2002 American League Division Series

The 2002 American League Division Series (ALDS), the opening round of the 2002 American League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 1, and ended on Sunday, October 6, with the champions of the three AL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. The teams were:

[1]

The Division Series saw the wild card-qualifying Angels beat the defending league champion Yankees, and the Twins defeat the Athletics in a startling upset. The Angels and Twins went on to meet in the AL Championship Series (ALCS). The Angels became the American League champion, and defeated the National League champion San Francisco Giants in the 2002 World Series.

2002 American League Division Series
2002ALDS
Teams
Team (Wins) Manager Season
Anaheim Angels (3) Mike Scioscia 99–63, .611, GB: 4
New York Yankees (1) Joe Torre 103–58, .640, GA: 10½
DatesOctober 1–5
TelevisionFox (Games 1–2, 4)
ABC Family (Game 3)
TV announcersJoe Buck, Tim McCarver (Games 1–2)
Jon Miller, Joe Morgan (Game 3)
Thom Brennaman, Tim McCarver (Game 4)
RadioESPN (National)
KLAC (ANA)
Radio announcersDan Shulman, Dave Campbell (ESPN Radio)
Rory Markas, Terry Smith (KLAC)
Teams
Team (Wins) Manager Season
Minnesota Twins (3) Ron Gardenhire 94–67, .584, GA: 13½
Oakland Athletics (2) Art Howe 103–59, .636, GA: 4
DatesOctober 1–6
TelevisionABC Family
TV announcersJon Miller, Joe Morgan (Games 1–2, 5)
Dave O'Brien, Tony Gwynn, Rick Sutcliffe (Games 3–4)
RadioESPN
Radio announcersJohn Rooney, Buck Martinez
UmpiresJerry Crawford, Doug Eddings, Jim Joyce, Mike Winters, Tim McClelland, Fieldin Culbreth (Yankees–Angels, Games 1–2; Athletics–Twins, Games 3–4)
Gerry Davis, Chuck Meriwether, Alfonso Márquez, Derryl Cousins, Joe West, Laz Díaz (Athletics–Twins, Games 1–2, 5; Yankees–Angels, Games 3–4)

Matchups

New York Yankees vs. Anaheim Angels

Anaheim won the series, 3–1.

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 1 Anaheim Angels – 5, New York Yankees – 8 Yankee Stadium (I) 3:27 56,710[2] 
2 October 2 Anaheim Angels – 8, New York Yankees – 6 Yankee Stadium (I) 4:11 56,695[3] 
3 October 4 New York Yankees – 6, Anaheim Angels – 9 Edison International Field of Anaheim 3:52 45,072[4] 
4 October 5 New York Yankees – 5, Anaheim Angels – 9 Edison International Field of Anaheim 3:37 45,067[5]

Oakland Athletics vs. Minnesota Twins

Minnesota won the series, 3–2.

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 1 Minnesota Twins – 7, Oakland Athletics – 5 Network Associates Coliseum 3:44 34,853[6] 
2 October 2 Minnesota Twins – 1, Oakland Athletics – 9 Network Associates Coliseum 3:04 31,953[7] 
3 October 4 Oakland Athletics – 6, Minnesota Twins – 3 Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 3:26 55,932[8] 
4 October 5 Oakland Athletics – 2, Minnesota Twins – 11 Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 3:20 55,960[9] 
5 October 6 Minnesota Twins – 5, Oakland Athletics – 4 Network Associates Coliseum 3:23 32,146[10]

New York vs. Anaheim

Game 1, October 1

Yankee Stadium (I) in Bronx, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Anaheim 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 5 12 0
New York 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 4 X 8 8 1
WP: Steve Karsay (1–0)   LP: Ben Weber (0–1)   Sv: Mariano Rivera (1)
Home runs:
ANA: Troy Glaus 2 (2)
NYY: Derek Jeter (1), Jason Giambi (1), Rondell White (1), Bernie Williams (1)

