1998–99 NBA season

The 1999 NBA season was the 53rd season of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Due to a lockout, the season did not start until February 5, 1999, after a new six-year Collective Bargaining Agreement was reached between the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association. All 29 teams played a shortened 50-game regular season schedule and the 16 teams who qualified for the playoffs played a full post-season schedule. That season's All-Star Game was also canceled. The season ended with the San Antonio Spurs winning the franchise's first NBA championship, beating the New York Knicks 4 games to 1 in the 1999 NBA Finals. This was the 50th season since the BAA and NBL had merged into the NBA.

1999 NBA season
LeagueNational Basketball Association
SportBasketball
DurationFebruary 5 – May 5, 1999
May 8 – June 11, 1999 (Playoffs)
June 16 – 25, 1999 (Finals)
Number of games50
Number of teams29
TV partner(s)NBC, TBS, TNT
Draft
Top draft pickMichael Olowokandi
Picked byLos Angeles Clippers
Regular season
Top seedSan Antonio Spurs
Season MVPKarl Malone (Utah)
Top scorerAllen Iverson (Philadelphia)
Playoffs
Eastern championsNew York Knicks
  Eastern runners-upIndiana Pacers
Western championsSan Antonio Spurs
  Western runners-upPortland Trail Blazers
Finals
ChampionsSan Antonio Spurs
  Runners-upNew York Knicks
Finals MVPTim Duncan (San Antonio)

Lockout

The second lockout in the history of the NBA lasted from July 1, 1998, to January 20, 1999. NBA owners were seeking changes to the league's salary cap system and a ceiling on individual player salaries. The National Basketball Players Association opposed the owners' plans and wanted raises for players who earned the league's minimum salary.

As the labor dispute continued into September, the preseason was shortened to just two games instead of the normal eight, and training camps were postponed indefinitely.[1] By October, it became the first time in NBA history that games were canceled due to a labor dispute.[2] Further games were canceled by November and December, including the All-Star Game, which had been scheduled to be played on February 14, 1999. The preseason was canceled as well.

An agreement between the owners and players was eventually reached on January 18, 1999. When play resumed, the regular season was shortened to 50 games per team, as opposed to the normal 82. To preserve games between teams in the same conference, much of the time missed was made up for by skipping well over half of the games played between teams in the opposite conference. As a result, some teams did not meet each other at all during the course of the shortened season.

Notable occurrences

Coaching changes
Offseason
Team 1997–98 coach 1998–99 coach
Chicago Bulls Phil Jackson Tim Floyd
Denver Nuggets Bill Hanzlik Mike D'Antoni
Los Angeles Clippers Bill Fitch Chris Ford
Milwaukee Bucks Chris Ford George Karl
Sacramento Kings Eddie Jordan Rick Adelman
Seattle SuperSonics George Karl Paul Westphal
In-season
Team Outgoing coach Incoming coach
Charlotte Hornets Dave Cowens Paul Silas
Los Angeles Lakers Del Harris Bill Bertka
Bill Bertka Kurt Rambis
New Jersey Nets John Calipari Don Casey
Washington Wizards Bernie Bickerstaff Jim Brovelli

