2001–02 Serie A

In the 2001–02 season, the Serie A, the major football Italian professional league, was composed by 18 teams, for the 14th consecutive time from season 1988–89.

The first two teams qualified directly to the UEFA Champions League, teams ending in the third and fourth places had to play Champions League qualifications, teams ending in the fifth and sixth places qualified for the UEFA Cup (another spot was given to the winner of Coppa Italia), while the last four teams were to be relegated to Serie B. However, Fiorentina's subsequent bankruptcy led to them being placed in the fourth tier of Italian football.

Juventus won its 26th title on the final day of the season after original leaders Internazionale (who finished third) lost 4–2 away to Lazio, and with it their chance at winning their first Scudetto since 1989. Second place went to Roma.

This season also featured Chievo's "miracle". The club, newly promoted to Serie A for the first time, were top of the table for six weeks early in the season. However, after the Christmas break, they hit some bad form and finished the season in fifth place.

Italian Serie A 2001-02 map
2001–02 Serie A team distribution

Personnel and sponsoring

Team Head Coach Kit manufacturer Shirt sponsor
Atalanta Italy Giovanni Vavassori Asics ORTOBELL
Bologna Italy Francesco Guidolin Macron Area Banca
Brescia Italy Carlo Mazzone Garman Banca Lombarda
Chievo Italy Luigi Delneri Joma Paluani
Fiorentina Italy Roberto Mancini
Italy Ottavio Bianchi
Italy Luciano Chiarugi
Mizuno Toyota
Hellas Verona Italy Alberto Malesani Lotto Amica Chips
Internazionale Argentina Héctor Cúper Nike Pirelli
Juventus Italy Marcello Lippi Lotto Fastweb
Lazio Italy Dino Zoff
Italy Alberto Zaccheroni
Puma Siemens Mobile
Lecce Italy Delio Rossi Asics Banca 121 (Banca del Salento)
AC Milan Turkey Fatih Terim
Italy Carlo Ancelotti
Adidas Opel
Parma Italy Pietro Carmignani Champion Parmalat
Piacenza Italy Walter Novellino Lotto Publitel
Perugia Italy Serse Cosmi Galex Daewoo
Roma Italy Fabio Capello Kappa INA Assitalia
Torino Italy Giancarlo Camolese Asics Conto Arancio
Udinese Italy Giampiero Ventura Diadora Ristora
Venezia Italy Alfredo Magni
Italy Cesare Prandelli
Kelme Emmezeta

League table

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification or relegation
1 Juventus (C) 34 20 11 3 64 23 +41 71 2002–03 UEFA Champions League First group stage
2 Roma 34 19 13 2 58 24 +34 70
3 Internazionale 34 20 9 5 62 35 +27 69 2002–03 UEFA Champions League Third qualifying round
4 AC Milan 34 14 13 7 47 33 +14 55
5 Chievo 34 14 12 8 57 52 +5 54 2002–03 UEFA Cup First round
6 Lazio 34 14 11 9 50 37 +13 53
7 Bologna 34 15 7 12 40 40 0 52 2002 UEFA Intertoto Cup Third round
8 Perugia 34 13 7 14 38 46 −8 46
9 Atalanta 34 12 9 13 41 50 −9 45
10 Parma 34 12 8 14 43 47 −4 44[a] 2002–03 UEFA Cup First round
11 Torino 34 10 13 11 37 39 −2 43[b] 2002 UEFA Intertoto Cup Second round
12 Piacenza 34 11 9 14 49 43 +6 42
13 Brescia 34 9 13 12 43 52 −9 40[c]
14 Udinese 34 11 7 16 41 52 −11 40[c]
15 Hellas Verona (R) 34 11 6 17 41 53 −12 39 Relegation to Serie B
16 Lecce (R) 34 6 10 18 36 56 −20 28
17 Fiorentina (B) 34 5 7 22 29 63 −34 22[d] Relegation to Serie C2
18 Venezia (R) 34 3 9 22 30 61 −31 18 Relegation to Serie B
  1. ^ Parma gained entry to the 2002–03 UEFA Cup as the 2001–02 Coppa Italia champions.
  2. ^ Torino gained entry to the 2002 UEFA Intertoto Cup after Atalanta declined to take part.
  3. ^ a b BRE 2–0 UDI; UDI 3–2 BRE
  4. ^ Fiorentina was denied entry to the 2002–03 Serie B season, having entered administration. It was later admitted to the Lega Professionisti Serie C after bankruptcy.