The Yankees struck first in Game 1 on Derek Jeter's home run in the first off Jarrod Washburn, but in the top of the third, Darin Erstad singled off Roger Clemens. Alfonso Soriano then mishandled Jorge Posada's throw to second on Erstad's stolen base attempt, letting Erstad go to third. Tim Salmon then singled to tie the game. Jason Giambi's two-run home run in the fourth after Jeter drew a leadoff walk put the Yankees up 3–1, but the Angels loaded the bases in the fifth with two outs on two walks and a single before Garret Anderson tied the game with a double to left. The Yankees regained the lead in the bottom of the inning on Rondell White's home run, but the Angels again tied the score on Troy Glaus's home run leading off the sixth. Glaus's second home run of the game in the eighth off Ramiro Mendoza put the Angels up 5–4, but in the bottom of the inning, reliever Ben Weber walked two with two outs, Anaheim manager Mike Scioscia brought in Scott Schoeneweis to pitch to Jason Giambi, who tied the game with an RBI single. Scioscia then brought in Brendan Donnelly to face Bernie Williams who hit a three-run homer to put the Yankees up 8–5. Mariano Rivera pitched a scoreless top of the ninth for the save and give the Yankees a 1–0 series lead.

Game 2, October 2

Yankee Stadium (I) in Bronx, New York

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Anaheim 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 8 17 1
New York 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 1 6 12 1
WP: Francisco Rodríguez (1–0)   LP: Orlando Hernández (0–1)   Sv: Troy Percival (1)
Home runs:
ANA: Tim Salmon (1), Scott Spiezio (1), Garret Anderson (1), Troy Glaus (3)
NYY: Derek Jeter (2), Alfonso Soriano (1)

The Angels struck first in Game 2 on Tim Salmon's two-out home run in the first off Andy Pettitte. Next inning, Scott Spiezio homered with one out off Pettitte, who then allowed three consecutive singles, the last of which Benji Gil scored Shawn Wooten. Next inning, Garret Anderson singled with one out, moved to second on a sacrifice fly, and scored on Spiezio's single. Derek Jeter's home run in the bottom of the inning off Kevin Appier put the Yankees on the board. Next inning, Juan Rivera's two-out two-run single cut the Angels lead to 4–3. In the sixth, Alfonso Soriano's two-run home run off Francisco Rodriguez put the Yankees up 5–4, but back-to-back home runs by Anderson and Troy Glaus leading off the eighth off Orlando Hernandez put the Angels up 6–5. Steve Karsay relieved Hernandez and allowed two one-out singles to put runners on first and third. Adam Kennedy's sacrifice fly off Mike Stanton put the Angels up 7–5. In the ninth, Jeff Weaver allowed two one-out singles before Spiezio's double put the Angels up 8–5. In the bottom of the inning, Troy Percival allowed three singles, the last of which to Jorge Posada scoring Jason Giambi, but earned the save as the Angels tied the series 1–1 going to Anaheim.

Game 3, October 4

Edison International Field of Anaheim in Anaheim, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 6 0
Anaheim 0 1 2 1 0 1 1 3 X 9 12 0
WP: Francisco Rodríguez (2–0)   LP: Mike Stanton (0–1)   Sv: Troy Percival (2)
Home runs:
NYY: None
ANA: Adam Kennedy (1), Tim Salmon (2)

The Yankees loaded the bases in the first off Ramon Ortiz on a single and two walks before Robin Ventura's double scored two and Jorge Posada's sacrifice fly scored another. The Angels got on the board in the second off Mike Mussina when Troy Glaus singled, moved to third on a double and scored on Scott Spiezio's groundout. Ortiz in the third allowed a leadoff walk and subsequent double before Ventura's sacrifice fly put the Yankees up 4–1. After walking Raul Mondesi with two outs, Ortiz was relieved by John Lackey, who allowed consecutive RBI singles to Nick Johnson and Juan Rivera. The Angels cut the Yankees' lead to 6–3 in the bottom of the inning on Tim Salmon's two-run double after David Eckstein and Darin Erstad singled. Next inning, Adam Kennedy's home run cut the lead to 6–4. In the sixth, Jeff Weaver allowed a leadoff single, subsequent walk, and sacrifice bunt before Kennedy's sacrifice fly made it 6–5 Yankees. Next inning, Spiezio's two-out single with runners on first and second off Mike Stanton tied the game. Next inning, Kennedy hit a leadoff double and scored on Erstad's one-out double. Steve Karsay relieved Stanton and allowed a home run to Salmon to put the Angels up 9–6. Troy Percival retired the Yankees in order in the ninth as the Angels took a 2–1 series lead.

