1999 World Rally Championship

The 1999 World Rally Championship was the 27th season of the FIA World Rally Championship. The season consisted of 14 rallies. Tommi Mäkinen won his fourth drivers' world championship driving for Mitsubishi, ahead of Richard Burns and Didier Auriol. The manufacturers' title was won by Toyota, ahead of Subaru and Mitsubishi.

In an upset predicted two years earlier a two-wheel-drive car won a rally for the first time since Alain Oreille won the 1989 Rallye Côte d'Ivoire in his Renault 5 when Philippe Bugalski took his Citroën Xsara Kit Car to victory in the Rally Catalunya. Bugalski backed it up three weeks later winning the Tour de Corse. With such specialised tarmac cars now beating WRC cars while at the same time not competing in the FIA 2-Litre World Rally Cup designed for them a revamp of two-wheel-drive regulations was created for the 2000 season.

1999 World Rally Championship
Previous: 1998 Next: 2000

Calendar

Round Dates Race
1 17–20 January Monaco Monte Carlo Rally
2 12–14 February Sweden Swedish Rally
3 25–28 February Kenya Safari Rally
4 21–24 March Portugal Rally Portugal
5 19–21 April Spain Rally Catalunya
6 7–9 May France Tour de Corse
7 22–25 May Argentina Rally Argentina
8 6–9 June Greece Acropolis Rally
9 15–18 July New Zealand Rally New Zealand
10 20–22 August Finland Rally Finland
11 17–19 September China China Rally
12 11–13 October Italy Rally Sanremo
13 4–7 November Australia Rally Australia
14 21–23 November United Kingdom Rally of Great Britain

Teams and drivers

Team Constructor Car Tyre No Drivers Rounds
Japan Marlboro Mitsubishi Ralliart Mitsubishi Lancer Evo VI M 1 Finland Tommi Mäkinen All
2 Belgium Freddy Loix 1–3, 5–14
Finland Marcus Grönholm 4
22 Oman Hamed Al-Wahaibi 2–13
Japan Toyota Castrol Team Toyota Corolla WRC M 3 Spain Carlos Sainz All
4 France Didier Auriol All
12 Kenya Ian Duncan 3
18 Australia Neal Bates 13
Japan Takuma Kamada 9, 11
19 Finland Pasi Hagström 2, 4, 10
Portugal Pedro Matos Chaves 4
26 Denmark Henrik Lundgaard 1, 5–6, 12
32 Germany Isolde Holderied 1, 6, 12
42 Germany Matthias Kahle 3, 8–9, 14
45 United Kingdom Martin Brundle 14
52 United Kingdom Jonny Milner 14
Japan Subaru World Rally Team Subaru Impreza WRC 99 P 5 United Kingdom Richard Burns All
6 Finland Juha Kankkunen 1–4, 7–14
Belgium Bruno Thiry 5–6
14 Belgium Bruno Thiry 1–4
Finland Juha Kankkunen 5
17 New Zealand Possum Bourne 9, 13
United Kingdom Ford Motor Co Ford Focus RS WRC 99 M 7 United Kingdom Colin McRae All
8 France Simon Jean-Joseph 1, 5–6, 12
Sweden Thomas Rådström 2, 7–11, 13–14
Norway Petter Solberg 3–4
20 Norway Petter Solberg 2, 10, 12, 14
Spain SEAT Sport SEAT Córdoba WRC P 9 Finland Harri Rovanperä All
10 Italy Piero Liatti 1, 3–8, 11–12
Finland Marcus Grönholm 2
Finland Toni Gardemeister 9–10, 13–14
16 United Kingdom Gwyndaf Evans 14
20 Finland Toni Gardemeister 12
Czech Republic Škoda Motorsport Škoda Octavia WRC M 11 Germany Armin Schwarz 1, 4–5, 8, 10, 12, 14
12 Czech Republic Pavel Sibera 1, 5
Czech Republic Emil Triner 4, 8, 10, 12
Belgium Bruno Thiry 14
France Peugeot Esso Peugeot 206 WRC M 14 France François Delecour 6, 8, 10, 12–14
15 France Gilles Panizzi 6, 12
Finland Marcus Grönholm 8, 10, 13–14
21 Finland Marcus Grönholm 12
22 France Gilles Panizzi 10, 14
France Citroën Sport Citroën Xsara F2 M 18 France Philippe Bugalski 5–6, 12
19 Spain Jesús Puras 5–6, 12
South Korea Hyundai World Rally Team Hyundai Coupe Evo 2 M 24 United Kingdom Alister McRae 2, 4–5, 8–14
26 Sweden Kenneth Eriksson 2, 4–5, 8–14

