1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season

The 1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season concluded in the 64-team 1999 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament whose finals were held at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. The Connecticut Huskies earned their first national championship by defeating the Duke Blue Devils 77–74 on March 29, 1999. They were coached by Jim Calhoun and the NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player was Richard Hamilton.

In the 32-team 1999 National Invitation Tournament, the California Golden Bears defeated the Clemson Tigers at the Madison Square Garden in New York City.

Following the season, the 1999 NCAA Men's Basketball All-American Consensus First team included Elton Brand, Mateen Cleaves, Richard Hamilton, Andre Miller and Jason Terry. The consensus second team was composed of Evan Eschmeyer, Steve Francis, Trajan Langdon, Chris Porter and Wally Szczerbiak.

1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season
Preseason AP #1Duke
Regular seasonNovember 1998 –
March 1999
NCAA Tournament1999
Tournament datesMarch 11 – March 29, 1999
National ChampionshipTropicana Field
St. Petersburg, Florida
NCAA ChampionsConnecticut Huskies
Other championsCalifornia Golden Bears (NIT)
Player of the Year
(Naismith, Wooden)
Elton Brand, Duke

Season headlines

Conference membership changes

These schools joined new conferences for the 1998–99 season.

School Former conference New conference
Buffalo Mid-Continent Conference Mid-American Conference
College of Charleston Trans America Athletic Conference Southern Conference
Denver NCAA Division II NCAA Division I Independent
FIU Trans America Athletic Conference Sun Belt Conference
IUPUI NCAA Division II Mid-Continent Conference
Jacksonville Sun Belt Conference Trans America Athletic Conference
Lamar Sun Belt Conference Southland Conference
Northeastern Illinois Mid-Continent Conference Dropped Athletics
Oakland NCAA Division II Mid-Continent Conference
Quinnipiac NCAA Division II Northeast Conference
Texas-Pan American Sun Belt Conference NCAA Division I Independent
UMBC Big South Conference Northeast Conference

Season outlook

Pre-season polls

The top 25 from the AP Poll November 6, 1998[2] and the ESPN/USA Today Poll November 5, 1998.[3]

'Associated Press'
Ranking Team
1 Duke (34)
2 Connecticut (25)
3 Stanford (12)
4 Kentucky (1)
5 Michigan State
6 Maryland
7 Temple
8 Kansas
9 Tennessee
10 Utah
11 North Carolina
12 UCLA
13 Oklahoma State
14 Washington
15 Cincinnati
16 Purdue
17 Xavier
18 Arizona
19 Arkansas
20 New Mexico
Syracuse
22 Indiana
23 Rhode Island
24 Massachusetts
25 TCU
ESPN/USA Today Coaches
Ranking Team
1 Duke (22)
2 Stanford (3)
3 Connecticut (4)
4 Michigan State
5 Maryland
6 Kentucky (1)
7 Temple
8 Kansas
9 Tennessee
10 Xavier
11 North Carolina
12 Utah
13 UCLA
14 Washington
15 Cincinnati
16 Purdue
17 Indiana
18 Oklahoma State
19 Arkansas
20 Arizona
21 New Mexico
22 Syracuse
23 Massachusetts
24 TCU
25 Rhode Island

Regular season

Conference winners and tournaments

28 conference seasons concluded with a single-elimination tournament, with only the Ivy League and the Pac-10 choosing not to conduct conference tournaments. Conference tournament winners generally received an automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament.

