2007 Pro Bowl

The 2007 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2006 season. The game took place on February 10, 2007, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The game was held on a Saturday instead of the usual Sunday after the Super Bowl because of a request by broadcaster CBS.[2] The 2007 Pro Bowl marked the 28th consecutive time that the National Football League's all-star game is held in Honolulu. The NFC was coached by Sean Payton of the New Orleans Saints. The AFC was coached by Bill Belichick of the New England Patriots.

AFC quarterback Carson Palmer was selected as the Most Valuable Player of the game. This Pro Bowl is mainly remembered for Sean Taylor's big hit on Buffalo Bills punter Brian Moorman.

2007 NFL Pro Bowl
2007 Pro Bowl
NFC AFC
28 31
Head coach:
Sean Payton
(New Orleans Saints)
Head coach:
Bill Belichick
(New England Patriots)
1234 Total
NFC 014014 28
AFC 014710 31
DateFebruary 10, 2007
StadiumAloha Stadium, Honolulu, Hawaii
MVPCarson Palmer (Cincinnati Bengals)
RefereeLarry Nemmers
Attendance50,410[1]
Ceremonies
National anthemJasmine Trias
Coin tossHonolulu Mayor Mufi Hannemann
TV in the United States
NetworkCBS
AnnouncersGreg Gumbel, Phil Simms, Dan Dierdorf, and Shannon Sharpe

Scoring summary

  • 1st Quarter
    • None.
  • 2nd Quarter
    Vince Young 2007 Pro Bowl
    AFC quarterback Vince Young scrambles past Antonio Pierce for a first down during the third quarter.
  • 3rd Quarter
    • AFC – LaDainian Tomlinson 3-yard run (Nate Kaeding kick), 9:36. AFC 21–14. Drive: 9 plays, 57 yards, 5:19.
  • 4th Quarter
    • AFC – Chad Johnson 42-yard pass from Palmer (Nate Kaeding kick), 12:47. AFC 28–14. Drive: 3 plays, 71 yards, 1:24.
    • NFC – Steven Jackson 4-yard run (Failed 2 pt. conversion pass from Tony Romo), 2:52. AFC 28–20. Drive: 4 plays, 11 yards, 1:25.
    • NFC – Anquan Boldin 47-yard pass from Tony Romo (S. Smith 2 pt. conversion pass from Tony Romo), 1:48. Tied 28–28. Drive: 4 plays, 58 yards, 1:04.
    • AFC – Nate Kaeding 21-yard FG, 0:00. AFC 31–28. Drive: 7 plays, 63 yards, 1:48.
Vince Young 2007 Pro Bowl
AFC quarterback Vince Young scrambles past Antonio Pierce for a first down during the third quarter.

AFC roster

Offense

Position: Starters: Reserves:
Quarterback 18 Peyton Manning, Indianapolis   9 Carson Palmer, Cincinnati
17 Philip Rivers, San Diego[b]
10 Vince Young, Tennessee[a][e]
Running back 21 LaDainian Tomlinson, San Diego 27 Larry Johnson, Kansas City
39 Willie Parker, Pittsburgh
Fullback 41 Lorenzo Neal, San Diego
Wide receiver 80 Andre Johnson, Houston
85 Chad Johnson, Cincinnati
88 Marvin Harrison, Indianapolis
87 Reggie Wayne, Indianapolis
Tight end 85 Antonio Gates, San Diego 88 Tony Gonzalez, Kansas City
Offensive tackle 71 Willie Anderson, Cincinnati[b]
75 Jonathan Ogden, Baltimore[b]
78 Tarik Glenn, Indianapolis[c]
73 Marcus McNeill, San Diego[a][c]
72 Matt Light, New England[a]
Offensive guard 66 Alan Faneca, Pittsburgh
68 Will Shields, Kansas City
54 Brian Waters, Kansas City
Center 63 Jeff Saturday, Indianapolis 61 Nick Hardwick, San Diego