1998–99 NBA changes

Final standings

By division

Atlantic Division W L PCT GB Home Road Div
y-Miami Heat 33 17 .660 18–7 15–10 12–8
x-Orlando Magic 33 17 .660 21–4 12–13 12–6
x-Philadelphia 76ers 28 22 .560 5 17–8 11–14 9–10
x-New York Knicks 27 23 .540 6 19–6 8–17 12–8
Boston Celtics 19 31 .380 14 10–15 9–16 10–9
Washington Wizards 18 32 .360 15 13–12 5–20 6–13
New Jersey Nets 16 34 .320 17 12–13 4–21 6–13
Central Division W L PCT GB Home Road Div
y-Indiana Pacers 33 17 .660 18–7 15–10 15–7
x-Atlanta Hawks 31 19 .620 2 16–9 15–10 15–8
x-Detroit Pistons 29 21 .580 4 17–8 12–13 13–8
x-Milwaukee Bucks 28 22 .560 5 17–8 11–14 13–11
Charlotte Hornets 26 24 .520 7 16–9 10–15 12–10
Toronto Raptors 23 27 .460 10 14–11 9–16 9–14
Cleveland Cavaliers 22 28 .440 11 15–10 7–18 9–13
Chicago Bulls 13 37 .260 20 8–17 5–20 4–19
Midwest Division W L PCT GB Home Road Div
y-San Antonio Spurs 37 13 .740 21–4 16–9 17–4
x-Utah Jazz 37 13 .740 22–3 15–10 15–3
x-Houston Rockets 31 19 .620 6 19–6 12–13 12–9
x-Minnesota Timberwolves 25 25 .500 12 18–7 7–18 11–9
Dallas Mavericks 19 31 .380 18 15–10 4–21 8–12
Denver Nuggets 14 36 .280 23 12–13 2–23 5–16
Vancouver Grizzlies 8 42 .160 29 7–18 1–24 3–18
Pacific Division W L PCT GB Home Road Div
y-Portland Trail Blazers 35 15 .700 22–3 13–12 15–7
x-Los Angeles Lakers 31 19 .620 4 18–7 13–12 14–8
x-Sacramento Kings 27 23 .540 8 16–9 11–14 11–9
x-Phoenix Suns 27 23 .540 8 15–10 12–13 9–10
Seattle SuperSonics 25 25 .500 10 17–8 8–17 11–10
Golden State Warriors 21 29 .420 14 13–12 8–17 8–11
Los Angeles Clippers 9 41 .180 26 6–19 3–22 3–16

By conference

# Eastern Conference
Team W L PCT GB
1 c-Miami Heat 33 17 .660
2 y-Indiana Pacers 33 17 .660
3 x-Orlando Magic 33 17 .660
4 x-Atlanta Hawks 31 19 .620 2
5 x-Detroit Pistons 29 21 .580 4
6 x-Philadelphia 76ers 28 22 .560 5
7 x-Milwaukee Bucks 28 22 .560 5
8 x-New York Knicks 27 23 .540 6
9 Charlotte Hornets 26 24 .520 7
10 Toronto Raptors 23 27 .460 10
11 Cleveland Cavaliers 22 28 .440 11
12 Boston Celtics 19 31 .380 14
13 Washington Wizards 18 32 .360 15
14 New Jersey Nets 16 34 .320 17
15 Chicago Bulls 13 37 .260 20
# Western Conference
Team W L PCT GB
1 z-San Antonio Spurs 37 13 .740
2 y-Portland Trail Blazers 35 15 .700 2
3 x-Utah Jazz 37 13 .740
4 x-Los Angeles Lakers 31 19 .620 6
5 x-Houston Rockets 31 19 .620 6
6 x-Sacramento Kings 27 23 .540 10
7 x-Phoenix Suns 27 23 .540 10
8 x-Minnesota Timberwolves 25 25 .500 12
9 Seattle SuperSonics 25 25 .500 12
10 Golden State Warriors 21 29 .420 16
11 Dallas Mavericks 19 31 .380 18
12 Denver Nuggets 14 36 .280 23
13 Los Angeles Clippers 9 41 .180 28
14 Vancouver Grizzlies 8 42 .160 29

Notes

  • z – Clinched home court advantage for the entire playoffs
  • c – Clinched home court advantage for the conference playoffs
  • y – Clinched division title
  • x – Clinched playoff spot

Playoffs

Teams in bold advanced to the next round. The numbers to the left of each team indicate the team's seeding in its conference, and the numbers to the right indicate the number of games the team won in that round. The division champions are marked by an asterisk. Home court advantage does not necessarily belong to the higher-seeded team, but instead the team with the better regular season record; teams enjoying the home advantage are shown in italics.

  First Round Conference Semifinals Conference Finals NBA Finals
                                     
E1 Miami* 2  
E8 New York 3  
  E8 New York 4  
  E4 Atlanta 0  
E4 Atlanta 3
E5 Detroit 2  
  E8 New York 4  
Eastern Conference
  E2 Indiana* 2  
E3 Orlando 1  
E6 Philadelphia 3  
  E6 Philadelphia 0
  E2 Indiana* 4  
E2 Indiana* 3
E7 Milwaukee 0  
  E8 New York 1
  W1 San Antonio* 4
W1 San Antonio* 3  
W8 Minnesota 1  
  W1 San Antonio* 4
  W4 LA Lakers 0  
W4 LA Lakers 3
W5 Houston 1  
  W1 San Antonio* 4
Western Conference
  W2 Portland* 0  
W3 Utah 3  
W6 Sacramento 2  
  W3 Utah 2
  W2 Portland* 4  
W2 Portland* 3
W7 Phoenix 0  


