2000 Major League Baseball season

The 2000 Major League Baseball season ended with the New York Yankees defeating the New York Mets in five games, for their third consecutive World Series title.[1] The 2000 World Series was known as the Subway Series because both fans and the two teams could take the subway to and from every game of the series.[2]

A then-record 5,693 home runs were hit during the regular season in 2000 (the record was broken in 2017, when 6,105 home runs were hit).[1] Ten teams hit at least 200 home runs each,[3] while for the first time since 1989 and only the fifth since 1949 no pitcher pitched a no-hitter.[a]

2000 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationMarch 29 – October 26, 2000
Draft
Top draft pickAdrian Gonzalez
Picked byFlorida Marlins
Regular Season
Season MVPAL: Jason Giambi (OAK)
NL: Jeff Kent (SF)
League Postseason
AL championsNew York Yankees
  AL runners-upSeattle Mariners
NL championsNew York Mets
  NL runners-upSt. Louis Cardinals
World Series
ChampionsNew York Yankees
  Runners-upNew York Mets
World Series MVPDerek Jeter (NYY)

Major league baseball final standings

American League

AL East W L Pct. GB Home Road
(3) New York Yankees 87 74 0.540 44–36 43–38
Boston Red Sox 85 77 0.525 42–39 43–38
Toronto Blue Jays 83 79 0.512 45–36 38–43
Baltimore Orioles 74 88 0.457 13½ 44–37 30–51
Tampa Bay Devil Rays 69 92 0.429 18 36–44 33–48
AL Central W L Pct. GB Home Road
(1) Chicago White Sox 95 67 0.586 46–35 49–32
Cleveland Indians 90 72 0.556 5 48–33 42–39
Detroit Tigers 79 83 0.488 16 43–38 36–45
Kansas City Royals 77 85 0.475 18 42–39 35–46
Minnesota Twins 69 93 0.426 26 36–45 33–48
AL West W L Pct. GB Home Road
(2) Oakland Athletics 91 70 0.565 47–34 44–36
(4) Seattle Mariners 91 71 0.562 ½ 47–34 44–37
Anaheim Angels 82 80 0.506 46–35 36–45
Texas Rangers 71 91 0.438 20½ 42–39 29–52

National League

NL East W L Pct. GB Home Road
(3) Atlanta Braves 95 67 0.586 51–30 44–37
(4) New York Mets 94 68 0.580 1 55–26 39–42
Florida Marlins 79 82 0.491 15½ 43–38 36–44
Montreal Expos 67 95 0.414 28 37–44 30–51
Philadelphia Phillies 65 97 0.401 30 34–47 31–50
NL Central W L Pct. GB Home Road
(2) St. Louis Cardinals 95 67 0.586 50–31 45–36
Cincinnati Reds 85 77 0.525 10 43–38 42–39
Milwaukee Brewers 73 89 0.451 22 42–39 31–50
Houston Astros 72 90 0.444 23 39–42 33–48
Pittsburgh Pirates 69 93 0.426 26 37–44 32–49
Chicago Cubs 65 97 0.401 30 38–43 27–54
NL West W L Pct. GB Home Road
(1) San Francisco Giants 97 65 0.599 55–26 42–39
Los Angeles Dodgers 86 76 0.531 11 44–37 42–39
Arizona Diamondbacks 85 77 0.525 12 47–34 38–43
Colorado Rockies 82 80 0.506 15 48–33 34–47
San Diego Padres 76 86 0.469 21 41–40 35–46

Postseason

Bracket

  Division Series
(ALDS, NLDS)
League Championship Series
(NLCS, ALCS)
World Series
                           
  1 Chicago Sox 0  
4 Seattle 3  
  4 Seattle 2  
American League
  3 NY Yankees 4  
2 Oakland 2
  3 NY Yankees 3  
    AL3 NY Yankees 4
  NL4 NY Mets 1
  1 San Francisco 1  
4 NY Mets 3  
  4 NY Mets 4
National League
  2 St. Louis 1  
2 St. Louis 3
  3 Atlanta 0  
Cubs at Cardinals 2000-09-14
The season's eventual National League Central Division champions St. Louis Cardinals playing host to the Chicago Cubs during a September 2000 game at Busch Memorial Stadium.