Conference Regular
Season Winner[4]
Conference Player of the Year Conference
Tournament
Tournament
Venue (City)
Tournament
Winner
America East Conference Delaware & Drexel Mike Pegues, Delaware[5] 1999 America East Men's Basketball Tournament Bob Carpenter Center
(Newark, Delaware)
(Except Finals)
Delaware[6]
Atlantic 10 Conference Temple (East)
George Washington (West)
Shawnta Rogers, George Washington[7] 1999 Atlantic 10 Men's Basketball Tournament The Spectrum
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
Rhode Island[8]
Atlantic Coast Conference Duke Elton Brand, Duke[9] 1999 ACC Men's Basketball Tournament Charlotte Coliseum
(Charlotte, North Carolina)
Duke[10]
Big 12 Conference Texas Venson Hamilton, Nebraska[11] 1999 Big 12 Men's Basketball Tournament Kemper Arena
(Kansas City, Missouri)
Kansas[12]
Big East Conference Connecticut Richard Hamilton, Connecticut &
Tim James, Miami (Florida)[13]
1999 Big East Men's Basketball Tournament Madison Square Garden
(New York City, New York)
Connecticut[14]
Big Sky Conference Weber State Harold Arceneaux, Weber State[15] 1999 Big Sky Men's Basketball Tournament Dee Events Center
(Ogden, Utah)
Weber State[16]
Big South Conference Winthrop Kevin Martin, UNC Asheville[17] 1999 Big South Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Asheville Civic Center
(Asheville, North Carolina)
Winthrop
Big Ten Conference Michigan State Mateen Cleaves, Michigan State (Coaches)
Scoonie Penn, Ohio State (Media)[18]
1999 Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Tournament United Center
(Chicago, Illinois)
Michigan State
Big West Conference Boise State & New Mexico State (Eastern)
UC Santa Barbara (Western)
Roberto Bergersen, Boise State[19] 1999 Big West Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Lawlor Events Center
(Reno, Nevada)
New Mexico State
Colonial Athletic Association George Mason George Evans, George Mason[20] 1999 CAA Men's Basketball Tournament Richmond Coliseum
(Richmond, Virginia)
George Mason
Conference USA Cincinnati (American)
UAB (National)
Quentin Richardson, DePaul[21] 1999 Conference USA Men's Basketball Tournament Birmingham–Jefferson Convention Complex
(Birmingham, Alabama)
Charlotte[22]
Ivy League Penn Brian Earl, Princeton[23] No Tournament
Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Niagara & Siena Alvin Young, Niagara[24] 1999 MAAC Men's Basketball Tournament Marine Midland Arena
(Buffalo, New York)
Siena[25]
Mid-American Conference Miami (Ohio) (East)
Toledo (West)
Wally Szczerbiak, Miami (Ohio)[26] 1999 MAC Men's Basketball Tournament SeaGate Convention Centre
(Toledo, Ohio)
Kent State[27]
Mid-Continent Conference Valparaiso Chad Wilkerson, Oral Roberts[28] 1999 Mid-Continent Conference Men's Basketball Tournament The MARK of the Quad Cities
(Moline, Illinois)
Valparaiso[29]
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Coppin State &
South Carolina State
Damian Woolfolk, Norfolk State 1999 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Richmond Coliseum
(Richmond, Virginia)
Florida A&M
Midwestern Collegiate Conference Detroit Jermaine Jackson, Detroit[30] 1999 Midwestern Collegiate Conference Men's Basketball Tournament UIC Pavilion
(Chicago, Illinois)
Detroit
Missouri Valley Conference Evansville Marcus Wilson, Evansville[31] 1999 Missouri Valley Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Savvis Center
(St. Louis, Missouri)
Creighton
Northeast Conference UMBC Ray Minlend, St. Francis (NY)[32] 1999 Northeast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Spiro Sports Center
(Staten Island, New York)
Mount St. Mary's[33]
Ohio Valley Conference Murray State Bud Eley, Southeast Missouri State[34] 1999 Ohio Valley Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Gaylord Entertainment Center
(Nashville, Tennessee)
(Semifinals and Finals)
Murray State[35]
Pacific-10 Conference Stanford Jason Terry, Arizona[36] No Tournament
Patriot League Lafayette Brian Ehlers, Lafayette[37] 1999 Patriot League Men's Basketball Tournament Kirby Sports Center
(Easton, Pennsylvania)
Lafayette[38]
Southeastern Conference Tennessee (East)
Auburn (West)
Chris Porter, Auburn[39] 1999 SEC Men's Basketball Tournament Georgia Dome
(Atlanta, Georgia)
Kentucky
Southern Conference Appalachian State (North)
College of Charleston (South)
Sedric Webber, College of Charleston[40] 1999 Southern Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Greensboro Coliseum
(Greensboro, North Carolina)
College of Charleston[41]
Southland Conference UTSA Donte Mathis, Texas State[42] 1999 Southland Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Hirsch Memorial Coliseum
(Shreveport, Louisiana)
(Semifinals & Finals)
UTSA
Southwestern Athletic Conference Alcorn State Adarrial Smylie, Southern[43] 1999 Southwestern Athletic Conference Men's Basketball Tournament F. G. Clark Center
(Baton Rouge, Louisiana)
Alcorn State
Sun Belt Conference Louisiana Tech Chico Fletcher, Arkansas State[44] 1999 Sun Belt Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Cajundome
(Lafayette, Louisiana)
Arkansas State
Trans America Athletic Conference Samford Reed Rawlings, Samford[45] 1999 TAAC Men's Basketball Tournament Memorial Coliseum
(Jacksonville, Florida)
Samford
West Coast Conference Gonzaga Eric Schraeder, Saint Mary's[46] 1999 West Coast Conference Men's Basketball Tournament Toso Pavilion
(Santa Clara, California)
Gonzaga
Western Athletic Conference UNLV & Tulsa (Mountain)
Utah (Pacific)
Andre Miller, Utah (Mountain)
Jeryl Sasser, SMU (Pacific)[47]
1999 WAC Men's Basketball Tournament Thomas & Mack Center
(Las Vegas, Nevada)
Utah

