2002–03 FA Cup

The 2002–03 FA Cup was the 122nd staging of the world's oldest cup competition, the FA Cup. The competition was won by Arsenal with a 1–0 victory in the final at the Millennium Stadium, Cardiff against Southampton, courtesy of a Robert Pires goal.

2002–03 FA Cup
Country England
 Wales
Defending championsArsenal
ChampionsArsenal (9th title)
Runners-upSouthampton
Top goal scorer(s)Nigel Jemson
(5 goals)

Calendar

Round Date (weekend of)
Extra Preliminary Round
Preliminary Round
First Round Qualifying
Second Round Qualifying
Third Round Qualifying Saturday 12 October 2002
Fourth Round Qualifying Saturday 26 October 2002
First Round Proper Saturday 16 November 2002
Second Round Saturday 7 December 2002
Third Round Saturday 4 January 2003
Fourth Round Saturday 25 January 2003
Fifth Round Saturday 15 February 2003
Sixth Round Saturday 8 March 2003
Semi-finals Sunday 13 April 2003
Final Saturday 17 May 2003

Early rounds

First Round Proper

At this stage the 48 Second and Third Division clubs joined the 32 non-league clubs who came through the qualifying rounds.

The matches were scheduled to be played on the weekend of Saturday, 16 November 2002, with replays in the week commencing 25 November.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Summary
1 Chesterfield 1–2 Morecambe 16 November 2002 3,703 [1]
2 Bournemouth 2–1 Doncaster Rovers 16 November 2002 5,371 [2]
3 Barrow 2–0 Moor Green 16 November 2002 2,650 [3]
4 Bury 0–3 Plymouth Argyle 16 November 2002 2,987 [4]
5 Rochdale 3–2 Peterborough United 16 November 2002 2,566 [5]
6 Yeovil Town 0–2 Cheltenham Town 16 November 2002 6,455 [6]
7 Vauxhall Motors 0–0 Queen's Park Rangers 16 November 2002 3,507 [7]
Replay Queen's Park Rangers 1 – 1 Vauxhall Motors 26 November 2002 5,336 [8]
Vauxhall Motors won 4 – 3 on penalties
8 Northwich Victoria 0–3 Scunthorpe United 16 November 2002 1,724 [9]
9 Luton Town 4–0 Guiseley 16 November 2002 5,248 [10]
10 Swindon Town 1–0 Huddersfield Town 16 November 2002 4,210 [11]
11 Scarborough 0–0 Cambridge United 16 November 2002 2,084 [12]
Replay Cambridge United 2 – 1 Scarborough 26 November 2002 3,373 [13]
12 Shrewsbury Town 4–0 Stafford Rangers 16 November 2002 5,114 [14]
13 Wrexham 0–2 Darlington 16 November 2002 3,442 [15]
14 Tranmere Rovers 2–2 Cardiff City 16 November 2002 5,592 [16]
Replay Cardiff City 2 – 1 Tranmere Rovers 26 November 2002 6,853 [17]
15 Stockport County 4–1 St Albans City 16 November 2002 3,303 [18]
16 Wycombe Wanderers 2–4 Brentford 16 November 2002 5,673 [19]
17 Kidderminster Harriers 2–2 Rushden & Diamonds 16 November 2002 3,079 [20]
Replay Rushden & Diamonds 2 – 1 Kidderminster Harriers 26 November 2002 3,391 [21]
18 Barnsley 1–4 Blackpool 16 November 2002 6,857 [22]
19 Bristol Rovers 0–0 Runcorn Halton 16 November 2002 4,135 [23]
Replay Runcorn Halton 1 – 3 Bristol Rovers 26 November 2002 2,444 [24]
20 Northampton Town 3–2 Boston United 16 November 2002 4,373 [25]
21 Hull City 0–3 Macclesfield Town 16 November 2002 7,803 [26]
22 Carlisle United 2–1 Lincoln City 16 November 2002 4,388 [27]
23 Oldham Athletic 2–2 Burton Albion 16 November 2002 5,802 [28]
Replay Burton Albion 2 – 2 Oldham Athletic 27 November 2002 3,416 [29]
Oldham Athletic won 5 – 4 on penalties
24 Southend United 1–1 Hartlepool United 16 November 2002 4,984 [30]
Replay Hartlepool United 1 – 2 Southend United 26 November 2002 4,080 [31]
25 Port Vale 0–1 Crewe Alexandra 16 November 2002 5,507 [32]
26 Southport 4–2 Notts County 16 November 2002 3,519 [33]
27 Torquay United 5–0 Boreham Wood 16 November 2002 2,739 [34]
28 York City 2–1 Swansea City 26 November 2002[1] 2,948 [35]
29 Hereford United 0–1 Wigan Athletic 16 November 2002 4,005 [36]
30 Tiverton Town 1–1 Crawley Town 16 November 2002 1,840 [37]
Replay Crawley Town 3 – 2 Tiverton Town 26 November 2002 3,907 [38]
31 Colchester United 0–1 Chester City 16 November 2002 2,901 [39]
32 Leyton Orient 1–1 Margate 16 November 2002 3,605 [40]
Replay Margate 1 – 0 Leyton Orient 26 November 2002 2,048 [41]
33 Slough Town 1–2 Harrogate Railway Athletic 16 November 2002 1,687 [42]
34 Farnborough Town 5–1 Harrogate Town 16 November 2002 1,090 [43]
35 Forest Green Rovers 0–0 Exeter City 17 November 2002 2,147 [44]
Replay Exeter City 2 – 1 Forest Green Rovers 26 November 2002 2,951 [45]
36 Heybridge Swifts 0–7 Bristol City 16 November 2002 2,046 [46]
37 Stevenage Borough 1–0 Hastings United 16 November 2002 1,821 [47]
38 Dover Athletic 0–1 Oxford United 16 November 2002 4,186 [48]
39 Dagenham & Redbridge 3–2 Havant & Waterlooville 16 November 2002 1,546 [49]
40 Team Bath 2–4 Mansfield Town 16 November 2002 5,469 [50]