Defense

Position: Starters: Reserves:
Defensive end 99 Jason Taylor, Miami
94 Aaron Schobel, Buffalo
56 Derrick Burgess, Oakland
Defensive tackle 93 Richard Seymour, New England[b]
76 Jamal Williams, San Diego
98 Casey Hampton, Pittsburgh[c]
98 John Henderson, Jacksonville[a]
Outside linebacker 96 Adalius Thomas, Baltimore
56 Shawne Merriman, San Diego
55 Terrell Suggs, Baltimore
Inside linebacker 56 Al Wilson, Denver[b]
54 Zach Thomas, Miami[c]
52 Ray Lewis, Baltimore[a][b]
57 Bart Scott, Baltimore[a]
Cornerback 24 Champ Bailey, Denver
27 Rashean Mathis, Jacksonville
21 Chris McAlister, Baltimore
Strong safety 43 Troy Polamalu, Pittsburgh
Free safety 20 Ed Reed, Baltimore 47 John Lynch, Denver

Special teams

Position: Player:
Punter   8 Brian Moorman, Buffalo
Placekicker 10 Nate Kaeding, San Diego
Kick returner 22 Justin Miller, N.Y. Jets
Special teamer 81 Kassim Osgood, San Diego
Long snapper 50 David Binn, San Diego[d]

NFC roster

Offense

Position: Starters: Reserves:
Quarterback   9 Drew Brees, New Orleans 10 Marc Bulger, St. Louis
  9 Tony Romo, Dallas
Running back 21 Frank Gore, San Francisco 21 Tiki Barber, N.Y. Giants
39 Steven Jackson, St. Louis
Fullback 38 Mack Strong, Seattle
Wide receiver 81 Torry Holt, St. Louis[b]
89 Steve Smith, Carolina
80 Donald Driver, Green Bay[c]
81 Anquan Boldin, Arizona
11 Roy Williams, Detroit[a]
Tight end 83 Alge Crumpler, Atlanta 80 Jeremy Shockey, N.Y. Giants[b]
82 Jason Witten, Dallas[a]
Offensive tackle 71 Walter Jones, Seattle
70 Jammal Brown, New Orleans[b]
76 Flozell Adams, Dallas[a][c]
60 Chris Samuels, Washington
Offensive guard 76 Steve Hutchinson, Minnesota
73 Shawn Andrews, Philadelphia[b]
71 Larry Allen, San Francisco[c]
74 Ruben Brown, Chicago[a]
Center 57 Olin Kreutz, Chicago[b]
78 Matt Birk, Minnesota[c]
65 Andre Gurode, Dallas[a]

Defense

Position: Starters: Reserves:
Defensive end 90 Julius Peppers, Carolina
91 Will Smith, New Orleans
74 Aaron Kampman, Green Bay
Defensive tackle 91 Tommie Harris, Chicago[b]
93 Kevin Williams, Minnesota
77 Kris Jenkins, Carolina[c]
94 Pat Williams, Minnesota[a]
Outside linebacker 55 Lance Briggs, Chicago[b]
94 DeMarcus Ware, Dallas
59 Julian Peterson, Seattle[c]
55 Derrick Brooks, Tampa Bay[a]
Inside linebacker 54 Brian Urlacher, Chicago[b]
51 Lofa Tatupu, Seattle[c]
58 Antonio Pierce, N.Y. Giants[a]
Cornerback 20 Ronde Barber, Tampa Bay
21 DeAngelo Hall, Atlanta
26 Lito Sheppard, Philadelphia[b]
27 Walt Harris, San Francisco[a]
Strong safety 24 Adrian Wilson, Arizona
Free safety 20 Brian Dawkins, Philadelphia[b]
31 Roy Williams, Dallas[c]
21 Sean Taylor, Washington[a]