MLB statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVG[8] Nomar Garciaparra BOS .372 Todd Helton COL .372
HR[8] Troy Glaus ANA 47 Sammy Sosa CHC 50
RBI[8] Edgar Martínez SEA 145 Todd Helton COL 147
Wins[8] Tim Hudson OAK
David Wells TOR
20 Tom Glavine ATL 21
ERA[8] Pedro Martínez BOS 1.74 Kevin Brown LA 2.58
SO[8] Pedro Martínez BOS 284 Randy Johnson ARI 347
SV[10][11][12] Todd Jones DET
Derek Lowe BOS
42 Antonio Alfonseca FLA 45
SB[13][14] Johnny Damon KC 46 Luis Castillo FLA 62

Managers

American League

Team Manager Tenure
Anaheim Angels Mike Scioscia[15] 1st season
Baltimore Orioles Mike Hargrove[16] 1st season
Boston Red Sox Jimy Williams[17] 4th season
Chicago White Sox Jerry Manuel[18] 3rd season
Cleveland Indians Charlie Manuel[19] 1st season
Detroit Tigers Phil Garner[20] 1st season
Kansas City Royals Tony Muser[21] 4th season
Minnesota Twins Tom Kelly[22] 15th season
New York Yankees Joe Torre[23] 5th season
Oakland Athletics Art Howe[24] 5th season
Seattle Mariners Lou Piniella[25] 8th season
Tampa Bay Devil Rays Larry Rothschild[26] 3rd season
Texas Rangers Johnny Oates[27] 6th season
Toronto Blue Jays Jim Fregosi[28] 2nd season

National League

Team Manager Tenure
Arizona Diamondbacks Buck Showalter[29] 3rd season
Atlanta Braves Bobby Cox[30] 11th season
Chicago Cubs Don Baylor[31] 1st season
Cincinnati Reds Jack McKeon[32] 4th season
Colorado Rockies Buddy Bell[33] 1st season
Florida Marlins John Boles Jr.[34] 2nd season
Houston Astros Larry Dierker[35] 4th season
Los Angeles Dodgers Davey Johnson[36] 2nd season
Milwaukee Brewers Davey Lopes[37] 1st season
Montreal Expos Felipe Alou[38] 9th season
New York Mets Bobby Valentine[39] 5th season
Philadelphia Phillies Terry Francona[40] 4th season
Pittsburgh Pirates Gene Lamont[41] 4th season
St. Louis Cardinals Tony La Russa[42] 5th season
San Diego Padres Bruce Bochy[43] 6th season
San Francisco Giants Dusty Baker[44] 8th season

Awards and honors

Baseball Writers' Association of America Awards
BBWAA Award National League[45] American League[46]
Rookie of the Year Rafael Furcal (ATL) Kazuhiro Sasaki (SEA)
Cy Young Award Randy Johnson (ARI) Pedro Martínez (BOS)
Manager of the Year Dusty Baker (SF) Jerry Manuel (CHW)
Most Valuable Player Jeff Kent (SF) Jason Giambi (OAK)
Gold Glove Awards
Position National League American League
Pitcher Greg Maddux (ATL) Kenny Rogers (TEX)
Catcher Mike Matheny (STL) Iván Rodríguez (TEX)
First Baseman J. T. Snow (SF) John Olerud (SEA)
Second Baseman Pokey Reese (CIN) Roberto Alomar (CLE)
Third Baseman Scott Rolen (PHI) Travis Fryman (CLE)
Shortstop Neifi Pérez (COL) Omar Vizquel (CLE)
Outfielders Steve Finley (ARI) Bernie Williams (NYY)
Jim Edmonds (STL) Jermaine Dye (KC)
Andruw Jones (ATL) Darin Erstad (ANA)
Silver Slugger Awards
Pitcher/Designated Hitter Mike Hampton (NYM) Frank Thomas (CHW)
Catcher Mike Piazza (NYM) Jorge Posada (NYY)
First Baseman Todd Helton (COL) Carlos Delgado (TOR)
Second Baseman Jeff Kent (SF) Roberto Alomar (CLE)
Third Baseman Chipper Jones (ATL) Troy Glaus (ANA)
Shortstop Édgar Renteria (STL) Alex Rodriguez (SEA)
Outfielders Barry Bonds (SF) Darin Erstad (ANA)
Vladimir Guerrero (MTL) Magglio Ordonez (CHW)
Sammy Sosa (CHC) Manny Ramirez (CLE)

