2002–03 OHL season

The 2002–03 OHL season was the 23rd season of the Ontario Hockey League. The North Bay Centennials relocated to Saginaw, Michigan, becoming the Saginaw Spirit. Due to the move, several teams changed divisions; the Saginaw Spirit were placed in the west division, the London Knights moved to the midwest division, and the Brampton Battalion moved to the central division. The London Knights moved into the new John Labatt Centre, which replaced the London Ice House. The Tim Adams Memorial Trophy was inaugurated as the MVP of the OHL Cup. Twenty teams each played 68 games. The Mississauga Icedogs qualified for the playoffs for the first time in their existence. The Kitchener Rangers won the J. Ross Robertson Cup, defeating the Ottawa 67's in the final.

Regular season

Standings

Eastern conference

East division GP W L T OTL Pts GF GA Rank
z-Ottawa 67's 68 44 14 7 3 98 318 210 1
x-Peterborough Petes 68 32 22 11 3 78 222 215 3
x-Belleville Bulls 68 33 27 6 2 74 195 200 5
x-Oshawa Generals 68 34 30 2 2 72 243 225 6
Kingston Frontenacs 68 25 37 2 4 56 222 287 9
Central division GP W L T OTL Pts GF GA Rank
y-Brampton Battalion 68 34 24 6 4 78 239 202 2
x-Toronto St. Michael's Majors 68 32 24 7 5 76 207 214 4
x-Barrie Colts 68 29 26 4 9 71 228 223 7
x-Mississauga IceDogs 68 23 31 11 3 60 212 231 8
Sudbury Wolves 68 16 46 4 2 38 175 273 10

Western conference

Midwest division GP W L T OTL Pts GF GA Rank
z-Kitchener Rangers 68 46 14 5 3 100 275 188 1
x-London Knights 68 31 27 7 3 72 220 205 5
x-Guelph Storm 68 29 28 9 2 69 217 208 6
x-Owen Sound Attack 68 27 30 7 4 65 206 243 7
Erie Otters 68 24 35 6 3 57 181 248 9
West division GP W L T OTL Pts GF GA Rank
y-Plymouth Whalers 68 43 14 9 2 97 259 174 2
x-Sarnia Sting 68 41 19 7 1 90 251 193 3
x-Windsor Spitfires 68 37 25 5 1 80 259 221 4
x-Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds 68 26 33 6 3 61 232 284 8
Saginaw Spirit 68 11 45 5 7 34 158 275 10

Scoring leaders

Player Team GP G A Pts PIM
Corey Locke Ottawa 67's 66 63 88 151 83
Matt Foy Ottawa 67's 68 61 71 132 112
Chad LaRose Plymouth Whalers 67 61 56 117 52
Joey Tenute Sarnia Sting 68 41 71 112 75
Kyle Wellwood Windsor Spitfires 57 41 59 100 20
Jamie Johnson Oshawa Generals 68 24 76 100 34
Eric Staal Peterborough Petes 66 39 59 98 36
Matt Stajan Belleville Bulls 57 34 60 94 75
Kris Newbury Sarnia Sting 64 34 58 92 149
Brandon Nolan Oshawa Generals 68 36 52 88 57

Playoffs

Conference quarterfinals Conference semifinals Conference finals Finals
            
E1 Ottawa 4
E8 Mississauga 1
E1 Ottawa 4
E6 Oshawa 2
E3 Peterborough 3
E6 Oshawa 4
E1 Ottawa 4
E4 Toronto 3
E4 Toronto 4
E5 Belleville 3
E4 Toronto 4
E2 Brampton 1
E2 Brampton 4
E7 Barrie 2
E1 Ottawa 1
W1 Kitchener 4
W1 Kitchener 4
W8 S.S. Marie 0
W1 Kitchener 4
W6 Guelph 1
W3 Sarnia 2
W6 Guelph 4
W1 Kitchener 4
W2 Plymouth 3
W4 Windsor 3
W5 London 4
W5 London 3
W2 Plymouth 4
W2 Plymouth 4
W7 Owen Sound 0