Second Round Proper

The matches were scheduled to be played on the weekend of Saturday, 7 December 2002, with replays in the week commencing 16 December.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Summary
1 Blackpool 3–1 Torquay United 7 December 2002 5,014 [51]
2 Darlington 4–1 Stevenage Borough 7 December 2002 3,351 [52]
3 Macclesfield Town 2–0 Vauxhall Motors 7 December 2002 2,972 [53]
4 Crewe Alexandra 3–0 Mansfield Town 7 December 2002 4,563 [54]
5 Shrewsbury Town 3–1 Barrow 7 December 2002 4,210 [55]
6 Stockport County 0–3 Plymouth Argyle 7 December 2002 3,571 [56]
7 Bristol Rovers 1–1 Rochdale 7 December 2002 4,369 [57]
Replay Rochdale 3 – 2 Bristol Rovers 17 December 2002 2,206 [58]
8 Oldham Athletic 1–2 Cheltenham Town 7 December 2002 4,416 [59]
9 Southend United 1–1 Bournemouth 7 December 2002 5,721 [60]
Replay Bournemouth 3 – 2 Southend United 17 December 2002 5,456 [61]
10 Exeter City 3–1 Rushden & Diamonds 7 December 2002 2,277 [62]
11 Scunthorpe United 0–0 Carlisle United 7 December 2002 3,590 [63]
Replay Carlisle United 0 – 1 Scunthorpe United 23 December 2002[2] 6,809 [64]
12 Margate 0–3 Cardiff City 7 December 2002 1,362 [65]
13 Southport 0–3 Farnborough Town 7 December 2002 2,534 [66]
14 Morecambe 3–2 Chester City 7 December 2002 4,293 [67]
15 York City 1–2 Brentford 7 December 2002 3,517 [68]
16 Wigan Athletic 3–0 Luton Town 7 December 2002 4,544 [69]
17 Cambridge United 2–2 Northampton Town 7 December 2002 5,076 [70]
Replay Northampton Town 0 – 1 Cambridge United 17 December 2002 4,591 [71]
18 Harrogate Railway Athletic 1–3 Bristol City 8 December 2002 3,500 [72]
19 Crawley Town 1–2 Dagenham & Redbridge 7 December 2002 4,516 [73]
20 Oxford United 1–0 Swindon Town 8 December 2002 11,645 [74]

Third Round Proper

This round was the first in which Division 1 and Premier League (top-flight) teams entered the competition. The matches were scheduled to be played on the weekend of Saturday, 4 January 2003, with replays in the week commencing 13 January.