Events

January–March

  • January 6 – Major league officials order Atlanta Braves reliever John Rocker is to undergo psychological testing following derogatory remarks he made in an interview with Sports Illustrated magazine.[47] Commissioner Bud Selig says he will listen to what the doctors say before deciding what punishment—if any—will be handed down to the pitcher.[48]
  • January 11 – The baseball writers elect catcher Carlton Fisk and first baseman Tony Pérez to the Hall of Fame. Fisk is chosen in his 2nd year on the ballot, while Pérez is picked on his 9th try.[49]
  • January 31 – Braves reliever John Rocker is suspended from baseball until May 1 by Commissioner Bud Selig for his racial and ethnic remarks in an article published in Sports Illustrated last month. He's also fined $20,000 and ordered to undergo sensitivity training.[50]
  • February 10 – The Seattle Mariners accommodate center fielder Ken Griffey, Jr., trading him to his hometown Cincinnati Reds in exchange for four players.[51] Cincinnati resisted giving up infielder Pokey Reese.[52]
  • February 29 – Manager Sparky Anderson, 19th-century star Bid McPhee, and Negro League player Norman "Turkey" Stearnes are elected to the Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee.[53]
  • March 1 – Independent arbitrator Shyam Das cuts Braves pitcher John Rocker's suspension from 28 days to 14 days. Rocker, who is allowed to report to spring training with the team, also has his fine cut.[54]
  • March 29 – The Chicago Cubs open the major league season in the Tokyo Dome in Tokyo, Japan, by defeating the New York Mets 5–3, in the first big league game ever played outside of North America.[55] Jon Lieber gets the victory and Mike Hampton takes the loss. Shane Andrews hits the first home run of the season. Mark Grace and Mike Piazza also homer.[56]

April–May

June–July

August

  • August 4 – The Blue Jays obtain outfielder Dave Martinez from the Rangers. Martinez becomes the 9th major leaguer to play for four teams in a season. He began the year with Tampa Bay and also played with the Cubs, in addition to Texas and Toronto. The last to do so was Dave Kingman (1977). Before him, according to historian Scott Flatow, the four-in-one players were Frank Huelsman (1904), Willis Hudlin (1940), Paul Lehner (1951), Ted Gray (1955), Wes Covington (1961) and Mike Kilkenny (1972).
  • August 8 – Trailing 3–2 entering the bottom of the ninth, the Yankees hit back-to-back home runs on back-to-back pitches from Oakland closer Jason Isringhausen. Bernie Williams jumped on the first pitch and sent it over the right field fence to tie the game, then David Justice sent the very next offering from Isringhausen over the center field wall to give the Yankees the win.
  • August 19 – The Yankees beat the Angels 9–1, hitting a major league record-tying three sacrifice flies in the 3rd inning.
  • August 19 – In the Houston Astros' 10–8 victory over the Milwaukee Brewers, Jeff Bagwell has two home runs and five RBI. Bagwell becomes the first Houston player to reach 300 homers in his career.
  • August 21 – Potomac's Esix Snead breaks Lenny Dykstra's Carolina League record of 105 stolen bases by swiping his 106th. Snead has a batting average of .242 and a .338 on-base percentage. It's the 10th time in the last 20 years that a minor-leaguer has stolen 100 or more bases in a season. According to Howe Sports data, the eight players who stole 100 or more bases in the minors were:
    • Vince Coleman (Macon, South Atlantic, 1983—145)
    • Donell Nixon (Bakersfield, California, 1983—144)
    • Jeff Stone (Spartanburg, South Atlantic, 1983—123)
    • Alan Wiggins (Lodi, California, 1980—120)
    • Marcus Lawton (Columbia, South Atlantic, 1985—111)
    • Esix Snead (Potomac, Carolina, 2000—106)
    • Lenny Dykstra (Lynchburg, Carolina, 1983—105)
    • Donell Nixon (Chattanooga, Southern, 1984—102)
    • Vince Coleman (Louisville, American Association, 1983— 101)
    • Albert Hall (Durham, Carolina, 1980—100)
  • August 22 – The Dodgers defeat the Expos 14–6, as Eric Karros becomes the first Dodger player to hit two home runs in a single inning (6th).
  • August 27 – The Anaheim Angels edge the Cleveland Indians 10–9, as outfielder Tim Salmon hits his 30th home run of the year in the 5th inning. Anaheim become the first team in AL history to have four players (Troy Glaus, Mo Vaughn, Garret Anderson, Salmon) reach the 30-homer mark in a single season. The Toronto Blue Jays are close with two hitters over 30 and two at 28. It's been done seven times in the NL.

September

[133]

  • September 22 – José Lima of the Houston Astros sets an NL single-season record by allowing his 47th home run in the Astros' 12–5 loss to the Cincinnati Reds. The major league record for home runs allowed in a season is 50, set by the Minnesota Twins' Bert Blyleven in 1986.
  • September 26 – Longtime broadcast partner NBC declines to renew its rights. NBC had televised baseball since 1947, with the exception of 1990–93, and had been the exclusive home of the World Series for 26 years.
  • September 27 – In an Oakland 9–7 victory over the Angels, Anaheim's Darin Erstad hits a home run in the 2nd inning for his 99th RBI of the year from the leadoff spot to set a new record. Nomar Garciaparra drove home 98 in 1997 for the previous mark.
  • Season Note – First time in MLB history that no team finished with a winning percentage below .400 and above .600 It is also the first time, in a full 162-game season, that no team achieved 100 wins or 100 losses.