Conference quarterfinals

Eastern conference

Ottawa (1) vs. Mississauga (8)
Date Away Home
March 21 Mississauga 3 4 Ottawa OT
March 23 Mississauga 3 8 Ottawa
March 24 Ottawa 7 4 Mississauga
March 25 Ottawa 4 5 Mississauga OT
March 29 Mississauga 3 6 Ottawa
Ottawa wins series 4–1
Brampton (2) vs. Barrie (7)
Date Away Home
March 20 Barrie 2 3 Brampton OT
March 22 Brampton 2 4 Barrie
March 23 Barrie 4 5 Brampton
March 25 Brampton 1 0 Barrie
March 27 Barrie 3 1 Brampton
March 29 Brampton 2 1 Barrie
Brampton wins series 4–2
Peterborough (3) vs. Oshawa (6)
Date Away Home
March 20 Oshawa 3 2 Peterborough OT
March 21 Peterborough 6 5 Oshawa OT
March 24 Oshawa 4 5 Peterborough OT
March 25 Peterborough 0 3 Oshawa
March 27 Oshawa 2 5 Peterborough
March 31 Peterborough 1 3 Oshawa
April 1 Oshawa 4 3 Peterborough OT
Oshawa wins series 4–3
Toronto (4) vs. Belleville (5)
Date Away Home
March 23 Belleville 4 6 Toronto
March 24 Toronto 1 4 Belleville
March 27 Belleville 3 6 Toronto
March 28 Toronto 2 4 Belleville
March 30 Belleville 2 6 Toronto
March 31 Toronto 1 6 Belleville
April 1 Belleville 1 3 Toronto
Toronto wins series 4–3

Western conference

Kitchener (1) vs. Sault Ste. Marie (8)
Date Away Home
March 21 Sault Ste. Marie 0 3 Kitchener
March 22 Sault Ste. Marie 0 4 Kitchener
March 25 Kitchener 2 1 Sault Ste. Marie
March 26 Kitchener 4 2 Sault Ste. Marie
Kitchener wins series 4–0
Plymouth (2) vs. Owen Sound (7)
Date Away Home
March 22 Owen Sound 3 6 Plymouth
March 23 Plymouth 6 3 Owen Sound
March 25 Owen Sound 4 6 Plymouth
March 27 Plymouth 5 2 Owen Sound
Plymouth wins series 4–0
Sarnia (3) vs. Guelph (6)
Date Away Home
March 21 Guelph 5 2 Sarnia
March 23 Sarnia 5 7 Guelph
March 26 Guelph 0 1 Sarnia
March 28 Sarnia 1 6 Guelph
March 29 Guelph 0 3 Sarnia
March 31 Sarnia 1 9 Guelph
Guelph wins series 4–2
Windsor (4) vs. London (5)
Date Away Home
March 20 London 3 2 Windsor
March 21 Windsor 4 1 London
March 23 London 6 7 Windsor OT
March 26 Windsor 1 2 London
March 28 London 5 3 Windsor
March 31 Windsor 3 2 London
April 1 London 7 4 Windsor
London wins series 4–3

Conference semifinals

Eastern conference
Ottawa (1) vs. Oshawa (6)
Date Away Home
April 4 Ottawa 2 3 Oshawa
April 6 Oshawa 3 4 Ottawa
April 7 Oshawa 1 8 Ottawa
April 9 Ottawa 5 7 Oshawa
April 11 Oshawa 1 7 Ottawa
April 13 Ottawa 6 0 Oshawa
Ottawa wins series 4–2
Brampton (2) vs. Toronto (4)
Date Away Home
April 4 Toronto 0 7 Brampton
April 6 Brampton 1 4 Toronto
April 8 Toronto 4 3 Brampton OT
April 10 Brampton 1 4 Toronto
April 11 Toronto 6 3 Brampton
Toronto wins series 4–1
Western conference
Kitchener (1) vs. Guelph (6)
Date Away Home
April 4 Guelph 3 4 Kitchener
April 6 Kitchener 6 2 Guelph
April 8 Guelph 5 4 Kitchener
April 10 Kitchener 4 1 Guelph
April 11 Guelph 4 5 Kitchener OT
Kitchener wins series 4–1
Plymouth (2) vs. London (5)
Date Away Home
April 5 London 3 2 Plymouth
April 6 Plymouth 2 1 London
April 8 London 4 3 Plymouth
April 9 Plymouth 3 2 London OT
April 11 London 3 6 Plymouth
April 12 Plymouth 1 5 London
April 14 London 2 4 Plymouth
Plymouth wins series 4–3