Shrewsbury, who ended the season with relegation from the Football League, achieved the biggest upset of the round (if not the whole competition), with a surprise 2–1 win over an Everton side who were pushing for a place in Europe and featuring a 17-year-old striker called Wayne Rooney – one of the most promising young players in the game.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Summary
1 Blackpool 1–2 Crystal Palace 4 January 2003 9,062 [75]
2 Darlington 2–3 Farnborough Town 4 January 2003 4,260 [76]
3 Bournemouth 0–0 Crewe Alexandra 4 January 2003 7,252 [77]
Replay Crewe Alexandra 2 – 2 Bournemouth 14 January 2003 4,540 [78]
Bournemouth won 3 – 1 on penalties
4 Preston North End 1–2 Rochdale 4 January 2003 8,762 [79]
5 Southampton 4–0 Tottenham Hotspur 4 January 2003 25,589 [80]
6 Walsall 0–0 Reading 4 January 2003 5,987 [81]
Replay Reading 1 – 1 Walsall 14 January 2003 8,767
Walsall won 4 – 1 on penalties
7 Gillingham 4–1 Sheffield Wednesday 7 January 2003 6,434 [82]
8 Leicester City 2–0 Bristol City 4 January 2003 25,868 [83]
9 Aston Villa 1–4 Blackburn Rovers 4 January 2003 23,884 [84]
10 Bolton Wanderers 1–1 Sunderland 4 January 2003 10,123 [85]
Replay Sunderland 2 – 0 Bolton Wanderers 14 January 2003 14,550 [86]
11 Grimsby Town 2–2 Burnley 4 January 2003 5,350 [87]
Replay Burnley 4 – 0 Grimsby Town 14 January 2003 5,436 [88]
12 Macclesfield Town 0–2 Watford 4 January 2003 4,244 [89]
13 Wolverhampton Wanderers 3–2 Newcastle United 5 January 2003 27,316 [90]
14 West Bromwich Albion 3–1 Bradford City 4 January 2003 19,909 [91]
15 Shrewsbury Town 2–1 Everton 4 January 2003 7,800 [92]
16 Sheffield United 4–0 Cheltenham Town 4 January 2003 9,166 [93]
17 Ipswich Town 4–0 Morecambe 4 January 2003 18,529 [94]
18 Manchester City 0–1 Liverpool 5 January 2003 28,586 [95]
19 Fulham 3–1 Birmingham City 5 January 2003 9,203 [96]
20 Brentford 1–0 Derby County 4 January 2003 8,709 [97]
21 West Ham United 3–2 Nottingham Forest 4 January 2003 29,612 [98]
22 Manchester United 4–1 Portsmouth 4 January 2003 67,222 [99]
23 Norwich City 3–1 Brighton & Hove Albion 14 January 2003[3] 17,205 [100]
24 Plymouth Argyle 2–2 Dagenham & Redbridge 4 January 2003 11,885 [101]
Replay Dagenham & Redbridge 2 – 0 Plymouth Argyle 14 January 2003 4,530 [102]
25 Chelsea 1–0 Middlesbrough 4 January 2003 29,796 [103]
26 Scunthorpe United 0–2 Leeds United 4 January 2003 8,329 [104]
27 Cardiff City 2–2 Coventry City 4 January 2003 16,013 [105]
Replay Coventry City 3 – 0 Cardiff City 15 January 2003 11,997 [106]
28 Charlton Athletic 3–1 Exeter City 4 January 2003 18,107 [107]
29 Arsenal 2–0 Oxford United 4 January 2003 35,432 [108]
30 Stoke City 3–0 Wigan Athletic 4 January 2003 9,618 [109]
31 Rotherham United 0–3 Wimbledon 4 January 2003 4,527 [110]
32 Cambridge United 1–1 Millwall 4 January 2003 6,864 [111]
Replay Millwall 3 – 2 Cambridge United 14 January 2003 7,031 [112]