Game 4, October 5

Edison International Field of Anaheim in Anaheim, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
New York 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 5 12 2
Anaheim 0 0 1 0 8 0 0 0 X 9 15 1
WP: Jarrod Washburn (1–0)   LP: David Wells (0–1)
Home runs:
NYY: Jorge Posada (1)
ANA: Shawn Wooten (1)

With New York facing elimination, they sent David Wells to the mound. They struck first in the second off Jarrod Washburn on Robin Ventura's RBI double with runners on first and third, but the Angels tied the game in the second when Shawn Wooten scored from third on an error on David Eckstein's ground ball. The Yankees regained the lead in the fifth when Juan Rivera reached first on Third Basemen Troy Glaus's throwing error, moved to second on a double and scored on Derek Jeter's sacrifice fly, but the Angels exploded for eight runs in the bottom of the inning. Shawn Wooten's lead off home run tied the game, then Anaheim hit five consecutive singles with one out, the last three scoring a run each, to chase Wells. Ramiro Mendoza relieved Wells and allowed an RBI single to Wooten and two-run double to Bengie Molina. Jorge Posada's leadoff home run in the sixth off Brendan Donnelly made it 9–3 Angels. Next inning, the Yankees loaded the bases with one out off Francisco Rodriguez, but scored just once on a wild pitch. In the ninth, the Yankees hit three consecutive two-out singles, the last of which to Raul Mondesi scoring Bernie Williams before Nick Johnson popped out to end the game and series. Anaheim's victory secured their place in the American League Championship Series.

Composite box

2002 ALDS (3–1): Anaheim Angels over New York Yankees

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Anaheim Angels 1 3 5 1 10 2 1 7 1 31 56 2
New York Yankees 4 1 4 4 2 3 1 4 2 25 38 4
Total attendance: 203,544   Average attendance: 50,886

Oakland vs. Minnesota

Game 1, October 1

Network Associates Coliseum in Oakland, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Minnesota 0 1 2 0 0 3 1 0 0 7 13 3
Oakland 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 12 0
WP: Brad Radke (1–0)   LP: Ted Lilly (0–1)   Sv: Eddie Guardado (1)
Home runs:
MIN: Corey Koskie (1), Doug Mientkiewicz (1)
OAK: None

The A's struck first in the bottom of the first off Brad Radke when with runners on first and second on a walk and fielder's choice error, Eric Chavez drove in both with a single right. Chavez reached second on another error, then scored on David Justice's two-out single, all three runs unearned. The Twins cut the lead to 3–1 when Torii Hunter doubled to lead off the second off Tim Hudson and scored on Michael Cuddyer's one-out double. In the bottom of the inning, Ray Durham doubled with two outs, then scored on Scott Hatteberg's single. After another Twins error put runners on first and third, Chavez's single scored Hatteberg. In the third, the Twins cut the A's lead to 5–3 on Corey Koskie's two-run home run. Doug Mientkiewicz's leadoff home run in the sixth cut it to 5–4 A's. After Cuddyer grounded out, Ted Lilly relieved Hudson and allowed back-to-back singles to A.J. Pierzynski and Luis Rivas. Jacque Jones's RBI double then tied the game and after a walk, Koskie's RBI groundout put the Twins up 6–5. They added insurance in the seventh when Cuddyer singled with two outs off Cory Lidle and scored on Pierzynki's triple. The Minnesota bullpen pitched four innings of shutout ball to escape with a stunning 7–5 victory over the Athletics.

Game 2, October 2

Network Associates Coliseum in Oakland, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Minnesota 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 7 1
Oakland 3 0 0 5 1 0 0 0 X 9 14 0
WP: Mark Mulder (1–0)   LP: Joe Mays (0–1)
Home runs:
MIN: Cristian Guzmán (1)
OAK: Eric Chavez (1)

Oakland dominated Twin starter Joe Mays from the get-go and never looked back. Third baseman Eric Chavez hit a three-run home run in the first inning, and the A's added five more runs in the fourth. Ray Durham was hit by a pitch with one out, then scored on Miguel Tejada's two-out double. After Chavez was intentionally walked, Mays was pulled from the game after ​3 13 innings. After Tony Fiore walked Jermaine Dye to load the bases, David Justice cleared them with a triple before Justice scored on Mark Ellis's double. The A's added another run in the fifth when Durham doubled with one out, moved to third on a wild pitch, and scored on Scott Hatteberg's single. The Twins' lone run came on a Cristian Guzmán home run in the sixth inning as the series was tied 1–1 heading to Minnesota.

