1996 Cricket World Cup

The 1996 Cricket World Cup, also called the Wills World Cup 1996 after its official sponsors, ITC's Wills brand, was the sixth Cricket World Cup, organised by the International Cricket Council (ICC). It was the second World Cup to be hosted by Pakistan and India, and for the first time by Sri Lanka. The tournament was won by Sri Lanka, who defeated Australia in the final at the Gaddafi Stadium in Lahore, Punjab.

Wills World Cup 1996
Wills World Cup 1996
Dates14 February–17 March
Administrator(s)International Cricket Council
Cricket formatOne Day International
Tournament format(s)Round robin and Knockout
Host(s) India
 Pakistan
 Sri Lanka
Champions Sri Lanka (1st title)
Runners-up Australia
Participants12
Matches played37
Player of the series Sanath Jayasuriya
Most runs Sachin Tendulkar (523)
Most wickets Anil Kumble (15)

Hosts

The Wills World Cup was played in India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Controversy dogged the tournament before any games were played; Australia and the West Indies refused to send their teams to Sri Lanka following the Central Bank bombing by the Tamil Tigers in January 1996. Sri Lanka, in addition to offering maximum security to the teams, questioned the validity of citing security concerns when the International Cricket Council had determined it was safe. After extensive negotiations, the ICC ruled that Sri Lanka would be awarded both games on forfeit. As a result of this decision, Sri Lanka automatically qualified for the quarter-finals before playing a game.

Host cities and venues

India hosted 17 matches at 17 different venues, while Pakistan hosted 16 matches at 6 venues and Sri Lanka hosted 4 matches at 3 venues.

India

Cities Venues Capacity Matches
Calcutta, West Bengal Eden Gardens 120,000 1
Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh Green Park 45,000 1
Mohali, Punjab Punjab Cricket Association Stadium 40,000 1
Bangalore, Karnataka M. Chinnaswamy Stadium 55,000 1
Madras, Tamil Nadu M. A. Chidambaram Stadium 50,000 1
Hyderabad, Telangana Lal Bahadur Shastri Stadium 30,000 1
Cuttack, Odisha Barabati Stadium 25,000 1
Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh Roop Singh Stadium 55,000 1
Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh Indira Priyadarshini Stadium 25,000 1
Patna, Bihar Moin-ul-Haq Stadium 25,000 1
Pune, Maharashtra Nehru Stadium 25,000 1
Bombay, Maharashtra Wankhede Stadium 45,000 1
Ahmedabad, Gujarat Sardar Patel Stadium 48,000 1
Baroda, Gujarat Moti Bagh Stadium 18,000 1
Jaipur, Rajasthan Sawai Mansingh Stadium 30,000 1
Nagpur, Maharashtra Vidarbha C.A. Ground 40,000 1
Delhi, New Delhi Feroz Shah Kotla Ground 48,000 1

Pakistan

Cities Venues Capacity Matches
Peshawar, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Arbab Niaz Stadium 20,000 2
Lahore, Punjab Gaddafi Stadium 35,000 4
Faisalabad, Punjab Iqbal Stadium 25,000 3
Gujranwala, Punjab Jinnah Stadium 40,000 1
Karachi, Sindh National Stadium 30,000 3
Rawalpindi, Punjab Rawalpindi Cricket Stadium 25,000 3

Sri Lanka

Cities Venues Capacity Matches
Kandy Asgiriya Stadium 25,000 1
Colombo R. Premadasa Stadium 35,000 2
Colombo Sinhalese Sports Club Ground 10,000 1
Venues in Sri Lanka

Teams

All the test playing countries participated in the competition including Zimbabwe who following the last world cup became the 9th Full Test status member of the ICC. The Three Associate teams (previously one) to qualify through the 1994 ICC Trophy also made their World Cup debuts in 1996: the United Arab Emirates, Kenya and the Netherlands. The Dutch lost all of their five matches while the U.A.E. only beat the Dutch. Kenya, however, recorded a surprise victory over the West Indies in Pune.