* Division winner
Bold Series winner
Italic Team with home-court advantage

Statistics leaders

Category Player Team Stat
Points per game Allen Iverson Philadelphia 76ers 26.8
Rebounds per game Chris Webber Sacramento Kings 13.0
Assists per game Jason Kidd Phoenix Suns 10.8
Steals per game Kendall Gill New Jersey Nets 2.68
Blocks per game Alonzo Mourning Miami Heat 3.91
FG% Shaquille O'Neal Los Angeles Lakers .576
FT% Reggie Miller Indiana Pacers .915
3FG% Dell Curry Milwaukee Bucks .476

NBA awards

Players of the month

The following players were named the Players of the Month.

Month Player
February Allen Iverson (Philadelphia 76ers)
March Tim Duncan (San Antonio Spurs)
April Jason Kidd (Phoenix Suns)

Rookies of the month

The following players were named the Rookies of the Month.

Month Player
February Paul Pierce (Boston Celtics)
March Vince Carter (Toronto Raptors)
April Vince Carter (Toronto Raptors)

Coaches of the month

The following coaches were named Coaches of the Month.

Month Coach
February Jerry Sloan (Utah Jazz)
March Mike Dunleavy, Sr. (Portland Trail Blazers)
April Gregg Popovich (San Antonio Spurs)

References

  1. ^ "Lockout cuts into preseason schedule". The San Diego Union-Tribune. September 25, 1998. p. D11.
  2. ^ Wise, Mike (October 15, 1998). "Pro Basketball; N.B.A. Owners Cool To Players' Proposal". The New York Times. Retrieved April 22, 2009.
1998 NBA draft

The 1998 NBA draft took place on June 24, 1998, at General Motors Place in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. This draft helped turn around three struggling franchises: the Dallas Mavericks, the Sacramento Kings, and the Toronto Raptors.

The Mavericks, despite having a talented nucleus of Jason Kidd, Jamal Mashburn and Jimmy Jackson in the mid-1990s, had not had a winning season since 1989–1990. By the end of the 1997 season, all three players were traded and it was time to rebuild. With the sixth selection in 1998, they drafted Robert Traylor and quickly traded him to the Milwaukee Bucks for Dirk Nowitzki and Pat Garrity. They then traded Garrity in a package to the Phoenix Suns for Steve Nash. With Nash and Nowitzki, the Mavericks quickly went from a lottery team in the late 1990s to a perennial playoff contender throughout the 2000s. Nowitzki went on to win the 2011 NBA Finals with Dallas without Nash, but with Kidd.

Meanwhile, the Raptors were a recent expansion team that had failed to win more than 30 games in its first three seasons. With the fourth pick they selected Antawn Jamison, whom they quickly dealt to the Golden State Warriors for Vince Carter.

The Kings, having been a perennial lottery bound franchise, skyrocketed in popularity with the addition of Chris Webber and 7th pick Jason Williams. The Kings went to the playoffs that year and took the defending Western Conference Champions to the final game of their first round Playoff series.

First overall pick Michael Olowokandi from mid-major University of the Pacific is regarded by Sports Illustrated as one of the biggest draft busts in NBA history. As of February 2019, he is the last top selection to come out of a university that is considered mid-major.

Five players from the 1998 draft class have played in the NBA All-Star Game at least once in their careers: Nowitzki, Carter, Jamison, Paul Pierce and Rashard Lewis. All of them have reached the 20,000 points plateau during their careers except for Lewis.

Carter is still an active player as of 2019, making him one only seven players to play at least 20 seasons in the NBA. Nowitzki retired in April 2019 and remained with the Mavericks for his entire career, making him the only person to ever play 21 seasons with one team.

Seven members of the 1998 draft class are currently in Ice Cube's BIG3 Basketball League: #2 pick Mike Bibby and #21 pick Ricky Davis (Ghost Ballers), #11 pick Bonzi Wells (Tri State), #25 pick Al Harrington (Trilogy), #32 pick Rashard Lewis (3 Headed Monsters), #41 pick Cuttino Mobley (Power), and Mike James (Killer 3's), who went undrafted. Jason Williams played in the league's first season with the Ghost Ballers, but suffered an injury and would be out for the rest of the season.

