2002 Pro Bowl

The 2002 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 2001 season. The game was played on February 9, 2002, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was AFC 38, NFC 30. Rich Gannon of the Oakland Raiders was the game's MVP.

2002 NFL Pro Bowl
2002 Pro Bowl
AFC NFC
38 30
Head coach:
Bill Cowher
(Pittsburgh Steelers)
Head coach:
Andy Reid
(Philadelphia Eagles)
1234 Total
AFC 217010 38
NFC 133014 30
DateFebruary 9, 2002
StadiumAloha Stadium, Honolulu, Hawaii
MVPRich Gannon (Oakland Raiders)
RefereeRon Blum
Attendance50,301[1]
Ceremonies
National anthemJessica Simpson
TV in the United States
NetworkABC
AnnouncersAl Michaels, Dan Fouts, Dennis Miller, Eric Dickerson, and Melissa Stark

AFC roster

Offense

Position Starter(s) Reserve(s) Alternate(s)
Quarterback 12 Rich Gannon, Oakland 12 Tom Brady, New England
10 Kordell Stewart, Pittsburgh
Running back 28 Curtis Martin, N.Y. Jets 36 Jerome Bettis, Pittsburgh[b]
31 Priest Holmes, Kansas City
28 Corey Dillon, Cincinnati[a]
Fullback 37 Larry Centers, Buffalo
Wide receiver 88 Marvin Harrison, Indianapolis
80 Rod Smith, Denver[b]
81 Tim Brown, Oakland[c]
82 Jimmy Smith, Jacksonville[b]
80 Troy Brown, New England[a]
86 Hines Ward, Pittsburgh[a]
Tight end 88 Tony Gonzalez, Kansas City[b] 82 Shannon Sharpe, Baltimore[c] 85 Ken Dilger, Indianapolis[a]
89 Dwayne Carswell, Denver[e]
Offensive tackle 72 Lincoln Kennedy, Oakland
75 Jonathan Ogden, Baltimore
71 Walter Jones, Seattle
Offensive guard 66 Alan Faneca, Pittsburgh
68 Will Shields, Kansas City
79 Ruben Brown, Buffalo
Center 68 Kevin Mawae, N.Y. Jets 74 Bruce Matthews, Tennessee

Defense

Position Starter(s) Reserve(s) Alternate(s)
Defensive end 94 John Abraham, N.Y. Jets
75 Marcellus Wiley, San Diego
90 Jevon Kearse, Tennessee
Defensive tackle 93 Trevor Pryce, Denver[b]
93 John Randle, Seattle
95 Sam Adams, Baltimore[c] 96 Gary Walker, Jacksonville[a]
Outside linebacker 92 Jason Gildon, Pittsburgh
95 Jamir Miller, Cleveland
55 Junior Seau, San Diego
Inside linebacker 52 Ray Lewis, Baltimore 54 Zach Thomas, Miami [b] 56 Al Wilson, Denver[a]
97 Kendrell Bell, Pittsburgh[d]
Cornerback 29 Sam Madison, Miami[b]
24 Charles Woodson, Oakland[b]
24 Deltha O'Neal, Denver[c] 47 Ryan McNeil, San Diego[a][c]
24 Ty Law, New England[a]
Free safety 26 Rod Woodson, Baltimore
Strong safety 37 Rodney Harrison, San Diego 36 Lawyer Milloy, New England

Special teams

Position Starter(s) Reserve(s) Alternate(s)
Punter   9 Shane Lechler, Oakland
Placekicker   1 Jason Elam, Denver
Kick returner 84 Jermaine Lewis, Baltimore
Special teamer 52 Ian Gold, Denver

NFC roster

Offense

Position Starter(s) Reserve(s) Alternate(s)
Quarterback   4 Brett Favre, Green Bay[b] 13 Kurt Warner, St. Louis[c]
  5 Jeff Garcia, San Francisco
  5 Donovan McNabb, Philadelphia[a]
Running back 28 Marshall Faulk, St. Louis 30 Ahman Green, Green Bay
20 Garrison Hearst, San Francisco
Fullback 40 Mike Alstott, Tampa Bay
Wide receiver 89 David Boston, Arizona
81 Terrell Owens, San Francisco
80 Isaac Bruce, St. Louis[b]
19 Keyshawn Johnson, Tampa Bay
87 Joe Horn, New Orleans[a][b]
88 Torry Holt, St. Louis[a]
Tight end 88 Bubba Franks, Green Bay 85 Wesley Walls, Carolina[b] 87 Byron Chamberlain, Minnesota[a]
Offensive tackle 76 Orlando Pace, St. Louis[b]
60 Chris Samuels, Washington
71 James Williams, Chicago[c] 72 Tra Thomas, Philadelphia[a]
Offensive guard 73 Larry Allen, Dallas[b]
65 Ron Stone, N.Y. Giants
65 Ray Brown, San Francisco[c] 62 Adam Timmerman, St. Louis[a]
Center 57 Olin Kreutz, Chicago 78 Matt Birk, Minnesota[b] 62 Jeremy Newberry, San Francisco[a]

