2005 American League Championship Series

The 2005 American League Championship Series (ALCS), the second round of the 2005 American League playoffs, which determined the 2005 American League champion, matched the Central Division champion Chicago White Sox against the West Division champion Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. The White Sox, by virtue of having the best record in the AL during the 2005 season, had the home-field advantage. The White Sox won the series four games to one to become the American League champions, and faced the Houston Astros in the 2005 World Series, in which the White Sox swept the Astros in four games to win their first World Series championship in 88 years; as a result of the 2005 All-Star Game played in Detroit, Michigan at Comerica Park on July 12, the White Sox had home-field advantage in the World Series. The series was notable both for a controversial call in Game 2 of the series, and the outstanding pitching and durability of Chicago's starting rotation, pitching four consecutive complete games; the ​ 23 of an inning Neal Cotts pitched in the first game was the only work the White Sox bullpen saw the entire series.

The White Sox and Angels were victorious in the AL Division Series (ALDS), with the White Sox defeating the defending World Champion and wild card qualifier Boston Red Sox three games to none, and the Angels defeating the Eastern Division champion New York Yankees three games to two. It was the first ALCS since 2002 not to feature the Red Sox and the Yankees.

2005 American League Championship Series
2005ALCS
Teams
Team (Wins) Manager Season
Chicago White Sox (4) Ozzie Guillén 99–63, .611, GA: 6
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (1) Mike Scioscia 95–67, .586, GA: 7
DatesOctober 11–16
MVPPaul Konerko (Chicago)
UmpiresJerry Crawford, Doug Eddings, Ted Barrett, Ron Kulpa, Ed Rapuano, Randy Marsh
ALDS
Broadcast
TelevisionFox (United States)
MLB International (International)
TV announcersJoe Buck, Tim McCarver and Lou Piniella (Fox)
Dave O'Brien and Rick Sutcliffe (MLB International)
RadioESPN
Radio announcersJon Miller and Joe Morgan

Summary

Chicago White Sox vs. Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

Chicago won the series, 4–1.

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 11 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim – 3, Chicago White Sox – 2 U.S. Cellular Field 2:47 40,659[1] 
2 October 12 Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim – 1, Chicago White Sox – 2 U.S. Cellular Field 2:34 41,013[2] 
3 October 14 Chicago White Sox – 5, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim – 2 Angel Stadium of Anaheim 2:42 44,725[3] 
4 October 15 Chicago White Sox – 8, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim – 2 Angel Stadium of Anaheim 2:46 44,857[4] 
5 October 16 Chicago White Sox – 6, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim – 3 Angel Stadium of Anaheim 3:11 44,712[5]

Game summaries

Game 1

Tuesday, October 11, 2005 at U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago, Illinois

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 7 1
Chicago 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 7 0
WP: Paul Byrd (1–0)   LP: José Contreras (0–1)   Sv: Francisco Rodríguez (1)
Home runs:
LAA: Garret Anderson (1)
CWS: Joe Crede (1)

In the series opener, the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim won 3–2 in their third game in as many nights and as many cities. The Angels took the lead in the second inning on a Garret Anderson leadoff home run. Next inning, Steve Finley and Adam Kennedy hit back-to-back leadoff singles and advanced one base each on Chone Figgins's sacrifice bunt. Orlando Cabrera's single and Vladimir Guerrero's groundout scored a run each. White Sox starter José Contreras allowed no more runs, going ​8 13 innings. In the bottom of the inning, Joe Crede's home run off of Paul Byrd put the Sox on the board. Next inning, Chicago's Carl Everett singled with one out, moved to second on a groundout, and scored on A. J. Pierzynski's single to make it a one-run game. However, neither team would score for the rest of the game. It was the first time in six tries that the Angels won a Game 1 under manager Mike Scioscia, despite having won the World Series in 2002. This turned out to be the only game the White Sox would lose in the entire postseason.