1998–99 Atlanta Hawks season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the Hawks' 50th season in the National Basketball Association, and 31st season in Atlanta. During a season cut to 50 games by a four-month lockout, the Hawks continued to split their home games between the Georgia Dome, and the Alexander Memorial Coliseum. In the offseason, the team signed free agents LaPhonso Ellis, a former teammate of Dikembe Mutombo on the Denver Nuggets, second-year guard Anthony Johnson and re-signed Grant Long. However, Ellis would be out for the remainder of the season with a hernia injury after just 20 games. The Hawks won nine of their final eleven games, and finished second in the Central Division with a 31–19 record. In the first round of the playoffs, they would defeat the Detroit Pistons in five games, but would be swept by the 8th-seeded New York Knicks in four straight games in the semifinals. This season would also be the last time the Hawks appear in the playoffs until 2008.

Following the season, Steve Smith was traded to the Portland Trail Blazers, Mookie Blaylock was traded to the Golden State Warriors, Long signed as a free agent with the Vancouver Grizzlies, and Tyrone Corbin re-signed with the Sacramento Kings.

1998–99 Boston Celtics season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the 53rd season for the Boston Celtics in the National Basketball Association. The Celtics continued to build with youth as they selected Paul Pierce out of the University of Kansas with the tenth pick in the 1998 NBA draft. In the offseason, the team acquired second-year center Tony Battie from the Los Angeles Lakers. Pierce would get off to a fast start as he was named Rookie of The Month in February, after the season was delayed by a four-month lockout. However, after a 7–7 start to the season, the Celtics struggled losing ten of their next eleven games, as they traded Andrew DeClercq to the Cleveland Cavaliers for Vitaly Potapenko. The Celtics finished fifth in the Atlantic Division with a 19–31 record, as fans began to get restless with Rick Pitino's slow growth. Pierce averaged 16.5 points per game and made the All-Rookie First Team. Following the season, second-year star Ron Mercer was traded to the Denver Nuggets, and Bruce Bowen signed as a free agent with the Philadelphia 76ers.

1998–99 Dallas Mavericks season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the Mavericks' 19th season in the National Basketball Association. In the offseason, the Mavericks acquired point guard Steve Nash from the Phoenix Suns, traded their top draft pick Robert Traylor to the Milwaukee Bucks for rookie Dirk Nowitzki, signed free agent Gary Trent and released Khalid Reeves to free agency. In a season shortened by a four-month lockout, the young Mavericks still struggled losing eight of their first nine games, but began to show promise by posting their first winning record at home in nine years at 15–10. However, with Cedric Ceballos only playing just 13 games due to a wrist injury, they were still a mile away from the playoffs as they finished fifth in the Midwest Division with a 19–31 record. Michael Finley led the team averaging 20.2 points per game. Following the season, A.C. Green was traded back to the Los Angeles Lakers, and Samaki Walker signed as a free agent with the San Antonio Spurs.

1998–99 Denver Nuggets season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the Nuggets' 23rd season in the National Basketball Association, and 32nd season as a franchise. During the offseason, the Nuggets acquired Nick Van Exel from the Los Angeles Lakers, and second-year guard Chauncey Billups from the Toronto Raptors. Despite the return of Antonio McDyess, who was re-signed by the team after one season with the Phoenix Suns, the Nuggets continued to struggle under new head coach Mike D'Antoni losing eight of their first nine games. Top draft pick Raef LaFrentz out of Kansas was out for the remainder of the season with a knee injury after playing just twelve games. The Nuggets finished the lockout shortened season sixth in the Midwest Division with a 14–36 record. This was also their final season playing at McNichols Sports Arena. Following the season, second-year forward Danny Fortson and Eric Williams were both traded to the Boston Celtics, and D'Antoni was fired as coach.