Full Members
 Australia  England  India
 New Zealand  Pakistan  South Africa
 Sri Lanka  West Indies  Zimbabwe
Associate Members
 Kenya  Netherlands  United Arab Emirates

Overview

The Sri Lankans, coached by Dav Whatmore and captained by Arjuna Ranatunga, used Man of the Series Sanath Jayasuriya[1] and Romesh Kaluwitharana as opening batsmen to take advantage of the fielding restrictions during the first 15 overs of each innings. At a time when 50 or 60 runs in the first 15 overs was considered adequate, Sri Lanka scored 117 runs in those overs against India, 123 against Kenya, 121 against England in the quarter-final and 86 against India in the semi-final. Against Kenya, Sri Lanka made 398 for 5, a new record for the highest team score in a One Day International that stood until April 2006. Gary Kirsten scored 188 not out against United Arab Emirates at Rawalpindi, Pakistan. This became the highest individual score ever in any World Cup match until it was surpassed by first Chris Gayle of the West Indies and later Martin Guptill who scored 215 and 237 respectively in the 2015 Cricket World Cup.

Sri Lanka won the first semi-final over India at Eden Gardens, Calcutta in front of a crowd unofficially estimated at 110 000. Chasing Sri Lanka's innings of 251 for 8, India had slumped to 120 for 8 in the 35th over when sections of crowd began to throw fruit and plastic bottles onto the field. The players left the field for 20 minutes in an attempt to quieten the crowd. When the players returned for play, more bottles were thrown onto the field and fires were lit in the stand. Match referee Clive Lloyd awarded the match to Sri Lanka, the first default ever in a Test or One Day International.

In the second semi-final in Mohali, Australia recovered from 15 for 4 to reach 207 for 8 from their 50 overs. The West Indians had reached 165 for 2 in the 42nd over before losing their last 8 wickets for 37 runs in 50 balls.

Sri Lanka won the toss in the final and sent Australia in to bat despite the team batting first having won all five previous World Cup finals. Mark Taylor top scored with 74 in Australia's total of 241 for 7. Sri Lanka won the match in the 47th over with Aravinda de Silva following his 3 for 42 with an unbeaten 107 to win the Player of the Match award. It was the first time a tournament host or co-host had won the cricket World Cup.