Special teams

Position: Player:
Punter   1 Mat McBriar, Dallas
Placekicker   9 Robbie Gould, Chicago
Kick returner 23 Devin Hester, Chicago
Special teamer 94 Brendon Ayanbadejo, Chicago
Long snapper 83 Dave Moore, Tampa Bay[d]

Notes:

a Replacement selection due to injury or vacancy
b Injured player; selected but did not play
c Replacement starter; selected as reserve
d "Need player"; named by coach
e Tom Brady was first alternate, but he declined[3]

Number of selections by team

  • 11 selections:
    • San Diego Chargers
  • 8 selections:
    • Chicago Bears
  • 7 selections:
    • Dallas Cowboys, Baltimore Ravens
  • 5 selections:
    • Indianapolis Colts
  • 4 selections:
    • Kansas City Chiefs, Minnesota Vikings, Pittsburgh Steelers, Seattle Seahawks
  • 3 selections:
    San Francisco 49ers, Carolina Panthers, Cincinnati Bengals, Denver Broncos, New Orleans Saints, Philadelphia Eagles, St. Louis Rams, New York Giants, Tampa Bay Buccaneers
  • 2 selections:
    • Arizona Cardinals, Atlanta Falcons, Buffalo Bills, Green Bay Packers, Jacksonville Jaguars, Miami Dolphins, New England Patriots, Washington Redskins
  • 1 selection:
    • Tennessee Titans, Houston Texans, New York Jets, Oakland Raiders, Detroit Lions
  • No selections:
    • Cleveland Browns

Officials

2007 Pro Bowl Cheerleading Squad

[4]

AFC

  • Leslie Anderson, Baltimore Ravens
  • Aimee, Buffalo Bills
  • Deanna Hazeley, Cincinnati Bengals
  • Holly Flahery, Denver Broncos
  • Tiffany Engelking, Houston Texans
  • Kristie Minton, Indianapolis Colts
  • Amy Froemming, Jacksonville Jaguars
  • Shanna Hill, Kansas City Chiefs
  • Jaime Edmondson, Miami Dolphins
  • Briana Lee, New England Patriots
  • Megan Myers, Oakland Raiders
  • Stacie Gazonas, San Diego Chargers
  • Jennifer Hill, Tennessee Titans
  • Brooke Bodnar, New York Jets

NFC

  • Brooke Castaneda, Arizona Cardinals
  • Jamie Ratliff, Atlanta Falcons
  • Kelly Randazzo, Carolina Panthers
  • Megan Fox, Dallas Cowboys
  • Stephanie Baker, Minnesota Vikings
  • Kristen Aucoin, New Orleans Saints
  • Amanda Wynn, Philadelphia Eagles
  • Janelle Delgado, San Francisco 49ers
  • Colleen Murphy, Seattle Seahawks
  • Erin Donnelly, St. Louis Rams
  • Jessica Diaz, Tampa Bay Buccaneers
  • Kimberly Linberger, Washington Redskins

References

  1. ^ "National Football League – CBSSports.com". Archived from the original on 2008-02-07. Retrieved 2008-02-11.
  2. ^ Reardon, Dave (2006-03-10). "Pro Bowl's move to Saturday fine with HTA". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. Retrieved 2007-02-10.
  3. ^ Beacham, Greg (2007-02-09). "Vince Young Not on Vacation at Pro Bowl". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2007-06-19.
  4. ^ The Professional Cheerleader Blog

Sources

External links

2006 Chicago Bears season

The 2006 Chicago Bears season was the franchise's 87th season in the National Football League and 25th post-season completed in the National Football League. The Bears posted a 13–3 regular season record, the best in the NFC, improving on their previous year’s record of 11–5. The Bears retained their NFC North divisional title, and won the National Football Conference Championship title against the New Orleans Saints, on January 21, 2007. The Bears played the Indianapolis Colts at Super Bowl XLI, where they lost 29–17. They finished the 2006 NFL season tied for second in points scored, and third in points allowed.Due to the NFL's scheduling formula the Bears played 6 intra-division games, posting a record of 5–1. Because of rotating cycle scheduling, the Bears matched up against all four teams in the AFC East (going 2–2) and NFC West (going 4–0). In the remaining games, the Bears played the NFC's other reigning division winners, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and New York Giants, posting a record of 2–0. During the entire season, the Bears played 10 games at home, 8 games on the road, and 1 game at a neutral field for the Super Bowl. Including the playoffs and Super Bowl, the Bears finished with a record of 15–4.