Fourth Round Proper

  • Matches played weekend of 25 January 2003
  • Four replays played week commencing 3 February 2003
Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Summary
1 Rochdale 2–0 Coventry City 25 January 2003 9,156
2 Southampton 1–1 Millwall 25 January 2003 23,809
Replay Millwall 1 – 2 Southampton 5 February 2003 10,197
3 Watford 1–0 West Bromwich Albion 25 January 2003 16,975
4 Walsall 2–0 Wimbledon 25 January 2003 6,693
5 Gillingham 1–1 Leeds United 25 January 2003 11,093
Replay Leeds United 2 – 1 Gillingham 4 February 2003 29,359
6 Blackburn Rovers 3–3 Sunderland 25 January 2003 14,315
Replay Sunderland 2 – 2 Blackburn Rovers 5 February 2003 15,745
Sunderland won 3 – 0 on penalties
7 Wolverhampton Wanderers 4–1 Leicester City 25 January 2003 28,164
8 Shrewsbury Town 0–4 Chelsea 26 January 2003 7,950
9 Sheffield United 4–3 Ipswich Town 25 January 2003 12,757
10 Fulham 3–0 Charlton Athletic 26 January 2003 12,203
11 Brentford 0–3 Burnley 25 January 2003 9,563
12 Manchester United 6–0 West Ham United 26 January 2003 67,181
13 Norwich City 1–0 Dagenham & Redbridge 25 January 2003 21,164
14 Crystal Palace 0–0 Liverpool 26 January 2003 26,054
Replay Liverpool 0 – 2 Crystal Palace 5 February 2003 35,109
15 Farnborough Town 1–5 Arsenal 25 January 2003 35,108[4]
16 Stoke City 3–0 Bournemouth 26 January 2003 12,004

Fifth Round Proper

  • Matches played weekend of 15 February 2003
  • One replay played 26 February 2003
Tie no Home team Score Away team Date Attendance Summary
1 Southampton 2–0 Norwich City 15 February 2003 31,103 [113]
2 Wolverhampton Wanderers 3–1 Rochdale 16 February 2003 23,921 [114]
3 Sunderland 0–1 Watford 15 February 2003 26,916 [115]
4 Sheffield United 2–0 Walsall 15 February 2003 17,510 [116]
5 Fulham 1–1 Burnley 16 February 2003 13,062 [117]
Replay Burnley 3–0 Fulham 26 February 2003 11,635 [118]
6 Manchester United 0–2 Arsenal 15 February 2003 67,209 [119]
7 Crystal Palace 1–2 Leeds United 16 February 2003 24,512 [120]
8 Stoke City 0–2 Chelsea 16 February 2003 26,615 [121]

Final rounds

Holders Arsenal moved closer to retaining the trophy by beating Chelsea 3–1 in a replay that followed a 2–2 draw. They were paired in the semi-finals with Sheffield United, while the other semi-final would be contested between Southampton and Watford.

Sixth Round Proper

Arsenal2–2Chelsea
Jeffers Goal 36'
Henry Goal 45'
(Summary) Terry Goal 3'
Lampard Goal 83'
Sheffield United1–0Leeds United
Kabba Goal 78' (Summary)
Watford2–0Burnley
Smith Goal 74'
Glass Goal 80'
(Summary)
Southampton2–0Wolverhampton Wanderers
Marsden Goal 56'
Butler Goal 81' (o.g.)
(Summary)

Replay

Chelsea1–3Arsenal
Terry Goal 79' (Summary) Terry Goal 25' (o.g.)
Wiltord Goal 34'
Lauren Goal 82'

Semi-finals

For the 11th season running, the FA Cup final would be contested by top division clubs – Arsenal and Southampton. However, their opponents (Sheffield United and Watford respectively) were both Division One sides.

Arsenal1–0Sheffield United
Ljungberg Goal 34' (Summary)
Watford1–2Southampton
Gayle Goal 88' (Summary) Ormerod Goal 43'
Robinson Goal 80' (o.g.)

Final

The final took place on Saturday, 17 May 2003 at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff and ended 1–0 with a goal by Robert Pires separating the sides.

It was the third consecutive year the final was played at the Millennium Stadium, due to the ongoing reconstruction of Wembley Stadium, the final's usual venue. There were 73,726 spectators at the game. Arsenal retained the trophy, winning it for the ninth time in their history – a record second only to that of Manchester United.

It was also Southampton's first FA Cup final since 1976, when they won the trophy for the only time to date.