Statistical leaders

Points Per Game
Rebounds Per Game
Assists Per Game
Steals Per Game
Player School PPG Player School RPG Player School APG Player School SPG
Alvin Young Niagara 25.1 Ian McGinnis Dartmouth 12.2 Doug Gottlieb Oklahoma State 8.8 Shawnta Rogers George Washington 3.6
Ray Minlend San Francisco 24.3 Todd MacCulloch Washington 11.9 Chico Fletcher Arkansas State 8.3 Tim Winn St. Bonaventure 3.5
Wally Szczerbiak Miami (OH) 24.2 Jeff Foster SW Texas State 11.3 Ali Ton Davidson 7.6 Jason Rowe Loyola (MD) 3.4
Brian Merriweather Texas–Pan American 23.7 Chris Mihm Texas 11.0 Ed Cota North Carolina 7.4 John Linehan Providence 3.3
Damian Woolfolk Norfolk State 23.5 K'zell Wesson La Salle 10.8 Chris Herren Fresno State 7.2 Cookie Belcher Nebraska 3.2
Blocked Shots Per Game
Field Goal Percentage
Three-Point FG Percentage
Free Throw Percentage
Player School BPG Player School FG% Player School 3FG% Player School FT%
Tarvis Williams Hampton 5.0 Delawn Grandison Liberty 67.4 Rodney Thomas IUPUI 52.2 Lonnie Cooper Louisiana Tech 92.1
Henry Jordan Miss. Valley St. 4.0 Todd MacCulloch Washington 66.2 Ross Land N. Arizona 50.9 Haywood Eaddy Loyola Marymount 89.8
Etan Thomas Syracuse 4.0 Quincy Gause Georgia State 65.2 Brian Grawer Missouri 49.6 Marcus Wilson Evansville 89.7
Wojciech Myrda Northeast Louisiana 3.6 Ryan Moss Arkansas–Little Rock 64.3 Ryan Borowicz Wisconsin–Green Bay 44.4 Jermel President College of Charleston 89.5
Calvin Booth Penn State 3.5 Elton Brand Duke 62.0 Alan Puckett The Citadel 44.4 Arthur Lee Stanford 88.6