Noteworthy football stories for the 2006 season were replacing retired cornerback and kick returner Jerry Azumah, the quarterback controversy between productive but inconsistent and potentially fragile Rex Grossman and veteran free agent Brian Griese, the record setting returns by Devin Hester, Bernard Berrian's breakout season, competition between the Bears' running backs (Cedric Benson and Thomas Jones), and 5th round draft pick Mark Anderson's 12 quarterback sacks as a rookie.

2006 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 2006 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 47th season, their 44th in Kansas City, and 37th in the National Football League.

The season began with the team looking to improve on their 10–6 record from 2005 under new head coach Herman Edwards.

The team battled many obstacles during the 2006 season, including the loss of starting quarterback Trent Green in the first game, the readjustment of a record-breaking offense, and the death of owner and founder Lamar Hunt. Despite the obstacles, the team gained momentum after rebounding from an 0–2 start, clinching the sixth seed in the 2006-07 playoffs with a 9–7 record. The team finished second in the AFC West with a 4–2 divisional record.

The Chiefs entered week 17 of the season a long shot to make the playoffs, needing a win and a loss from the Denver Broncos, Cincinnati Bengals, and Tennessee Titans. In an unlikely clinching scenario, the Chiefs defeated the Jaguars 35–30, the Bengals lost to the Steelers 23–17, the Titans lost to the Patriots 40–23, and the Broncos lost to the 49ers 26–23 in overtime, allowing the Chiefs to clinch their first playoff berth since the 2003 season. The Chiefs lost in the Wild Card round of the playoffs 8–23 to their playoff rival and eventual Super Bowl champions, the Indianapolis Colts.

Aaron Schobel

Aaron Ross Schobel (; born September 1, 1977) is a former American football defensive end for the Buffalo Bills of the National Football League (NFL). Schobel played college football for Texas Christian University (TCU). He was drafted by the Buffalo Bills in the second round (46th overall) of the 2001 NFL Draft, and he played his entire nine-season career for the Bills. Schobel is notable for recording more sacks of New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady than any other NFL player.

Aloha Stadium

Aloha Stadium is a stadium located in Halawa, Hawaii, a western suburb of Honolulu (though with a Honolulu address). It is the largest stadium in the state of Hawaii. Aloha Stadium is home to the University of Hawaiʻi Rainbow Warriors football team (Mountain West Conference, NCAA Division I FBS).

It hosts the NCAA's Hawai'i Bowl, and formerly was home to the National Football League's Pro Bowl from 1980 through 2016 (except in 2010 and 2015) and to the NCAA's Hula Bowl from 1975 to 1997 and again from 2006 to 2008. It also hosts numerous high school football games during the season, and serves as a venue for large concerts and events. A swap meet in the stadium's parking lot every Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday draws large crowds.Aloha Stadium was home field for the AAA Hawaii Islanders of the Pacific Coast League (PCL) from 1975 to 1987, before the team moved to Colorado Springs.

Antonio Pierce

Antonio Durran Pierce (born October 26, 1978) is a former American football linebacker who played in the National Football League for nine seasons. He played college football for the University of Arizona. He was signed by the Washington Redskins as an undrafted free agent, and also played for the New York Giants. He is currently the linebackers coach at Arizona State University.