Group stage

Group A

Team Pld W L NR T NRR Pts
 Sri Lanka 5 5 0 0 0 1.60 10
 Australia 5 3 2 0 0 0.90 6
 India 5 3 2 0 0 0.45 6
 West Indies 5 2 3 0 0 −0.13 4
 Zimbabwe 5 1 4 0 0 −0.93 2
 Kenya 5 1 4 0 0 −1.00 2
16 February
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
151/9 (50 overs)
v
 West Indies
155/4 (29.3 overs)
Grant Flower 31 (54)
Curtly Ambrose 3/28 (10 overs)
Sherwin Campbell 47 (88)
Paul Strang 4/40 (7.3 overs)
West Indies won by 6 wickets
Lal Bahadur Shastri Stadium, Hyderabad
Umpires: Steve Dunne and Srinivas Venkataraghavan
Player of the match: Curtly Ambrose (WI)
17 February
Scorecard
v
Sri Lanka won by a walkover
R. Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Umpires: Mahboob Shah and Cyril Mitchley
18 February
Scorecard
Kenya 
199/6 (50 overs)
v
 India
203/3 (41.5 overs)
Steve Tikolo 65 (83)
Anil Kumble 3/28 (10 overs)
Sachin Tendulkar 127* (138)
Steve Tikolo 1/26 (3 overs)
India won by 7 wickets
Barabati Stadium, Cuttack
Umpires: K. T. Francis and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Sachin Tendulkar (Ind)
21 February
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
228/6 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
229/4 (37 overs)
Alistair Campbell 75 (102)
Chaminda Vaas 2/30 (10 overs)
Aravinda de Silva 91 (86)
Heath Streak 3/60 (10 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 6 wickets
Sinhalese Sports Club Ground, Colombo
Umpires: Steve Dunne and Mahboob Shah
Player of the match: Aravinda de Silva (SL)
21 February
Scorecard
West Indies 
173 (50 overs)
v
 India
174/5 (39.4 overs)
Richie Richardson 47 (70)
Anil Kumble 3/35 (10 overs)
Sachin Tendulkar 70 (91)
Roger Harper 2/34 (9 overs)
India won by 5 wickets
Captain Roop Singh Stadium, Gwalior
Umpires: Khizer Hayat and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Sachin Tendulkar (Ind)
23 February
Scorecard
Australia 
304/7 (50 overs)
v
 Kenya
207/7 (50 overs)
Mark Waugh 130 (128)
Rajab Ali 3/45 (10 overs)
Kennedy Otieno 85 (137)
Paul Reiffel 2/18 (7 overs)
Australia won by 97 runs
Indira Priyadarshini Stadium, Visakhapatnam
Umpires: Cyril Mitchley and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Mark Waugh (Aus)
26 February
Scorecard
v
Sri Lanka won by a walkover
Premadasa Stadium, Colombo
Umpires: Mahboob Shah and V.K. Ramaswamy
26 February
Scorecard
Kenya 
134 (49.4 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
137/5 (42.2 overs)
Dipak Chudasama 34 (66)
Paul Strang 5/21 (9.4 overs)
Grant Flower 45 (112)
Rajab Ali 3/22 (8 overs)
Zimbabwe won by 5 wickets
Moin-ul-Haq Stadium, Patna
Umpires: Khizer Hayat and Cyril Mitchley
Player of the match: Paul Strang (Zim)
27 February
Scorecard
Australia 
258 (50 overs)
v
 India
242 (48 overs)
Mark Waugh 126 (135)
Venkatapathy Raju 2/48 (10 overs)
Sachin Tendulkar 90 (84)
Damien Fleming 5/36 (9 overs)
Australia won by 16 runs
Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai
Umpires: Steve Dunne and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Mark Waugh (Aus)
29 February
Scorecard
Kenya 
166 (49.3 overs)
v
 West Indies
93 (35.2 overs)
Steve Tikolo 29 (50)
Courtney Walsh 3/46 (9 overs)
Shivnarine Chanderpaul 19 (48)
Maurice Odumbe 3/15 (10 overs)
Kenya won by 73 runs
Nehru Stadium, Pune
Umpires: Khizer Hayat and V.K. Ramaswamy
Player of the match: Maurice Odumbe (Ken)
1 March
Scorecard
Zimbabwe 
154 all out (45.3 overs)
v
 Australia
158/2 (36 overs)
Andy Waller 67 (101)
Shane Warne 4/34 (9.3 overs)
Mark Waugh 76* (109)
Paul Strang 2/33 (10 overs)
Australia won by 8 wickets
Vidarbha Cricket Association Ground, Nagpur
Umpires: Steve Dunne and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Shane Warne (Aus)
2 March
Scorecard
India 
271/3 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
272/4 (48.4 overs)
Sachin Tendulkar 137 (137)
Ravindra Pushpakumara 1/53 (8 overs)
Sanath Jayasuriya 79 (76)
Anil Kumble 2/39 (10 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 6 wickets
Feroz Shah Kotla, Delhi
Umpires: Cyril Mitchley and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Sanath Jayasuriya (SL)
4 March
Scorecard
Australia 
229/6 (50 overs)
v
 West Indies
232/6 (48.5 overs)
Ricky Ponting 102 (112)
Courtney Walsh 2/35 (9 overs)
Richie Richardson 93* (133)
Mark Waugh 3/38 (10 overs)
West Indies won by 4 wickets
Sawai Mansingh Stadium, Jaipur
Umpires: Mahboob Shah and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Richie Richardson (WI)
6 March
Scorecard
India 
247/5 (50 overs)
v
 Zimbabwe
207 all out (49.4 overs)
Vinod Kambli 106 (110)
Charlie Lock 2/57 (10 overs)
Heath Streak 30 (39)
Venkatapathy Raju 3/30 (10 overs)
India won by 40 runs
Green Park, Kanpur
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and Cyril Mitchley
Player of the match: Ajay Jadeja (Ind)
6 March
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
398/5 (50 overs)
v
 Kenya
254/7 (50 overs)
Aravinda de Silva 145 (115)
Tito Odumbe 2/34 (5 overs)
Steve Tikolo 96 (95)
Arjuna Ranatunga 2/31 (5 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 144 runs
Asgiriya Stadium, Kandy
Umpires: Steve Dunne and V.K. Ramaswamy
Player of the match: Aravinda de Silva (SL)