Results and standings

Drivers' championship

Pos. Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
KEN
Kenya
POR
Portugal
ESP
Spain
FRA
France
ARG
Argentina
GRE
Greece
NZL
New Zealand
FIN
Finland
CHN
China
ITA
Italy
AUS
Australia
GBR
United Kingdom
 Pts 
1 Finland Tommi Mäkinen 1 1 DSQ 5 3 62 4 3 1 Ret2 Ret 1 3 Ret 62
2 United Kingdom Richard Burns 8 5 Ret 4 5 7 2 1 Ret 2 2 Ret 1 1 55
3 France Didier Auriol 3 4 2 3 2 51 3 Ret 4 Ret1 1 3 Ret Ret 52
4 Finland Juha Kankkunen 2 6 Ret Ret 6 1 Ret 2 1 4 6 Ret 2 44
5 Spain Carlos Sainz Ret 2 3 2 Ret 33 5 2 6 3 3 Ret 2 Ret 44
6 United Kingdom Colin McRae DSQ Ret 1 1 Ret 4 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 23
7 France Philippe Bugalski Ret 1 1 Ret 20
8 Belgium Freddy Loix Ret 9 Ret 4 8 Ret 4 8 10 Ret 4 4 5 14
9 Finland Harri Rovanperä 7 16 6 Ret 14 13 Ret Ret Ret 5 5 16 6 3 10
10 France Gilles Panizzi Ret Ret 33 2 7 6
11 Spain Jesús Puras Ret Ret 2 Ret Ret Ret 16 6
12 Sweden Thomas Rådström 3 6 Ret Ret Ret Ret 7 6 6
13 Finland Toni Gardemeister 14 33 Ret 3 63 Ret 16 Ret 6
14 Belgium Bruno Thiry 5 10 Ret 6 7 Ret 4 6
15 Finland Marcus Grönholm Ret Ret Ret 4 8 5 Ret 5
16 France François Delecour 4 Ret Ret 9 Ret Ret Ret 3
17 Kenya Ian Duncan 4 3
18 Estonia Markko Märtin 8 Ret 5 Ret Ret 8 2
19 Norway Petter Solberg 11 5 11 12 27 9 2
20 New Zealand Possum Bourne 5 Ret 2
21 Italy Andrea Aghini 5 2
22 Turkey Volkan Işık 7 11 Ret Ret 15 6 15 1
23 Italy Piero Liatti 6 Ret Ret 10 9 Ret Ret Ret Ret 1
24 Greece Leonídas Kyrkos 6 1
Pos. Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
KEN
Kenya
POR
Portugal
ESP
Spain
FRA
France
ARG
Argentina
GRE
Greece
NZL
New Zealand
FIN
Finland
CHN
China
ITA
Italy
AUS
Australia
GBR
United Kingdom
 Pts 

Manufacturers' championship

Pos. Manufacturer No. MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
KEN
Kenya
POR
Portugal
ESP
Spain
FRA
France
ARG
Argentina
GRE
Greece
NZL
New Zealand
FIN
Finland
CHN
China
ITA
Italy
AUS
Australia
GBR
United Kingdom
Points
1 Japan Toyota Castrol Team 3 Ret 2 3 2 Ret 13 5 2 5 3 3 Ret 2 Ret 109
4 3 4 2 3 1 31 3 Ret 4 Ret1 1 3 Ret Ret
2 Japan Subaru World Rally Team 5 6 5 Ret 4 4 5 2 1 Ret 2 2 Ret 1 1 105
6 2 6 Ret Ret 5 Ret 1 Ret 2 1 4 5 Ret 2
3 Japan Marlboro Mitsubishi Ralliart 1 1 1 EX 5 2 42 4 3 1 Ret2 Ret 1 3 Ret 83
2 Ret 7 Ret Ret 3 6 Ret 4 6 8 Ret 4 4 5
4 United States Ford Motor Co 7 EX Ret 1 1 Ret 2 Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret Ret 37
8 EX 3 4 6 Ret Ret 6 Ret Ret Ret Ret 6 7 6
5 Spain SEAT Sport 9 5 8 5 Ret 7 8 Ret Ret Ret 5 5 7 6 3 23
10 4 Ret Ret Ret 6 7 Ret Ret 3 63 Ret Ret 8 Ret
6 France Peugeot Esso 14 Ret Ret 7 Ret Ret Ret 11
15 Ret Ret 4 2 5 Ret
7 Czech Republic Škoda Motorsport 11 Ret Ret Ret 5 Ret Ret Ret 6
12 Ret Ret Ret 6 9 8 4
Pos. Manufacturer No. MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
KEN
Kenya
POR
Portugal
ESP
Spain
FRA
France
ARG
Argentina
GRE
Greece
NZL
New Zealand
FIN
Finland
CHN
China
ITA
Italy
AUS
Australia
GBR
United Kingdom
Points