Conference finals

Eastern conference Western conference
Ottawa (1) vs. Toronto (4)
Date Away Home
April 18 Toronto 3 0 Ottawa
April 20 Ottawa 1 2 Toronto
April 22 Toronto 0 6 Ottawa
April 24 Ottawa 4 2 Toronto
April 25 Toronto 6 2 Ottawa
April 27 Ottawa 3 2 Toronto OT
April 28 Toronto 2 5 Ottawa
Ottawa wins series 4–3
Kitchener (1) vs. Plymouth (2)
Date Away Home
April 16 Plymouth 3 1 Kitchener
April 18 Kitchener 6 1 Plymouth
April 20 Plymouth 2 3 Kitchener
April 22 Kitchener 2 3 Plymouth
April 24 Plymouth 2 1 Kitchener OT
April 26 Kitchener 7 4 Plymouth
April 28 Plymouth 1 3 Kitchener
Kitchener wins series 4–3

J. Ross Robertson Cup finals

Kitchener (1) vs. Ottawa (1)
Date Away Home
May 2 Ottawa 3 2 Kitchener OT
May 4 Kitchener 4 3 Ottawa OT
May 6 Ottawa 1 4 Kitchener
May 8 Kitchener 4 3 Ottawa OT
May 10 Ottawa 1 4 Kitchener
Kitchener wins series 4–1

All-Star teams

First team

Second team

Third team

Awards

J. Ross Robertson Cup: Kitchener Rangers
Hamilton Spectator Trophy: Kitchener Rangers
Bobby Orr Trophy: Ottawa 67's
Wayne Gretzky Trophy: Kitchener Rangers
Leyden Trophy: Ottawa 67's
Emms Trophy: Brampton Battalion
Holody Trophy: Kitchener Rangers
Bumbacco Trophy: Plymouth Whalers
Red Tilson Trophy: Corey Locke, Ottawa 67's
Eddie Powers Memorial Trophy: Corey Locke, Ottawa 67's
Matt Leyden Trophy: Brian Kilrea, Ottawa 67's
Jim Mahon Memorial Trophy: Matt Foy, Ottawa 67's
Max Kaminsky Trophy: Brendan Bell, Ottawa 67's
OHL Goaltender of the Year: Andy Chiodo, Toronto St. Michael's Majors
Jack Ferguson Award: Patrick McNeill, Saginaw Spirit
Dave Pinkney Trophy: Paul Drew and Jeff Weber, Plymouth Whalers
OHL Executive of the Year: Steve Bienkowski, Kitchener Rangers
Bill Long Award: Norm Bryan, Peterborough Petes
Emms Family Award: Rob Schremp, Mississauga IceDogs
F.W. 'Dinty' Moore Trophy: Ryan Munce, Sarnia Sting
OHL Humanitarian of the Year: Michael Mole, Belleville Bulls
William Hanley Trophy: Kyle Wellwood, Windsor Spitfires
Leo Lalonde Memorial Trophy: Chad Larose, Plymouth Whalers
Bobby Smith Trophy: Dustin Brown, Guelph Storm
Tim Adams Memorial Trophy: Jhase Sniderman, Toronto Young Nats
Wayne Gretzky 99 Award: Derek Roy, Kitchener Rangers

See also

References

Preceded by
2001–02 OHL season
OHL seasons Succeeded by
2003–04 OHL season
2001–02 OHL season

The 2001–02 OHL season was the 22nd season of the Ontario Hockey League. Twenty teams each played 68 games. The Erie Otters defeated the Barrie Colts for the J. Ross Robertson Cup.