Arsenal1–0Southampton
Pires Goal 38' (Report)

Notes

  1. ^ Postponed due to waterlogged pitch
  2. ^ Match postponed due to frozen pitch
  3. ^ Original match postponed because of power failure
  4. ^ Played at Highbury

Media coverage

In the United Kingdom, the BBC were the free to air broadcasters for the second consecutive season while Sky Sports were the subscription broadcasters for the fifteenth consecutive season.

External links

2002 FA Community Shield

The 2002 FA Community Shield (also known as The FA Community Shield in partnership with McDonald's for sponsorship reasons) was the 80th FA Community Shield, an annual English football match played between the winners of the previous season's Premier League and FA Cup. It was the first edition since the competition's rename from FA Charity Shield. The match was contested by Arsenal, who won a league and FA Cup double the previous season, and Liverpool, who finished runners-up in the league. It was held at Cardiff's Millennium Stadium, on 11 August 2002. Arsenal won the match by one goal to nil, watched by a crowd of 67,337.

This was Arsenal's 16th Shield appearance and Liverpool's 20th. Arsenal was without several of their first choice players in midfield, who were absent through injury; this prompted a shuffle in the team which saw striker Sylvain Wiltord positioned on the left wing. For Liverpool, defender Markus Babbel was named as a substitute after a lengthy period out of the side through illness. New signing El Hadji Diouf started in a creative role, behind strikers Michael Owen and Emile Heskey to begin with.

The only goal of the match came in the second half; Arsenal substitute Gilberto Silva on his debut collected a pass from Dennis Bergkamp and struck the ball through goalkeeper Jerzy Dudek's legs. Arsenal manager Arsène Wenger praised the match-winner in his post-match interview, while opposing manager Gérard Houllier felt the result showed that his team needed more game time and attention to passing, in order to improve. The result meant Arsenal was the first team to win the Shield outright 11 times, while it marked Liverpool's first defeat at the Millennium Stadium.

2002–03 Birmingham City F.C. season

The 2002–03 season was Birmingham City Football Club's 100th in the English football league system, their 51st in the top tier, and their debut season in the Premier League, having been promoted via the play-offs. Under the management of Steve Bruce, they finished in 13th position in the 20-team league. Birmingham entered the 2002–03 FA Cup at the third round and lost to Fulham in that round, and, having entered the League Cup in the second round, lost to Preston North End in the third.

French manufacturers Le Coq Sportif supplied Birmingham's kit for the fifth consecutive season, and mobile phone retailer Phones4U retained the shirt sponsorship. Stern John was top scorer with nine goals in all competitions; if only league goals are considered, Clinton Morrison top-scored with six. Steve Vickers was club captain, but his long absences through injury meant that vice-captain Jeff Kenna usually captained the team.

2002–03 FA Cup qualifying rounds

The 2002–03 FA Cup Qualifying Rounds opened the 122nd season of competition in England for 'The Football Association Challenge Cup' (FA Cup), the world's oldest association football single knockout competition.

The large number of clubs entering the tournament from lower down (Levels 5 through 10) in the English football pyramid meant that the competition started with six rounds of preliminary (2) and qualifying (4) knockouts for these non-League teams. The 32 winning teams from Fourth Round Qualifying progressed to the First Round Proper, where League teams tiered at Levels 3 and 4 entered the competition.

2003 FA Cup Final

The 2003 FA Cup Final was the 122nd final of the FA Cup, the world's oldest domestic football cup competition. The final took place on Saturday 17 May 2003 at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, in front of a crowd of 73,726. It was the third consecutive year the final was played at the stadium, due to the ongoing reconstruction of Wembley Stadium, the final's usual venue. The 2003 final was the first to be played indoors; the roof was closed because of bad weather. The clubs contesting the final were Arsenal, the holders of the competition and Southampton. This was Arsenal's sixteenth appearance in a final to Southampton's fourth.

As Premier League clubs, Arsenal and Southampton entered the FA Cup in the third round, which meant each club needed to progress through five rounds to reach the final. Arsenal made a convincing start, they won their opening three rounds, but needed a sixth-round replay against Chelsea. By contrast, Southampton played one replay in the fourth round against Millwall. Arsenal entered the match as favourites and had beaten Southampton 6–1 nine days earlier in the league. Goalkeeper David Seaman captained Arsenal in the absence of the injured Patrick Vieira; it was to be Seaman's last appearance for the club. In defence for Southampton, Chris Baird made only his second competitive start. Chris Marsden captained the club in the absence of the injured club captain, Jason Dodd.