Game 2

Wednesday, October 12, 2005 at U.S. Cellular Field in Chicago, Illinois

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 5 3
Chicago 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 7 1
WP: Mark Buehrle (1–0)   LP: Kelvim Escobar (0–1)
Home runs:
LAA: Robb Quinlan (1)
CWS: None

Then-Senator and future President of the United States Barack Obama threw out the ceremonial first pitch. Behind a complete game from Mark Buehrle and a now infamous strikeout in the bottom of the ninth, the White Sox evened the series at a game apiece. In the bottom of the first, Scott Podsednik reached second on an error, moved to third on a sacrifice bunt, and scored on Jermaine Dye's ground out. Jarrod Washburn and two relievers held the Sox scoreless over the next seven innings while Robb Quinlan's fifth inning home run tied the game. It remained tied until the bottom of the ninth. With two strikes, A. J. Pierzynski swung and missed at a low pitch from Angels pitcher Kelvim Escobar for strike three. Josh Paul, the Angels catcher, rolled the ball to the mound and left the infield. Pierzynski realized strike three had been called, so he ran to first base in case the umpire ruled that the catcher had not legally caught the strike-three pitch (see Uncaught third strike rule).[6] In a controversial call, home-plate umpire Doug Eddings ruled that the ball hit the ground before going into the catcher's glove despite signalling out,[7] so the pitch was considered uncaught and Pierzynski was safe at first. A pinch-runner, Pablo Ozuna, stole second base. Third baseman Joe Crede delivered a base hit three pitches later, scoring Ozuna for the winning run.

Game 3

Friday, October 14, 2005 at Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Anaheim, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 11 0
Los Angeles 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 4 0
WP: Jon Garland (1–0)   LP: John Lackey (0–1)
Home runs:
CWS: Paul Konerko (1)
LAA: Orlando Cabrera (1)

Chicago jumped to a 3−0 lead in the first inning off of John Lackey as the series moved west to Anaheim. Scott Podsednik hit a leadoff single, moved to second on a sacrifice bunt and came home on Jermaine Dye's single before Paul Konerko's two-run home run capped the scoring. Tadahito Iguchi singled to lead off the third, moved to second on a walk, and scored on Carl Everett's single. Two innings later, Iguchi doubled with one out and scored on Konerko's two-out single to put Chicago up 5−0. A two-run home run by Orlando Cabrera in the sixth cut the lead to 5−2, but it would not be enough as the White Sox took the series lead, two games to one, with Jon Garland pitching a complete game.

Game 4

Saturday, October 15, 2005 at Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Anaheim, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago 3 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 0 8 8 1
Los Angeles 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 1
WP: Freddy García (1–0)   LP: Ervin Santana (0–1)
Home runs:
CWS: Paul Konerko (2), A. J. Pierzynski (1)
LAA: None

The visitors again jumped to a 3−0 lead in the first. Angel starter Ervin Santana walked Scott Podsednik and hit Tadahito Iguchi before Paul Konerko, after a disputed check swing on a 2–2 pitch, homered for the second straight game. The Angels cut it to 3−1 in the second when Darin Erstad walked with one out, moved to third on Casey Kotchman's single and White Sox pitcher Freddy Garcia's throwing error to first, then scored on Bengie Molina's single. With men on first and third, Steve Finley hit a ground ball to second for an inning-ending double play, but argued that Sox catcher A. J. Pierzynski had interfered with his swing. Chicago got that run back when Jermaine Dye reached on shortstop Orlando Cabrera's throwing error to first, stole second, and scored on Carl Everett's base hit. Pierzynski's home run next inning made it 5−1. In the bottom of the inning, Angel Garret Anderson singled with one out and scored on Coachman's two-out double, but in the fifth, Podsednik drew a leadoff walk and after Scot Shields relieved Santana, stole second and scored on Everett's single. Esteban Yan walked Everett to lead off the eighth, allowed a subsequent double to Aaron Rowand followed by Joe Crede's two-run single to put the Sox up 8−2. García pitched the White Sox's third straight complete game, helping put them one win from their first World Series visit since 1959.

Game 5

Sunday, October 16, 2005 at Angel Stadium of Anaheim in Anaheim, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 6 8 1
Los Angeles 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 5 2
WP: José Contreras (1–1)   LP: Kelvim Escobar (0–2)
Home runs:
CWS: Joe Crede (2)
LAA: None