October–December

Deaths

  • January 4 – John Milner, 50, first baseman and left fielder for the Mets and Pirates who hit 20 home runs twice, had 10 career grand slams
  • January 11 – Bob Lemon, 79, Hall of Fame pitcher who won 207 games including a no-hitter for the Cleveland Indians, posting seven 20-win seasons; won final game of 1948 World Series, and managed Yankees to 1978 championship
  • January 16 – By Saam, 85, broadcaster for the Philadelphia Athletics and Phillies from 1938 to 1975
  • March 7 – Jack Sanford, 70, All-Star pitcher who was the 1957 NL Rookie of the Year; was 24–7 for 1962 Giants
  • June 2 – Ellis Clary, 83, infielder for the Senators and Browns; later a scout for 32 years
  • June 5 – Don Liddle, 75, pitcher for the New York Giants during Game 1 of the 1954 World Series when teammate Willie Mays made his famous over-the-shoulder catch
  • June 21 – Bud Stewart, 84, outfielder who was the AL runnerup in triples with the 1948 Senators
  • June 23 – Bob Tillman, 63, catcher for the Red Sox and Braves who caught two no-hitters and had three home runs in a 1969 game
  • September 3 – Clyde Sukeforth, 98, catcher for the Reds and Dodgers who later scouted Jackie Robinson, and also signed Don Newcombe and Roberto Clemente; served as acting manager for Robinson's Dodgers debut April 15, 1947 which broke MLB's color barrier
  • September 17 – Chico Salmon, 59, infielder for the Indians and Orioles who had a crucial pinch hit in the 1970 World Series
  • September 23 – Aurelio Rodríguez, 52, third baseman, primarily for the Tigers, who won a Gold Glove and retired with the sixth most games at his position
  • October 22 – Hank Wyse. 82, All-Star pitcher who helped the Cubs to clinch the 1945 National League title after going 22–10 with a 2.68 ERA and the last Cubs pitcher to appear in a Series game
  • October 28 – Andújar Cedeño, 31, shortstop for the Astros and Padres who hit for the cycle in a 1992 game
  • November 25 – Hugh Alexander, 83, outfielder who played seven games for 1937 Indians; became a scout for 61 years after losing his left hand in an accident
  • December 10 – Willard Nixon, 72, pitcher who won 69 games for the Red Sox
  • December 19 – Lou Polli, 99, Italian relief pitcher for the 1932 Browns and 1944 Giants

Apparel

  • The Oakland Athletics changed to black spikes, ending a longtime tradition of being the only team in the majors with white cleats. This was the first season since 1962 the Athletics did not wear white shoes.

Notes

a Major League Baseball seasons since 1901 without a no-hitter pitched are 1909, 1913, 1921, 19271928, 19321933, 1936, 1939, 19421943, 1949, 1959, 1982, 1985, 1989, 2000 and 2005.

See also

External links

References

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2000 American League Championship Series

The 2000 American League Championship Series (ALCS) was a matchup between the East Division champion New York Yankees and the Wild Card Seattle Mariners. The Yankees had advanced to the Series after beating the West Division champion Oakland Athletics in the ALDS three games to two and the Mariners advanced by beating the Central Division champion Chicago White Sox three games to none. The Yankees won the Series four games to two and went on to defeat the New York Mets in the World Series to win their third consecutive World Series championship, twenty-sixth overall.

2000 Anaheim Angels season

The Anaheim Angels 2000 season involved the Angels finishing 3rd in the American League West with a record of 82 wins and 80 losses.

The Angels had an extremely powerful offense, with five players (Garret Anderson, Darin Erstad, Troy Glaus, Tim Salmon, and Mo Vaughn) hitting at least 25 homers and driving in 97 runs. Glaus led the AL in HRs, and Erstad had the most hits on his way to a .355 batting average. However, the pitching was very inconsistent. No one pitched over 170 innings. Reliever Shigetoshi Hasegawa led the team with a 3.57 ERA and was also the only one to win 10 games.

2000 Arizona Diamondbacks season

The 2000 Arizona Diamondbacks looked to improve on their 1999 season, in which they won 100 games in just their 2nd season. They looked to contend in what was a strong National League West Division. They finished the season with a record of 85-77, good enough for third place in the division.