Notes:
1 2 3 – Indicate position on TV Covered Stage

FIA Teams' Cup

Pos. Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
KEN
Kenya
POR
Portugal
ESP
Spain
FRA
France
ARG
Argentina
GRE
Greece
NZL
New Zealand
FIN
Finland
CHN
China
ITA
Italy
AUS
Australia
GBR
United Kingdom
 Pts 
1 Spain Luís Clíment Ret 2 2 2 1 1 1 Ret Ret 1 58
2 Turkey Volkan Işık 1 2 Ret Ret 1 1 1 46
3 France Frédéric Dor 1 3 1 3 2 2 Ret 40
4 Oman Hamed Al-Wahaibi Ret 4 2 Ret 4 1 Ret Ret 3 Ret 28
5 Saudi Arabia Abdullah Bakhashab Ret 3 Ret 2 Ret 2 Ret 16
NC Poland Krzysztof Hołowczyc 1 Ret 2 16
NC Australia Michael Guest Ret 5 Ret Ret 2 Ret 8
Pos. Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
KEN
Kenya
POR
Portugal
ESP
Spain
FRA
France
ARG
Argentina
GRE
Greece
NZL
New Zealand
FIN
Finland
CHN
China
ITA
Italy
AUS
Australia
GBR
United Kingdom
 Pts 

Production World Rally Championship

Pos. Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
KEN
Kenya
POR
Portugal
ESP
Spain
FRA
France
ARG
Argentina
GRE
Greece
NZL
New Zealand
FIN
Finland
CHN
China
ITA
Italy
AUS
Australia
GBR
United Kingdom
 Pts 
1 Uruguay Gustavo Trelles 2 6 2 3 1 1 Ret 1 Ret 2 Ret Ret 69
2 Oman Hamed Al-Wahaibi 9 1 Ret 1 3 Ret 1 2 Ret Ret 6 Ret 53
3 Japan Toshihiro Arai 4 1 1 29
4 Austria Manfred Stohl Ret 4 4 Ret Ret 2 Ret Ret 3 2 Ret 27
5 Finland Jouko Puhakka 1 Ret Ret Ret 1 26
6 Peru Ramón Ferreyros 4 2 Ret 1 24
7 Italy Gianluigi Galli 7 Ret Ret Ret 6 1 24
8 Belgium Marc Duez 1 13
9 Portugal Miguel Campos 1 13
10 Finland Jani Paasonen 3 2 13
11 Japan Katsuhiko Taguchi 3 3 4 13
12 Sweden Stig-Olov Walfridson 2 8
13 Spain Luis Climent Ret 8 2 8
14 Italy Giovanni Manfrinato 2 8
15 Argentina Jorge Recalde 2 8
16 Australia Ed Ordynski 2 8
17 United Kingdom Richard Tuthill 2 8
18 Monaco Christophe Spiliotis 3 5
19 Japan Hideaki Miyoshi 3 5
20 Finland Juha Kangas Ret 3 8 Ret Ret 5
21 Argentina Claudio Menzi 3 5
22 Belgium Gaby Goudezeune 3 5
23 Italy Mario Stagni 3 5
24 Germany Uwe Nittel 3 5
21 United Kingdom Gavin Cox 3 5
Pos. Driver MON
Monaco
SWE
Sweden
KEN
Kenya
POR
Portugal
ESP
Spain
FRA
France
ARG
Argentina
GRE
Greece
NZL
New Zealand
FIN
Finland
CHN
China
ITA
Italy
AUS
Australia
GBR
United Kingdom
 Pts 

FIA 2 Litre World Cup for Manufacturers

() Denotes dropped score.