Award winners

Consensus All-American teams

Consensus First Team
Player Position Class Team
Elton Brand C Sophomore Duke
Mateen Cleaves G Junior Michigan State
Richard Hamilton F-G Junior Connecticut
Andre Miller G Senior Utah
Jason Terry G Senior Arizona
Consensus Second Team
Player Position Class Team
Evan Eschmeyer C Senior Northwestern
Steve Francis G Junior Maryland
Trajan Langdon G Senior Duke
Chris Porter F Junior Auburn
Wally Szczerbiak F Senior Miami (OH)

Major player of the year awards

Major freshman of the year awards

Major coach of the year awards

Other major awards

References

  1. ^ Jim O'Connell (AP) (November 10, 1998). "Hamilton is chosen nation's top player". The Day. Retrieved January 30, 2011.
  2. ^ Jim O'Connell (November 6, 1998). "Duke tops preseason basketball poll". The Albany Herald. Retrieved January 30, 2011.
  3. ^ "USA Today-ESPN top 25". Lawrence Journal-World. November 5, 1998. Retrieved January 30, 2011.
  4. ^ "2001 NCAA Men's Basketball Record Book – Conferences Section" (PDF). NCAA. 2001. Retrieved February 4, 2009.
  5. ^ America East Players of the Year, America East Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  6. ^ America East Championship Results, America East Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  7. ^ 2008–09 A-10 men's basketball media guide – Awards section, Atlantic 10 Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  8. ^ 2008–09 A-10 men's basketball media guide – Championship section, Atlantic 10 Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  9. ^ 2010–11 ACC men's basketball media guide Archived 2011-05-31 at WebCite, Atlantic Coast Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  10. ^ "2010–11 ACC Men's Basketball Media Guide – History Section" (PDF). Atlantic Coast Conference. 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 31, 2011. Retrieved January 27, 2011.
  11. ^ 2008–09 Big 12 Men's Basketball Media Guide – Awards section, Big 12 Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  12. ^ "2007–08 Big 12 Tournament Media Guide" (PDF). Big 12 Conference. March 2000. Retrieved January 27, 2011.
  13. ^ 2008–09 Big East men's basketball media guide – Records section Archived April 28, 2009, at the Wayback Machine, Big East Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  14. ^ 2008–09 Big East men's basketball media guide – Records section Archived April 28, 2009, at the Wayback Machine, Big East Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  15. ^ 2010–11 Big Sky men's basketball media guide, Big Sky Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  16. ^ 2010–11 Big Sky men's basketball media guide, Big Sky Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  17. ^ 2010–11 Big South men's basketball media guide – History section, Big South Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  18. ^ 2010–11 Big Ten Men's Basketball Media Guide, Big Ten, retrieved January 27, 2011
  19. ^ 2010–11 Big West Conference men's basketball media guide, Big West Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  20. ^ CAA men's basketball record book, Colonial Athletic Association, retrieved January 27, 2011
  21. ^ 2010–11 Conference USA Men's Basketball Media Guide – History Section, Conference USA, retrieved January 27, 2011
  22. ^ 2010–11 Conference USA Men's Basketball Media Guide – History Section, Conference USA, retrieved January 27, 2011
  23. ^ 2010–11 Ivy League men's basketball media guide, Ivy League, retrieved January 27, 2011
  24. ^ Men's Basketball All-MAAC Awards Archived March 12, 2009, at the Wayback Machine, Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  25. ^ "Men's Basketball Championship History". MAAC. June 30, 2007. Retrieved January 27, 2011.
  26. ^ 2010–11 MAC men's basketball media guide, Mid-American Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  27. ^ 2010–11 MAC men's basketball media guide, Mid-American Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  28. ^ 2010–11 Summit League men's basketball media guide Archived March 4, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, Summit League, retrieved January 27, 2011
  29. ^ 2010–11 Summit League men's basketball media guide Archived March 4, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, Summit League, retrieved January 27, 2011
  30. ^ 2008–09 Horizon League Men's Basketball Record Book, Horizon League, retrieved January 27, 2011
  31. ^ 2010–11 MVC Men's Basketball Media Guide – Honors Section Archived July 14, 2011, at the Wayback Machine, Missouri Valley Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  32. ^ 1998–99 NEC Men's Basketball All-Conference Team, Northeast Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  33. ^ 1998–99 NEC Men's Basketball media guide, Northeast Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  34. ^ 2010–11 OVC men's basketball media guide, Ohio Valley Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  35. ^ 2010–11 OVC men's basketball media guide, Ohio Valley Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  36. ^ 2010–11 Pacific-10 Men's Basketball Media Guide- History Section, Pacific-10 Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  37. ^ 2010–11 Patriot League Men's Basketball media guide, Patriot League, retrieved January 27, 2011
  38. ^ 2010–11 Patriot League Men's Basketball media guide, Patriot League, retrieved January 27, 2011
  39. ^ 2010–11 SEC Men's Basketball Record Book Archived July 18, 2011, at the Wayback Machine, Southeastern Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  40. ^ 2010–11 SoCon Men's Basketball Media Guide – Honors Section Archived September 17, 2011, at the Wayback Machine, Southern Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  41. ^ 2010–11 SoCon Men's Basketball Media Guide – Postseason Section Archived September 17, 2011, at the Wayback Machine, Southern Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  42. ^ 2010–11 Southland Conference Men’s Basketball Media Guide, Southland Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  43. ^ 2010–11 SWAC Men’s Basketball Media Guide, SWAC, retrieved January 27, 2011
  44. ^ 2010–11 Sun Belt Men's Basketball Media Guide, Sun Belt Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  45. ^ Atlantic Sun men's basketball record book, Atlantic Sun Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  46. ^ 2010–11 WCC Men's Basketball Media Guide, West Coast Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
  47. ^ 2010–11 WAC Men's Basketball Media Guide, Western Athletic Conference, retrieved January 27, 2011
1998 Maui Invitational Tournament