1998–99 Detroit Pistons season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the Pistons' 51st season in the National Basketball Association, and 42nd season in the city of Detroit. In the offseason, the Pistons acquired Christian Laettner from the Atlanta Hawks, and signed free agents Jud Buechler and Loy Vaught. Laettner would reunite with former Duke University teammate Grant Hill, but would only play just 16 games due to an Achilles injury and broken rib. After a solid year the previous season, Brian Williams changed his named to Bison Dele to honor his Cherokee heritage. In a season cut in half by a four-month lockout, the Pistons would bounce back from their disappointing season to finish third in the Central Division with a 29–21 record, and return to the playoffs after a one-year absence. In the playoffs, they would lose in five games to the Atlanta Hawks in the first round. This season also marked an end of an era as Joe Dumars retired after a solid fourteen-year career. This was also Dele's final season of his career as he retired before the following season.

1998–99 Golden State Warriors season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the Warriors' 53rd season in the National Basketball Association, and 37th in the San Francisco Bay Area. In the 1998 NBA draft, the Warriors selected Vince Carter out of the University of North Carolina with the fifth pick, but soon traded him to the Toronto Raptors for his college teammate Antawn Jamison. The team also acquired John Starks, Chris Mills and Terry Cummings from the New York Knicks during the offseason. Starks previously played for the Warriors during the 1988–89 season. After losing their first five games, the Warriors started to show signs of improvement in a lockout shortened season. Despite playing 32 games fewer, they won two more games than the previous year, finishing sixth in the Pacific Division with a 21–29 record. Jamison was selected to the All-Rookie Second Team. Following the season, Bimbo Coles was traded to the Atlanta Hawks, Muggsy Bogues signed as a free agent with the Toronto Raptors, and Tony Delk signed with the Sacramento Kings.

1998–99 Indiana Pacers season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the Pacers' 23rd season in the National Basketball Association, and 32nd season as a franchise. The Pacers entered the season as a heavy favorite, because Michael Jordan retired and other members of the Chicago Bulls were broken up by their management. During the offseason, the team signed free agent Sam Perkins, who played in the 1991 NBA Finals with the Los Angeles Lakers, and the 1996 NBA Finals with the Seattle SuperSonics. After a four-month lockout, the Pacers won the Central Division with a record of 33 wins and 17 losses. Reggie Miller led the team in scoring averaging 18.4 points per game.

In the playoffs, the Pacers swept the Milwaukee Bucks 3–0 in the first round, and the 6th-seeded Philadelphia 76ers 4–0 in the semifinals. The Pacers advanced to the Eastern Conference Finals for the second consecutive season, and the fourth time in six seasons. Once again, the Pacers were up against the New York Knicks. Despite being the 8th-seeded team in the Eastern Conference, the Knicks upset the Pacers in six games to reach the NBA Finals for the second time in six seasons. It was also the final season the Pacers played at Market Square Arena, moving to the Conseco Fieldhouse the following season. Also following the season, Antonio Davis was traded to the Toronto Raptors.

For the season, the Pacers added gold pinstripe alternate road uniforms which lasted until 2005.

1998–99 Los Angeles Lakers season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the Lakers' 51st season in the National Basketball Association, and 39th in the city of Los Angeles. It was the Lakers' final season at the Great Western Forum. During the offseason, the Lakers signed free agent Derek Harper. In his first season as a starter, Kobe Bryant finished second on the team in scoring with 19.9 points per game. At midseason, Eddie Jones and Elden Campbell were both traded to the Charlotte Hornets for All-Star forward Glen Rice, J.R. Reid and B.J. Armstrong, who was released and signed with the Orlando Magic. The Lakers move continued midway through the season, signing free agent and rebounding specialist Dennis Rodman, who was well known for winning championships with the Detroit Pistons and the Chicago Bulls. However, after 23 games, Rodman was released by the team.The Lakers finished second in the Pacific Division with a 31–19 record in a season shortened to 50 games due to a four-month lockout. Their attendance for the season was 430,007 (12th in the league). In the playoffs, the Lakers defeated the Houston Rockets 3–1 in the Western Conference Quarterfinals, but were swept in four straight games by the eventual champion San Antonio Spurs during the Western Conference Semifinals.

Following the season, Reid signed as a free agent with the Milwaukee Bucks, Sean Rooks was traded back to the Dallas Mavericks, rookie Ruben Patterson signed with the Seattle SuperSonics, and Harper was dealt to the Detroit Pistons, but was released and then retired.

