2005 NFL season

The 2005 NFL season was the 86th regular season of the National Football League.

Regular season play was held from September 8, 2005 to January 1, 2006. The regular season also saw the first ever regular season game played outside the United States, as well as the New Orleans Saints being forced to play elsewhere due to damage to the Superdome and the entire New Orleans area by Hurricane Katrina.

The playoffs began on January 7. New England's streak of 10 consecutive playoff wins and chance at a third straight Super Bowl title was ended in the Divisional Playoff Round by the Denver Broncos, and eventually the NFL title was won by the Pittsburgh Steelers, who defeated the Seattle Seahawks 21–10 in Super Bowl XL at Ford Field in Detroit, Michigan on February 5 for their fifth Super Bowl win. This also marked the first time that a sixth-seeded team, who by the nature of their seeding would play every game on the road, would advance to and win the Super Bowl.

The season formally concluded with the Pro Bowl, the league's all-star game, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii on February 12.

2005 National Football League season
Regular season
DurationSeptember 8, 2005 – January 1, 2006
Playoffs
Start dateJanuary 7, 2006
AFC ChampionsPittsburgh Steelers
NFC ChampionsSeattle Seahawks
Super Bowl XL
DateFebruary 5, 2006
SiteFord Field, Detroit, Michigan
ChampionsPittsburgh Steelers
Pro Bowl
DateFebruary 12, 2006
SiteAloha Stadium

Television

This marked the final season that ABC held the rights to televise Monday Night Football after thirty-six years of airing the series. When the TV contracts were renewed near the end of the season, the rights to broadcast Monday Night Football were awarded to Disney-owned corporate sibling ESPN. NBC bought the right to televise Sunday Night Football, marking the first time that the network broadcast NFL games since Super Bowl XXXII in 1998.[1] Meanwhile, CBS and Fox renewed their television contracts to the American Football Conference and the National Football Conference packages, respectively.[2]

First regular season game played outside the United States

The 2005 season also featured the first ever regular season game played outside the United States when a San Francisco 49ersArizona Cardinals game was played at Estadio Azteca in Mexico City on October 2 (the Cardinals won 31–14). The game drew an NFL regular season record of 103,467 paid fans. It was a home game for the Cardinals, mostly because the team rarely sold out at their then-home field, Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, Arizona. This season was the last year that the Cardinals played at Sun Devil Stadium; the team then moved to their new Cardinals Stadium in nearby Glendale.

Effect of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season

Effect of Hurricane Katrina

Superdome Roof Damage FEMA
The Louisiana Superdome did not host the New Orleans Saints during the 2005 season, due in part to damage seen here.

Due to the damage caused by Hurricane Katrina to the Louisiana Superdome and the greater New Orleans area, the New Orleans Saints’ entire 2005 home schedule was played at different venues while the Saints set up temporary operations in San Antonio, Texas. The Saints’ first home game scheduled for September 18 against the New York Giants was moved to September 19 at Giants Stadium, where the Giants won 27–10. The impromptu “Monday Night doubleheader” with the game already scheduled (Washington Redskins at Dallas Cowboys) was a success, and was made a permanent part of the schedule the next year when Monday Night Football made the move to ESPN.

As a result of the unscheduled doubleheader, the NFL designated its second weekend, September 18 and 19, as “Hurricane Relief Weekend’, with fund raising collections at all of the league's games. The Saints’ remaining home games were split between the Alamodome in San Antonio and Louisiana State University's Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Being forced to travel to 13 of their 16 games (only 3 of their games were actually played in the same city where they practiced) and practice in substandard facilities and conditions in San Antonio, the Saints finished 3–13, their worst season since 1999.

The last time an NFL franchise had to play at an alternate site was in 2002, when the Chicago Bears played home games in Champaign, Illinois, 120 miles (200 km) away, due to the reconstruction of Soldier Field.[3] The last NFL team to abandon their home city during a season was the hapless 1952 Dallas Texans, whose franchise was returned to the league after drawing several poor crowds at the Cotton Bowl. They played their final “home” game at the Rubber Bowl in Akron, Ohio, against the Bears on Thanksgiving; the Texans stunned the Bears, 27–23, in front of a crowd estimated at 3,000, for their only win of the season.[4]

Effect of Hurricane Wilma

The Sunday, October 23 game between the Kansas City Chiefs and the Miami Dolphins at Dolphins Stadium was rescheduled to Friday, October 21 at 7:00 pm EDT to beat Hurricane Wilma's arrival to the Miami, Florida area.[5] The Chiefs won the game, 30–20, and became the first visiting team to travel and play on the same day. Since the game was planned for Sunday afternoon, it is one of the few times in history that the Dolphins wore their road jerseys in a home game played at night.

