2005 Pulitzer Prize

The Pulitzer Prizes for 2005 were announced on 2005-04-04.

Gen pulitzer
The gold medal awarded for Public Service in Journalism

Journalism

Letters and drama

External links

Anja Niedringhaus

Anja Niedringhaus (12 October 1965 – 4 April 2014) was a German photojournalist who worked for the Associated Press (AP). She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers that won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography for coverage of the Iraq War. That same year she was awarded the International Women's Media Foundation's Courage in Journalism prize.Niedringhaus had covered Afghanistan for several years before she was killed on Friday, 4 April 2014, while covering the presidential election, after an Afghan policeman opened fire at the car she was waiting in at a checkpoint, part of an election convoy.

Bilal Hussein

Bilal Hussein is an Iraqi Associated Press photojournalist based in Fallujah, Iraq. He was arrested in Ramadi by U.S. forces in April 2006 and detained on suspicion of aiding insurgents in Iraq. He was taken into custody to face charges in the Iraqi Central Court, reportedly over the circumstances of his photos, which were supplied by the U.S. military. American and Iraqi governments were criticized for violating the Geneva Conventions, and for detaining Hussein without evidence. He was finally released without charge in 2008. That year, Hussein won an International Press Freedom Award.

One of his photographs was among a group of 20 Associated Press photographs that won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography. His was an image of four insurgents in Fallujah firing a mortar and small arms during the U.S.-led offensive in the city in November 2004.On September 17, 2006, the AP reported that Hussein had been imprisoned by the United States military since April 2006 without publicly known charges or hearings; his captors citing "imperative reasons of security" under United Nations resolutions. Hussein was taken into U.S. custody on April 12, 2006 in Ramadi, Iraq, and had since been held without charge. On November 20, 2007, the US military announced that they would soon be bringing criminal charges against Hussein, and would be turning the case over to Iraqi judges. On April 9, 2008 an Iraqi judicial panel ordered Hussein's release, ruling (according to the AP) that he was covered by an Iraqi amnesty law. On April 14, 2008 the US military announced it would release Hussein from custody by April 16 of that year, saying only that "he no longer presents an imperative threat to security".

Borzou Daragahi

Borzou Daragahi (born c. 1969) is an Iranian-American print and radio journalist, who is International Correspondent for The Independent. He was previously a correspondent for BuzzFeed News and The Financial Times. He served also as Baghdad bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times.

A U.S. citizen of Iranian descent, Daragahi was a 2005 Pulitzer Prize finalist for his coverage of Iraq and led the bureau that was named a 2007 Pulitzer finalist for its Iraq coverage. He was also named a 2010 Pulitzer finalist for his coverage of the 2009 election unrest in Iran. He has covered Iran, Afghanistan, Lebanon and the wider Middle East. Before joining the Los Angeles Times in 2005, he was a freelance journalist for a number of publications and radio outlets, including the Newark, N.J. Star-Ledger. He also contributed to the Marketplace radio program. He covered the build-up to the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq for the Associated Press.

After 4½ years in Iraq, Daragahi moved on in 2007 to a new assignment in Beirut. On April 10, 2007, The L.A. Times started publishing a front page memoir of his time in Iraq. The article describes the tactics used by reporters working under potentially lethal conditions, and provides personal insight into the effects of terror and stress on those working in combat zones.

In September 2011, Daragahi became the Cairo-based Middle East and North Africa correspondent for the Financial Times. In April 2015, Daragahi joined BuzzFeed News as a new Middle East reporter. He joined The Independent in September 2018.

He is a 1987 alumnus of Homewood-Flossmoor High School in Flossmoor, Ill.

Charles Ornstein

Charles Ornstein is an American journalist. He is currently a senior reporter for ProPublica specializing in health care issues, including medical quality, the United States Department of Veterans Affairs and Big Pharma. He is also an adjunct associate professor of journalism at Columbia University.Born in Detroit, Michigan, Ornstein is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, where he majored in history and psychology and was editor of the college newspaper, the Daily Pennsylvanian. In 1999-2000, he was a Media Fellow with the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. He is a past president and vice president of the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was a reporter for The Dallas Morning News (where he covered health care on the business desk and worked in the Washington bureau) before joining the metro investigative projects team at the Los Angeles Times.

In 2004, Ornstein and Tracy Weber reported "The Trouble at King/Drew Hospital" in a series of articles for the Los Angeles Times. The newspaper received the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service "for its courageous, exhaustively researched series exposing deadly medical problems and racial injustice at a major public hospital". The series was also recognized by other journalism awards.Another series by Ornstein and Weber, "When Caregivers Harm: California's Unwatched Nurses" in 2009, was a finalist for the Public Service Pulitzer. The citation recognized LA Times and ProPublica for "their exposure of gaps in California’s oversight of dangerous and incompetent nurses, blending investigative scrutiny and multimedia storytelling to produce corrective changes."Previously based in Burbank, California, he currently lives in Glen Ridge, New Jersey with his wife and son.