Pos Entrant R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10 R11 R12 R13 R14 Pts
1 Renault 16 (3) 0 (7) 10 16 10 10 (4) 16 0 16 8 (6) 102
2 Hyundai 0 0 10 16 0 0 0 13 16 4 16 0 13 7 95
NC(*) Volkswagen 0 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 4 0 0 25

(*) – Volkswagen were not classified for not homologating their Golf Kit Car at the start of the season.

Events

Rally Name Start-End Date Podium Drivers
(Finishing Time)
Podium Cars
Monaco Monte Carlo Rally 17 January–20 January
  1. Finland Tommi Mäkinen (5h:16m:50.6s)
  2. Finland Juha Kankkunen (5h:18m:35.3s)
  3. France Didier Auriol (5h:20m:43.4s)
  1. Mitsubishi Lancer Evo 6
  2. Subaru Impreza WRC
  3. Toyota Corolla WRC
Sweden Swedish Rally 12 February–14 February
  1. Finland Tommi Mäkinen (3h:29m:15.6s)
  2. Spain Carlos Sainz (3h:29m:33.7s)
  3. Sweden Thomas Rådström (3h:29m:53.4s)
  1. Mitsubishi Lancer Evo 6
  2. Toyota Corolla WRC
  3. Ford Focus WRC
Kenya Safari Rally 26 February–28 February
  1. United Kingdom Colin McRae (8h:41m:39s)
  2. France Didier Auriol (8h:56m:05s)
  3. Spain Carlos Sainz (8h:59m:46s)
  1. Ford Focus WRC
  2. Toyota Corolla WRC
  3. Toyota Corolla WRC
Portugal Rally Portugal 21 March–24 March
  1. United Kingdom Colin McRae (4h:05m:41.7s)
  2. Spain Carlos Sainz (4h:05m:54.0s)
  3. France Didier Auriol (4h:05m:58.2s)
  1. Ford Focus WRC
  2. Toyota Corolla WRC
  3. Toyota Corolla WRC
Spain Rally Catalunya 19 April–21 April
  1. France Philippe Bugalski (4h:13m:45.6s)
  2. France Didier Auriol (4h:14m:17.4s)
  3. Finland Tommi Mäkinen (4h:16m:06.7s)
  1. Citroën Xsara Kit Car
  2. Toyota Corolla WRC
  3. Mitsubishi Lancer Evo 6
France Tour de Corse 7 May–9 May
  1. France Philippe Bugalski (3h:44m:35.7s)
  2. Spain Jesús Puras (3h:45m:10.4s)
  3. Spain Carlos Sainz (3h:45m:45.0s)
  1. Citroën Xsara Kit Car
  2. Citroën Xsara Kit Car
  3. Toyota Corolla WRC
Argentina Rally Argentina 22 May–25 May
  1. Finland Juha Kankkunen (4h:17m:15.4s)
  2. United Kingdom Richard Burns (4h:17m:17.8s)
  3. France Didier Auriol (4h:17m:55.0s)
  1. Subaru Impreza WRC
  2. Subaru Impreza WRC
  3. Toyota Corolla WRC
Greece Acropolis Rally 6 June–9 June
  1. United Kingdom Richard Burns (4h:21m:21.2s)
  2. Spain Carlos Sainz (4h:22m:22.5s)
  3. Finland Tommi Mäkinen (4h:24m:01.2s)
  1. Subaru Impreza WRC
  2. Toyota Corolla WRC
  3. Mitsubishi Lancer Evo 6
New Zealand Rally New Zealand 15 July–18 July
  1. Finland Tommi Mäkinen (4h:11m:07.1s)
  2. Finland Juha Kankkunen (4h:12m:44.1s)
  3. Finland Toni Gardemeister (4h:13m:56.1s)
  1. Mitsubishi Lancer Evo 6
  2. Subaru Impreza WRC
  3. SEAT Córdoba WRC
Finland Rally Finland 20 August–22 August
  1. Finland Juha Kankkunen (3h:08m:54.5s)
  2. United Kingdom Richard Burns (3h:09m:04.2s)
  3. Spain Carlos Sainz (3h:09m:12.5s)
  1. Subaru Impreza WRC
  2. Subaru Impreza WRC
  3. Toyota Corolla WRC
China Rally China 17 September–19 September
  1. France Didier Auriol (3h:38m:36.6s)
  2. United Kingdom Richard Burns (3h:39m:32.4s)
  3. Spain Carlos Sainz (3h:40m:56.0s)
  1. Toyota Corolla WRC
  2. Subaru Impreza WRC
  3. Toyota Corolla WRC
Italy Rally Sanremo 11 October–13 October
  1. Finland Tommi Mäkinen (4h:26m:45.0s)
  2. France Gilles Panizzi (4h:27m:03.0s)
  3. France Didier Auriol (4h:27m:27.2s)
  1. Mitsubishi Lancer Evo 6
  2. Peugeot 206 WRC
  3. Toyota Corolla WRC
Australia Rally Australia 4 November–7 November
  1. United Kingdom Richard Burns (3h:44m:31.5s)
  2. Spain Carlos Sainz (3h:44m:43.1s)
  3. Finland Tommi Mäkinen (3h:49m:02.9s)
  1. Subaru Impreza WRC
  2. Toyota Corolla WRC
  3. Mitsubishi Lancer Evo 6
United Kingdom Rally of Great Britain 23 November–26 November
  1. United Kingdom Richard Burns (3h:53m:44.2s)
  2. Finland Juha Kankkunen (3h:55m:31.5s)
  3. Finland Harri Rovanperä (3h:58m:39.5s)
  1. Subaru Impreza WRC
  2. Subaru Impreza WRC
  3. SEAT Córdoba WRC E2