Defense

Position Starter(s) Reserve(s) Alternate(s)
Defensive end 53 Hugh Douglas, Philadelphia
92 Michael Strahan, N.Y. Giants
91 Robert Porcher, Detroit
Defensive tackle 97 La'Roi Glover, New Orleans
99 Warren Sapp, Tampa Bay[b]
97 Bryant Young, San Francisco[c] 92 Ted Washington, Chicago[a]
Outside linebacker 56 LaVar Arrington, Washington
55 Derrick Brooks, Tampa Bay[b]
98 Jessie Armstead, N.Y. Giants[c] 52 Dexter Coakley, Dallas[a]
Inside linebacker 54 Brian Urlacher, Chicago 54 Jeremiah Trotter, Philadelphia 56 Keith Brooking, Atlanta[d]
Cornerback 20 Ronde Barber, Tampa Bay
35 Aeneas Williams, St. Louis
23 Troy Vincent, Philadelphia[b] 24 Champ Bailey, Washington[a]
Free safety 21 Brian Dawkins, Philadelphia
Strong safety 29 Sammy Knight, New Orleans 47 John Lynch, Tampa Bay

Special teams

Position Starter(s) Reserve(s) Alternate(s)
Punter 10 Todd Sauerbrun, Carolina
Placekicker   2 David Akers, Philadelphia
Kick returner 89 Steve Smith, Carolina
Special teamer 33 Larry Whigham, Chicago
Long snapper 89 Chad Lewis, Philadelphia[e]

Notes:

a Replacement selection due to injury or vacancy
b Injured player; selected but did not play
c Replacement starter; selected as reserve
d "Need player"; named by coach
e Other additional player; added by league

Number of selections per team

AFC Team Selections NFC Team Selections
Denver Broncos 7 Philadelphia Eagles 8
Baltimore Ravens 6 St. Louis Rams 7
Pittsburgh Steelers 6 San Francisco 49ers 6
Oakland Raiders 5 Tampa Bay Buccaneers 6
New England Patriots 4 Chicago Bears 5
San Diego Chargers 4 Carolina Panthers 3
Kansas City Chiefs 3 Green Bay Packers 3
New York Jets 3 New Orleans Saints 3
Tennessee Titans 3 New York Giants 3
Buffalo Bills 2 Washington Redskins 3
Indianapolis Colts 2 Dallas Cowboys 2
Miami Dolphins 2 Minnesota Vikings 2
Seattle Seahawks 2 Arizona Cardinals 1
Cincinnati Bengals 1 Atlanta Falcons 1
Cleveland Browns 1 Detroit Lions 1
Jacksonville Jaguars 1

References

  1. ^ NFL.com. "2002 Pro Bowl Gamebook" (PDF). Retrieved 2008-12-17.

External links

2001 Pittsburgh Steelers season

The 2001 Pittsburgh Steelers season was the franchise's 69th season as a professional sports franchise and as a member of the National Football League. After finishing the previous three seasons a combined 22–26, the Steelers returned to the top seed in the AFC, rolling to a 13–3 record in their first playoff berth since 1997 and playing at Heinz Field. The Steelers went 7–1 in their new home stadium, with the only loss coming to the defending Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens (a loss the Steelers avenged in the divisional playoffs).

However, for the third time in Bill Cowher's coaching tenure, the Steelers fell in the AFC Championship Game at home. This time, the eventual champion New England Patriots defeated the top-seeded Steelers.

2001 Seattle Seahawks season

The 2001 Seattle Seahawks season was the franchise's 26th season in the National Football League, The second of two seasons the Seahawks played at Husky Stadium while Qwest Field was being built and the third under head coach Mike Holmgren. They improved on their 6-10 record from 2000 and finished the season at 9–7. The Seahawks were in the playoff hunt until the very last game of the season; Baltimore's win over Minnesota on the last Monday Night game of the year ended Seattle's post-season bid. The 2001 season was the final season for the Seahawks in the American Football Conference and the second and final season they played at Husky Stadium while Qwest Field was being built.

Before the season, the Seahawks signed free agent quarterbacks Trent Dilfer and Matt Hasselbeck. Hasselbeck eventually won the starting position over Dilfer. The Seahawks also signed future Hall of Fame defensive tackle John Randle, who spent the last 11 seasons with the Minnesota Vikings and would make the Pro Bowl in his first season with the Seahawks.

The season saw the emergence of the second year running back Shaun Alexander after Ricky Watters was injured for most of the season. Watters retired after the season ended.