Major rule changes

  • The “horse-collar tackle”, in which a defender grabs inside the back or side of an opponent's shoulder pads and pulls that player down, is prohibited.[6] Named the “Roy Williams Rule” after the Dallas Cowboys safety whose horse collar tackles during the 2004 season caused serious injuries to Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Terrell Owens, Tennessee Titans wide receiver Tyrone Calico, and Baltimore Ravens running back Musa Smith.
  • Peel-back blocks (where an offensive player blocks a defender who is moving back toward the direction of his own end zone) below the waist and from the back are now illegal.
  • Unnecessary roughness would be called for blocks away from the play on punters or kickers, similar to the same protection quarterbacks have after interceptions.
  • When time is stopped by officials prior to the snap for any reason while time is in, the play clock resumes with the same amount of time that remained on it – with a minimum of 10 seconds. Previously, the play-clock would be reset to 25 seconds.
  • During field goal and extra point attempts, the defensive team will be penalized for unsportsmanlike conduct if it calls consecutive timeouts in an attempt to "ice" the kicker. Previously, the second timeout request was only denied by officials, and thus could be used to distract the kickers.
  • Players cannot run, dive into, cut, or throw their bodies against or on an opponent who is out of the play or should not have reasonably anticipated such contact.
  • If the defensive team commits a dead ball foul following the end of the half, the offensive team may choose to extend the period for one more play. Previously, the half automatically ended without the defensive team being penalized.
  • During a punt, if the kicking team illegally touches the ball inside the 5-yard line, the receiving team has the option of either treating the result as a touchback or replaying the down with a 5-yard penalty against the kicking team. Previously, the receiving team's only options were either the latter or taking over possession at the spot of the foul. This change prevents an ineligible player from keeping a kick from entering the end zone and becoming a touchback.
  • If the kicking team commits a penalty, the receiving team can have the option of adding the penalty yardage to the return or taking a penalty and forcing the kicking team to rekick the ball. Previously they could take the latter or decline the penalty.
  • If a team calls for an instant replay challenge after it has used all its challenges or is out of timeouts, it will be assessed an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty. The penalty will also be assessed if a team calls for a challenge inside of two minutes of either half or overtime, when only the replay assistant can initiate reviews. Previously, the request was only denied by the Referee. This change was made to prevent head coaches from constantly stopping the game for any reason, including to just argue with the Referee.
  • Teams are only able to request an instant replay challenge by tossing their red flag to get the attention of officials. The league decided to do away with the electronic pager/vibrating alert system used by head coaches because practically all of them always used their red flags instead of their pagers anyway. (However, the replay assistant will still use the pagers to notify the officials of a replay request.)

New uniforms

Patriots-Steelers 2005
Defending champions the New England Patriots at the eventual Super Bowl winners the Pittsburgh Steelers, September 25
  • Buffalo Bills – Added third alternative uniforms. The 1960s throwback with the white helmets with the red buffalo.
  • New York Giants – Road uniform changed to mimic the team's classic 1960s look, with red block numbers and stripes on the sleeves of the jersey.
  • Detroit Lions – Added third alternative uniforms. Black.
  • St. Louis Rams – New alternative navy road pants.
  • Arizona Cardinals – New logo. New uniforms.

Stadiums

The New Orleans Saints played in Baton Rouge’s Tiger Stadium and in San Antonio's Alamodome due to Louisiana Superdome damaged by Hurricane Katrina. Tiger Stadium’s goalposts did not conform to NFL standards due to (a) two supports instead of one and (b) white paint instead of gold. The NFL granted the Saints dispensation to keep LSU's goalposts in place for their games.

In addition, with the RCA and Edward Jones domes both removing their AstroTurf surfaces in favor of the newer next-generation FieldTurf surface, the old first-generation AstroTurf surface ceased to be used in the NFL.