External links

Flavio Alonso

Not to be confused with Fernando Alonso.

Flavio Alonso (born May 11, 1968) is a Spanish rally driver. He is best known for participating in the Race of Champions during the event's tenure at Gran Canaria, the highlight being winning the 'Rally Masters' contest in 1992 and 1996. He also represented Spain alongside Oriol Servia and Emilio Alzamora at the 2003 event, losing in the final to the 'All-Star' team. He also reached the quarter-finals of the main event that year, but was beaten by François Duval.

He has competed sporadically in the Spanish Rally Championship and the European Rally Championship, and also participated in the Spanish round of the 1999 World Rally Championship.

List of 1999 motorsport champions

The following list of 1999 motorsport champions is a list of national or international auto racing series with a Championship decided by the points or positions earned by a driver from multiple races.

List of World Rally Championship video games

This is a list of video games based on, or otherwise licensed by, the FIA's World Rally Championship.

List of video game developers

This is a list of notable video game companies that have made games for either computers (like PC or Mac), video game consoles, handheld or mobile devices, and includes companies that currently exist as well as now-defunct companies.

See the list of video games for other lists relating to video games, and defunct video game companies for a more specific list of companies that no longer exist. Many of the developers publish their own games.

Possum Bourne

Peter Raymond George "Possum" Bourne (13 April 1956 – 30 April 2003) was a champion New Zealand rally car driver. He died under non-competitive circumstances while driving on a public road that was to be the track for an upcoming race.

Rally Sweden

The Rally Sweden (Swedish: Svenska rallyt), formerly the International Swedish Rally, and later the Uddeholm Swedish Rally, is an automobile rally competition held in Värmland, Sweden in early February. First held in 1950, when it was called the Rally to the Midnight Sun (Which at this time was a summer rally) with start and finish at separate locations, seventeen years later both start and finish became located in Karlstad. The main service park is located in the town of Torsby, which is actually much closer to the special stages than Karlstad. The competition is spread out over three days with the start of the first part on Friday morning and the finish on Sunday afternoon.

In 1973 the rally was introduced to the World Rally Championship and started to get international attention; the Swedish Rally has been also traditionally the only rally held on snow. Like Rally Finland, this rally is known to be very difficult for non-Nordic drivers. The first winning driver of the Swedish Rally that wasn't from Sweden or Finland was Frenchman Sébastien Loeb in 2004, Frenchman Sébastien Ogier was the second non-Nordic winner with wins in 2013, 2015 and 2016. Spaniard Carlos Sainz finished second four times and third two times.

