2000 Stanley Cup Finals

The 2000 Stanley Cup Finals was the championship series of the National Hockey League's (NHL) 1999–2000 season, and the culmination of the 2000 Stanley Cup playoffs. It was contested by the Eastern Conference champion New Jersey Devils and the Western Conference champion Dallas Stars (who were the defending Stanley Cup champion). The Devils were led by captain Scott Stevens, Head Coach Larry Robinson and goaltender Martin Brodeur. The Stars were led by captain Derian Hatcher, Head Coach Ken Hitchcock and goaltender Ed Belfour. The Devils defeated the Stars, four games to two.

2000 Stanley Cup Finals
2000 Stanley Cup logo
123456 Total
New Jersey Devils 71230***2** 4
Dallas Stars 32111***1** 2
* indicates periods of overtime
Location(s)East Rutherford: Continental Airlines Arena (1, 2, 5)
Dallas: Reunion Arena (3, 4, 6)
CoachesNew Jersey: Larry Robinson
Dallas: Ken Hitchcock
CaptainsNew Jersey: Scott Stevens
Dallas: Derian Hatcher
National anthems{{{team1_short}}}: Arlette Roxburgh
{{{team2_short}}}: Unknown
RefereesDon Koharski (1, 3, 6)
Bill McCreary (1, 4, 6)
Kerry Fraser (2, 4)
Dan Marouelli (2, 5)
Terry Gregson (3, 5)
DatesMay 30 – June 10
MVPScott Stevens (Devils)
Series-winning goalJason Arnott (8:20, second OT, G6)
NetworksABC (Games 3-6), CBC, ESPN (Games 1-2), SRC, NASN
Announcers(CBC) Bob Cole, Harry Neale (ESPN/ABC) Gary Thorne, Bill Clement

Paths to the Finals

New Jersey defeated the Florida Panthers 4–0, the Toronto Maple Leafs 4–2 and the Philadelphia Flyers 4–3 to advance to the Finals.

Dallas defeated the Edmonton Oilers 4–1, the San Jose Sharks 4–1 and the Colorado Avalanche 4–3 to advance to the Finals.

Game summaries

Despite New Jersey being a lower seed in conference play (4) than Dallas (2), New Jersey's 103 points were one more than Dallas, giving them home-ice advantage in the series. The Devils won the Cup in game six on a one-timer goal by Jason Arnott in double overtime. It was their second Stanley Cup overall and first since 1995.

For the Stars, this was the first time since the New York Islanders lost to the Edmonton Oilers in the 1984 Finals that a defending Stanley Cup champion lost in the Finals. This happened to the Devils themselves the following year when they lost to the Colorado Avalanche.

This is the first-ever Finals that featured two relocated teams competing for the Stanley Cup, as well as being the first Finals in which both teams had won the Stanley Cup previously after relocation.

New Jersey wins series 4–2
Scott Stevens (New Jersey) wins Conn Smythe Trophy

Broadcasting

In Canada, the series was televised on CBC. In the United States, this was the first year under the new joint American TV contract with the Disney-owned networks ESPN and ABC, with ESPN airing the first two games of the Cup Finals and ABC broadcasting the rest of the series.

New Jersey Devils – 2000 Stanley Cup champions

Players

  Centres
  Wingers
  Defencemen
  Goaltenders

Coaching and administrative staff:

  • John J. McMullen (Owner/Chairman/Governor), Peter McMullen (Vice President), Lou Lamoriello (President/General Manager)
  • Larry Robinson (Head Coach), Viacheslav Fetisov (Asst. Coach), Bobby Carpenter Jr. (Asst. Coaches), Jacques Caron (Goaltending Coach), John Cunniff (AHL Coach)
  • David Conte (Director of Scouting), Claude Carrier (Scout), Milt Fisher (Scout), Dan Labraatan (Scout), Marcel Pronovost (Scout)
  • Bob Hoffmeyer (Scout), Barry Fisher (Head Team Physician), Dennis Gendron (AHL Asst. Coach), Robbie Ftorek (Coach/Scout), Vladimir Bure (Consultant)
  • Taran Singelton (Video Coordinator), Marie Carnevale (Hockey Operations-Ass't to President-General Manager), Callie Smith (Scouting Staff Asst.), Bill Murray (Medical Trainer), Michael Vasalani (Strength-Conditioning Coordinator)
  • Dana McGuane (Equipment Manager), Juergen Merz (Message Therapist), Harry Bricker (Asst. Equipment Manager), Lou Centanni (Asst. Equipment Manager)