Brian Moorman

Brian Donald Moorman (born February 5, 1976) is a former American football punter. He played college football for Pittsburg State University, and was signed by the Seattle Seahawks as an undrafted free agent in 1999 and played for the Buffalo Bills from 2001 to 2012, to which he returned after a one-year absence in 2013. He also played for the Dallas Cowboys in 2012. Moorman is a two-time Pro Bowl selection and was voted into the Buffalo Bills' 50th Anniversary Team. He is the founder of the P.U.N.T. Foundation which supports children in Western New York who face life-threatening illnesses.

Corey Graham

Corey Dewayne Graham (born July 25, 1985) is an American football free safety who is currently a free agent. He was drafted by the Chicago Bears in the fifth round of the 2007 NFL Draft. He played college football at New Hampshire. He has also played for the Baltimore Ravens and Buffalo Bills. Graham is a one-time Pro Bowler and two time Super Bowl champion.

Dave Toub

Dave Toub (born June 1, 1962) is the assistant head coach and special teams coordinator for the Kansas City Chiefs of the National Football League.

Greg Ellis (American football)

Gregory Lemont Ellis (born August 14, 1975) is a former football defensive end who played in the National Football League (NFL) for twelve seasons. He played college football for the University of North Carolina, and was recognized as an All-American. He was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in the first round of the 1998 NFL Draft, and also played a season for the Oakland Raiders.

Horned helmet

Horned helmets were worn by many people around the world. Headpieces mounted with animal horns or replicas were also worn, as in the Mesolithic Star Carr. These were probably used for religious ceremonial or ritual purposes. Horns tend to be impractical on a combat helmet. Much of the evidence for these helmets and headpieces comes from depictions rather than the items themselves.

Jeff Faine

Jeffrey Kalei Faine (born April 6, 1981) is a former American football center. He was drafted by the Cleveland Browns 21st overall in the 2003 NFL Draft. He played college football at Notre Dame.

Faine, a Pro Bowl alternate in 2007, has also played for the New Orleans Saints, Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Cincinnati Bengals.

Kris Dielman

Kristopher M. Dielman (born February 3, 1981) is a former American football guard who played for the San Diego Chargers of the National Football League (NFL) for nine seasons. He played college football for Indiana University. The San Diego Chargers signed him as an undrafted free agent in 2003, and he played his entire professional career for the Chargers. He was selected to the Pro Bowl four times, and was a member of the Chargers 50th Anniversary Team.

Larry Allen

Larry Christopher Allen Jr. (born November 27, 1971) is a former American football guard who played in the National Football League (NFL) for fourteen seasons. He was drafted by the Dallas Cowboys in the second round of the 1994 NFL Draft. He played college football at Sonoma State University. At 6 ft 3 in height and weighing 325 pounds, Allen is regarded as one of the physically strongest men to have ever played in the NFL, having recorded an official bench press of 705 lb (320 kg) and a squat of 905 lb (411 kg). He also did 10 repetitions of incline bench press weighing 520 lb (236 kg). Despite his strength and size, he still had speed to run down defenders.An 11-time Pro Bowl selection, Allen played 12 seasons with the Cowboys and earned a Super Bowl ring with the team after a 27–17 win over the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl XXX. He played his final two seasons with the San Francisco 49ers before signing a one-day contract with the Dallas Cowboys, allowing him to retire with the organization that drafted him, prior to the 2008 regular season. In his career, he played in more Pro Bowls than any other Dallas Cowboys offensive player in franchise history. On February 2, 2013, Allen was voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Marcus McNeill

Marcus McNeill (born November 16, 1983) is a former American college and professional football player who was an offensive tackle in the National Football League (NFL) for six seasons. He played college football for Auburn University, and was two-time All-American. The San Diego Chargers selected McNeill in the second round of the 2006 NFL Draft, and he played his entire pro career for the Chargers. He was selected for the Pro Bowl twice.

Matt Light

Matthew Charles "Matt" Light (born June 23, 1978) is a former American football offensive tackle who spent his entire eleven-year career playing for the New England Patriots of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Purdue University. He was picked by the Patriots in the second round of the 2001 NFL Draft.