Game 3, October 4

Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Oakland 2 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 6 9 1
Minnesota 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 3 8 0
WP: Barry Zito (1–0)   LP: Rick Reed (0–1)   Sv: Billy Koch (1)
Home runs:
OAK: Ray Durham (1), Scott Hatteberg (1), Terrence Long (1), Jermaine Dye (1)
MIN: None

Ray Durham stunned the Twin fans inside the Metrodome by leading off the game with an inside-the-park home run off Rick Reed, the first in Division Series history. Scott Hatteberg hit a home run to right field moments later to stake 23-game winner Barry Zito to a 2–0 lead. Terrence Long's home run in the fourth made it 3–0 A's. The Twins cut it to 3–1 on A.J. Pierzynski's RBI single with runners on first and third. Next inning, Jacque Jones drew a leadoff walk, then scored on Corey Koskie's one-out double. One out later, Koskie scored on Torii Hunter's single to tie the game, but in the sixth, Jermaine Dye's leadoff home run put the A's up 4–3 off Reed. Next inning, Johan Santana walked Durham with one out and Randy Velarde's pinch-hit double made it 5–3 A's. Verlade moved to third on the throw to home. Michael Jackson replaced Santana and allowed a sacrifice fly to Miguel Tejada to make it 6–3 A's. This was just the second postseason loss at the HHH Metrodome for the Twins (11–1 home record coming into the game), the last coming in 1991 to Toronto in the ALCS.

Game 4, October 5

Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Oakland 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 7 2
Minnesota 0 0 2 7 0 0 2 0 X 11 12 0
WP: Eric Milton (1–0)   LP: Tim Hudson (0–1)
Home runs:
OAK: Miguel Tejada (1)
MIN: Doug Mientkiewicz (2)

The A's struck first on Miguel Tejada's two-run home run after a two-out walk off Eric Milton in the third, but in the bottom of the inning, the Twins tied the score on Cristian Guzman's RBI groundout with runners on second and third followed by David Ortiz's RBI double off Tim Hudson. Next inning, an error on Luis Rivas's ground ball with runners on first and second scored a run and put runners on second and third. A wild pitch scored another run before Jacque Jones was hit by a pitch. Another A's error on Cristian Guzman's ground ball scored another run and put runners on first and third. Ted Lilly in relief allowed an RBI single to Corey Koskie. After David Ortiz struck out, a wild pitch to Torii Hunter scored another run before Hunter's double and Doug Mientkiewicz's single scored a run each, all seven runs scored in this inning unearned. Mientkiewicz's two-run home run in the seventh after a lead off single off Lilly made it 11–2 Twins. and that was all starter Eric Milton needed, forcing a decisive Game 5 in Oakland.

Game 5, October 6

Network Associates Coliseum in Oakland, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Minnesota 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 5 12 0
Oakland 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 11 0
WP: Brad Radke (2–0)   LP: Mark Mulder (1–1)
Home runs:
MIN: A. J. Pierzynski (1)
OAK: Ray Durham (2), Mark Ellis (1)

The Twins struck first in the second off Mark Mulder on Denny Hocking's based loaded two-out single. Next inning, Cristian Guzman hit a lead off double, then scored on Matt LeCroy's one-out single. Ray Durham's home run in the bottom of the inning off Brad Radke made it 2–1 Twins, which stayed that way until the ninth, when Dustan Mohr drew a leadoff walk off Billy Koch, then a home run from A. J. Pierzynski made it 4–1 Twins. Two outs later, Corey Koskie' singled, moved to second on a walk, and scored on an RBI double from David Ortiz. Oakland cut the lead to 5–4 off Twin closer Eddie Guardado in the bottom of the inning on Mark Ellis's three-run home run to left. Randy Velarde singled with two outs to represent the tying run when Ray Durham fouled out to second to end the series.

Minnesota's victory secured its place in the American League Championship Series. To date, this is the Twins most recent playoff series win.