Coaching changes

Final regular season standings

AFC East
W L T PCT DIV CONF PF PA STK
(4) New England Patriots 10 6 0 .625 5–1 7–5 379 338 L1
Miami Dolphins 9 7 0 .563 3–3 7–5 318 317 W6
Buffalo Bills 5 11 0 .313 2–4 5–7 271 367 L1
New York Jets 4 12 0 .250 2–4 3–9 240 355 W1
AFC North
W L T PCT DIV CONF PF PA STK
(3) Cincinnati Bengals 11 5 0 .688 5–1 7–5 421 350 L2
(6) Pittsburgh Steelers 11 5 0 .688 4–2 7–5 389 258 W4
Baltimore Ravens 6 10 0 .375 2–4 4–8 265 299 L1
Cleveland Browns 6 10 0 .375 1–5 4–8 232 301 W1
AFC South
W L T PCT DIV CONF PF PA STK
(1) Indianapolis Colts 14 2 0 .875 6–0 11–1 439 247 W1
(5) Jacksonville Jaguars 12 4 0 .750 4–2 9–3 361 269 W3
Tennessee Titans 4 12 0 .250 2–4 3–9 299 421 L3
Houston Texans 2 14 0 .125 0–6 1–11 260 431 L2
AFC West
W L T PCT DIV CONF PF PA STK
(2) Denver Broncos 13 3 0 .813 5–1 10–2 395 258 W4
Kansas City Chiefs 10 6 0 .625 4–2 9–3 403 325 W2
San Diego Chargers 9 7 0 .563 3–3 7–5 418 312 L2
Oakland Raiders 4 12 0 .250 0–6 2–10 290 383 L6
NFC East
W L T PCT DIV CONF PF PA STK
(4) New York Giants 11 5 0 .688 4–2 8–4 422 314 W1
(6) Washington Redskins 10 6 0 .625 5–1 10–2 359 293 W5
Dallas Cowboys 9 7 0 .563 3–3 7–5 325 308 L1
Philadelphia Eagles 6 10 0 .375 0–6 3–9 310 388 L2
NFC North
W L T PCT DIV CONF PF PA STK
(2) Chicago Bears 11 5 0 .688 5–1 10–2 260 202 L1
Minnesota Vikings 9 7 0 .563 5–1 8–4 306 344 W1
Detroit Lions 5 11 0 .313 1–5 3–9 254 345 L1
Green Bay Packers 4 12 0 .250 1–5 4–8 298 344 W1
NFC South
W L T PCT DIV CONF PF PA STK
(3) Tampa Bay Buccaneers 11 5 0 .688 5–1 9–3 300 274 W2
(5) Carolina Panthers 11 5 0 .688 4–2 8–4 391 259 W1
Atlanta Falcons 8 8 0 .500 2–4 5–7 351 341 L3
New Orleans Saints 3 13 0 .188 1–5 1–11 235 398 L5
NFC West
W L T PCT DIV CONF PF PA STK
(1) Seattle Seahawks 13 3 0 .813 6–0 10–2 454 271 L1
St. Louis Rams 6 10 0 .375 1–5 3–9 363 429 W1
Arizona Cardinals 5 11 0 .313 3–3 4–8 311 387 L1
San Francisco 49ers 4 12 0 .250 2–4 3–9 239 428 W2
Tiebreakers[7]
  • Cincinnati finished ahead of Pittsburgh in the AFC North based on better division record (5–1 to 4–2).
  • Baltimore finished ahead of Cleveland in the AFC North based on better division record (2–4 to 1–5).
  • Tampa Bay finished ahead of Carolina in the NFC South based on better division record (5–1 to 4–2).
  • Chicago clinched the NFC’s #2 seed instead of Tampa Bay or the N.Y. Giants based on better conference record (10–2 to Buccaneers’ 9–3 and Giants’ 8–4).
  • Tampa Bay clinched the NFC's #3 seed instead of the N.Y. Giants based on better conference record (9–3 to 8–4).

Playoffs

Within each conference, the four division winners and the two wild card teams (the top two non-division winners with the best overall regular season records) qualified for the playoffs. The four division winners are seeded 1 through 4 based on their overall won-lost-tied record, and the wild card teams are seeded 5 and 6. The NFL does not use a fixed bracket playoff system, and there are no restrictions regarding teams from the same division matching up in any round. In the first round, dubbed the wild-card playoffs or wild-card weekend, the third-seeded division winner hosts the sixth seed wild card, and the fourth seed hosts the fifth. The 1 and 2 seeds from each conference then receive a bye in the first round. In the second round, the divisional playoffs, the number 1 seed hosts the worst surviving seed from the first round (seed 4, 5 or 6), while the number 2 seed will play the other team (seed 3, 4 or 5). The two surviving teams from each conference's divisional playoff games then meet in the respective AFC and NFC Conference Championship games, hosted by the higher seed. Although the Super Bowl, the fourth and final round of the playoffs, is played at a neutral site, the designated home team is based on an annual rotation by conference.

