianapolis Colts 6 Green Bay Packers 5
Pittsburgh Steelers 6 Chicago Bears 4
Baltimore Ravens 4 Washington Redskins 4
Tennessee Titans 3 Philadelphia Eagles 3
Buffalo Bills 2 Arizona Cardinals 2
Cincinnati Bengals 2 San Francisco 49ers 2
Denver Broncos 2 New York Giants 1
Kansas City Chiefs 2 St. Louis Rams 1
Houston Texans 1 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 1
Jacksonville Jaguars 1 Atlanta Falcons 0
Miami Dolphins 1 Carolina Panthers 0
Oakland Raiders 1 Detroit Lions 0
New York Jets 0 New Orleans Saints 0

Halftime

The halftime show featured a performance by the band Lifehouse, who played their songs "Hanging by a Moment" and "First Time".

Foreign transmissions

References

  1. ^ NFL.com. "2008 Pro Bowl Gamebook" (PDF). Retrieved 2008-02-10.
  2. ^ Maffei, John (2008-02-08). "Davis focuses on job with ESPN". North County Times. Retrieved 2008-02-10.
  3. ^ "Judge: Vick can keep bonus". Associated Press. 2008-02-05. Archived from the original on February 10, 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-09.
  4. ^ Sakamoto, Kyle (2008-02-08). "Redskins to honor fallen teammate". The Honolulu Advertiser website. Archived from the original on 14 February 2008. Retrieved 2008-02-09.
  5. ^ Jaymes Song (2008-02-09). "Fred Taylor among 41 Pro Bowl 'rookies'". Associated Press. Retrieved 2008-02-09.
  6. ^ "Pro Bowl draws highest ratings since 2000". Associated Press. 2008-02-12. Retrieved 2008-02-13.

External links

2007 Cleveland Browns season

The 2007 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 59th season as a professional sports franchise and its 55th season as a member of the National Football League (NFL). The season began with the Browns attempting to improve upon their 4–12 record from the 2006 season, in which the team finished in fourth place in the AFC North. The Browns also attempted to overcome the many injuries that plagued the team throughout the 2006 season. The Browns remained under the supervision of head coach Romeo Crennel and they played all of their home games in Cleveland Browns Stadium in Cleveland, Ohio.

During the 2007 NFL Draft, the Browns selected Wisconsin offensive tackle Joe Thomas with the third overall selection. The Browns were also able to draft Notre Dame quarterback Brady Quinn with the 22nd overall selection, after completing a trade with the Dallas Cowboys, which saw the Browns send their second-round pick in the 2007 draft, along with their first-round pick in the 2008 NFL Draft, to the Cowboys for their first-round selection at number 22. The Browns completed their first-day draft by selecting UNLV cornerback Eric Wright, following another trade with Dallas, which saw the Browns giving up their third- and fourth-round picks in the 2007 draft and swapping sixth-round picks with the Cowboys.During the off-season, the Browns signed key free agents Eric Steinbach (Cincinnati, offensive guard), Jamal Lewis (Baltimore, running back), and Robaire Smith (Tennessee, defensive end).The Browns ultimately finished the season with a 10–6 record but nevertheless failed to qualify for the playoffs. They were beaten for the division title on a tiebreaker by the Pittsburgh Steelers and lost another tiebreaker for a wildcard berth to the Tennessee Titans. As of the 2018 NFL season, this remains the best record and the last winning season the Browns have had since returning to the NFL in 1999.

2007 Green Bay Packers season

The 2007 Green Bay Packers season was the franchise's 89th overall and 87th season in the National Football League. The Packers finished the regular season with an impressive 13–3 record. They received a bye for the first round of the playoffs, won their divisional round playoff game, and lost in the NFC Championship game to the eventual Super Bowl champion New York Giants. This was the last season for quarterback Brett Favre as a Green Bay Packer.

This season also marked the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Packers' home stadium of Lambeau Field. The Packers' tenure at Lambeau, now at 59 seasons, is the longest in NFL history at a single stadium, breaking the Chicago Bears' previous record of 50 seasons at Wrigley Field (1921–1970).

2009 Pro Bowl

The 2009 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2008 season. It was played at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii on February 8, 2009. This was the most recent year that the game was held after the Super Bowl. The NFC defeated the AFC, 30–21.The AFC was coached by Baltimore's John Harbaugh, while the NFC's coach was Philadelphia's Andy Reid.