Composite box

2002 ALDS (3–2): Minnesota Twins over Oakland Athletics

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Minnesota Twins 0 2 5 8 2 4 3 0 3 27 52 4
Oakland Athletics 8 2 3 6 1 1 2 0 3 26 53 3
Total attendance: 210,844   Average attendance: 42,169

Notes

  1. ^ The higher seed (in parentheses) had the home field advantage (Games 1, 2 and 5 at home), which was determined by playing record. The Yankees were not required to make up one remaining game against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, potentially allowing the Athletics to tie them for the best record, because they had a 5–4 advantage over Oakland in head-to-head play and thus would win the tiebreaker for home field advantage through the playoffs.
  2. ^ "2002 ALDS – Anaheim Angels vs. New York Yankees – Game 1". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  3. ^ "2002 ALDS – Anaheim Angels vs. New York Yankees – Game 2". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  4. ^ "2002 ALDS – New York Yankees vs. Anaheim Angels – Game 3". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  5. ^ "2002 ALDS – New York Yankees vs. Anaheim Angels – Game 4". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  6. ^ "2002 ALDS – Minnesota Twins vs. Oakland Athletics – Game 1". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  7. ^ "2002 ALDS – Minnesota Twins vs. Oakland Athletics – Game 2". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  8. ^ "2002 ALDS – Oakland Athletics vs. Minnesota Twins – Game 3". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  9. ^ "2002 ALDS – Oakland Athletics vs. Minnesota Twins – Game 4". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  10. ^ "2002 ALDS – Minnesota Twins vs. Oakland Athletics – Game 5". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.

External links

2002 American League Championship Series

The 2002 American League Championship Series (ALCS) was a matchup between the Wild Card Anaheim Angels and the Central Division Champion Minnesota Twins. The Angels advanced to the Series after dethroning the reigning four-time AL Champion New York Yankees in the 2002 American League Division Series three games to one. The Twins made their way into the Series after beating the Athletics three games to two. The Angels won the Series four games to one and went on to defeat the San Francisco Giants in the 2002 World Series to win their first World Series championship.

2002 Anaheim Angels season

The Anaheim Angels' 2002 season was the franchise's 42nd, and it ended with the team's first American League pennant and World Series championship.

The Angels finished the regular season with a record of 99-63, 4 games behind the Oakland Athletics in the American League West standings, but qualified for the franchise's first ever wild card playoff berth to return to the postseason for the first time since 1986. Outfielder Garret Anderson led the team with 123 runs batted in and a .539 slugging percentage, was selected for the AL All-Star team, and won the Silver Slugger Award. Jarrod Washburn went 18-6 with a 3.15 earned run average to anchor a pitching staff that allowed the fewest runs in the league.

In the postseason, the Angels defeated the New York Yankees 3-1 in the American League Division Series, then defeated the Minnesota Twins 4-1 in the American League Championship Series to win the AL pennant. The Angels then won the World Series in dramatic fashion when, with a 3-2 series deficit to the San Francisco Giants, they overcame a 5 run deficit in the late innings of Game 6 to force a winner-take-all Game 7, which they won to clinch the series 4-3. The morning after the win, The Orange County Register celebrated the Angels' win with the headline "7th Heaven," referring to the popular television series and fact that it took seven games for the Angels to win the World Series, and in doing so, it sent them to seventh heaven.2002 was also notable as the season in which the Angels debuted their present-day uniforms, colors, and halo insignia, which replaced the widely ridiculed "periwinkle" uniforms and "winged" insignia they had worn since 1997. It was also the last season the team was owned by The Walt Disney Company, which sold its controlling interest in the team to present-day owner Arte Moreno in 2003.

2002 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 2002 season was the team's 35th in Oakland, California.

It was the 102nd season in franchise history. The Athletics finished first in the American League West with a record of 103-59.

The Athletics' 2002 campaign ranks among the most famous in franchise history. Following the 2001 season, Oakland saw the departure of three key players. Billy Beane, the team's general manager, responded with a series of under-the-radar free agent signings. The new-look Athletics, despite a comparative lack of star power, surprised the baseball world by besting the 2001 team's regular season record. The team is most famous, however, for winning 20 consecutive games between August 13 and September 4, 2002. The Athletics' season was the subject of Michael Lewis's 2003 book Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game (Lewis was given the opportunity to follow the team around throughout the season). A film adaptation of the book, also titled Moneyball, was released in 2011.