Playoff seeds
Seed AFC NFC
1 Indianapolis Colts (South winner) Seattle Seahawks (West winner)
2 Denver Broncos (West winner) Chicago Bears (North winner)
3 Cincinnati Bengals (North winner) Tampa Bay Buccaneers (South winner)
4 New England Patriots (East winner) New York Giants (East winner)
5 Jacksonville Jaguars (wild card) Carolina Panthers (wild card)
6 Pittsburgh Steelers (wild card) Washington Redskins (wild card)

Bracket

                                   
Jan. 8 – Giants Stadium   Jan. 15 – Soldier Field          
 5  Carolina  23
 5  Carolina  29
 4  NY Giants  0     Jan. 22 – Qwest Field
 2  Chicago  21  
NFC
Jan. 7 – Raymond James Stadium  5  Carolina  14
Jan. 14 – Qwest Field
   1  Seattle  34  
 6  Washington  17 NFC Championship
 6  Washington  10
 3  Tampa Bay  10   Feb. 5 – Ford Field
 1  Seattle  20  
Wild card playoffs  
Divisional playoffs
Jan. 8 – Paul Brown Stadium  N1  Seattle  10
Jan. 15 – RCA Dome
   A6  Pittsburgh  21
 6  Pittsburgh  31 Super Bowl XL
 6  Pittsburgh  21
 3  Cincinnati  17     Jan. 22 – Invesco Field at Mile High
 1  Indianapolis  18  
AFC
Jan. 7 – Gillette Stadium  6  Pittsburgh  34
Jan. 14 – Invesco Field at Mile High
   2  Denver  17  
 5  Jacksonville  3 AFC Championship
 4  New England  13
 4  New England  28  
 2  Denver  27  

Milestones

The following teams and players set all-time NFL records during the season:

Record Player/Team Date/Opponent Previous Record Holder[8]
Longest Return of a Missed Field Goal/
Longest Play in NFL History
Nathan Vasher, Chicago (108 yards) November 13, vs. San Francisco Chris McAlister, Baltimore vs. Denver, September 30, 2002 (107 yards)
Most Consecutive Games Played, Career Jeff Feagles, New York Giants November 27, at Seattle Jim Marshall, 1960–1979 (282)
Most Touchdowns, Season Shaun Alexander, Seattle (28) N/A Priest Holmes, Kansas City, 2003 (27)
Most Field Goals, Season Neil Rackers, Arizona (40) N/A Tied by 2 players (39)
Most Field Goals by a Team, Season Arizona (43) N/A Tied by 2 teams (39)

Statistical leaders

Thanksgiving 2005 - Falcons vs. Lions
Atlanta at Detroit on Thanksgiving, November 24, 2005

Team

Points scored Seattle Seahawks (452)
Total yards gained Kansas City Chiefs (6,192)
Yards rushing Atlanta Falcons (2,546)
Yards passing Arizona Cardinals (4,437)
Fewest points allowed Chicago Bears (202)
Fewest total yards allowed Tampa Bay Buccaneers (4,444)
Fewest rushing yards allowed San Diego Chargers (1,349)
Fewest passing yards allowed Green Bay Packers (2,680)

Individual

Scoring Shaun Alexander, Seattle (168 points)
Touchdowns Shaun Alexander, Seattle (28 TDs) *
Most field goals made Neil Rackers, Arizona (40 FGs) *
Rushing Shaun Alexander, Seattle (1,880 yards)
Passer rating Peyton Manning, Indianapolis (104.1 rating)
Passing touchdowns Carson Palmer, Cincinnati (32 TDs)
Passing yards Tom Brady, New England (4,110 yards)
Pass receptions Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona and Steve Smith, Carolina (103 catches)
Pass receiving yards Steve Smith, Carolina (1,563 yards)
Punt returns Reno Mahe, Philadelphia (12.8 average yards)
Kickoff returns Terrence McGee, Buffalo (30.2 average yards)
Interceptions Ty Law, New York Jets and Deltha O'Neal, Cincinnati (10)
Punting Brian Moorman, Buffalo and Shane Lechler, Oakland (45.7 average yards)
Sacks Derrick Burgess, Oakland (16)
* — Denotes new league record.

Awards

Most Valuable Player Shaun Alexander, Running Back, Seattle
Coach of the Year Lovie Smith, Chicago
Offensive Player of the Year Shaun Alexander, Running Back, Seattle
Defensive Player of the Year Brian Urlacher, Linebacker, Chicago
Offensive Rookie of the Year Carnell Williams, Running Back, Tampa Bay
Defensive Rookie of the Year Shawne Merriman, Linebacker, San Diego
NFL Comeback Player of the Year Tedy Bruschi, Linebacker, New England
Steve Smith, Wide Receiver, Carolina (tie)
Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year Peyton Manning, Quarterback, Indianapolis
Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Hines Ward, Wide Receiver, Pittsburgh

Team Superlatives

Roethlisberger-Bettis-Berman
Pittsburgh Super Bowl winners Ben Roethlisberger and Jerome Bettis with sportscaster Chris Berman at Super Bowl XL media day

Offense

  • Most points scored: Seattle, 452
  • Fewest points scored: Cleveland, 232
  • Most total offensive yards: Kansas City, 6,192
  • Fewest total offensive yards: San Francisco, 3,587
  • Most total passing yards: Arizona, 4,437
  • Fewest total passing yards: San Francisco, 1,898
  • Most rushing yards: Atlanta, 2,546
  • Fewest rushing yards: Arizona, 1,138