The 1999 Maui Invitational Tournament was an early-season college basketball tournament that was played, for the 15th time, from November 23 to November 25, 1998. The tournament, which began in 1984, was part of the 1998-99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The tournament was played at the Lahaina Civic Center in Maui, Hawaii and was won by the Syracuse Orange. It was the second title for both the program and for its head coach Jim Boeheim.

1998–99 Drexel Dragons men's basketball team

The 1998–99 Drexel Dragons men's basketball team represented Drexel University during the 1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Dragons, led by 8th year head coach Bill Herrion, played their home games at the Daskalakis Athletic Center and were members of the America East Conference (AEC).

The team finished the season 20–9, and finished in 1st place in the AEC in the regular season.

1998–99 Gonzaga Bulldogs men's basketball team

The 1998-99 Gonzaga men's basketball team represented Gonzaga University during the 1998-99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season.

1998–99 Idaho Vandals men's basketball team

The 1998–99 Idaho Vandals men's basketball team represented the University of Idaho during the 1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. Members of the Big West Conference, the Vandals were led by second-year head coach David Farrar and played their home games on campus at the Kibbie Dome in Moscow, Idaho.

The Vandals were 16–10 overall in the regular season and 11–5 in conference play, third in the East division standings. In the regular season finale, Idaho defeated rival Boise State before 7,323 at the Kibbie Dome, the largest home attendance in a decade.

They met Long Beach State in the first round of the conference tournament and lost by five points.

1998–99 Kansas Jayhawks men's basketball team

The 1998–99 Kansas Jayhawks men's basketball team represented the University of Kansas in the 1998-99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season, which was the Jayhawks' 101st basketball season. The head coach was Roy Williams, who served his 11th year at KU. The team played its home games in Allen Fieldhouse in Lawrence, Kansas.