Results

Home \ Away ATA BOL BRE CHV FIO INT JUV LAZ LCE MIL PAR PER PIA ROM TOR UDI VEN HEL
Atalanta 2–2 0–0 1–2 2–0 2–4 0–2 0–1 2–1 1–1 4–1 2–1 1–1 1–1 1–1 1–5 1–0 1–0
Bologna 1–0 2–1 3–1 3–2 2–1 0–0 2–0 4–3 2–0 1–0 2–1 1–2 1–3 1–0 0–1 1–1 2–1
Brescia 3–3 3–0 2–2 3–0 1–3 0–4 1–1 1–1 2–2 1–4 3–0 2–2 0–0 1–2 2–0 3–2 0–0
Chievo 2–1 2–0 1–1 2–2 2–2 1–3 3–1 2–1 1–1 1–0 2–0 4–2 0–3 3–0 1–2 1–1 2–1
Fiorentina 3–1 1–1 1–0 0–2 0–1 1–1 0–1 1–2 1–1 1–2 1–3 1–3 2–2 0–0 0–0 3–1 0–2
Internazionale 1–2 1–0 2–1 1–2 2–0 2–2 0–0 2–0 2–4 2–0 4–1 3–1 3–1 0–0 3–2 2–1 3–0
Juventus 3–0 2–1 5–0 3–2 2–1 0–0 1–1 3–0 1–0 3–1 2–0 2–0 0–2 3–3 3–0 4–0 1–0
Lazio 2–0 2–2 5–0 1–1 3–0 4–2 1–0 1–0 1–1 0–0 5–0 1–1 1–5 0–0 2–0 4–2 5–4
Lecce 0–2 1–0 1–3 2–3 4–1 1–2 0–0 1–2 0–1 1–1 2–3 0–0 1–1 1–1 1–2 2–1 1–1
AC Milan 0–0 0–0 0–0 3–2 5–2 0–1 1–1 2–0 3–0 3–1 1–1 0–0 0–0 2–1 2–3 1–1 2–1
Parma 1–1 2–1 1–0 0–0 2–0 2–2 1–0 1–0 1–1 0–1 2–1 2–2 1–2 0–1 2–0 2–1 2–2
Perugia 2–0 1–0 1–1 2–2 2–0 0–2 0–4 0–0 2–1 3–1 2–1 1–0 0–0 2–0 1–2 2–0 3–1
Piacenza 1–2 2–0 0–1 2–2 3–0 2–3 0–1 1–0 1–2 0–1 2–3 2–0 2–0 3–1 1–2 5–0 3–0
Roma 3–1 3–1 0–0 5–0 2–1 0–0 0–0 2–0 5–1 1–0 3–1 1–0 2–0 1–0 1–1 1–0 3–2
Torino 1–2 1–1 1–3 2–2 1–0 0–1 2–2 1–0 1–1 1–0 1–0 1–0 1–1 0–1 3–1 1–2 5–1
Udinese 1–2 0–1 3–2 1–2 1–2 1–1 0–2 1–4 0–1 1–2 3–2 0–0 1–1 1–1 2–2 1–0 2–1
Venezia 0–1 0–1 1–2 0–0 2–0 1–1 1–2 0–0 1–1 1–4 3–4 0–2 2–3 2–2 1–1 2–1 0–1
Hellas Verona 3–1 0–1 2–0 3–2 1–2 0–3 2–2 3–1 2–1 1–2 1–0 1–1 1–0 1–1 0–1 1–0 1–0