Chad Clifton

Jeffrey Chad Clifton (born June 26, 1976) is a former American football offensive tackle for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Tennessee, and was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the second round of the 2000 NFL Draft. With the Packers, he won Super Bowl XLV over the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Chris Samuels

Chris Samuels (born July 28, 1977) is a former American college and professional football player who was an offensive tackle in the National Football League (NFL) for ten seasons. He played college football for the University of Alabama, and was recognized as a consensus All-American. Selected third overall in the 2000 NFL Draft, Samuels played his entire pro career for the NFL's Washington Redskins and was a six-time Pro Bowl selection.

Dan Koppen

Daniel Koppen (born September 12, 1979) is a former American football center. He played college football for Boston College, and was drafted by the New England Patriots in the fifth round of the 2003 NFL Draft.

Ed Reed

Edward Earl Reed Jr. (born September 11, 1978) is a former American football safety who spent the majority of his career with the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Miami, where he was a two-time consensus All-American. He was drafted by the Ravens in the first round of the 2002 NFL Draft and played eleven seasons for Baltimore before playing with the Houston Texans and New York Jets in 2013.

During his playing career, Reed was selected to nine total Pro Bowls, was the 2004 NFL Defensive Player of the Year Award winner, and has an NFL record for the two longest interception returns (106 yards in 2004 and 107 yards in 2008). He also holds the all-time NFL record for interception return yards, with 1,590, and postseason interceptions (9, tied with three other players). His 64 regular season interceptions ranked him 6th on the NFL's all-time leader list at the time of his retirement. Reed is considered to be one of the greatest safeties in NFL history, and was often referred to as a "ball hawk" during his prime. Reed was known for studying film to memorize opposing teams' tendencies, as well as his ability to lure quarterbacks into throwing interceptions. In 2019, Reed was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, his first year of eligibility.

Eric Steinbach

Eric Steinbach (born April 4, 1980) is a former American football guard who played for nine seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Iowa, and earned consensus All-American honors. He was selected by the Cincinnati Bengals in the second round of the 2003 NFL Draft. He played for the Bengals from 2003 to 2006 and the Cleveland Browns from 2007 to 2011.

Jamir Miller

Jamir Malik Miller (born November 19, 1973) is a former American college and professional football player who was a linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for nine seasons. He played college football for the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and received All-American honors. A first-round pick in the 1994 NFL Draft, he played professionally for the Arizona Cardinals and Cleveland Browns of the NFL.

Jammal Brown

Jammal Filbert Brown (born March 30, 1981) is a former American football offensive tackle who played in the National Football League (NFL) for seven seasons. He played college football for the University of Oklahoma, and received unanimous All-American recognition. The New Orleans Saints chose him in the first round of the 2005 NFL Draft, and he was selected for the Pro Bowl twice. He last played for the Washington Redskins.

Lawrence Vickers

Lawrence Blanchard Vickers, Jr. (born May 8, 1983) is a former American football fullback. He was drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the sixth round of the 2006 NFL Draft. He played college football for the University of Colorado Buffaloes.

Logan Mankins

Logan Lee Mankins (born March 10, 1982) is a former American football guard who played eleven seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Fresno State, and was drafted by the New England Patriots in the first round of the 2005 NFL Draft. Mankins also played for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

Marcus Trufant

Marcus Lavon Trufant (born December 25, 1980) is a former American football player who was a cornerback in the National Football League (NFL) for ten seasons. He played college football for Washington State University, and was chosen by the Seattle Seahawks 11th overall in the 2003 NFL Draft.

From 2010-2012 Trufant helped mentor the young Seahawks secondary that became known as the Legion of Boom.

Matt Light

Matthew Charles "Matt" Light (born June 23, 1978) is a former American football offensive tackle who spent his entire eleven-year career playing for the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Purdue University. He was picked by the Patriots in the second round of the 2001 NFL Draft.