Concerto for Orchestra No. 2 (Stucky)

The Second Concerto for Orchestra is a concerto for orchestra by the American composer Steven Stucky. The work was commissioned by the Los Angeles Philharmonic while Stucky was their composer-in-residence for the inaugural season of the Walt Disney Concert Hall. It was completed in 2003 and was first performed on March 12, 2004, with the conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen leading the Los Angeles Philharmonic. The piece was awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Music.

Connie Schultz

Connie Schultz (born July 21, 1957) is an American writer and journalist. Schultz is a nationally syndicated columnist for Creators Syndicate. She worked at The Cleveland Plain Dealer newspaper from 1993 to 2011. She won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary for "her pungent columns that provided a voice for the underdog and underprivileged." She is married to Sherrod Brown, senior Democratic U.S. Senator for Ohio, and resigned from the paper to avoid a conflict of interest. She teaches journalism at Kent State University.

Copper Canyon Press

Copper Canyon Press is an independent, non-profit small press, specializing in the publication of poetry and located in Port Townsend, Washington. Since 1972, the Press has published poetry exclusively.

Copper Canyon Press publishes new collections of poetry by both revered and emerging American poets, translations of classical and contemporary work from many of the world's cultures, re-issues of out-of-print poetry classics, prose books about poetry, and anthologies.

The press achieved national stature when Copper Canyon poet, W.S. Merwin, won the 2005 National Book Award for Poetry in the same year another Copper Canyon poet, Ted Kooser, won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry and was appointed to a second year as United States Poet Laureate. Merwin later won the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry and in 2010 was named United States Poet Laureate.

Copper Canyon has published more than 400 titles, including works by Nobel Prize Laureates Pablo Neruda, Odysseas Elytis, Octavio Paz, Vicente Aleixandre and Rabindranath Tagore; Pulitzer Prize-winners Ted Kooser, Carolyn Kizer, Maxine Kumin, Theodore Roethke, and W.S. Merwin; National Book Award winners Hayden Carruth, Lucille Clifton, and Ruth Stone; and some contemporary poets and translators such as Jim Harrison, C. D. Wright, Bill Porter (aka Red Pine), Norman Dubie, Eleanor Wilner, Arthur Sze, James Richardson, Tom Hennen and Lucia Perillo.

The press published What About This: Collected Poems of Frank Stanford to great critical acclaim in 2015. In his New York Times review, Dwight Garner complimented the press for performing a "vital and difficult task" and giving the reader "a chance to see him (Stanford) whole." National Public Radio called the book's release "the big event in poetry for 2015."Also in 2015, Copper Canyon Press acquired the U.S. rights to a manuscript of lost poems by Nobel Laureate Pablo Neruda. Discovered by archivists from The Pablo Neruda Foundation in the summer of 2014 just after the April 2013 exhumation of Neruda's body in Chile, this collection of poems has been called "a literary event of universal importance" and "the biggest find in Spanish literature in recent years". The collection, Then Come Back: The Lost Neruda Poems, translated by Pulitzer finalist Forrest Gander, was released in April 2016 and includes full-color, facsimile presentations of Neruda's handwritten poems. Copper Canyon was also awarded the rights to publish Neruda's first book, Crepusulario, which has also never appeared in the U.S. in English translation.

Not only does Copper Canyon Press publish works of established poets, it also strives to publish the first books by extraordinary new poets. In 2016, Copper Canyon published two debut collections: Camille Rankine's Incorrect Merciful Impulses and Ocean Vuong's Night Sky With Exit Wounds; both of these titles received critical acclaim.

Dialogues (Carter)

Dialogues is a composition for solo piano and chamber orchestra by the American composer Elliott Carter. The work was commissioned by the BBC for the pianist Nicolas Hodges and completed in 2003. It was first performed on January 23, 2004 at the Queen Elizabeth Hall in Southbank Centre, London, by Nicolas Hodges and the London Sinfonietta under the conductor Oliver Knussen. The piece was a finalist for the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Music. In 2012, Carter composed a followup to the piece Dialogues II for the conductor Daniel Barenboim's 70th birthday.

Dialogues II

Dialogues II is a composition for piano and chamber orchestra by the American composer Elliott Carter. It was composed in celebration of the conductor Daniel Barenboim's 70th birthday. The work was first performed at La Scala, Milan on October 25, 2012, by Barenboim on the piano and the Orchestra of La Scala under the conductor Gustavo Dudamel. Composed at the age of 103, Dialogues II was one of Carter's last completed orchestral compositions before his death in November 2012. The piece is a followup to the composer's 2003 Dialogues, which was a finalist for the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Music.