1998–99 Milwaukee Bucks season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the Bucks' 31st season in the National Basketball Association. After a four-month lockout, the Bucks hired George Karl, who previously coached the Seattle SuperSonics as their new head coach. The team also traded their top draft pick Dirk Nowitzki to the Dallas Mavericks for rookie Robert Traylor, and signed free agents Dell Curry and Vinny Del Negro. The Bucks transition continued at midseason trading Terrell Brandon to the Minnesota Timberwolves, and acquiring Sam Cassell and Chris Gatling from the New Jersey Nets in exchange for Elliot Perry in a three-team trade. In another trade, they dealt Tyrone Hill to the Philadelphia 76ers for second-year forward Tim Thomas and Scott Williams, while signing free agent Haywoode Workman.

Under Karl, the Bucks played above .500 for the entire season as they finally entered the playoffs after a seven-year playoff drought, finishing fourth in the Central Division with a 28–22 record. In the first round of the playoffs, they would be swept by the Indiana Pacers in three straight games. Following the season, Curry signed as a free agent with the Toronto Raptors, Gatling was traded along with Armen Gilliam to the Orlando Magic, and Michael Curry re-signed with the Detroit Pistons.

1998–99 Minnesota Timberwolves season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the Timberwolves' 10th season in the National Basketball Association. A year after signing Kevin Garnett to an unprecedented six year $126 million contract, the Timberwolves had a heavy payroll and were forced to let Tom Gugliotta walk away and trade Stephon Marbury, fearing both would seek similar deals to Garnett. Gugliotta would sign as a free agent with the Phoenix Suns before the start of the season. Meanwhile, in an effort to shore up their defensive back court weakness, the Timberwolves signed free agent Malik Sealy and acquired second-year guard Bobby Jackson, and Dean Garrett from the Denver Nuggets in a three-team trade during the offseason. The team also signed free agent Joe Smith as their starting power forward.

In a three-team midseason trade, the Timberwolves dealt Marbury along with Chris Carr to the New Jersey Nets, and acquired Terrell Brandon from the Milwaukee Bucks, while signing free agent Dennis Scott. The Timberwolves got off to a fast start winning eight of their first ten games, but played below .500 for most of the remaining season. They finished fourth in the Midwest Division with a 25–25 record, and made their third consecutive trip to the playoffs, winning a tie-breaker for the #8 seed in the Western Conference over the Seattle SuperSonics. In the first round of the playoffs, they would lose in four games to the San Antonio Spurs. Following the season, Scott signed with the Vancouver Grizzlies.

1998–99 Philadelphia 76ers season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the 76ers 50th season in the National Basketball Association, and 36th season in Philadelphia. After a four-month lockout wiped out half the season, the Sixers signed free agents Matt Geiger and George Lynch, while re-signing former 76ers forward Rick Mahorn. At midseason, they traded second-year forward Tim Thomas and Scott Williams to the Milwaukee Bucks for Tyrone Hill. The Sixers recorded their first winning month in five years winning 8 of 13 games in February, on their way to making the playoffs for the first time in eight years with a 28–22 record, third in the Atlantic Division. Allen Iverson led the league in scoring averaging 26.8 points per game, and was selected to the All-NBA First Team. In the first round of the playoffs, the Sixers defeated the 3rd–seeded Orlando Magic in four games, but were swept in the semifinals by the Indiana Pacers in four straight games. Following the season, Mahorn retired after making his second stint with the Sixers.

1998–99 Portland Trail Blazers season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the 29th season for the Portland Trail Blazers in the National Basketball Association. During the offseason, the Blazers signed free agents Jim Jackson and Greg Anthony, who would reunite with his former UNLV teammate Stacey Augmon. Portland got off to a fast start winning 15 of their first 18 games, and went 35–15 in the lockout-shortened season, earning their fourth Pacific Division title and the first since 1991–92. Their record qualified them for the #2 seed in the Western Conference. The team earned their 17th straight trip to the playoffs, and 22nd in 23 years. Head coach Mike Dunleavy was named Coach of The Year.The Blazers swept the Phoenix Suns in the first round in three straight games, marking the first time since 1992 that the Blazers advanced in the playoffs. They followed with a 4–2 series victory over the two-time defending Western Conference champion Utah Jazz, but were swept out of the Western Conference Finals by the eventual NBA champion San Antonio Spurs in four straight games. Following the season, Jackson and Isaiah Rider were traded to the Atlanta Hawks, and Walt Williams and second-year center Kelvin Cato were traded to the Houston Rockets.