Pro Bowl

The Pro Bowl is the all-star game of the National Football League (NFL). From the merger with the rival American Football League (AFL) in 1970 up through 2013 and since 2017, it is officially called the AFC–NFC Pro Bowl, matching the top players in the American Football Conference (AFC) against those in the National Football Conference (NFC). From 2014 through 2016, the NFL experimented with an unconferenced format, where the teams were selected by two honorary team captains (who are each in the Hall of Fame), instead of selecting players from each conference. The players were picked in a televised "schoolyard pick" prior to the game.Unlike most major sports leagues, which hold their all-star games roughly midway through their regular seasons, the Pro Bowl is played around the end of the NFL season. The first official Pro Bowl was played in January 1951, three weeks after the 1950 NFL Championship Game (between 1939 and 1942, the NFL experimented with all-star games pitting the league's champion against a team of all-stars). Between 1970 and 2009, the Pro Bowl was usually held the weekend after the Super Bowl. Since 2010, it has been played the weekend before the Super Bowl. Players from the two teams competing in the Super Bowl do not participate.

For years, the game has suffered from lack of interest due to perceived low quality, with observers and commentators expressing their disfavor with it in its current state. It draws lower TV ratings than regular season NFL games, although the game draws similar ratings to other major all-star games, such as the Major League Baseball All-Star Game. However, the biggest concern of teams is to avoid injuries to the star players. The Associated Press wrote that players in the 2012 game were "hitting each other as though they were having a pillow fight".Between 1980 and 2016, the game was played at Aloha Stadium in Hawaii except for two years (2010 and 2015). On June 1, 2016, the NFL announced that they reached a multi-year deal to move the game to Orlando, Florida as part of the league's ongoing efforts to make the game more relevant.

Sean Taylor

Sean Michael Maurice Taylor (April 1, 1983 – November 27, 2007) was an American football free safety for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Redskins with the fifth overall pick of the 2004 NFL Draft where he played for four seasons until his death in 2007.

As a high school player, Taylor led Gulliver Prep to a Florida state championship and rushed for a state record 44 touchdowns in a season. He subsequently played college football as a defensive back for the University of Miami, where he was a member of the Hurricanes' 2001 BCS National Championship team, and earned unanimous All-American honors.

Taylor's success in college led to him being selected in the first round of the 2004 draft by the Redskins where he gained a reputation as a hard-hitting player. Due to his ferocious hits, several of his Redskins teammates nicknamed him "Meast", from the expression "half man, half beast." He made one Pro Bowl appearance in 2006.

During the 2007 NFL season, Taylor was shot by intruders at his Miami area home and died 10 days later on November 27. His death led to an outpouring of national support and sympathy, especially in the Washington, D.C. area, where Taylor had been a fan favorite as a Redskin, and the Miami area, where he had starred in high school and college. Posthumously, he earned a second Pro Bowl selection and First Team All-Pro honors.

Shaun O'Hara

Shaun O'Hara (born June 23, 1977) is a former American football center who played in the National Football League for eleven seasons. He played college football for Rutgers University. He began his professional career by signing as an undrafted free agent with the Cleveland Browns, and spent the majority of his NFL career with the New York Giants. He was a three-time Pro Bowl selection.

Tony Richardson (American football)

Antonio Richardson (born December 17, 1971) is a former American football fullback who played in the National Football League (NFL) for sixteen seasons. He played college football for Auburn University. He was signed by the Dallas Cowboys as an undrafted free agent in 1994. A three-time Pro Bowl selection, Richardson played for the NFL's Minnesota Vikings, Kansas City Chiefs and New York Jets.

He is considered one of the best fullbacks in NFL history having blocked for 1,000 yards rushers in nine consecutive NFL seasons in addition to leading the Kansas City Chiefs in rushing yards in 2000. During those seasons he blocked for multiple Pro Bowl running backs including Priest Holmes, Larry Johnson, Adrian Peterson and Thomas Jones.

On March 5, 2016, the Chiefs announced Richardson would be inducted into the team's Hall of Fame during the 2016 season.

Torry Holt

Torry Jabar Holt (born June 5, 1976) is a former professional American football player who was a wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL) for eleven seasons. He was named to the Pro Bowl seven times and retired with the 10th most receiving yards, including a record six consecutive seasons with 1,300 yards. He played college football at North Carolina State University, and earned consensus All-American honors. He was drafted by the St. Louis Rams in the first round of the 1999 NFL Draft, and spent the next ten years with the Rams and is remembered as one of the members of the "Greatest Show on Turf."

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