It was also the final season the Seahawks wore their traditional blue and green uniforms.

2003 Pro Bowl

The 2003 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 2002 season. The game was played on February 2, 2003, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final Score was AFC 45, NFC 23. Ricky Williams of the Miami Dolphins was the game's MVP.

Alan Faneca

Alan Joseph Faneca (; born December 7, 1976) is a former professional American football player who was a guard in the National Football League (NFL) for thirteen seasons. He played college football for Louisiana State University (LSU), and earned consensus All-America honors. He was drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in first round of the 1998 NFL Draft, and played professionally for the Steelers, New York Jets and Arizona Cardinals of the NFL. A six-time first-team All-Pro and nine-time Pro Bowl selection, Faneca won a Super Bowl ring with the Steelers in Super Bowl XL, defeating the Seattle Seahawks.

Brian Dawkins

Brian Patrick Dawkins Sr. (born October 13, 1973) is a former American football safety who played 16 seasons in the National Football League (NFL), primarily with the Philadelphia Eagles. He played college football at Clemson and was drafted by the Eagles in the second round of the 1996 NFL Draft, whom he was a member of for 13 seasons. In his last three seasons, he played for the Denver Broncos.

Regarded as one of the greatest safeties of all time, Dawkins was viewed as the leader of the Eagles' defense, named to nine Pro Bowls, and a five-time first-team All-Pro during his career. He also made one Super Bowl appearance with the Eagles in XXXIX, which was played in his home city of Jacksonville, Florida. Dawkins was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2018.In addition to his playing career, Dawkins served the Eagles as an executive of football operations for player development from 2016 to 2018 and was with the organization when they won Super Bowl LII.

Byron Chamberlain

Byron Daniel Chamberlain (born October 17, 1971) is a former American football tight end in the National Football League. He played professionally for the Denver Broncos, Minnesota Vikings, and the Washington Redskins. Chamberlain won back-to-back Super Bowl Championships as a member of the Denver Broncos. (Super Bowls XXXII & XXXIII) He was voted to the 2002 Pro Bowl while with the Vikings.

Cory Schlesinger

Cory Michael Schlesinger (born June 23, 1972) is a former American football fullback of the National Football League. He was drafted by the Detroit Lions in the sixth round of the 1995 NFL Draft. He played college football at Nebraska.

Donnie Edwards

Donnie Edwards (born April 6, 1973) is a former American football linebacker from San Diego, California. He played for thirteen seasons in the National Football League (NFL) for the Kansas City Chiefs and the San Diego Chargers. He began his career as an All-American Collegiate at the University of California, Los Angeles. He was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs in the fourth round of the 1996 NFL Draft.

Edwards retired as one of only eight players in the history of the NFL to record more than 20 interceptions and 20 sacks during his career. Since his retirement in 2009, Edwards has devoted himself to philanthropic work with veterans and children from underprivileged backgrounds.

Greg Jones (fullback)

Gregory B. Jones, Sr. (born May 9, 1981) is a former American football fullback. He was drafted by the Jacksonville Jaguars in the second round of the 2004 NFL Draft and also played for the Houston Texans. He played college football at Florida State.

Ian Gold

Ian Maurice Gold (born August 23, 1978) is a former American football player.

Gold played eight seasons of professional football as a linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for the Denver Broncos from 2000 to 2003 and 2004 to 2007 and for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in 2004. He appeared in 115 NFL games, 80 as a starter, registered 422 tackles, and was selected to play in the 2002 Pro Bowl.

Gold played college football as a linebacker for the University of Michigan from 1996 to 1999 and was a member of the undefeated 1997 Michigan Wolverines football team that was ranked #1 in the final AP Poll. He was selected as a first-team linebacker on both the 1998 and 1999 All-Big Ten teams.

John Lynch (American football)

John Terrence Lynch Jr. (born September 25, 1971) is a former American football strong safety and the current general manager of the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Stanford University, and was drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the third round of the 1993 NFL Draft.

A nine-time Pro Bowl selection, Lynch earned a Super Bowl ring with the Buccaneers in Super Bowl XXXVII. He also spent four seasons with the Denver Broncos before retiring in 2008. After the end of his playing career, Lynch worked in the broadcasting booth as a color commentator for NFL on Fox games, and remained doing so until his hiring as the general manager of the 49ers in 2017.

Kwamie Lassiter

Kwamie Lassiter (December 3, 1969 – January 6, 2019) was an American football safety. He was signed by the Arizona Cardinals as an undrafted free agent in 1995. He played college football at Kansas.

Larry Izzo

Lawrence Alexander Izzo (; born September 26, 1974) is a retired American football linebacker and special teamer. He was signed by the Miami Dolphins as an undrafted free agent in 1996. He played college football at Rice. He is an assistant special teams coach for the Seattle Seahawks of the National Football League (NFL).