Stanley Cup engraving

Three players who did not automatically qualify for their names to be engraved on the Stanley Cup were engraved at the Devils' request:

  • Steve Kelly† – Played ten playoff games, four in Eastern Conference Final.
  • Steve Brule† – Played one game in the Conference Finals.
  • Ken Sutton† – Joined the team at the NHL trade deadline from the minors. He played six regular season games, but was a healthy scratch for the playoffs.
  • Larry Robinson was promoted from assistant coach to head coach with only eight games left in the regular season to replace Robbie Ftorek. Ftorek stayed on as a scout for the rest of season and the NHL allowed his name to be included on the Stanley Cup.
  • Krzysztof Oliwa was first Polish born-trained player to win the Stanley Cup. He played 69 regular season, but missed whole playoff injured. Oliwa qualified for playing more than 1/2 the regular season games for New Jersey.
  • 14 members were engraved with an install and two full names.

Left off the Stanley Cup

  • Rob McLean (Consultant) – Still awarded a Stanley Cup Ring, and on the team picture.
  • #24 Willie Mitchell (D) – Played in two regular season games. He was recalled for the playoffs, but did not make any playoff appearances. He won the Stanley Cup with the Los Angeles Kings in 2012 and 2014.[1]
  • #2 Deron Quint (D) – Played 50 regular season games for Phoenix, and four games for New Jersey (joined in a March 7 trade for Lyle Odelein) was not engraved on the Stanley Cup because New Jersey suspended him for failing to report to the minors for conditioning purposes.

Aftermath

The Devils returned to the Finals the following year, facing the Colorado Avalanche. However, they lost in seven games. The Stars got swept in the Conference Semifinals the following year by the St. Louis Blues.

See also

References

  • Podnieks, Andrew; Hockey Hall of Fame (2004). Lord Stanley's Cup. Triumph Books. ISBN 978-1-55168-261-7.

Notes

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-12-03. Retrieved 2013-11-28.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
Preceded by
Dallas Stars
1999
New Jersey Devils
Stanley Cup Champions

2000
Succeeded by
Colorado Avalanche
2001
1999–2000 New Jersey Devils season

The 1999–2000 New Jersey Devils season was the franchise's 18th season in the National Hockey League since the franchise relocated to New Jersey.

After firing head coach Robbie Ftorek on March 23, the team won their second Stanley Cup championship on June 10, 2000 in a double-overtime victory in Game 6 of the 2000 Stanley Cup Finals against the Dallas Stars.

1999–2000 Philadelphia Flyers season

The 1999–2000 Philadelphia Flyers season was the Philadelphia Flyers' 33rd season in the National Hockey League (NHL). One of the most tumultuous seasons in franchise history, the Flyers reached the Eastern Conference Finals, losing in seven games to the New Jersey Devils.

2000–01 Philadelphia Flyers season

The 2000–01 Philadelphia Flyers season was the Philadelphia Flyers' 34th season in the National Hockey League (NHL). The Flyers lost in the first round to the Buffalo Sabres in six games.

2001 Stanley Cup Finals

The 2001 Stanley Cup Finals was the championship series of the National Hockey League's (NHL) 2000–01 season, and the culmination of the 2001 Stanley Cup playoffs. It was contested between the Eastern Conference champion and defending Stanley Cup champion New Jersey Devils and the Western Conference champion and Presidents' Trophy-winning Colorado Avalanche. It was Colorado's second appearance in the Final, and the first since the team won the Cup in 1996. It was New Jersey's third appearance in the Final and second straight appearance after winning the Cup in the 2000 Final.

Colorado defeated New Jersey in seven games to win their second Stanley Cup in franchise history. Colorado's Patrick Roy would win the Conn Smythe Trophy as the MVP of the 2001 playoffs. This was the first Stanley Cup Final since 1994 that would be decided in the maximum seven games. This was also the first and, as of 2018, most recent Finals since 1989 that the number one seeds in each conference met.