1998–99 Kentucky Wildcats men's basketball team

The 1998-99 Kentucky Wildcats men's basketball team represented University of Kentucky in the 1998-99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The head coach was Tubby Smith and the team finished the season with an overall record of 28-9.

1998–99 Louisville Cardinals men's basketball team

The 1998–99 Louisville Cardinals men's basketball team represented the University of Louisville in the 1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The head coach was Denny Crum and the team finished the season with an overall record of 19-11.

1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball rankings

The 1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball rankings was made up of two human polls, the AP Poll and the Coaches Poll, in addition to various other preseason polls.

1998–99 Pittsburgh Panthers men's basketball team

The 1998–99 Pittsburgh Panthers men's basketball team represented the University of Pittsburgh in the 1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. Led by head coach Ralph Willard, the Panthers finished with a record of 14–16.

1998–99 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team

The 1998–99 Princeton Tigers men's basketball team represented the Princeton University in intercollegiate college basketball during the 1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The head coach was Bill Carmody and the team co-captains were Brian Earl and Gabe Lewullis. The team played its home games in the Jadwin Gymnasium on the University campus in Princeton, New Jersey, and was the runner-up of the Ivy League. The team earned an invitation to the 32-team 1999 National Invitation Tournament.Using the Princeton offense, the team had a midseason eleven-game winning streak and posted a 22–8 overall record and an 11–3 conference record. On March 10, the team came back from a 23-point half time deficit and a 27-point deficit with 15:11 remaining against the Penn Quakers to win 50–49. Although the team failed to secure an invitation to the 1999 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, the team defeated several entrants in the tournament including the UAB Blazers and conference foe Penn as well as wins on back-to-back nights against Texas and Charlotte to win the 8-team Rainbow Classic held in Honolulu, Hawaii. As of 2010, the 27-point comeback from 13–40 with 15:11 remaining to win 50–49 over Penn on February 9, 1999, remains the fifth-largest comeback and fourth-largest second-half comeback in NCAA history. That game's 9–33 half time deficit comeback remains the second-largest comeback. In the National Invitation Tournament the team defeated the Georgetown Hoyas 54–47 at home on March 10, 1998 and the NC State Wolfpack 61–58 on March 15 at Reynolds Coliseum in Raleigh, North Carolina before losing to the Xavier Musketeers at Cincinnati Gardens Cincinnati, Ohio, on March 17 by a 65–58 score.The team was led by All-Ivy League first team selections Lewullis and Earl, who won the Ivy League Men's Basketball Player of the Year, as well as Ivy League Men's Basketball Rookie of the Year Chris Young. The team won the eleventh of twelve consecutive national statistical championships in scoring defense with a 52.7 points allowed average. Earl ended his Princeton career as the Ivy League's all-time three-point field goal with 281, surpassing Matt Maloney's 244. The total continues to be the all-time record. He also achieved a 90.9% free throw percentage in conference games to earn the Ivy League statistical championship.

1998–99 Stanford Cardinal men's basketball team

The 1998–99 Stanford Cardinal men's basketball team represented Stanford University in the 1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The team finished 1st in the conference.

1998–99 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team

The 1998–99 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team represented the University of California, Los Angeles in the 1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The team finished 3rd in the conference. The Bruins competed in the 1999 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, losing to the Detroit Titans in the round of 64. This was the third season for head coach Steve Lavin.

1998–99 UC Irvine Anteaters men's basketball team

The 1998–99 UC Irvine Anteaters men's basketball team is a team that represented the University of California, Irvine during the 1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. It was led by 2nd-year head coach Pat Douglass, the Anteaters played at the Bren Events Center. At the time, the team was part of the Big West Conference.

1998–99 Wisconsin Badgers men's basketball team

The 1998–1999 Wisconsin Badgers men's basketball team represented University of Wisconsin–Madison in the 1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The head coach was Dick Bennett, coaching his fourth season with the Badgers. The team played their home games at the Kohl Center in Madison, Wisconsin and was a member of the Big Ten Conference.