Still on the road, Chicago struck first in Game 5 when Aaron Rowand hit a leadoff ground-rule double in the third off of Paul Byrd, moved to third on a sacrifice bunt, then scored on Joe Crede's sacrifice fly. But the Angels tied it in the third when Juan Rivera hit a leadoff double, moved to third on pitcher Jose Contreras's pickoff attempt error, and scored on Adam Kennedy's single. In the top of the fifth, Juan Uribe doubled and scored on Jermaine Dye's single, but in the bottom of the inning, Kennedy hit a leadoff single and scored on Chone Figgins's double. Figgins scored on a Garret Anderson sacrifice fly to put the Angels up 3−2. Crede's leadoff home run in the seventh off of Kelvim Escobar tied the game. Next inning, Escobar walked Rowand with two outs and an error moved him to second. Francisco Rodriguez relieved Escobar and Crede greeted him with an RBI single to put the White Sox up 4−3. They got two insurance runs in the ninth when Paul Konerko's double after back-to-back walks and Rowand's sacrifice fly scored a run each. Contreras delivered the fourth consecutive complete game by a White Sox pitcher, retiring the Angels in order in the ninth. Chicago captured its first American League pennant since 1959. This marked the first time in 77 years that a team threw four straight complete-game victories in the playoffs, becoming the first time it was done by four different pitchers since the Chicago Cubs did it in the 1907 World Series.

Konerko was named the ALCS MVP. He finished the series batting .286, with two home runs and seven RBIs. His two home runs came in the first innings of Games 3 and 4; he became only the third player in Major League history to hit homers in the first inning of consecutive playoff games, the other two having been Dan Ford during the 1979 ALCS and Carlos Beltrán during the 2004 NLCS.[8]

Composite box

2005 ALCS (4–1): Chicago White Sox over Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago White Sox 7 1 3 2 3 0 1 3 3 23 41 3
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim 0 2 3 1 3 2 0 0 0 11 27 7
Total attendance: 215,966   Average attendance: 43,193

Series quotes

All quotes are by Joe Buck of Fox Sports unless otherwise noted.

Escobar, another strikeout..Pierzynski is going down to first. The Angels are already off the field. The home plate umpire never made a call and safe is Pierzynski.

— A. J. Pierzynski's controversial strike out in the ninth inning of Game 2

And that's into the left field corner. This ball is off the wall, the White Sox have won, and this only begins what will be an argument.

— Joe Crede's game-winning hit after A. J. Pierzynski's controversial strike out.

Ground ball to first, the White Sox have won the pennant!

— The last out.

Swing and a ground ball to first, Konerko has it. He steps on the bag! The White Sox have won the pennant! They won the pennant! A White Sox winner, and they're going to the World Series!

— John Rooney on the White Sox radio network calling the same moment as above.

Notes

  1. ^ "2005 ALCS Game 1 – Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim vs. Chicago White Sox". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  2. ^ "2005 ALCS Game 2 – Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim vs. Chicago White Sox". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  3. ^ "2005 ALCS Game 3 – Chicago White Sox vs. Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  4. ^ "2005 ALCS Game 4 – Chicago White Sox vs. Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  5. ^ "2005 ALCS Game 5 – Chicago White Sox vs. Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  6. ^ "Rule 6.05(b) & 6.09(b) – Official Baseball Rules". Major League Baseball. Archived from the original on July 15, 2007. Retrieved July 10, 2007.
  7. ^ "Umpires postgame interview". Major League Baseball. October 13, 2005. Archived from the original on November 3, 2007. Retrieved July 10, 2007.
  8. ^ Sanchez, Jesse (October 17, 2005). "Konerko blasts way to ALCS MVP". Major League Baseball. Retrieved October 17, 2005.

External links

2005 Los Angeles Angels season

The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim 2005 season was the franchise's 45th since its inception. The regular season ended with a record of 95-67, resulting in the Angels winning the American League West division title for the second consecutive season, its fifth in franchise history.

In the postseason, the Angels defeated the New York Yankees in the American League Division Series, 3-2, but were subsequently defeated by the eventual World Series champion Chicago White Sox in the American League Championship Series, 4-1.

The season was the first the team played under its controversial "Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim" moniker.

Francisco Rodríguez (Venezuelan pitcher)

Francisco José Rodríguez, Sr. (born January 7, 1982), nicknamed "Frankie" and "K-Rod", is a Venezuelan professional baseball pitcher who is a free agent. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Anaheim Angels / Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, New York Mets, Baltimore Orioles, Milwaukee Brewers, and Detroit Tigers.

Rodriguez pitched for the Angels from 2002 to 2008, and the Mets from 2009 to midway through the 2011 season. He served as the closer for both teams. Rodriguez then pitched for the Brewers until July 2013, mostly in a setup role, and for the Orioles for the rest of 2013 before returning to the Brewers for 2014 and 2015, this time as the team's closer. He was then traded to the Detroit Tigers in 2016, and became the Tigers' closer.