Al Michaels

Alan Richard Michaels (born November 12, 1944) is an American television sportscaster.

Now employed by NBC Sports after nearly three decades (1977–2006) with ABC Sports, Michaels is known for his many years calling play-by-play of National Football League games, including nearly two decades with ABC's Monday Night Football and over a decade with NBC Sunday Night Football. He is also known for famous calls in other sports, including the Miracle on Ice at the 1980 Winter Olympics and the earthquake-interrupted Game 3 of the 1989 World Series. Michaels' move from ABC to NBC in 2006 was notable as it was part of an agreement between the two networks' parent companies, The Walt Disney Company and NBCUniversal, respectively, that allowed Disney to take ownership of the intellectual property of Oswald the Lucky Rabbit from NBCUniversal.

Brian Skrudland

Brian Norman Skrudland (born July 31, 1963) is a Canadian retired professional ice hockey player who played for the Montreal Canadiens, Calgary Flames, Florida Panthers, New York Rangers and Dallas Stars.

Conn Smythe Trophy

The Conn Smythe Trophy (French: Trophée Conn Smythe) is awarded annually to the most valuable player (MVP) during the National Hockey League's (NHL) Stanley Cup playoffs. It is named after Conn Smythe, the longtime owner, general manager, and head coach of the Toronto Maple Leafs. The Conn Smythe Trophy has been awarded 52 times to 45 players since the 1964–65 NHL season. Each year, at the conclusion of the final game of the Stanley Cup Final, members of the Professional Hockey Writers' Association vote to elect the player deserving of the trophy. The trophy is handed out prior to the presentation of the Stanley Cup by the NHL Commissioner and only the winner is announced, in contrast to most of the other NHL awards which name three finalists and are presented at a ceremony.

Unlike the playoff MVP awards presented in the other major professional sports leagues of the United States and Canada (the Super Bowl MVP, the NBA Finals MVP, and the World Series MVP), the Conn Smythe is based on a player's performance during the entire NHL postseason instead of just the championship game or series.

The most recent winner is Alexander Ovechkin.

Joe Nieuwendyk

Joseph "Joe" Nieuwendyk (born September 10, 1966) is a Canadian former National Hockey League (NHL) player. He was a second round selection of the Calgary Flames, 27th overall, at the 1985 NHL Entry Draft and played 20 seasons for the Flames, Dallas Stars, New Jersey Devils, Toronto Maple Leafs, and Florida Panthers. He is one of only 11 players in NHL history to win the Stanley Cup with three or more different teams, winning titles with Calgary in 1989, Dallas in 1999 and New Jersey in 2003. A two-time Olympian, Nieuwendyk won a gold medal with Team Canada at the 2002 winter games. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2011 and his uniform number 25 was honoured by the Flames in 2014. Joe Nieuwendyk was inducted into the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame in 2014. In 2017 Nieuwendyk was named one of the '100 Greatest NHL Players' in history.An accomplished box lacrosse player, Nieuwendyk led the Whitby Warriors to the 1984 Minto Cup national junior championship before focusing exclusively on hockey. He played university hockey with the Cornell Big Red where he was a two-time All-American. He won the Calder Memorial Trophy as NHL rookie of the year in 1988 after becoming only the second first-year player to score 50 goals. He was a four-time All-Star, won the King Clancy Memorial Trophy in 1995 for his leadership and humanitarian work, and was named the Conn Smythe Trophy winner in 1999 as most valuable player of the postseason. Nieuwendyk played 1,257 games in his career, scoring 564 goals and 1,126 points.

Chronic back pain forced Nieuwendyk's retirement as a player in 2006. He then began a new career in management, acting first as a consultant to the general manager with the Panthers before moving onto the Maple Leafs where he was an assistant to the general manager. Nieuwendyk was the general manager of the Dallas Stars between 2009 and 2013. He most recently worked as a pro scout and advisor for the Carolina Hurricanes, until resigning his contract April 30, 2018.

