1996 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1996 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 67th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 9, 1996, at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, the home of the Philadelphia Phillies of the National League. This marked the fifteenth and final all star game appearance of Ozzie Smith, who retired after the 1996 season. Smith entered the game in the top of the sixth inning. His first at-bat was greeted by chants of "Oz-zie, Oz-zie" from the Philadelphia crowd. Iron Man Cal Ripken, Jr., who was in the midst of his record-breaking run of consecutive games played, broke his nose during the pre-game AL team picture.[1] However, he was ready to go at game time and started at SS.

During the pregame ceremonies, Kelsey Grammer of Frasier sang the American National Anthem and Canadian singer Sarah McLachlan sang the Canadian National Anthem. U.S. Congressman Jim Bunning (who was elected to the baseball hall-of-fame in 1996) joined other Phillies' hall of fame alumni Mike Schmidt, Steve Carlton, Richie Ashburn and Robin Roberts in tossing the ceremonial first pitches.

Joe Carter, the Toronto Blue Jays representative to the All-Star Game, received boos from the crowd for his home run that ended the 1993 World Series.[2][3][4]

The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 6–0. The National League would not win another All-Star Game until 2010.

Then-Chairman of the Executive Committee Bud Selig presented the All-Star Game MVP Award to Mike Piazza. Bobby Brown had presented the MVP Award in 1993, while National League President Len Coleman had presented the award in 1994 and 1995. After presenting the MVP Award at the 1998 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, Selig was officially named Commissioner of Baseball.

This is the only All-Star Game in which not a single pitcher walked a batter; appropriately, Braves closer Mark Wohlers was the final pitcher of the game.

Veterans Stadium also held the "distinction" of being the most recent host stadium to be closed down, a distinction it lost after Yankee Stadium closed at the conclusion of the 2008 season. This is also, as of the end of the 2019 MLB season, the last MLB All-Star Game to be played on artificial turf (there are now only two MLB stadiums with artificial turf, but both are of the next-generation variety).

1996 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
Mlb-asg-1996
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0
National League 1 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 x 6 12 1
DateJuly 9, 1996
VenueVeterans Stadium
CityPhiladelphia
Managers
MVPMike Piazza (LA)
Attendance62,670
Ceremonial first pitchMike Schmidt, Richie Ashburn, Jim Bunning, Steve Carlton and Robin Roberts
TelevisionNBC (United States)
MLB International (International)
TV announcersBob Costas, Joe Morgan and Bob Uecker (NBC)
Gary Thorne and Ken Singleton (MLB International)
RadioCBS
Radio announcersJohn Rooney and Jim Hunter

Rosters

Players in italics have since been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

American League

Elected starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Iván Rodríguez Rangers 5
1B Frank Thomas[5] White Sox 4
2B Roberto Alomar Orioles 6
3B Wade Boggs Yankees 12
SS Cal Ripken, Jr. Orioles 14
OF Albert Belle Indians 4
OF Ken Griffey Jr.[5] Mariners 7
OF Kenny Lofton Indians 3
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Chuck Finley Angels 4
P Roberto Hernández White Sox 1
P José Mesa Indians 2
P Jeff Montgomery Royals 3
P Charles Nagy Indians 2
P Roger Pavlik Rangers 1
P Troy Percival Angels 1
P Andy Pettitte Yankees 1
P John Wetteland Yankees 1
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Sandy Alomar, Jr. Indians 4
C Dan Wilson Mariners 1
1B Mark McGwire Athletics 8
1B Mo Vaughn Red Sox 2
2B Chuck Knoblauch Twins 3
3B Travis Fryman Tigers 4
SS Alex Rodriguez Mariners 1
OF Brady Anderson Orioles 2
OF Jay Buhner Mariners 1
OF Joe Carter Blue Jays 5
OF Greg Vaughn Brewers 2
DH Edgar Martínez Mariners 3