Arsenal began the match more effectively of the two and scored what proved to be the winning goal in the latter minutes of the first half – Freddie Ljungberg's rebounded goal effort was converted by Robert Pires. Midway through the second half, Southampton goalkeeper Antti Niemi was substituted, as he strained his calf muscle; he was replaced by Paul Jones. In stoppage time, striker James Beattie had his header cleared off the line by Ashley Cole, in what was the final chance for Southampton.

Arsenal's win marked the first time a team had retained the trophy since Tottenham Hotspur in 1982. They later played against league champions Manchester United in the 2003 FA Community Shield. Given Arsenal had already qualified for Europe via their league position, their UEFA Cup spot was awarded to runners-up Southampton.

Anders Svensson (footballer, born 1976)

Anders Gunnar Svensson (Swedish pronunciation: [²anːdɛʂ ˈsvɛnːsɔn]; born 17 July 1976) is a Swedish former footballer. He was a playmaker and a central midfielder, known for his passing, free kicks, and set piece abilities. He was capped 148 times for the Swedish national football team, many times as a captain, before he retired from international football in 2013. He is the most capped male player for Sweden, beating Thomas Ravelli's previous record of 143 caps.

As well as being named captain of Sweden on several occasions, Svensson also captained Southampton and Elfsborg. He played important roles in the 2002 and 2006 World Cups, in which he proved his leadership skills, resulting in him being named captain of Sweden in 2009.He is the sixth most capped player in Europe after Iker Casillas, Lothar Matthäus, Vitālijs Astafjevs, Martin Reim, and Gianluigi Buffon. Svensson also represented the Swedish national football team for three consecutive European Championships in 2004, 2008, and 2012.

Bangkok United F.C.

Bangkok United Football Club (Thai: สโมสรฟุตบอล แบงค็อก ยูไนเต็ด) is a Thai professional football club based in Pathum Thani. Formerly known as Bangkok University FC until 2009. The club was relegated from the 2010 Thai Premier League only 4 years after winning their first league title in 2006. In 2012 they got promoted to Thai League 1 again, after finishing 3rd in 2012 Thai Division 1 League.

Darlington Town F.C.

Darlington Town formerly known as Horden Colliery Welfare Association Football Club, Horden Athletic and recently known as the Reserve team for Darlington F.C. is a football club based in Darlington, in County Durham, England. The club was formed in 1908 and joined the North Eastern League in 1935, reaching the second round of the FA Cup in the 1938–39 season. They are currently members of the Wearside League and play at Eastbourne Sports Complex in Darlington

David Seaman

David Andrew Seaman, MBE (born 19 September 1963) is an English former footballer who played as a goalkeeper. In a career lasting from 1981 to 2004, he is best known for his time playing for Arsenal. He won 75 caps for the England national football team, and is the country's second-most capped goalkeeper, after Peter Shilton. In 1997 was awarded the MBE for services to football.

The peak of Seaman's career was during his period as Arsenal and England goalkeeper in the 1990s and early 2000s. During his time at Arsenal he won three league championships (1991, 1998, 2002), four FA Cups (1993, 1998, 2002, 2003), the League Cup in 1993 and the European Cup Winners Cup in 1994. During this time he also played for England in the 1998 and 2002 FIFA World Cups, and Euro 96 and Euro 2000. As well as Arsenal, he also played in the Premier League for Manchester City, as well as making appearances in the Football League for Peterborough United, Birmingham City and Queens Park Rangers.

His save from Paul Peschisolido of Sheffield United in the 2002–03 FA Cup was described as one of the best ever. Notable lows came with two costly errors, both from long-range efforts—conceding a last-minute goal in the 1995 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup Final to Nayim and conceding to a Ronaldinho free-kick in the 2002 FIFA World Cup quarter-final. Seaman is left-handed, but threw the ball with his right arm and kicked with his right foot. He retired in 2004 due to a recurring shoulder injury. In June 2012, he was appointed goalkeeping coach of Combined Counties League club Wembley.

Julian Gray

Julian Raymond Marvin Gray (born 21 September 1979) is an English professional footballer who last played for Walsall.

He previously played in the Football League and Premier League for Arsenal, Crystal Palace, Cardiff City, Birmingham City, Coventry City, Fulham, Barnsley and Walsall, and in Cyprus for Nea Salamis Famagusta.