2002–03 QMJHL season

The 2002–03 QMJHL season was the 34th season in the history of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League. The league discontinues the AutoPro Plaque and Philips Plaque as those sponsorships expire. The St-Clair Group Plaque is renamed the Jean Sawyer Trophy. Sixteen teams played 72 games each in the schedule. The Baie-Comeau Drakkar finished first overall in the regular season winning their first Jean Rougeau Trophy. The Hull Olympiques won their fifth President's Cup, defeating the Halifax Mooseheads in the finals.

2003–04 OHL season

The 2003–04 OHL season was the 24th season of the Ontario Hockey League. In November 2003, the OHL Board of Governors renamed the OHL Humanitarian of the Year Award to the Dan Snyder Memorial Trophy, in recognition of former Owen Sound Platers player, Dan Snyder, who died in a car accident in September 2003. Twenty teams each played 68 games. The J. Ross Robertson Cup was won by the Guelph Storm, who swept the Mississauga IceDogs in the league final.

Andrew Penner

Andrew Penner (born December 21, 1982) is a Canadian professional ice hockey goaltender who currently plays for the Colorado Eagles of the ECHL.

Barrie Colts

The Barrie Colts are a junior ice hockey team in Ontario Hockey League, based in Barrie, Ontario, Canada.

George Burnett (ice hockey)

George Burnett (born March 25, 1962 in Port Perry, Ontario, Canada) is the head coach and general manager of the Guelph Storm of the Ontario Hockey League. Burnett is currently in his 21st season as a head coach for junior ice hockey in the OHL. Burnett previously played in the OHL with the London Knights, and later became a two-time OHL Coach of the Year and won an OHL championship in his first tour of duty with the Guelph Storm. As of the end of the 2015–16 OHL season, Burnett has coached 1332 games in the OHL, and is 6th all-time in wins with 636. Burnett has led OHL teams to 5 division titles, playoff appearances in 16 of 20 seasons, and two Memorial Cup appearances. Burnett was head coach and general manager of the Belleville Bulls for 11 seasons, and drafted all three Subban brothers into the OHL; P. K. Subban, Malcolm Subban and Jordan Subban.Burnett briefly coached in the National Hockey League for three seasons. He was head coach of the Edmonton Oilers for part of the 1994–95 season, and was an assistant coach for the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim for two seasons. Burnett coached in the American Hockey League for four seasons, winning one division title and one Calder Cup championship. Burnett was the head coach of Canada's U18 National team which won the gold medal at the Six Nations Cup in the Czech Republic in 2001, and another gold medal at the 2010 Ivan Hlinka Memorial Tournament. Burnett was assistant coach for the Canada's U20 National Junior team at the 2011 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships and the 2012 World Junior Ice Hockey Championships winning silver and bronze medals.

Greg Walters

Greg Walters (born August 12, 1970) is a Canadian ice hockey head coach, and retired professional player. He was drafted into the National Hockey League in 1990, but spent his career playing in the minor leagues. During 12 seasons, he played 248 games in the American Hockey League, and 241 games in the International Hockey League. He later turned to coaching, and has won two Ontario Junior Hockey League Coach of the Year awards, and one Canadian Junior Hockey League Coach of the Year award. He was named head coach of the Oshawa Generals on June 11, 2018.

Sarnia Sting

The Sarnia Sting are a junior ice hockey team based in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada. They are one of the 20 teams that make up the Ontario Hockey League. They play out of the Progressive Auto Sales Arena (formerly the Sarnia Sports and Entertainment Centre).

On January 22, 2015, now retired NHL forward David Legwand, who played for the Ottawa Senators at the time, and retired NHL defenseman Derian Hatcher entered an agreement to purchase the Sarnia Sting. The transfer of ownership was approved by the OHL Board of Governors and completed on March 4, 2015.

Tomas Csabi

Tomas Csabi (born November 16, 1984) is a Czech retired professional ice hockey player. During the 2002–03 Czech Extraliga season Csabi played one game in the Czech Extraliga with HC Slavia Praha.

Csabi won a bronze medal with the Czech Republic men's national under-18 ice hockey team at the 2002 IIHF World U18 Championships. He skated 19 games in the Ontario Hockey League during the 2002–03 OHL season with the Saginaw Spirit before returning to the Czech Republic.

East Division
Central Division
Midwest Division
West Division
Defunct teams

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