A three-time Pro Bowl selection and three-time All-Pro selection, Izzo has also played for the New England Patriots. He earned three Super Bowl rings during his time with the Patriots and also won a ring during his time as an assistant Special teams coordinator for the New York Giants whom coincidentally, beat Izzo's former team, the Patriots in Super Bowl XLVI.

List of Pro Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast the National Football League's Pro Bowl throughout the years.

Ray Lewis

Raymond Anthony Lewis Jr. (born May 15, 1975) is a former American football linebacker who played all of his 17-year professional career for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League (NFL). He previously played college football for the University of Miami, and earned All-America honors. Lewis was drafted by the Ravens in the first round of the 1996 NFL Draft, and upon his retirement following the 2012 season, was the last remaining active player from the team's inaugural season.

Lewis played middle linebacker his entire career, and is considered to be one of the greatest ever to play the position. He was a 13-time Pro Bowler, a 10-time All-Pro, and one of the few players in NFL history to play in a Pro Bowl in three different decades (1990s, 2000s, and 2010s). He is also considered to be the greatest Baltimore Raven of all-time.Lewis pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice in connection with the stabbing deaths of two men in 2000. The following season, he won the NFL Defensive Player of the Year and led the Ravens' record-setting defense to victory in Super Bowl XXXV. Lewis also became the second linebacker to win the Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Award, and the first to win the award on the winning Super Bowl team. Lewis won his second Defensive Player of the Year award in 2003, becoming the sixth player to win the award multiple times. After a triceps tear that sidelined him for most of the 2012–13 season, Lewis returned for the Ravens' playoff run and earned his second Super Bowl victory in his final NFL game. On February 3, 2018, the fifth anniversary of his final game, Lewis was selected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility.

Ricky Williams

Errick Lynne "Ricky" Williams Jr. (born May 21, 1977) is a former American football running back who played 12 seasons in the National Football League (NFL) and one season in the Canadian Football League (CFL). He played college football for the University of Texas, where he was a two-time All-American and won the Heisman Trophy. Williams was drafted by the New Orleans Saints fifth overall in the 1999 NFL Draft and spent three seasons with the team before he was traded to the Miami Dolphins in 2002. He played for the Dolphins for two seasons, and retired for the first time from football in 2004. Due to his suspension from the NFL in 2006, he played for the Toronto Argonauts that year. Williams re-joined the Dolphins in 2007 and played with them until 2010, and spent the 2011 season with the Baltimore Ravens. He was formerly an assistant football coach at the University of the Incarnate Word and is currently a football analyst for ESPN's Longhorn Network. In 2015, Williams was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

Rod Woodson

Roderick Kevin Woodson (born March 10, 1965) is a former American football player who played in the National Football League (NFL) for 17 seasons. He had a 10-year stint with the Pittsburgh Steelers and was a key member of the Baltimore Ravens' Super Bowl XXXV championship team that beat the New York Giants. He also played for the San Francisco 49ers and Oakland Raiders, wearing the jersey number 26 throughout his career. He holds the NFL record for fumble recoveries (32) by a defensive player, and interceptions returned for touchdown (12), and was named the NFL Defensive Player of the Year in 1993. His 71 career interceptions is the third-most in NFL history. He was an inductee of the Class of 2009 of the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio on August 8, 2009. Woodson was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2016. Rod played most of his career as a cornerback then switched to safety during the later part of his career.

From his retirement in 2003 to February 2011, Woodson worked as an analyst for the NFL Network (on NFL Total Access and Thursday Night Football) and for the Big Ten Network. He spent the 2011 season as the Raiders' cornerbacks coach. He then returned to broadcasting, working for Westwood One as an analyst on college football (2012) and the NFL (2013) before resuming his coaching career in 2014.

Wade Smith

Wade Leon Smith (born April 26, 1981) is a former American football offensive tackle who played twelve seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Memphis, and was drafted by the Miami Dolphins in the third round of the 2003 NFL Draft. Smith has also played for the New York Jets, Kansas City Chiefs, Houston Texans, Seattle Seahawks, and Philadelphia Eagles.

Zach Thomas

Zachary Michael Thomas (born September 1, 1973) is a former American college and professional football player who was a middle linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for thirteen seasons. He played college football for Texas Tech University, and was recognized as a unanimous All-American. He was drafted by the Miami Dolphins in the fifth round of the 1996 NFL Draft, and played for the Dolphins his first twelve seasons in the NFL, before playing his 13th and final season with the Dallas Cowboys.

A seven time Pro Bowl selection, and seven time first or second team All-Pro, Thomas recorded more than 1,700 combined tackles in his career, was named the AFC Defensive Rookie of the Year in 1996, a two-time NFL Alumni Linebacker of the Year, and was selected to the NFL 2000s All-Decade Team. In 2015, Thomas was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

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