Overall

Top goalscorers

Rank Player Club Goals
1 France David Trezeguet Juventus 24
Italy Dario Hübner Piacenza
3 Italy Christian Vieri Internazionale 22
4 Italy Marco Di Vaio Parma 20
5 Italy Filippo Maniero Venezia 18
6 Italy Alessandro Del Piero Juventus 16
Italy Cristiano Doni Atalanta
8 Italy Roberto Muzzi Udinese 14
Ukraine Andriy Shevchenko AC Milan
10 Argentina Hernán Crespo Lazio 13
Italy Massimo Marazzina Chievo
Italy Vincenzo Montella Roma
Italy Luca Toni Brescia
14 Romania Adrian Mutu Hellas Verona 12
15 Uruguay Javier Chevantón Lecce 11
Italy Roberto Baggio Brescia

Number of teams by region

Region Number of teams Teams
1  Lombardy 4 Atalanta, Brescia, Internazionale and AC Milan
2  Emilia-Romagna 3 Bologna, Parma and Piacenza
 Veneto 3 Chievo, Hellas Verona and Venezia
4  Lazio 2 Lazio and Roma
 Piedmont 2 Juventus and Torino
6  Apulia 1 Lecce
 Friuli-Venezia Giulia 1 Udinese
 Tuscany 1 Fiorentna
 Umbria 1 Perugia

References and sources

  • Almanacco Illustrato del Calcio - La Storia 1898-2004, Panini Edizioni, Modena, September 2005

External links

2001–02 Serie A (ice hockey) season

The 2001–02 Serie A season was the 68th season of the Serie A, the top level of ice hockey in Italy. Eight teams participated in the league, and the HC Milano Vipers won the championship by defeating HC Alleghe in the final.

2002 Supercoppa Italiana

The 2002 Supercoppa Italiana was a match contested by Juventus, the 2001–02 Serie A winner, and Parma, the 2001–02 Coppa Italia winner.

It was the fifth appearance for Juventus (2 victories in 1995 and 1997) and the fourth for Parma (victory in 1999). The teams had already faced each other in the 1995 Supercoppa.

The match was played in Tripoli, Libya and was only the second Supercoppa Italiana to be played outside of Italy, after the 1993 edition in the United States.

2002–03 A.C. ChievoVerona season

A.C. ChievoVerona played its second consecutive season in Serie A, and nearly equaled 5th place from the 2001-02 Serie A season. The club's second season in the premier division was played without Christian Manfredini and Bernardo Corradi, both ending up with Lazio. Due to passport troubles, it also lost key winger Eriberto, who turned out to be four years older and called Luciano, but had faked his identity since he was 21, in order to participate in a Brazilian youth team.

Despite the squad being thinned out, several key players, including Nicola Legrottaglie, Eugenio Corini and Simone Perrotta remained at the club, and those three proved to be the most important players for Chievo, since the absence of the previous starts hardly mattered in terms of results. In the end, only negative results against Udinese hindered Chievo from a second consecutive UEFA Cup qualification. Its European debut ended in a flop, though, as it lost to unfancied Serbian side Crvena Zvedza in the primary round.

2002–03 Udinese Calcio season

Udinese Calcio bounced back from the hugely disappointing 2001–02 Serie A season, in which it only just managed to avoid relegation. Under new coach Luciano Spalletti, Udinese gathered strength, and was a constant feature on the top half of the league table. Even though the squad lacked the goalscoring punch, the defence led by Néstor Sensini and surprising goalkeeper Morgan De Sanctis held it together to such a degree it finished sixth in the league. Also Czech signing Marek Jankulovski impressed, the Napoli signing switching form left-wing to left back, causing interest from several bigger clubs. In the offence, Udinese's most influential player was David Pizarro, who scored seven times from the midfield and grabbed the attention from Lazio, who tried to sign him and teammate Martin Jørgensen immediately after the season had finished. Undisclosed Lazio players refused moving to Udine as compensation for the transfers, and both stayed on, much to the relief of Spalletti.