[9]

Defense

  • Fewest points allowed: Chicago, 202
  • Most points allowed: Houston, 431
  • Fewest total yards allowed: Tampa Bay, 4,444
  • Most total yards allowed: San Francisco, 6,259
  • Fewest passing yards allowed: Green Bay, 2,680
  • Most passing yards allowed: San Francisco, 4,427
  • Fewest rushing yards allowed: San Diego, 1,349
  • Most rushing yards allowed: Houston, 2,303

[10]

All-Pro Team
Offense
Quarterback Peyton Manning, Indianapolis
Running back Shaun Alexander, Seattle
Tiki Barber, N.Y. Giants
Fullback Mack Strong, Seattle
Wide receiver Steve Smith, Carolina
Chad Johnson, Cincinnati
Tight end Antonio Gates, San Diego
Offensive tackle Walter Jones, Seattle
Willie Anderson, Cincinnati
Offensive guard Steve Hutchinson, Seattle
Brian Waters, Kansas City
Alan Faneca, Pittsburgh
Center Jeff Saturday, Indianapolis
Defense
Defensive end Dwight Freeney, Indianapolis
Osi Umenyiora, N.Y. Giants
Defensive tackle Jamal Williams, San Diego
Richard Seymour, New England
Outside linebacker Lance Briggs, Chicago
Derrick Brooks, Tampa Bay
Inside linebacker Brian Urlacher, Chicago
Al Wilson, Denver
Cornerback Champ Bailey, Denver
Ronde Barber, Tampa Bay
Safety Bob Sanders, Indianapolis
Troy Polamalu, Pittsburgh
Special teams
Kicker Neil Rackers, Arizona
Punter Brian Moorman, Buffalo
Kick returner Jerome Mathis, Houston

Draft

The 2005 NFL Draft was held from April 23 to 24, 2005 at New York City's Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. With the first pick, the San Francisco 49ers selected quarterback Alex Smith from the University of Utah.

Officials

Footnotes

  1. ^ "NFL announces new prime-time TV packages". NFL.com. Archived from the original on November 30, 2005. Retrieved December 13, 2005.
  2. ^ "NFL to remain on broadcast TV". NFL.com. Archived from the original on December 4, 2005. Retrieved December 13, 2005.
  3. ^ "NFL History 2001 —". NFL.com. Archived from the original on October 13, 2005. Retrieved October 2, 2005.
  4. ^ Total Football: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. ISBN 0-06-270174-6.
  5. ^ "Chiefs-Dolphins game moved to Oct. 21". NFL.com. Archived from the original on October 23, 2005. Retrieved October 21, 2005.
  6. ^ "NFL approves ban on horse-collar tackle". NFL.com. Archived from the original on May 27, 2005. Retrieved August 18, 2005.
  7. ^ 2006 NFL Record and Fact Book. p. 421. ISBN 1-933405-32-5.
  8. ^ "Records". 2005 NFL Record and Fact Book. NFL. 2005. ISBN 1-932994-36-X.
  9. ^ Pro-Football-Reference.com: 2005 NFL Standings, Team & Offensive Statistics
  10. ^ Pro-Football-Reference.com: 2005 NFL Opposition & Defensive Statistics

References

External links

1990 Cincinnati Bengals season

The 1990 Cincinnati Bengals season was the franchise's 23rd year in professional football and its 21st with the National Football League (NFL). The Bengals won the AFC Central division for the second time in three seasons.

This would be the last time the Bengals would make the playoffs until the 2005 NFL season, and as of 2018, the Bengals have never won a playoff game since this season – the longest such drought in the league.

2005–06 United States network television schedule

The following is the 2005–06 network television schedule for the six major English language commercial broadcast networks in the United States. The schedule covers primetime hours from September 2005 through May 2006. The schedule is followed by a list per network of returning series, new series, and series cancelled after the 2004–05 season. All times are Eastern and Pacific, with certain exceptions, such as Monday Night Football.

This would be the final season of broadcasting for both UPN and The WB. They would merge to form The CW next season. The famous Monday Night Football would move to ESPN from ABC after the 2005 NFL season ended with Super Bowl XL

New series are highlighted in bold.

Each of the 30 highest-rated shows is listed with its rank and rating as determined by Nielsen Media Research.

Yellow indicates the programs in the top 10 for the season.

Cyan indicates the programs in the top 20 for the season.

Magenta indicates the programs in the top 30 for the season.PBS, the Public Broadcasting Service, was in operation, but is not included because member stations have local flexibility over most of their schedules and broadcast times for network shows may vary.

