1999–2000 Serie A

The 1999–2000 season of Serie A, the major Italian professional football league, was contested by 18 teams.

By late March, Juventus topped the table by nine points over Lazio with only eight games remaining, but they lost to Milan, to Lazio at the Stadio delle Alpi, and to Verona, with Lazio only dropping two points, against Fiorentina.[1] Lazio won the title on the final day of the season when Juventus lost their match against Perugia 1–0 on an almost flooded pitch, while Lazio comfortably beat Reggina 3–0 at home at the Stadio Olimpico.[1]

Italian Serie A 1999-2000 map
Serie A 1999-2000 team distribution
Serie A
Season1999–2000
ChampionsLazio
2nd title
RelegatedTorino
Venezia
Cagliari
Piacenza
Champions LeagueLazio
Juventus
Milan
Internazionale
UEFA CupParma
Roma
Fiorentina
Intertoto CupUdinese
Matches played306
Goals scored764 (2.5 per match)
Top goalscorerAndriy Shevchenko (24)

League table

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification or relegation
1 Lazio (C) 34 21 9 4 64 33 +31 72 2000–01 UEFA Champions League First group stage
2 Juventus 34 21 8 5 46 20 +26 71
3 Milan 34 16 13 5 65 40 +25 61 2000–01 UEFA Champions League Third qualifying round
4 Internazionale 34 17 7 10 58 36 +22 58
5 Parma 34 16 10 8 52 37 +15 58 2000–01 UEFA Cup First round[a]
6 Roma 34 14 12 8 57 34 +23 54
7 Fiorentina 34 13 12 9 48 38 +10 51
8 Udinese 34 13 11 10 55 45 +10 50 2000 UEFA Intertoto Cup Third round
9 Hellas Verona 34 10 13 11 40 45 −5 43
10 Perugia 34 12 6 16 36 52 −16 42
11 Reggina 34 9 13 12 31 42 −11 40[b]
12 Bologna 34 9 13 12 32 39 −7 40[b]
13 Lecce 34 10 10 14 33 49 −16 40[b]
14 Bari 34 10 9 15 34 48 −14 39
15 Torino (R) 34 8 12 14 35 47 −12 36 Relegation to Serie B
16 Venezia (R) 34 6 8 20 30 60 −30 26
17 Cagliari (R) 34 3 13 18 29 54 −25 22
18 Piacenza (R) 34 4 9 21 19 45 −26 21
  1. ^ Fiorentina gained entry to the 2000–01 UEFA Cup as both 1999–2000 Coppa Italia finalists qualified to the 2000–01 UEFA Champions League.
  2. ^ a b c REG: 9 pts; BOL: 4 pts → BOL 2–0 LCE; LCE: 4 pts → LCE 1–1 BOL

Results

Home \ Away[1] BAR BOL CAG FIO INT JUV LAZ LCE MIL PAR PER PIA REG ROM TOR UDI VEN HEL
Bari 1–1 1–0 1–0 2–1 1–1 0–0 3–1 1–1 0–1 0–2 3–2 1–1 0–0 1–1 1–1 3–0 1–1
Bologna 1–0 1–0 0–0 3–0 0–2 2–3 2–0 2–3 1–0 2–1 0–0 0–1 1–0 0–0 2–1 1–1 0–0
Cagliari 2–3 2–2 1–1 0–2 0–1 0–0 0–0 0–0 2–3 2–1 3–0 0–1 1–0 1–1 0–3 1–1 0–1
Fiorentina 1–0 2–2 2–0 2–1 1–1 3–3 3–0 2–1 0–2 1–0 2–1 1–0 1–3 1–1 1–1 3–0 4–1
Internazionale 3–0 1–1 2–1 0–4 1–2 1–1 6–0 1–2 5–1 5–0 2–1 1–1 2–1 1–1 3–0 3–0 3–0
Juventus 2–0 2–0 1–1 1–0 1–0 0–1 1–0 3–1 1–0 3–0 1–0 1–1 2–1 3–2 4–1 1–0 1–0
Lazio 3–1 3–1 2–1 2–0 2–2 0–0 4–2 4–4 0–0 1–0 2–0 3–0 2–1 3–0 2–1 3–2 4–0
Lecce 1–0 1–1 2–1 0–0 1–0 2–0 0–1 2–2 0–0 0–1 0–1 2–1 0–0 2–1 1–0 2–1 2–1
Milan 4–1 4–0 2–2 1–1 1–2 2–0 2–1 2–2 2–1 3–1 1–0 2–2 2–2 2–0 4–0 3–0 3–3
Parma 2–1 1–1 3–1 0–4 1–1 1–1 1–2 4–1 1–0 1–2 1–0 3–0 2–0 4–1 0–0 3–1 3–0
Perugia 1–2 3–2 3–0 1–2 1–2 1–0 0–2 2–2 0–3 1–1 2–0 2–1 2–2 1–0 0–5 2–1 0–0
Piacenza 2–1 0–0 1–1 2–0 1–3 0–2 0–2 1–1 0–1 1–2 0–0 0–0 1–1 0–2 0–1 2–2 1–0
Reggina 1–0 1–0 1–1 2–2 0–1 0–2 0–0 2–1 1–2 2–2 1–1 1–0 0–4 2–1 0–0 1–0 1–1
Roma 3–1 2–0 2–2 4–0 0–0 0–1 4–1 3–2 1–1 0–0 3–1 2–1 0–2 1–0 1–1 5–0 3–1
Torino 3–1 2–1 1–1 1–0 0–1 0–0 2–4 1–2 2–2 2–2 0–1 2–1 2–1 1–1 0–1 2–1 0–3
Udinese 5–1 2–1 5–2 1–1 3–0 1–1 0–3 2–1 1–2 0–1 2–1 3–0 3–2 0–2 0–0 5–2 3–3
Venezia 0–1 0–1 3–0 2–1 1–0 0–4 2–0 0–0 1–0 0–2 1–2 0–0 2–0 1–3 2–2 1–1 2–2
Hellas Verona 0–1 0–0 2–0 2–2 1–2 2–0 1–0 2–0 0–0 4–3 2–0 1–0 1–1 2–2 0–1 2–2 1–0