2000 Atlanta Braves season

The 2000 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 35th season in Atlanta along with the 125th season in the National League and 130th overall. The Braves won their ninth consecutive division title, however, the 2000 season would mark the first time since 1990 that the Braves did not appear in the National League Championship Series. One of the highlights of the season was that the All-Star Game was held at Turner Field in Atlanta.

2000 Baltimore Orioles season

The 2000 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 4th in the American League East with a record of 74 wins and 88 losses.

2000 Boston Red Sox season

The 2000 Boston Red Sox season was the 100th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 85 wins and 77 losses, 2½ games behind the New York Yankees. The Red Sox did not qualify for the postseason, as the AL wild card was the Seattle Mariners who had finished second in the American League West with a record of 91–71.

2000 Chicago Cubs season

The 2000 Chicago Cubs season was the 129th season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 125th in the National League and the 85th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished sixth and last in the National League Central with a record of 65–97.

During this season, the Cubs played in the first game held outside North America on Opening Day. The Cubs played the New York Mets in front of over 55,000 at the Tokyodome in Japan. The Cubs won the game by a score of 5-3.

2000 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 2000 season was a season in American baseball. It consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League Central, although coming short at 2nd place. They had 85 wins and 77 losses. They were only the 2nd team in the modern era of baseball to not be shut out an entire season.The Reds were managed by Jack McKeon.

2000 Florida Marlins season

The Florida Marlins' 2000 season was the 8th season for the Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise in the National League. It would begin with the team attempting to improve on their season from 1999. Their manager was John Boles. They played home games at Pro Player Stadium. They finished with a record of 79-82, 3rd in the NL East.

2000 Houston Astros season

The 2000 Houston Astros season was a season in American baseball. They finished in fourth place in the National League Central division. It was their first season in their new ballpark, Minute Maid Park (known as Enron Field at the time).

2000 Kansas City Royals season

The 2000 Kansas City Royals season involved the Royals finishing 4th in the American League Central with a record of 77 wins and 85 losses.

2000 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 2000 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 71st playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 11, 2000 at Turner Field in Atlanta, Georgia, home of the Atlanta Braves of the National League.

The Florida Marlins were originally awarded the 2000 All-Star Game in July 1995, but due to concerns over the chronically low attendance figures at Pro Player Stadium and the long-term viability of the South Florida market, National League president Len Coleman revoked the game from Miami in December 1998. The Marlins finally got to host the All-Star Game for the first time, 17 years later.

Coleman announced Atlanta would be the replacement host of the game, giving the Braves the chance to host their first All-Star Game since 1972. Turner Field, which opened in 1997 played a factor in Coleman's decision to award the game to Atlanta, citing Major League Baseball's desire to have the All-Star Game played in newer venues as a way to showcase the ballparks.

The 2000 All-Star Game was one of the few occurrences in which the manager of the host team also managed the home team of the game, in this case, the National League (Bobby Cox had led the Braves to the World Series the previous year earning the right to manage the National League).

The result of the game was the American League defeating the National League by a score of 6–3. The game is remembered for Chipper Jones' home run off James Baldwin. This was also the last MLB All-Star Game that was broadcast on NBC.

2000 Milwaukee Brewers season

The Milwaukee Brewers' 2000 season involved the Brewers' finishing 3rd in the National League Central with a record of 73 wins and 89 losses.

2000 New York Mets season

The New York Mets' 2000 season was the 39th regular season for the Mets. They went 94-68 and finished 2nd in the NL East, but earned the NL Wild Card. They made it to the World Series where they were defeated by their crosstown rival the New York Yankees. They were managed by Bobby Valentine. They played home games at Shea Stadium.

2000 San Diego Padres season

The 2000 San Diego Padres season was the 32nd season in franchise history.

2000 San Francisco Giants season

The 2000 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 118th season in Major League Baseball and their 43rd season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season. The Giants finished in first place in the National League West with a record of 97 wins and 65 losses. They lost the National League Division Series in four games to the New York Mets.

The team played their first season in newly opened Pacific Bell Park.

2000 Tampa Bay Devil Rays season

The 2000 Tampa Bay Devil Rays season was their third since the franchise was created. This season, they finished last in the AL East division, and managed to finish the season with a record of 69-92. Their manager were Larry Rothschild, who entered his 3rd year with the club. This season is sometimes referred to as the "Hit Show" because the club signed several big-name sluggers in hopes of the team putting up better offensive numbers.

2000 Texas Rangers season

The Texas Rangers 2000 season involved the Rangers finishing 4th in the American League west with a record of 71 wins and 91 losses.

Pre-modern era
Modern era
See also
2000 MLB season by team

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