A. J. Pierzynski

Anthony John Pierzynski (; born December 30, 1976) is an American former professional baseball catcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Minnesota Twins (1998–2003), San Francisco Giants (2004), Chicago White Sox (2005–2012), Texas Rangers (2013), Boston Red Sox (2014), St. Louis Cardinals (2014) and Atlanta Braves (2015–2016). Pierzynski is one of only ten catchers in Major League history to reach 2,000 hits in his career.Pierzynski is known for having a strong and colorful personality, a fact he acknowledges. During his turn at the microphone following the White Sox victory parade in 2005, he thanked team personnel "for putting up with me." Former White Sox manager Ozzie Guillén summed up the situation as, "If you play against him, you hate him. If you play with him, you hate him a little less." Guillén also acknowledged Pierzynski's value to the club, despite being relatively high-maintenance: "A.J.'s been great for me. He's worth the work because he always shows up for you."

Denny Hocking

Dennis Lee "Denny" Hocking (born April 2, 1970 in Torrance, California) is a former Major League Baseball utility player. After playing at El Camino College in California, he was drafted in the 52nd round of the 1989 Major League Baseball Draft by the Minnesota Twins and made his major league debut in 1993. He played with the Minnesota Twins until 2004 when he went to the Colorado Rockies as a free agent. Hocking was a utility player for his entire career, playing every position except pitcher and catcher. Hocking's best year was 2000 when he hit .298 with 4 home runs and 47 RBI, a year where he also played in 10 or more games at 7 different positions. Hocking was never a regular starter at any one position, but played over 100 games at shortstop, second base, third base, and right field.

He is currently the manager for 2019 with the West Virginia Power.

In February 1987, Hocking hit a full court shot right before halftime in a basketball game for West Torrance High, his hometown team.

In 2000, Hocking's wife gave birth to fraternal twins, Iliana and Penelope, making him the first player in Twins franchise history to become the father of a set of twins. When the Twins clinched the 2002 American League Division Series against the heavily favored Oakland Athletics, Hocking broke his hand in the ensuing celebration. Hocking caught the final out of Game 5 and players piled on top of him. A player he believed to be teammate Jacque Jones stepped on the middle finger of his right hand and split the nail in two places. This injury forced Hocking to miss the entire 2002 American League Championship Series.

Hocking served as an analyst and reporter for MLB.com and teamed with Rob Dibble on Fox Sports Radio. in 2008. He co-hosted with Derrick Deese on Saturdays from 5pm to 8pm Pacific Time.

In January 2010, Hocking was named hitting coach of the single-A Frederick Keys, a Baltimore Orioles affiliate. He was promoted to the AA Bowie Baysox in 2012 as hitting coach.

in December 2013, the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim announced that Denny Hocking will be the manager of the Inland Empire 66ers for the 2014 season. The Inland Empire 66ers is the Class A – Advanced affiliate of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.In 2016, Denny Hocking was working as the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim minor league infield coordinator.In 2017, Hocking joined the Seattle Mariners and worked as an Outfield and Base Running Coach with the Triple-A Tacoma Rainiers. Hocking was named the 56th manager for the Clinton LumberKings for the 2018 season.

Doug Mientkiewicz

Douglas Andrew Mientkiewicz ( mint-KAY-vitch; born June 19, 1974) is an American retired professional baseball first baseman, and current manager for the Toledo Mud Hens. He batted left-handed and threw right-handed. He is one of five American players to win both an Olympic gold medal and a World Series championship which he won with the Boston Red Sox in 2004 over the St. Louis Cardinals.

Francisco Rodríguez (Venezuelan pitcher)

Francisco José Rodríguez, Sr. (born January 7, 1982), nicknamed "Frankie" and "K-Rod", is a Venezuelan professional baseball pitcher who is a free agent. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Anaheim Angels / Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, New York Mets, Baltimore Orioles, Milwaukee Brewers, and Detroit Tigers.

Rodriguez pitched for the Angels from 2002 to 2008, and the Mets from 2009 to midway through the 2011 season. He served as the closer for both teams. Rodriguez then pitched for the Brewers until July 2013, mostly in a setup role, and for the Orioles for the rest of 2013 before returning to the Brewers for 2014 and 2015, this time as the team's closer. He was then traded to the Detroit Tigers in 2016, and became the Tigers' closer.