The rally has been cancelled twice; in 1974 due to the oil crisis and in 1990 because of the mild weather. The rally was also not held in 2009 due to the WRC's round rotation system. Weather continues to be a concern, as rising global temperatures reduce the likelihood of appropriately snowy conditions every year. The 2005 event was one of the warmest ever, turning many stages into mud and destroying the special studded snow tires used by the teams.

Rally de Portugal

The Rally de Portugal (formerly: Rallye de Portugal) is a rally competition held in Portugal. First held in 1967, the seventh running of the race, the 7º TAP Rallye de Portugal was the third event in the inaugural FIA World Rally Championship in 1973. The rally remained on the WRC calendar for the next 29 years, and after being dropped for 2002–2006, the event returned to Portugal in 2007. During the 1970s, 1980s and early 1990s, Rally de Portugal was a mixed event between asphalt and gravel. Currently it is an all-gravel event.

Rally de Portugal has been awarded "The Best Rally in the World" five times and in 2000 "The Most Improved Rally of the Year". The most successful driver in the history of the rally is Finland's Markku Alén, who has won the event five times (1975, 1977, 1978, 1981 and 1987).

Robert Reid (co-driver)

Robert Reid (born 17 February 1966) is a retired British rally co-driver who partnered Richard Burns to victory in the 2001 World Rally Championship. The partnership lasted from 1991 until 2003 during which time they entered into 103 world rallies, achieving 277 stage wins and 34 podium finishes. The pair were runners-up in the 1999 World Rally Championship and the 2000 World Rally Championship.

Sébastien Loeb

Sébastien Loeb (French pronunciation: ​[sebastjɛ̃ lœb]; born 26 February 1974) is a French professional rally, racing, and rallycross driver. He competed for the Citroën World Rally Team in the World Rally Championship (WRC) and is the most successful driver in WRC history, having won the world championship a record nine times in a row. He holds several other WRC records, including most event wins, most podium finishes and most stage wins. Loeb announced his retirement from World Rallying at the end of the 2012 season. Participating in selected events in the 2013 WRC season, he raced a full season in the FIA GT Series driving a McLaren MP4-12C before moving on with Citroën to the FIA World Touring Car Championship in 2014. In the 2018 season he is one of the official drivers of the Team Peugeot Total.Originally a gymnast, Loeb switched to rallying in 1995 and won the Junior World Rally Championship in 2001. Signed by the Citroën factory team for the 2002 season, he and co-driver Daniel Elena took their maiden WRC win that same year at the Rallye Deutschland. After finishing runner-up to Petter Solberg by one point in 2003, Loeb took his first drivers' title in 2004. Continuing with Citroën, he went on to take a record ninth consecutive world title in 2012. Loeb is a tarmac expert, having won all but three of the WRC rallies on that surface in which he has participated since 2005.

Besides his success in rallying, Loeb is a three-time winner at the Race of Champions, after taking home the Henri Toivonen Memorial Trophy and the title "Champion of Champions" in 2003, 2005 and 2008. In 2004, he won the Nations' Cup for France with Jean Alesi. In 2006, he finished second in the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Loeb was named the French Sportsman of the Year in 2007 and 2009, and made knight of the Legion of Honour (Légion d'honneur) in 2009. In 2012, he won the rallycross final in his first appearance at X Games XVIII. In 2018, Loeb won the Spanish round of that year's World Rally Championship, in a rare entry six years after his retirement as a full-time rally driver.

V-Rally 2

V-Rally 2 (Need for Speed: V-Rally 2 in North America for the PlayStation version and Test Drive V-Rally in North America for the Dreamcast version) is a racing video game developed by Eden Studios and published by Infogrames for PlayStation, Dreamcast and Microsoft Windows.

Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Black Excluded (EX)
Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Cancelled (C)
Blank Withdrew entry from
the event (WD)
Key
Colour Result
Gold Winner
Silver 2nd place
Bronze 3rd place
Green Points finish
Blue Non-points finish
Non-classified finish (NC)
Purple Did not finish (Ret)
Black Excluded (EX)
Disqualified (DSQ)
White Did not start (DNS)
Cancelled (C)
Blank Withdrew entry from
the event (WD)
WRC
seasons
Support
categories

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