List of Stanley Cup Finals officials

Before the Stanley Cup playoffs, a list of forty on-ice officials are named to work: Twenty referees and twenty linesmen. They are paired up in each round, traveling and working together between the series. Usually, they are never assigned to work two games between two teams they have already seen. This does not apply if a series reaches seven games, or at any point in time beginning in the third round. If a game seven is reached, those who have been assigned to work in the next round will call the series-deciding game. If at any time a referee or linesman is injured or unable to work, there is a standby official; he is there in the event that one of the officials cannot continue in the game.

Throughout the playoffs, the list of officials is minimized.

During the second round, twenty-four officials (twelve referees and twelve linesmen) work games.

During the third round, sixteen officials (eight referees and eight linesmen) work games.In the Stanley Cup playoffs, the list is reduced to eight officials: Four referees and four linesmen. They are named as Stanley Cup Finals officials. They are still in pairs, who will work every other game (even numbered and odd numbered). If the Stanley Cup final reaches a game seven, the top four will be assigned to officiate the game; they may not have been paired during the finals.

Maurice Richard

Joseph Henri Maurice "Rocket" Richard (; French: [ʁiʃaʁ]; August 4, 1921 – May 27, 2000) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player who played 18 seasons in the National Hockey League (NHL) for the Montreal Canadiens. He was the first player in NHL history to score 50 goals in one season, accomplishing the feat in 50 games in 1944–45, and the first to reach 500 career goals. Richard retired in 1960 as the league's all-time leader in goals with 544. He won the Hart Trophy as the NHL's most valuable player in 1947, played in 13 All-Star Games and was named to 14 post-season NHL All-Star Teams, eight on the First-Team. In 2017 Richard was named one of the '100 Greatest NHL Players' in history.Richard, Elmer Lach and Toe Blake formed the "Punch line", a high-scoring forward line of the 1940s. Richard was a member of eight Stanley Cup championship teams, including a league record five straight between 1956 and 1960; he was the team's captain for the last four. The Hockey Hall of Fame waived its five-year waiting period for eligibility and inducted Richard into the hall in 1961. In 1975 he was inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. The Canadiens retired his number, 9, in 1960, and in 1999 donated the Maurice "Rocket" Richard Trophy to the NHL, awarded annually to the league's regular season leading goal-scorer.

The oldest of eight children, Richard emerged from a poverty-stricken family during the Great Depression. He was initially viewed as a fragile player. A string of injuries prevented him from joining the Canadian military during the Second World War. Outspoken and intense, he was renowned for his physical and occasionally violent style of play. Richard was involved in a vicious on-ice incident late in the 1954–55 season during which he struck a linesman. NHL President Clarence Campbell suspended him for the remainder of the season and playoffs, which precipitated the Richard Riot in Montreal. The riot has taken on a mythical quality in the decades since and is often viewed as a precursor to Quebec's Quiet Revolution. Richard was a cultural icon among Quebec's francophone population; his legend is a primary motif in Roch Carrier's short story The Hockey Sweater, an emblematic work of Canadian culture. Richard died in 2000 and became the first non-politician honoured by the province of Quebec with a state funeral.

Reunion Arena

Reunion Arena was an indoor arena located in the Reunion district of downtown Dallas, Texas. The arena served as the primary home of the National Basketball Association's Dallas Mavericks and the National Hockey League's Dallas Stars. Its capacity held accommodations for 18,190 basketball spectators and 17,000 for ice hockey spectators. Reunion was also a performance venue for some of the biggest names in popular music from the 1980s through the late 2000s including Paul McCartney, Michael Jackson, Prince, Elton John, David Bowie, Madonna, Pink Floyd, Queen, U2, R.E.M. and Radiohead.

Reunion Arena was demolished in November 2009 and the site was cleared by the end of the year.

Tue, May 30 New Jersey Devils 7–3 Dallas Stars Continental Airlines Arena Recap
Thu, June 1 New Jersey Devils 1–2 Dallas Stars Continental Airlines Arena Recap
Sat, June 3 Dallas Stars 1–2 New Jersey Devils Reunion Arena Recap
Mon, June 5 Dallas Stars 1–3 New Jersey Devils Reunion Arena Recap
Thu, June 8 New Jersey Devils 0–1 3OT Dallas Stars Continental Airlines Arena Recap
Sat, June 10 Dallas Stars 1–2 2OT New Jersey Devils Reunion Arena Recap

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