Ruben Brown

Ruben Parnell Brown (born February 13, 1972) is a former American football guard who played in the National Football League (NFL) for thirteen seasons. He was drafted by the Buffalo Bills 14th overall in the 1995 NFL Draft. He played college football at Pittsburgh.

Brown played nine seasons for the Bills and four more for the Chicago Bears, starting all 181 games in which he played. He was a four-time All-Pro and nine-time Pro Bowl selection, including eight consecutive Pro Bowl selections with the Bills from 1996 to 2003. He is the older brother of former NFL linebacker Cornell Brown.

Brown attended E. C. Glass High School in Lynchburg, Virginia.

Sean Taylor

Sean Michael Maurice Taylor (April 1, 1983 – November 27, 2007) was an American football free safety for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Redskins with the fifth overall pick of the 2004 NFL Draft where he played for four seasons until his death in 2007.

As a high school player, Taylor led Gulliver Prep to a Florida state championship and rushed for a state record 44 touchdowns in a season. He subsequently played college football as a defensive back for the University of Miami, where he was a member of the Hurricanes' 2001 BCS National Championship team, and earned unanimous All-American honors.

Taylor's success in college led to him being selected in the first round of the 2004 draft by the Redskins where he gained a reputation as a hard-hitting player. Due to his ferocious hits, several of his Redskins teammates nicknamed him "Meast", from the expression "half man, half beast." He made one Pro Bowl appearance in 2006.

During the 2007 NFL season, on November 26 Taylor was shot by intruders at his Miami area home and died the next day on November 27. His death led to an outpouring of national support and sympathy, especially in the Washington, D.C. area, where Taylor had been a fan favorite as a Redskin, and the Miami area, where he had starred in high school and college. Posthumously, he earned a second Pro Bowl selection and First Team All-Pro honors.

Walt Harris (cornerback)

Walter Lee "Walt" Harris (born August 10, 1974) is a former American football cornerback who played in the National Football League (NFL) for thirteen seasons. He played college football for Mississippi State University and was drafted by the Chicago Bears in the first round (13th overall) in the 1996 NFL Draft. He played for the Bears for six years and was then signed as a free agent by the Indianapolis Colts in 2002. He then signed with Washington Redskins in 2004. He signed with the San Francisco 49ers in 2006 where he earned his 1st trip to the Pro Bowl.

Harris signed with the 49ers in 2006, where he led the team with a career-high eight interceptions.

He was awarded NFC Defensive Player of the Month in November 2006. Harris was also selected to represent the National Football Conference (NFC) in the 2007 Pro Bowl, in place of injured Philadelphia Eagles cornerback Lito Sheppard.

Harris blocked an extra point in a 17-16 LaGrange High School victory against Colquitt County in the 1991 AAAA state championship game, a win that led LaGrange High School to be named national champion by USA Today.

Zach Thomas

Zachary Michael Thomas (born September 1, 1973) is a former American college and professional football player who was a middle linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for thirteen seasons. He played college football for Texas Tech University, and was recognized as a unanimous All-American. He was drafted by the Miami Dolphins in the fifth round of the 1996 NFL Draft, and played for the Dolphins his first twelve seasons in the NFL, before playing his 13th and final season with the Dallas Cowboys.

A seven time Pro Bowl selection, and seven time first or second team All-Pro, Thomas recorded more than 1,700 combined tackles in his career, was named the AFC Defensive Rookie of the Year in 1996, a two-time NFL Alumni Linebacker of the Year, and was selected to the NFL 2000s All-Decade Team. In 2015, Thomas was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

All-Star Games
NFL Pro Bowls
AFC–NFC Pro Bowls
Draft Pro Bowls
Related programs
Related articles
Commentators
Lore
Music
NFL Championship
Super Bowl
Pro Bowl

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.