Mary Phillip

Mary Rose Phillip (born 14 March 1977) is a former English international footballer. A versatile player, she played in all four positions at the back and also in midfield. Phillip captained England and—until 2011—was the only player to represent the country in two World Cup squads. She enjoyed a successful club career with Millwall Lionesses, Fulham, Arsenal and Chelsea.

Nicky Butt

Nicholas Butt (born 21 January 1975) is an English football coach and former player who is the head of coaching at the Manchester United youth academy. He is also a co-owner of Salford City.

He played professional football as a midfielder from 1992 to 2011. He began his career with Manchester United and spent 12 years in their first-team, winning six Premier League titles, three FA Cups, four FA Community Shields, the UEFA Champions League and the Intercontinental Cup, before moving to Newcastle United in 2004. He spent one season on loan to Birmingham City in 2005–06. He finished his career abroad, playing for South China where he won the Hong Kong League Cup.

Butt earned 39 caps for England between 1997 and 2004. He was chosen for the 2002 FIFA World Cup and UEFA Euro 2004.

Odd Down A.F.C.

Odd Down Football Club are a football club based in Bath, England. They are currently members of the Western League Premier Division and play at the Lew Hill Memorial Ground. The club is affiliated to the Somerset County FA.

Paul Tisdale

Paul Robert Tisdale (born 14 January 1973) is an English professional football manager and former player who played as a midfielder. He is the manager of League One club Milton Keynes Dons.

Tisdale represented Southampton, Bristol City, FinnPa, Panionios and Yeovil Town during a career which began in 1991 and concluded in 2000. During his time at Exeter City, he remained registered as a player between 2007 and 2016, making his debut as a late substitute in a 2–1 victory at Sheffield Wednesday at the end of the 2010–11 season and naming himself as a substitute in the EFL Trophy match at Oxford Utd on 30 August 2016.

Tisdale previously managed Team Bath. Having managed Exeter City from June 2006 until June 2018, he was, for 19 days, the longest-serving manager at one club in the English Football League.

Pegguy Arphexad

Pegguy Arphexad (born 18 May 1973) is a former footballer who played as a goalkeeper.

Prudhoe Town F.C.

Prudhoe Town Football Club is a football club based in Prudhoe, Northumberland, England. The club is affiliated to the Northumberland Football Association. They play at Kimberley Park.

Selsey F.C.

Selsey Football Club is a football club based in Selsey, West Sussex, England. The club is a FA Chartered Standard Community club affiliated to the Sussex County Football Association. The club are currently members of the Southern Combination Division One and play at the High Street Ground.

Stuart Taylor (footballer, born 1980)

Stuart James Taylor (born 28 November 1980) is an English professional footballer who plays as a goalkeeper and is currently a free agent following his release from Premier League club Southampton in June 2018. Taylor began his career with Arsenal, winning the 2001–02 Premier League and 2002–03 FA Cup and representing England at under-16, under-18, under-20 and under-21 level. He was spoken of as a future replacement for Arsenal and England goalkeeper David Seaman but after other goalkeepers were signed, he struggled to get playing time after 2003 and he joined Aston Villa in 2005.Initially second-choice behind Thomas Sørensen, Taylor was again supplanted by other keepers and pushed down the pecking order. He left Aston Villa in 2009, having played only 12 league matches in 4 seasons. He has since been contracted with Manchester City, Reading, Yeovil Town, Leeds United and Southampton. Taylor has spent most of his career as a third-choice goalkeeper; he has made only 95 career appearances, played in just 10 games since a loan spell at Cardiff City ended in May 2009 and hasn't played at all since 2015.

Tony Henry (singer)

Antony Garfield "Tony" Henry is an English opera singer from St Albans, Hertfordshire, England.

Verwood Town F.C.

Verwood Town Football Club are a football club based in Verwood, Dorset, England. The club is affiliated to the Dorset County Football Association and is a FA chartered Standard club. They play in the Wessex League Division One. Long term manager Adie Arnold resigned from his post in March 2014, ending an ​8 1⁄2-year association with the club. The new manager was Alan Lay formerly manager of Swanage Town and Herston FC. He recently stepped down from his duties for only it to re-open the door to Adie Arnold to come back and manage the club once again.

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