1998–99 Sacramento Kings season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the Kings' 50th season in the National Basketball Association, and 14th season in Sacramento. During the offseason, the Kings acquired All-Star forward Chris Webber from the Washington Wizards, and signed free agents Vlade Divac, Vernon Maxwell, second-year center Scot Pollard and Jon Barry. Under new head coach Rick Adelman, the Kings improved winning ten of their final eleven games, finishing third in the Pacific Division with a 27–23 record, their first winning season in 16 years. Top draft pick Jason Williams made the All-Rookie First Team. In the first round of the playoffs, the Kings got off to a good start, taking a 2–1 series lead over the 3rd–seeded Utah Jazz. However, the Jazz won Game 4 by one point to even the series and force a decisive fifth game. The Kings would lose Game 5 in overtime 99–92. Following the season, second-year guard Tariq Abdul-Wahad was traded to the Orlando Magic, and Maxwell signed as a free agent with the Seattle SuperSonics.

1998–99 Utah Jazz season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the Jazz's 25th season in the National Basketball Association, and 20th season in Salt Lake City, Utah. The Jazz entered the season once again as runner-ups in the NBA Finals, having lost back-to-back NBA Finals to the Chicago Bulls, both in six games. However, with Michael Jordan retiring for a second time, Scottie Pippen being traded to the Houston Rockets, Dennis Rodman signing with the Los Angeles Lakers as a free agent, and Phil Jackson's contract expiring, it marked the end of the Bulls dynasty, and the Jazz hoped to make the NBA Finals for a third time. During the offseason, the team re-signed free agent Thurl Bailey, who came out of his retirement. The start of the Jazz season was delayed by a four-month lockout. When the season finally started, the Jazz got off to a 19–4 start, and then posted an 11-game winning streak in April. However, they struggled a bit down the stretch as they lost their grip on first place. They finished with a league best record of 37–13. However, their record was tied by the San Antonio Spurs, who won the Midwest Division by a tie-breaker. Karl Malone was named Most Valuable Player of the Year for the second time.In the first round off the playoffs, the Jazz faced elimination as they trailed 2–1 against the 6th–seeded Sacramento Kings. However, they managed to win the series in five games. In the semifinals, they struggled and lost to the Portland Trail Blazers in six games. Following the season, Shandon Anderson signed as a free agent with the Houston Rockets, Greg Foster signed with the Seattle SuperSonics, and Bailey retired for the second time.

For the season, the Jazz added black alternate road uniforms that lasted until 2004.

1998–99 Washington Wizards season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the Wizards' 38th season in the National Basketball Association. Prior to the start of the season, which was delayed by a four-month lockout, the Wizards acquired All-Star guard Mitch Richmond and Otis Thorpe from the Sacramento Kings. Richmond had a solid season leading the team in scoring averaging 19.7 points per game. Meanwhile, Rod Strickland finished second in the league with 9.9 assists per game. However, the Wizards continued to under achieve as head coach Bernie Bickerstaff was fired after a 13–19 start, and was replaced with Jim Brovelli midway through the season. The team lost seven of their final nine games finishing sixth in the Atlantic Division with a disappointing 18–32 record. Following the season, Thorpe signed as a free agent with the Miami Heat, Calbert Cheaney signed with the Boston Celtics, Ben Wallace was traded to the Orlando Magic, and Brovelli was fired as coach.

1999 NBA Finals

The 1999 NBA Finals was the championship round of the shortened 1998–99 NBA season or the 1999 season. The Western Conference champion San Antonio Spurs took on the Eastern Conference champion New York Knicks for the title, with the Spurs holding home court advantage. The series was played under a best-of-seven format, with the first team to collect four game victories winning the series. The Spurs defeated the Knicks 4 games to 1 to win the championship. As of 2018, this is the last NBA Finals where neither team scored 100 or more points in any game during the series.

Will Lyman narrated the season-ending documentary Go Spurs Go! for NBA Entertainment.

List of 1998–99 NBA season transactions

This is a list of all transactions occurring in the 1998-99 NBA season.

Memorial Day Miracle

The Memorial Day Miracle is a game-winning three-point field goal by Sean Elliott in Game 2 of the 1999 Western Conference Finals between the Portland Trail Blazers and the San Antonio Spurs at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas on May 31, 1999, Memorial Day.

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