Brescia Calcio

Brescia Calcio, commonly referred to as Brescia (Italian pronunciation: [ˈbreʃʃa ˈkaltʃo]), is an Italian football club based in Brescia, Lombardy, that currently plays in Serie B.

The club holds the record for total number of seasons (61) and consecutive seasons (18, from 1947–48 to 1964–65) in Serie B, which they have won three times. Their best finish in Serie A came in the 2000–01 season when they placed seventh. At the beginning of the new millennium, led by the 1993 Ballon d'Or winner Roberto Baggio, the club also qualified for the Intertoto Cup twice, reaching the final in 2001 but being defeated on the away goals rule by Paris Saint-Germain.

The team's colours are blue and white. Its stadium is the 16,743 seater Stadio Mario Rigamonti.

Dario Dainelli

Dario Dainelli (Italian pronunciation: [ˈdaːrjo daiˈnɛlli]; born 9 June 1979) is an Italian footballer who plays for Livorno as a defender.

Dario Hübner

Dario Hübner (born 28 April 1967), nicknamed Bisonte (Bison), is a retired Italian footballer, who played as a striker. An opportunistic forward, with an eye for goal, and an accurate finisher (with both his head and feet) and penalty taker, he was, however, questioned for his work-rate and behaviour at times. A prolific centre-forward, he scored over 300 goals throughout his career, only playing in the higher divisions towards the end of his career, becoming the oldest player to win the Serie A Top-scorer award, which he managed during the 2001–02 Serie A season, at the age of 35; this record was later broken by Luca Toni in 2015, who won the award at the age of 38. 38 of Hübner's career goals came from penalties, whilst he was sent off 10 times throughout his career, also receiving 36 yellow cards.

David Trezeguet

David Sergio Trezeguet (French pronunciation: ​[david sɛʁʒjo tʁezəɡɛ]; born 15 October 1977) is a French former footballer who played as a striker.

Trezeguet began his career in Argentina with Club Atlético Platense at the age of eight, progressing through their youth system to their first team, where he made his debut in the Primera División in 1994. After one season, he transferred to Ligue 1 side AS Monaco, where he would form a striking partnership with international teammate Thierry Henry, winning the league in the 1996–97 season. He left the club in 2000, having scored 52 goals in 93 Ligue 1 appearances and having claimed two Ligue 1 championships and the 1997 Trophée des champions. In 2000, Trezeguet signed for Serie A club Juventus for a transfer fee of £20 million. With 24 goals, he was the joint recipient of the Capocannoniere award for top scorer as his team won the 2001–02 Serie A title; Trezeguet also scored eight goals in 10 Champions League appearances as Juventus reached the second round of the tournament. Despite struggling with injuries the following season, he won another league title with the club, and also scored four goals in 10 Champions League appearances as Juventus reached the final of the tournament, eventually losing 2–3 on penalties to Milan, as Trezeguet missed his spot kick in the resulting shoot-out. Overall, Trezeguet scored 138 goals in 245 league appearances for Juventus, making him the fourth-highest goalscorer in the club's history. Later in his career he had brief spells in Spain, the United Arab Emirates, Argentina and India.

At international level, Trezeguet scored 34 goals in 71 appearances for the France national team between 1998 and 2008. He also played for France at under-18, under-20, and under-21 levels. Trezeguet represented France at the 1997 FIFA World Youth Championship, the 1998 FIFA World Cup, UEFA Euro 2000 (scoring the golden goal in the final against Italy, which gave France a 2–1 win in extra time), the 2002 World Cup, Euro 2004 and the 2006 World Cup (where he missed his penalty in the shoot-out against Italy in the final). Trezeguet is part of the FIFA 100 list of 125 Greatest living players. In 2015, he was named one of the Golden Foot Award Legends.