From February 10 to 26, 2006, all of NBC's primetime programming was preempted in favor of coverage of the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin.

Aaron Hosack

Aaron Hosack (born November 28, 1981) is a former American football wide receiver.

He graduated from Chino High School in Chino, California and played at Mt. San Antonio College before transferring to the University of Minnesota. From 2002-03 Hosack played college football for the Minnesota Golden Gophers. Hosack finished with 80 receptions for 1,463 yards and 11 touchdowns in only two seasons at the University of Minnesota. After his senior year, Hosack signed with the Minnesota Vikings as an undrafted free-agent. He spent his rookie year on Minnesota's practice squad before being allocated to NFL Europe. In 2005, due to injury Hosack played in only four games for the Frankfurt Galaxy. Off-season shoulder surgery kept him out of action for the 2005 NFL season. In 2006 Hosack returned to Frankfurt where his team won World Bowl XIV and he was named to the All-NFL Europe team. He then returned to Minnesota where he was cut by the Vikings during the 2006 preseason. In 2007 Hosack joined the Frankfurt Galaxy yet again to defend their World Bowl title but came up short in the championship, losing to the Hamburg Sea Devils. After a three-year stint in NFL Europe Hosack finished with 70 receptions for 1,129 yards and 14 touchdowns.

Antwaan Randle El

Antwaan Randle El (; born August 17, 1979) is an American football coach and former player who was a wide receiver in the National Football League (NFL) for nine seasons. He is currently an offensive assistant for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. He attended Indiana University where he played college football for the Indiana Hoosiers, and also played basketball and baseball as well. He is currently the sideline reporter for the Big Ten Network for interconference games that the Indiana football team plays.

Following four years at Indiana, Randle El was chosen in the second round (62nd overall) of the 2002 NFL Draft, by the Pittsburgh Steelers. Playing with the Steelers for four seasons, he was active in all 64 regular season games with 23 starts, finding success as a wide receiver, kick returner and punt returner. He was also instrumental in a number of trick plays, including throwing a touchdown pass as a wide receiver for the Steelers in Super Bowl XL against the Seattle Seahawks, the only wide receiver in Super Bowl history to do so. After the 2005 NFL season, Randle El was signed as a free agent to the Washington Redskins. As a receiver for the Redskins, he scored ten touchdowns, catching eight and throwing two. In 2007, Randle El was sidelined for a game against the Buffalo Bills with a hamstring injury, to date being his only inactive game.

Randle El was released by the Redskins in March 2010, re-signing with the Pittsburgh Steelers shortly after. Randle El was also named fifth in USA Today's All-Decade kick returners.

Brent Jones

Brent Michael Jones (born February 12, 1963) is a former American football tight end who played almost his entire National Football League (NFL) career with the San Francisco 49ers from 1987 to 1997. He was selected in the fifth round of the 1986 NFL Draft by the Pittsburgh Steelers. Jones won three Super Bowl rings with the 49ers and was three times named All-Pro (1992–1994) and is a four-time Pro Bowler (1992–1995). He finished his 11 NFL seasons with 417 receptions for 5,195 yards and 33 touchdowns.

Shortly after his playing career ended, Jones became an analyst for The NFL Today. Jones worked for the NFL on CBS from 1998 to 2005. Jones decided to leave CBS Sports during the 2005 NFL season in order to focus on his business in California, Northgate Capital, which he founded with former teammates Mark Harris and Tommy Vardell. Jones is a former member of the board of directors for San Jose Sports & Entertainment Enterprises, which owns the San Jose Sharks of the National Hockey League.

Charles Woodson

Charles Cameron Woodson (born October 7, 1976) is a former American football player. He played college football for Michigan, where he led the Wolverines to a share of the national championship in 1997. Woodson, a "two-way player" who played both offense and defense, won the Heisman Trophy in the same year. To date, he is the only primarily defensive player to win the Heisman, and he is the most recent player to win the Heisman who was not either a running back or quarterback. Woodson went on to accomplish a storied career professionally with one of the most decorated professional football resumes of all time, considered by many of his peers to be one of the greatest defensive players to have ever played.