Group B

Team Pld W L NR T NRR Pts
 South Africa 5 5 0 0 0 2.04 10
 Pakistan 5 4 1 0 0 0.96 8
 New Zealand 5 3 2 0 0 0.55 6
 England 5 2 3 0 0 0.08 4
 United Arab Emirates 5 1 4 0 0 −1.83 2
 Netherlands 5 0 5 0 0 −1.92 0
14 February
Scorecard
New Zealand 
239/6 (50 overs)
v
 England
228/9 (50 overs)
Nathan Astle 101 (132)
Graeme Hick 2/45 (9 overs)
Graeme Hick 85 (102)
Dion Nash 3/26 (7 overs)
New Zealand won by 11 runs
Gujarat Stadium, Motera, Ahmedabad
Umpires: B.C. Cooray and Steve Randell
Player of the match: Nathan Astle (NZ)
16 February
Scorecard
South Africa 
321/2 (50 overs)
v
 United Arab Emirates
152/8 (50 overs)
Gary Kirsten 188* (159)
Johanne Samarasekera 1/39 (9 overs)
Arshad Laeeq 43 (79)
Brian McMillan 3/11 (8 overs)
South Africa won by 169 runs
Rawalpindi Cricket Stadium, Rawalpindi
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and V.K. Ramaswamy
Player of the match: Gary Kirsten (SA)
17 February
Scorecard
New Zealand 
307/8 (50 overs)
v
 Netherlands
188/7 (50 overs)
Craig Spearman 68 (59)
Steven Lubbers 3/48 (9 overs)
Roland Lefebvre 45 (64)
Chris Harris 3/24 (10 overs)
New Zealand won by 119 runs
Moti Bagh Stadium, Baroda
Umpires: Khizer Hayat and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Craig Spearman (NZ)
18 February
Scorecard
United Arab Emirates 
136 (48.3 overs)
v
 England
140/2 (35 overs)
Graham Thorpe 44* (66)
Arshad Laeeq 1/25 (7 overs)
England won by 8 wickets
Arbab Niaz Stadium, Peshawar
Umpires: B.C. Cooray and V.K. Ramaswamy
Player of the match: Neil Smith (Eng)
20 February
Scorecard
New Zealand 
177/9 (50 overs)
v
 South Africa
178/5 (37.3 overs)
Stephen Fleming 33 (79)
Allan Donald 3/34 (10 overs)
Hansie Cronje 78 (64)
Nathan Astle 2/10 (3 overs)
South Africa won by 5 wickets
Iqbal Stadium, Faisalabad
Umpires: Steve Randell and Srinivas Venkataraghavan
Player of the match: Hansie Cronje (SA)
22 February
Scorecard
England 
279/4 (50 overs)
v
 Netherlands
230/6 (50 overs)
Graeme Hick 104* (133)
Roland Lefebvre 1/40 (10 overs)
Klaas van Noortwijk 64 (82)
Phil DeFreitas 3/31 (10 overs)
England won by 49 runs
Arbab Niaz Stadium, Peshawar
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and K.T. Francis
Player of the match: Graeme Hick (Eng)
24 February
Scorecard
United Arab Emirates 
109/9 (33 overs)
v
 Pakistan
112/1 (18 overs)
Shaukat Dukanwala 21* (19)
Mushtaq Ahmed 3/16 (7 overs)
Ijaz Ahmed 50* (57)
Johanne Samarasekera 1/17 (3 overs)
Pakistan won by 9 wickets
Jinnah Stadium, Gujranwala
Umpires: B.C. Cooray and Srinivas Venkataraghavan
Player of the match: Mushtaq Ahmed (Pak)
25 February
Scorecard
South Africa 
230 all out (50 overs)
v
 England
152 all out (44.3 overs)
Gary Kirsten 38 (60)
Peter Martin 3/33 (10 overs)
Graham Thorpe 46 (69)
Shaun Pollock 2/16 (8 overs)
South Africa won by 78 runs
Rawalpindi Cricket Stadium, Rawalpindi
Umpires: Steve Randell and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Jonty Rhodes (SA)
26 February
Scorecard
Netherlands 
145/7 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
151/2 (30.4 overs)
Saeed Anwar 83*
Peter Cantrell 1/18 (4 overs)
Pakistan won by 8 wickets
Gaddafi Stadium, Lahore
Umpires: K.T. Francis and Steve Bucknor
Player of the match: Waqar Younis (Pak)
27 February
Scorecard
New Zealand 
276/8 (47 overs)
v
 United Arab Emirates
167/9 (47 overs)
Roger Twose 92 (112)
Azhar Saeed 3/45 (7 overs)
New Zealand won by 109 runs
Iqbal Stadium, Faisalabad
Umpires: B.C. Cooray and Srinivas Venkataraghavan
Player of the match: Roger Twose (NZ)
29 February
Scorecard
Pakistan 
242/6 (50 overs)
v
 South Africa
243/5 (44.2 overs)
Aamir Sohail 111 (139)
Hansie Cronje 2/20 (5 overs)
Daryll Cullinan 65 (76)
Waqar Younis 3/50 (8 overs)
South Africa won by 5 wickets
National Stadium, Karachi
Umpires: K.T. Francis and Steve Bucknor
Player of the match: Hansie Cronje (SA)
1 March
Scorecard
Netherlands 
216/9 (50 overs)
v
 United Arab Emirates
220/3 (44.2 overs)
Peter Cantrell 47 (106)
Shaukat Dukanwala 5/29 (10 overs)
Saleem Raza 84 (68)
Roland Lefebvre 1/24 (8 overs)
United Arab Emirates won by 7 wickets
Gaddafi Stadium, Lahore
Umpires: Mahboob Shah and Steve Randell
Player of the match: Shaukat Dukanwala (UAE)
3 March
Scorecard
England 
249/9 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
250/3 (47.4 overs)
Robin Smith 75 (92)
Mushtaq Ahmed 3/53 (10 overs)
Saeed Anwar 71 (72)
Dominic Cork 2/59 (10 overs)
Pakistan won by 7 wickets
National Stadium, Karachi
Umpires: B.C. Cooray and Srinivas Venkataraghavan
Player of the match: Aamer Sohail (Pak)
5 March
Scorecard
South Africa 
328/3 (50 overs)
v
 Netherlands
168/8 (50 overs)
Andrew Hudson 161 (132)
Eric Gouka 1/32 (2 overs)
Nolan Clarke 32 (46)
Allan Donald 2/21 (6 overs)
South Africa won by 160 runs
Rawalpindi Cricket Stadium, Rawalpindi
Umpires: Khizer Hayat and Steve Randell
Player of the match: Andrew Hudson (SA)
6 March
Scorecard
Pakistan 
281/5 (50 overs)
v
 New Zealand
235 (47.3 overs)
Saeed Anwar 62 (67)
Robert Kennedy 1/32 (5 overs)
Stephen Fleming 42 (43)
Mushtaq Ahmed 2/32 (10 overs)
Pakistan won by 46 runs
Gaddafi Stadium, Lahore
Umpires: K.T. Francis and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Saleem Malik (Pak)