National League

Elected starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Mike Piazza Dodgers 3
1B Fred McGriff Braves 4
2B Craig Biggio Astros 5
3B Matt Williams[5] Giants 4
SS Barry Larkin Reds 8
OF Dante Bichette Rockies 3
OF Barry Bonds Giants 6
OF Tony Gwynn[5] Padres 12
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Ricky Bottalico Phillies 1
P Kevin Brown Marlins 2
P Tom Glavine Braves 4
P Al Leiter Marlins 1
P Greg Maddux Braves 5
P Pedro Martínez Expos 1
P John Smoltz Braves 4
P Steve Trachsel Cubs 1
P Mark Wohlers Braves 1
P Todd Worrell Dodgers 3
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Todd Hundley Mets 1
C Jason Kendall Pirates 1
1B Jeff Bagwell Astros 2
2B Eric Young Rockies 1
3B Ken Caminiti Padres 2
3B Chipper Jones Braves 1
SS Mark Grudzielanek Expos 1
SS Ozzie Smith Cardinals 15
OF Ellis Burks Rockies 2
OF Lance Johnson Mets 1
OF Henry Rodríguez Expos 1
OF Gary Sheffield Marlins 3

Game

Umpires

Home Plate Randy Marsh (NL)
First Base Larry McCoy (AL)
Second Base Charlie Reliford (NL)
Third Base Joe Brinkman (AL)
Left Field Larry Poncino (NL)
Right Field Chuck Meriwether (AL)

Starting lineups

American League National League
Order Player Team Position Order Player Team Position
1 Kenny Lofton Indians CF 1 Lance Johnson Mets CF
2 Wade Boggs Yankees 3B 2 Barry Larkin Reds SS
3 Roberto Alomar Orioles 2B 3 Barry Bonds Giants LF
4 Albert Belle Indians LF 4 Fred McGriff Braves 1B
5 Mo Vaughn Red Sox 1B 5 Mike Piazza Dodgers C
6 Iván Rodríguez Rangers C 6 Dante Bichette Rockies RF
7 Cal Ripken, Jr. Orioles SS 7 Chipper Jones Braves 3B
8 Brady Anderson Orioles RF 8 Craig Biggio Astros 2B
9 Charles Nagy Indians P 9 John Smoltz Braves P

Game summary

Tuesday, July 9, 1996 8:29 pm (ET) at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0
National League 1 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 - 6 12 1
WP: John Smoltz (1–0)   LP: Charles Nagy (0–1)
Home runs:
AL: None
NL: Ken Caminiti (1), Mike Piazza (1)

References

  1. ^ Chass, Murray (July 10, 1996). "BASEBALL;National League Subs Top American League's Best". New York Times. p. B13.
  2. ^ Carchidi, Sam (July 9, 1996). "Carter Likes Even the Boos at the Vet". Philadelphia Inquirer. p. D6.
  3. ^ Bodley, Hal (July 10, 1996). "To Phillie fans, Carter still Public Enemy No. 1". USA Today. p. 3C. Joe Carter...walked out onto the sizzling Veterans Stadium turf...held his head high...and heard the boos even before he was introduced. Hard-core Philly baseball fans...(will) never forgive Carter for the dramatic ninth-inning home run that won the 1993 World Series.
  4. ^ Griffin, Richard (July 9, 1996). "This time, Phillies pitcher shuts down Carter". Toronto Star. p. C3. As Carter took his first swing and the on-field introduction was made, the boos rained down.
  5. ^ a b c d Player declined or was unable to play.

External links

1996 Atlanta Braves season

The 1996 Atlanta Braves season was the 126th season in the history of the franchise and 31st season in the city of Atlanta. They secured a regular season record of 96-66 and reached the World Series, where it lost to the New York Yankees in six games, failing to defend its championship in 1995. Despite taking a 2-0 lead the Braves unexpectedly lost the next 4 games. This World Series appearance was their fourth appearance in the last 5 years as a franchise. Atlanta won its seventh division title (second in the National League East, the other five in the NL West) and its fifth in six years. In the previous round, Atlanta completed a miraculous comeback. After trailing in the NLCS to St. Louis three games to one, Atlanta outscored St. Louis 32-1 in games five through seven to complete the comeback. The collapse was remembered as one of the largest in North American sports history.