1999 MAC Men's Basketball Tournament

The 1999 MAC Men's Basketball Tournament, a part of the 1998–99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season, took place at SeaGate Centre in Toledo, Ohio. It was a single-elimination tournament with three rounds and included only the top eight conference teams. The quarterfinal round was held on the campus sites of the top four seeds, and the winners advanced to play the semifinal and final rounds in Toledo. It was the final Mid-American Conference Men's Basketball Tournament that did not include all conference members, and the final tournament held in Toledo. Miami, the MAC regular season winner, received the number one seed in the tournament. Second-seeded Kent State won the tournament with a 49–43 win over Miami and received the Mid-American Conference's automatic bid to the 1999 NCAA Tournament. It was Kent State's first MAC Tournament win and marked their first appearance in the NCAA Tournament. Miami was selected as an at-large entry for the NCAA Tournament. Through the 2016–17 season, it is the most recent time the MAC has had more than one team participate in the NCAA Tournament.

1999 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship Game

The 1999 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship Game was the finals of the 1999 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament and it determined the national champion for the 1998-99 NCAA Division I men's basketball season The 1999 National Title Game was played on March 29, 1999, at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida, The 1999 National Title Game was played between the 1999 East Regional Champions, #1-seeded Duke and the 1999 West Regional Champions, #1-seeded Connecticut.

1999 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament

The 1999 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division I college basketball. It began on March 11, 1999, and ended with the championship game on March 29 at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Florida. A total of 63 games were played. This year's Final Four was the first—and so far, only—to be held in a baseball-specific facility, as Tropicana Field is home to the Tampa Bay Rays (then known as the Devil Rays).

The Final Four consisted of Connecticut, making their first ever Final Four appearance; Ohio State, making their ninth Final Four appearance and first since 1968; Michigan State, making their third Final Four appearance and first since their 1979 national championship; and Duke, the overall number one seed and making their first Final Four appearance since losing the national championship game in 1994.

In the national championship game, Connecticut defeated Duke 77-74 to win their first ever national championship, snapping Duke's 32-game winning streak, and scoring the biggest point-spread upset in Championship Game history. Duke nonetheless tied the record for most games won during a single season, with 37, which they co-held until Kentucky's 38-win seasons in 2011–12 and 2014–15. The 2007–08 Memphis team actually broke this record first, but the team was later forced to forfeit their entire season due to eligibility issues surrounding the team.

Richard "Rip" Hamilton of Connecticut was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. This was a significant victory for the program, as it cemented Connecticut's reputation as a true basketball power after decades of barely missing the Final Four. Also, the Huskies did not play football at the level now known as the Football Bowl Subdivision (known as Division I-A from 1978 to 2006) at the time of their title. Connecticut then played football in Division I-AA, now the Football Championship Subdivision; by the time of the Huskies' next men's basketball title in 2004, the school's football team had upgraded to the current FBS level. The next team to win a title that did not also have an FBS football team was Villanova in 2016.

This tournament is also historically notable as the coming-out party for Gonzaga as a rising mid-major power. The Bulldogs became the nation's basketball darlings during a run to the West Regional final in which they defeated three major-conference powers, including 1998 Final Four participant Stanford, and took UConn literally to the last minute before losing. Gonzaga has made every NCAA tournament since then, and is now generally considered to be a high-major program despite its mid-major conference affiliation.

Due to violations committed by Ohio State head coach Jim O'Brien, the Buckeyes were forced to vacate their appearance in the 1999 Final Four.

1999 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The Consensus 1999 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The Sporting News and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

1999 National Invitation Tournament

The 1999 National Invitation Tournament was the 1999 edition of the annual NCAA college basketball competition.

NCAA Division I men's basketball seasons
Pre-regulation
IAAUS / NCAA
pre-tournament era
NCAA tournament era

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