Woodson was drafted by the Oakland Raiders fourth overall in the 1998 NFL Draft. In his first season with Oakland, Woodson was selected as the NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year by the Associated Press. He was named to the Pro Bowl and earned All-Pro recognition three consecutive times (1999–2001). In a 2002 AFC playoff match against the New England Patriots, Woodson seemed to have clinched the game by forcing a fumble by sacking quarterback (and former Michigan teammate) Tom Brady, but the ruling was overturned. Woodson later battled several nagging injuries in consecutive seasons in Oakland, leading to his departure after the 2005 NFL season via free agency.On April 26, 2006, Woodson signed a seven-year, $52 million contract with the Green Bay Packers. He would later win Super Bowl XLV with the team over the Pittsburgh Steelers. In his first season in Green Bay, Woodson was the team's punt returner and led the National Football Conference with eight interceptions, surpassing his previous career high of five, in his rookie year. In his second season in Green Bay, the injury problems returned and Woodson was forced to sit out two games. He was the AP NFL Defensive Player of the Year for the 2009 NFL season. He returned to the Raiders in 2013, playing three more seasons and once more being voted to the Pro Bowl. Woodson is one of the few players in NFL history to play in a Pro Bowl in three different decades (1990s, 2000s, 2010s). He is currently tied for fifth on the all time interceptions list with 65, and is tied with Rod Woodson and Darren Sharper for most career defensive touchdowns with 13. He also is second all time in interceptions returned for touchdowns, with 11.

After he retired in 2015, he signed with ESPN in 2016.

Chris Mohr

Christopher Garrett Mohr (born May 11, 1966 in Atlanta, Georgia) is a former American football punter. Mohr grew up in Thomson, Georgia, where he played football at Briarwood Academy. He was recruited by the University of Alabama, where he was the team's starting punter for three years. After being named the Southeastern Conference's best punter his senior year, he spent the 1989 NFL season with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and was their punter the entire season. He spent one season with the Montreal Machine of the World League of American Football before being signed by the Buffalo Bills. Mohr was with the Bills from 1991 to 2000, during which time he appeared in three Super Bowls with the team—Super Bowl XXVI, Super Bowl XXVII, and Super Bowl XXVIII. He signed with his hometown Atlanta Falcons before the 2001 NFL season, where he played for four years before being waived in 2005. He was signed by the Washington Redskins before the 2005 NFL season began, but was cut a few days later. He officially retired from the NFL in 2007 by signing a one-day contract with the Buffalo Bills. Mohr has four boys. Garrett, Harrison, Quinn and Chapman. Garrett Mohr, his oldest son, is currently a NFL free agent.

Of note is that Mohr, along with Casey Beathard, co-wrote "I See Me" for country singer Travis Tritt, which appeared on Tritt's album My Honky Tonk History.

Donald Lee (American football)

Donald Tywon Lee (born August 31, 1980) is a former American football tight end in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the Mississippi State Bulldogs. He was drafted by the Miami Dolphins in the fifth round of the 2003 NFL Draft and spent two seasons with the team. He also played for the Green Bay Packers from 2005 to 2010 and the Cincinnati Bengals from 2011 to 2012. With Green Bay, he won Super Bowl XLV against the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Drew Carter

Christopher Drew Carter (born September 5, 1981) is a former American football wide receiver of the National Football League. He was originally drafted by the Carolina Panthers in the fifth round of the 2004 NFL Draft. He played college football at Ohio State.

He also played for the Oakland Raiders.

Ed Coukart

Ed Coukart was an American football official in the National Football League from the 1989 to 2005 NFL season. He served as an umpire and officiated in Super Bowl XXXVII in 2003 and selected as an alternate for Super Bowl XXXII in 1998. Coukart wore the uniform number 71.

A native of Shadyside, Ohio, Coukart attended Northwestern University before graduating from Lasalle Law School and University of Wisconsin's Graduate School of Banking. Coukart later became the President of Potters Bank and Trust in East Liverpool, Ohio, where he resides. Upon retiring as an NFL official, he serves as a supervisor in the NFL front office. Some of Coukart's main responsibilities as a supervisor include traveling to one venue a week during the regular season and reviewing tapes from other games to analyze and evaluate the officiating in the game and training officials.

He called the first leaping penalty since 1938 in a 2003 Monday Night game between the Indianapolis Colts and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa.

Jim Sorgi

James Joseph Sorgi Jr. (born December 3, 1980) is a former American football quarterback. He played college football at the University of Wisconsin and was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts in the sixth round of the 2004 NFL Draft. Sorgi served as the backup to Peyton Manning for several years, and won a ring when the Colts won Super Bowl XLI against the Chicago Bears. Once he was released by the Colts, he signed with the New York Giants to compete for the backup job to Eli Manning, but lost, and he was released that offseason.

Jonathan Jackson (defensive end)

Jonathan Jackson (born October 17, 1982) is an American football defensive end who formerly played for the Dallas Desperados in the Arena Football League. Jackson is from Houston, Texas, attended North Shore High School (Class of 2001) and played college football for the University of Oklahoma Sooners. He was signed in 2005 by the Chicago Bears as an undrafted rookie free-agent, but was released during training

camp. He was claimed off waivers by the Tennessee Titans, but was released before the start of the 2005 NFL season. In 2006, he was signed by the Atlanta Falcons,

but was again released before ever starting a game.In 2007, he was signed by the Dallas Desperados of the Arena Football League, and assigned to their practice squad. He started one game for the Desperados,

and was released by them in July 2007.