Source: lega-calcio.it (in Italian)
^ The home team is listed in the left-hand column.
Colours: Blue = home team win; Yellow = draw; Red = away team win.
For coming matches, an a indicates there is an article about the match.

UEFA Champions League qualification

Internazionale3–1Parma
Baggio Goal 35'73'
Zamorano Goal 89'
Stanić Goal 69'

Internazionale qualified to 2000–01 UEFA Champions League's third qualifying round, while Parma qualified to the 2000–01 UEFA Cup first round.

Top goalscorers

Rank Player Club Goals
1 Ukraine Andriy Shevchenko AC Milan 24
2 Argentina Gabriel Batistuta Fiorentina 23
3 Argentina Hernán Crespo Parma 22
4 Italy Marco Ferrante Torino 18
Italy Vincenzo Montella Roma
6 Italy Filippo Inzaghi Juventus 15
Italy Cristiano Lucarelli Lecce
Italy Giuseppe Signori Bologna
9 Italy Christian Vieri Internazionale 13
10 Italy Roberto Muzzi Udinese 12
Italy Marco Delvecchio Roma
Chile Marcelo Salas Lazio
13 Germany Oliver Bierhoff AC Milan 11

Personnels and Sponsoring

Team Head Coach Kit manufacturer Shirt sponsor
Bari Italy Eugenio Fascetti Lotto TELE +
Bologna Italy Francesco Guidolin Macron Granarolo
Cagliari Italy Eugenio Fascetti Biemme Pecorino Sardo
Fiorentina Italy Giovanni Trapattoni Fila Nintendo
Internazionale Italy Marcelo Lippi Nike Pirelli
Juventus Italy Carlo Ancelotti Kappa D+ Liberta Digitale
Lazio Sweden Sven-Göran Eriksson Puma Cirio
Lecce Italy Alberto Cavasin Asics Banca 121 (Banca del Salento)
AC Milan Italy Alberto Zaccheroni Adidas Opel
Parma Italy Alberto Malesani Champion Parmalat
Perugia Italy Serse Cosmi Galex Daewoo
Piacenza Italy Luigi Simoni Lotto Copra
Roma Italy Fabio Capello Kappa INA Assitalia
Reggina Italy Franco Colomba Asics Caffe Mauro
Torino Italy Emiliano Mondonico Kelme SDA
Udinese Italy Luigi De Canio Diadora Telit
Venezia Italy Luciano Spalletti Kelme Emmezeta
Verona Italy Cesare Prandelli Errea Salumi Marsili

Number of teams by region

Region Number of teams Teams
1  Emilia-Romagna 3 Bologna, Parma and Piacenza
2  Apulia 2 Bari and Lecce
 Lazio 2 Lazio and Roma
 Lombardy 2 Internazionale and Milan
 Piedmont 2 Juventus and Torino
 Veneto 2 Venezia and Hellas Verona
6  Calabria 1 Reggina
 Friuli-Venezia Giulia 1 Udinese
 Sardinia 1 Cagliari
 Tuscany 1 Fiorentna
 Umbria 1 Perugia

References and sources

  • Almanacco Illustrato del Calcio - La Storia 1898-2004, Panini Edizioni, Modena, September 2005

External links

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b Newman, Blair (30 March 2015). "How Sven-Goran Eriksson's Lazio won the great Serie A title race of 1999-2000". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 February 2017.
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2000 Supercoppa Italiana

The 2000 Supercoppa Italiana was a match contested by the 1999–2000 Serie A winners Lazio and the 1999–2000 Coppa Italia runners-up Internazionale. Since the Coppa Italia winners were also the newly appointed league champions, the Super Cup spot was given to the runners-up of the Coppa Italia, Internazionale.

The match resulted in a 4-3 win for Lazio.

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Mutu started his career in Romania playing two years for Argeș Pitești and half a year for Dinamo București, before joining Internazionale in Italy midway through the 1999–2000 Serie A. After only 10 games with the Nerazzurri, he left for Hellas Verona and then Parma, for which he scored 39 goals in the next three years. His excellent form brought him a €22.5 million transfer to Chelsea. Due to breach of contract for failing a (recreational) drug test, he was released and returned to Serie A to join Juventus. After the 2006 Italian football scandal and the relegation of Juventus to Serie B, Mutu decided to join Fiorentina, where he played consistently for five years. He then had a season at Cesena and French club Ajaccio before returning to his native country with Petrolul Ploiești in 2014. After two more brief spells with Pune City and ASA Târgu Mureș, Mutu retired from professional football in 2016.

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At international level, Fiore won 38 caps for the Italy national football team between 2000 and 2004, and scored twice. At youth level, he was a member of the team that won the 1997 Mediterranean Games, while at senior level he was selected to the Italy squads for UEFA Euro 2000, in which he scored one goal as his team reached the final, and UEFA Euro 2004.

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