1996 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1996 Los Angeles Dodgers season saw the Dodgers remain atop the standings most of the season. However, longtime manager Tommy Lasorda suffered a heart attack in mid-season and had to step down. Bill Russell, Lasorda's bench coach and a former Dodger player, was chosen to manage the rest of the season.

The Dodgers went into the final weekend of the season with a two-game lead on the San Diego Padres, needing only to win one of the final three games with the Padres to clinch the National League Western Division crown. However, the Padres swept the Dodgers and they limped into the playoffs as a Wild Card team. The Dodgers were swept by the Atlanta Braves in the National League Division Series.

The Dodgers used 15 different pitchers during the season, the fewest of any MLB team in 1996.

1996 Montreal Expos season

The 1996 Montreal Expos season was the 28th season in franchise history.

1996 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1996 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 114th season in the history of the franchise. The Phillies finished fifth in the National League East with a record of 67 wins and 95 losses. They also hosted the 1996 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

1996 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1996 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 115th season of the franchise; the 110th in the National League. This was their 27th season at Three Rivers Stadium. The Pirates finished fifth and last in the National League Central with a record of 73–89.

1996 San Diego Padres season

The 1996 San Diego Padres season was the 28th season in franchise history.

1997 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1997 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 68th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 8, 1997, at Jacobs Field in Cleveland, the home of the Cleveland Indians of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 3-1. The game marked the fifth time the All-Star Game was held in Cleveland and first since 1981. It was also the first All-Star game held at Jacobs Field, which opened three years earlier.

2012 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 2012 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 83rd edition of the Major League Baseball All-Star Game. It was held on July 10, 2012, during the 2012 Major League Baseball season at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri, home of the Kansas City Royals. This marked the third time the Mid-summer Classic had been played in Kansas City, with Kauffman Stadium (then named Royals Stadium) last hosting the event in 1973, the stadium's first year of existence. The event was also held at Municipal Stadium in 1960, when the Athletics were still based there, one of two played that season. The game was televised in the United States by Fox.

The National League shut out the American League for the sixth time in All-Star Game history. It was the third-largest margin of victory for any Mid-summer Classic. The TV ratings fell even further than the 2011 edition, earning a 6.8 rating and 12 share on Fox. The total number of viewers who watched any portion of the game was up 7 percent from the previous year, however, with 27.7 million total viewers.

Jim Bunning

James Paul David Bunning (October 23, 1931 – May 26, 2017) was an American professional baseball pitcher and politician who represented Kentucky in both chambers of the United States Congress. He is the sole Major League Baseball athlete to have been elected to both the United States Senate and the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Bunning pitched from 1955 to 1971 for the Detroit Tigers, Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Los Angeles Dodgers. When Bunning retired, he had the second-highest total career strikeouts in Major League history; he currently ranks 18th. As a member of the Phillies, Bunning pitched the seventh perfect game in Major League Baseball history on June 21, 1964, the first game of a Father's Day doubleheader at Shea Stadium, against the New York Mets. The perfect game was the first since 1880 in the National League. Bunning was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in 1996 after election by the Hall's Veterans Committee.

After retiring from baseball, Bunning returned to his native northern Kentucky and was elected to the Fort Thomas city council, then the Kentucky Senate, in which he served as minority leader. In 1986, Bunning was elected to the United States House of Representatives from Kentucky's 4th congressional district, and served in the House from 1987 to 1999. He was elected to the United States Senate from Kentucky in 1998 and served two terms as the Republican junior U.S. Senator. In July 2009, he announced that he would not run for re-election in 2010. Bunning gave his farewell speech to the Senate on December 9, 2010, and was succeeded by Rand Paul on January 3, 2011.

Mark Grudzielanek

Mark James Grudzielanek (; born June 30, 1970) is a former Major League Baseball second baseman and shortstop. Grudzielanek played for six different teams during his 15-season career. He batted and threw right-handed. He is currently the manager of the Charlotte Knights, the Triple-A affiliate of the Chicago White Sox.

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