List of Philadelphia Eagles seasons

This article is a list of seasons completed by the Philadelphia Eagles, a professional American football franchise based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Eagles are a member of the National Football Conference (NFC) East division in the National Football League (NFL). This article documents the season-by-season records of the Eagles’ franchise from 1933 to present, including postseason records, as well as league awards for individual players or head coaches. The Philadelphia Eagles won their 500th game on Sunday, October 26, 2009 over the Atlanta Falcons by a score of 27–14. They were the seventh NFL team to accomplish this feat and the first since the San Francisco 49ers defeated the St. Louis Rams in week 16 of the 2005 NFL season. They are also the first team in the NFC East to accomplish this feat since the Washington Redskins defeated the Jacksonville Jaguars in Week 8 of the 2000 NFL season. As of 2018, the Eagles have never lost a game to the New York Jets (10–0) or the Houston Texans (5–0).

The Eagles have won four league titles. Three of these were won prior to the start of the Super Bowl era (in 1948, 1949, and 1960). The fourth and most recent championship was won in Super Bowl LII.

List of Tennessee Titans broadcasters

This is a list of all current broadcasters of content related to the Tennessee Titans, a National Football League franchise based in Nashville, Tennessee, United States.

Patrick O'Neal (sportscaster)

Patrick O'Neal (born September 14, 1967) is an American former actor, and current studio host/reporter for Fox Sports West/Prime Ticket.

Reggie Hayward

Reginald Joseph Hayward Jr. (born March 14, 1979) is a former American football defensive end who played nine seasons in the National Football League (NFL) for the Denver Broncos and Jacksonville Jaguars. He played college football at Iowa State, and was drafted by the Broncos in the third round of the 2001 NFL Draft.

Tampa 2

The Tampa 2 is an American football defensive scheme popularized by (and thus named after) the Tampa Bay Buccaneers National Football League (NFL) team in the mid-1990s–early 2000s. The Tampa 2 is typically employed out of a 4–3 defensive alignment, which consists of four linemen, three linebackers, two cornerbacks, and two safeties. The defense is similar to a Cover 2 defense, except the middle linebacker drops into a deep middle coverage for a Cover 3 when he reads a pass play.The term rose to popularity due to the installation and effective execution of this defensive scheme by then-head coach Tony Dungy and defensive coordinator Monte Kiffin, and the style helped the Buccaneers win Super Bowl XXXVII.

The roots of the Tampa 2 system actually are in the Steel Curtain days of Pittsburgh football. "My philosophy is really out of the 1975 Pittsburgh Steelers playbook," said Dungy (who played for the Steelers early in his career) during media interviews while at Super Bowl XLI. "That is why I have to laugh when I hear 'Tampa 2'. Chuck Noll and Bud Carson—that is where it came from, I changed very little." Lovie Smith mentions having played the system in junior high school during the 1970s, though Carson introduced the idea of moving the middle linebacker into coverage. Carson's system became especially effective with the Steelers' addition of aggressive and athletic middle linebacker Jack Lambert.After Dungy became head coach of the Indianapolis Colts and Lovie Smith (linebackers coach in Tampa from 1996–2000) became head coach of the Chicago Bears, they installed the Tampa 2 in their respective teams. During the 2005 NFL season, the Buccaneers, still under defensive coordinator Kiffin, ranked first in the league in fewest total yards allowed, Smith's Bears ranked number two, and Dungy's Colts ranked eleventh. By 2006, the Buffalo Bills, Minnesota Vikings, Kansas City Chiefs, and Detroit Lions had also adopted the defense. In college football, Gene Chizik is among the coaches that successfully implemented the Tampa 2.

The scheme is known for its simple format, speed, and the aggressive mentality of its players. Tampa 2 teams are known as gang tacklers with tremendous team speed, and practice to always run to the ball. It also requires a hard hitting secondary to cause turnovers.

Ted Johnson

Ted Curtis Johnson (born December 4, 1972) is a former American football player in the National Football League. He grew up in Carlsbad, California where he graduated from Carlsbad High School in 1991. From there he attended the University of Colorado and was drafted by the Patriots in the second round of the 1995 NFL Draft with the 57th overall selection.

The Blitz (TV program)

The Blitz is an American television sports program which consists of scores and highlights of NFL games. It debuted on ESPNEWS on the first day of the 2005 NFL season, September 11, 2005. It airs mainly during the NFL season on Sundays, from 1:00pm ET to 10:00pm ET. This program is currently on hiatus.

2005 NFL season
Early era
(1920–1969)
Modern era
(1970–present)

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