Rodríguez holds the major league record for saves in a single season, with 62, set in 2008 while pitching for the Angels. He is a three-time league leader in saves (2005, 2006, and 2008) and a six-time All-Star. Rodríguez is one of only six Major League pitchers to accumulate a total of 400 or more saves, in his baseball career.

Mike Stanton (left-handed pitcher)

William Michael Stanton (born June 2, 1967) is a former left-handed specialist relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who enjoyed success over his career, most notably with the Atlanta Braves and New York Yankees. Stanton currently hosts the pregame show for the Houston Astros on AT&T SportsNet Southwest.

Moneyball (film)

Moneyball is a 2011 American sports film directed by Bennett Miller and written by Steven Zaillian and Aaron Sorkin. The film is based on Michael Lewis's 2003 nonfiction book of the same name, an account of the Oakland Athletics baseball team's 2002 season and their general manager Billy Beane's attempts to assemble a competitive team.

In the film, Beane (Brad Pitt) and assistant GM Peter Brand (Jonah Hill), faced with the franchise's limited budget for players, build a team of undervalued talent by taking a sophisticated sabermetric approach to scouting and analyzing players. Columbia Pictures bought the rights to Lewis's book in 2004.Moneyball premiered at the 2011 Toronto International Film Festival and was released on September 23, 2011 to box office success and critical acclaim. The film was nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Actor for Pitt and Best Supporting Actor for Hill.

Olmedo Sáenz

Olmedo Sáenz Sánchez (born October 8, 1970) is a former Major League Baseball player. Though primarily a pinch hitter, he occasionally played first base or third base.

Ramiro Mendoza

Ramiro Mendoza (born June 15, 1972), nicknamed "El Brujo" (The Witch Doctor), is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. Mendoza played with the New York Yankees (1996–2002, 2005) and Boston Red Sox (2003–04). He batted and threw right-handed. Although Mendoza made 62 starts in his major league career, he was primarily known as a middle relief pitcher. He threw a sinker along with a slider, a four-seam fastball and a changeup. In Mendoza's ten seasons in the Major Leagues he was a part of five World Series champion teams.

Raúl Mondesí

Raúl Ramón Mondesí Avelino (born March 12, 1971) is a Dominican former politician who was the mayor of San Cristóbal, Dominican Republic, and a former professional baseball right fielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for 13 seasons, primarily for the Los Angeles Dodgers, and made his MLB debut with them in 1993. He was the National League (NL) Rookie of the Year in 1994, an MLB All-Star, and a two-time Rawlings Gold Glove Award winner. Known for his combination of power and speed, Mondesí twice achieved the 30–30 club. Also noted for his strong throwing arm, he led right fielders in his league in assists three times while registering over 100 in his career.

After baseball, Mondesí began a career in politics, gaining election to the Dominican Chamber of Deputies in 2006. In 2010, he became mayor of San Cristóbal for a six-year term. On September 20, 2017, Mondesí was sentenced to eight years in prison on corruption charges.

Shawn Wooten

William Shawn Wooten (born July 24, 1972) is the assistant major league hitting coach for the Los Angeles Angels. He is a former professional baseball player. He played all or part of five seasons in Major League Baseball with the Anaheim Angels (2000–03), Philadelphia Phillies (2004), and Boston Red Sox (2005). He bats and throws right-handed.

A utility player who played first base, catcher, and third base, Wooten compiled a .272 batting average with 18 home runs and 86 RBI in 266 games played in his major league career. A member of the Angels' 2002 World Series championship team, he was a late bloomer, not making the majors until age 28. After that, while he played well in limited playing time, his career was derailed by a pair of injuries.

Terry Ryan (baseball)

Terry W. Ryan (born October 26, 1953 in Janesville, Wisconsin) is an American professional baseball executive and former general manager for the Minnesota Twins of Major League Baseball. Ryan was known for using a low payroll and building up the minor league system to put up contending teams. He resigned as general manager of the Twins on October 1, 2007 but returned to his former post on November 7, 2011 until being relieved of his duties on July 18, 2016. Ryan was hired as a special assignment scout by the Philadelphia Phillies on November 30, 2016.

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