Emanuele Calaiò

Emanuele Calaiò (born 8 January 1982) is an Italian footballer who plays as a striker for Salernitana.

Francesco Toldo

Francesco Toldo (born 2 December 1971) is an Italian retired footballer who played as a goalkeeper. He is regarded by pundits as one of the greatest goalkeepers of his generation.In a professional career which spanned two full decades, he mainly represented Fiorentina and Internazionale (eight and nine seasons respectively), winning a total of 15 trophies combined; in his last five years, however, he was solely a backup for the Nerazzurri.

For the Italy national team, Toldo appeared in five international competitions, being a starter in UEFA Euro 2000, where he helped Italy reach the final.

Jorge Francisco Vargas

Jorge Vargas (born 8 February 1976 in Santiago de Chile) is a retired Chilean football defender.

List of A.S. Roma seasons

This is a list of seasons played by A.S. Roma in Italian and European football, from 1978 to the present day. It details the club's achievements in major competitions, and the top scorers for each season.

Marco Simone

Marco Simone (born 7 January 1969) is an Italian former professional footballer, who played as a striker or winger. He most prominently played for A.C. Milan, with whom he won four Serie A championships and two UEFA Champions League titles, as well as French club Paris Saint-Germain, and Monégasque outfit AS Monaco. Simone played four games for the Italian national team.

As a manager, Simone, has also served as the head coach of Monaco in Ligue 2, and Lausanne-Sport.

Nicola Amoruso

Nicola Amoruso (born 29 August 1974) is a former Italian footballer who played as a striker. An elegant, technically gifted, and agile forward, known for his delicate touch on the ball and use of feints, he usually played in a central role; his nicknames were piede caldo (Hot Foot) and Dinamite (Dynamite), due to his eye for goal. He is currently the sporting director of Palermo.

Orlando Fanasca

Orlando Fanasca (born 21 February 1983) is an Italian former footballer who played, as a midfielder, for Polisportiva Monti Cimini.

He played one game in the Serie A in his debut 2001–02 Serie A season for AC Fiorentina.

After released by his last fully professional club Barletta in 2010 Fanasca joined hometown club Marino of Eccellenza Lazio (6th highest level of Italy) in December 2010. He finished as the runner-up of Coppa Italia Dilettanti, and promoted to 2011–12 Serie D due to winner U.S. Ancona 1905 also won its league title. Fanasca renewed his contract at the start of season.

Riccardo Maspero

Riccardo Maspero (born 19 February 1970) is an Italian former footballer who played as an attacking midfielder, and now a head coach.

Simone Perrotta

Simone Perrotta (Italian pronunciation: [siˈmoːne perˈrɔtta]; born 17 September 1977 in Ashton-under-Lyne, England) is a retired Italian footballer who played as a midfielder. Throughout his career he stood out for his work-rate, energy, and box-to-box play as a ball-winner in midfield. After initially playing for Italian sides Reggina, Juventus, Bari, and Chievo, he went on to spend most of his career with Serie A club Roma, from 2004, until his retirement on 29 June 2013; he won consecutive Coppa Italia titles with the club in 2007 and 2008, as well as the 2007 Supercoppa Italiana.

Born in England, at international level, he represented the Italian national football team on 48 occasions between 2002 and 2009, scoring 2 goals. He was a member of the team that won the 2006 FIFA World Cup, and also represented Italy in two UEFA European Championships.

Venezia F.C.

Venezia Football Club, commonly referred to as Venezia, is an Italian football club based in Venice, Veneto, that currently plays in Serie B.

Founded by a merger in 1907, Venezia have spent a large part of their history in Serie A and Serie B, the top two divisions in Italy.

Venezia won the Coppa Italia in 1941.

Čestmír Vycpálek

Čestmír Vycpálek (Prague, 15 May 1921 – Palermo, 5 May 2002) was a Czech football player and manager who played as a midfielder. He was an uncle of noted football manager Zdeněk Zeman.

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