Ghost Wars

Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001, abbreviated as Ghost Wars, is a book written by Steve Coll, published in 2004 by Penguin Press, won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction.

Gilead (novel)

Gilead is a novel written by Marilynne Robinson published in 2004. It won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Critics Circle Award. It is Robinson's second novel, following Housekeeping (1980). Gilead is described in A Study Guide for Marilynne Robinson's Gilead (published by Gale, an imprint of Cengage Learning) as an epistolary novel. In fact the entire narrative is a single, continuing, albeit episodic, document, written on several occasions in a form combining a journal and a memoire. It comprises the fictional autobiography of the Reverend John Ames, an elderly Congregationalist pastor in the small, secluded town of Gilead, Iowa, who knows that he is dying of a heart condition. At the beginning of the book, the date is established as 1956, and Ames explains that he is writing an account of his life for his seven-year-old son, who will have few memories of him.

John Patrick Shanley

John Patrick Shanley (born October 13, 1950) is an American playwright, screenwriter, and director. His play, Doubt: A Parable, won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and the 2005 Tony Award for Best Play. He won the 1988 Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for his film Moonstruck.

Mitchell Landsberg

Mitchell Landsberg is an American journalist and newspaper editor. Since 2018 he has been the foreign editor of the Los Angeles Times.Landsberg was born November 1, 1953 in Sacramento, California. He received a bachelor's degree in history from UCLA in 1976.After graduation he worked at the Beverly Hills Independent and the Ukiah Daily Journal. In 1980 he went to work for the Associated Press, where he was a reporter, editor, and foreign correspondent for 19 years, moving to the Times in 1989. At the Times he reported on local and national politics, including coverage of the 2000 Florida recount, the 2003 California gubernatorial recall election, and the 2010 Haiti earthquake.Landsberg was one of three journalists cited by name when the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Reporting was given to the Los Angeles Times for "compelling and comprehensive coverage of the massive wildfires that imperiled a populated region of southern California." He was the lead writer for a 70-member team covering the fire stories. The next year, his reporting contributed to the newspaper's winning of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. He and three other reporters were credited for a "courageous, exhaustively researched series exposing deadly medical problems and racial injustice at a major public hospital", the King/Drew Medical Center.

Nigel Jaquiss

Nigel Jaquiss (born 1962) is an American journalist who won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting, for his work exposing former Oregon Governor Neil Goldschmidt's sexual abuse of a 14-year-old girl while he was mayor of Portland, Oregon. His story was published in Willamette Week in May 2004. He continues to write for Willamette Week.

Suketu Mehta

Suketu Mehta is a writer based in New York City. He was born in Kolkata, India, to Gujarati parents and raised in Mumbai where he lived until his family moved to the New York area in 1977. He has attended New York University and the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop.His autobiographical account of his experiences in the city of Mumbai, Maximum City, was published in 2004. The book, based on two and a half years research, explores the underbelly of the sprawling city. It was a 2005 Pulitzer Prize finalist.

Suketu Mehta also co-wrote the screenplay to the Bollywood film Mission Kashmir with novelist Vikram Chandra. His next book This Land Is Our Land: An Immigrant's Manifesto, will be published in June 2019.

Suketu lives in Manhattan. He is currently working on a book about the New York City immigrant experience. He joined the New York University journalism faculty in 2008.

The Clean House

The Clean House is a play by Sarah Ruhl, which premiered in 2004 at Yale Repertory Theatre, was produced Off-Broadway in 2006, and has since been produced in many theaters. The play is a whimsical romantic comedy centered on Matilde, a Brazilian cleaning woman who would rather be a comedian. The play was a finalist for the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

Tracy Weber

Tracy Weber in La Grange, Illinois an American journalist, a reporter for ProPublica.Tracy was one of the country's top track runners as a high school student. She recorded a 4:44.7 mile while competing for the Cindergals Running Club (San Jose) and Lynbrook High School in California.

She graduated from University of California, Berkeley with a B.A. and M.A. in Journalism in 1989.

She was a reporter for the Orange County Register and the Los Angeles Times.In 2004, Weber and Charles Ornstein reported "The Trouble at King/Drew Hospital" in a series of articles for the Los Angeles Times. The newspaper received the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service "for its courageous, exhaustively researched series exposing deadly medical problems and racial injustice at a major public hospital". The series was also recognized by other journalism awards.Another series by Ornstein and Weber, "When Caregivers Harm: California's Unwatched Nurses" in 2009, was a finalist for the Public Service Pulitzer. The citation recognized LA Times and ProPublica for "their exposure of gaps in California’s oversight of dangerous and incompetent nurses, blending investigative scrutiny and multimedia storytelling to produce corrective changes."

Weber is married, with two children.

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