Rodríguez holds the major league record for saves in a single season, with 62, set in 2008 while pitching for the Angels. He is a three-time league leader in saves (2005, 2006, and 2008) and a six-time All-Star. Rodríguez is one of only six Major League pitchers to accumulate a total of 400 or more saves, in his baseball career.

Guaranteed Rate Field

Guaranteed Rate Field is a baseball park located in Chicago, Illinois, that serves as the home ballpark for the Chicago White Sox of Major League Baseball. The facility is owned by the state of Illinois through the Illinois Sports Facilities Authority, and is operated by the White Sox. The park opened for the 1991 season, after the White Sox had spent 81 years at the original Comiskey Park. It also opened with the name Comiskey Park but was renamed U.S. Cellular Field in 2003 after U.S. Cellular bought the naming rights at $68 million over 20 years. The current name was announced on October 31, 2016, after Guaranteed Rate, a private residential mortgage company located in Chicago, purchased the naming rights to the ballpark in a 13-year deal.The stadium is situated just to the west of the Dan Ryan Expressway in Chicago's Armour Square neighborhood, adjacent to the more famous neighborhood of Bridgeport. It was built directly across 35th Street from old Comiskey Park, which was demolished to make room for a parking lot that serves the venue. Old Comiskey's home plate location is represented by a marble plaque on the sidewalk next to Guaranteed Rate Field and the foul lines are painted in the parking lot. Also, the spectator ramp across 35th Street is designed in such a way (partly curved, partly straight but angling east-northeast) that it echoes the contour of the old first-base grandstand.

The park was completed at a cost of US$137 million. The current public address announcer is Gene Honda, who also serves as the PA announcer for the Chicago Blackhawks, NCAA Final Four, and University of Illinois Football.

Patrick O'Neal (sportscaster)

Patrick O'Neal (born September 14, 1967) is an American former actor, now a studio host/reporter for Fox Sports West/Prime Ticket.

Paul Konerko

Paul Henry Konerko (; born March 5, 1976) is an American former professional baseball first baseman who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Cincinnati Reds and, for most of his career, the Chicago White Sox. Konerko helped the White Sox win the 2005 World Series over the Houston Astros, the franchise's first since 1917. From 2006 to 2014 he served as the White Sox captain.

Uncaught third strike

In baseball and softball, an uncaught third strike (sometimes referred to as dropped third strike or non-caught third strike) occurs when the catcher fails to cleanly catch a pitch for the third strike. In Major League Baseball, the specific rules concerning the uncaught third strike are addressed in Rules 5.05 and 5.09 of the Official Baseball Rules:On an uncaught third strike with (1) no runner on first base, or (2) with a runner on first base and two outs, the batter immediately becomes a runner. The strike is called, but the umpire does not call the batter out. The umpire may also signal that there is "no catch" of the pitch. The batter may then attempt to reach first base and must be tagged or forced out. With two outs and the bases loaded, the catcher who fails to catch the third strike may, upon picking up the ball, step on home plate for a force-out or make a throw to any other base in an effort to force out a runner. An “uncaught” strike includes not only pitches dropped by the catcher, but also pitches that hit the ground before the catcher attempts to catch it.

The purpose of the "no runner on first base or two outs" qualification is to prevent the catcher from deliberately dropping a third strike pitch and then initiating an unfair double or triple play with possible force plays at second base, third base, or home plate, in addition to putting the batter out at first base. The logic of the situation is similar to that which led to the infield fly rule.Regardless of the outcome of an uncaught third strike, the pitcher is statistically credited with a strikeout, and the batter is statistically charged with one. Because of the uncaught third strike rule, it is possible for a pitcher to register more than three strikeouts in an inning. Numerous pitchers have recorded four strikeouts in an inning in a Major League Baseball game, though no five-strikeout innings have ever occurred.In Little League, in the Tee-Ball and Minor League divisions, the batter is out after the third strike regardless of whether the pitched ball is caught cleanly by the catcher. In Little League (or the Major Division), Junior, Senior, and Big League divisions, a batter may attempt to advance to first base on an uncaught third strike. Little League Major Division Softball and many other youth baseball leagues (such as the USSSA) also follow the rule.

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