Knockout stage

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
9 March – Faisalabad, Pakistan
 
 
 England235/8
 
13 March – Calcutta, India
 
 Sri Lanka236/5
 
 Sri Lanka251/8
 
9 March – Bangalore, India
 
 India120/8
 
 India287/8
 
17 March – Lahore, Pakistan
 
 Pakistan248/9
 
 Sri Lanka245/3
 
11 March – Karachi, Pakistan
 
 Australia241/7
 
 West Indies264/8
 
14 March – Mohali, India
 
 South Africa245
 
 West Indies202
 
11 March – Chennai, India
 
 Australia207/8
 
 New Zealand286/9
 
 
 Australia289/4
 

Quarter-finals

9 March
Scorecard
England 
235/8 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
236/5 (40.4 overs)
Phil DeFreitas 67 (64)
Kumar Dharmasena 2/30 (10 overs)
Sanath Jayasuriya 82 (44)
Dermot Reeve 1/14 (4 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 5 wickets
Iqbal Stadium, Faisalabad
Umpires: Mahboob Shah and Ian Robinson
Player of the match: Sanath Jayasuriya (SL)
9 March
Scorecard
India 
287/8 (50 overs)
v
 Pakistan
248/9 (49 overs)
Navjot Sidhu 93 (115)
Mushtaq Ahmed 2/56 (10 overs)
Aamer Sohail 55 (46)
Venkatesh Prasad 3/45 (10 overs)
India won by 39 runs
M Chinnaswamy Stadium, Bangalore
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Navjot Sidhu (Ind)
11 March
Scorecard
West Indies 
264/8 (50 overs)
v
 South Africa
245 (49.3 overs)
Brian Lara 111 (94)
Brian McMillan 2/37 (10 overs)
Daryll Cullinan 69 (78)
Roger Harper 4/47 (10 overs)
West Indies won by 19 runs
National Stadium, Karachi
Umpires: K.T. Francis and Steve Randell
Player of the match: Brian Lara (WI)
11 March
Scorecard
New Zealand 
286/9 (50 overs)
v
 Australia
289/4 (47.5 overs)
Chris Harris 130 (124)
Glenn McGrath 2/50 (9 overs)
Mark Waugh 110 (112)
Nathan Astle 1/21 (3 overs)
Australia won by 6 wickets
MA Chidambaram Stadium, Chennai
Umpires: Cyril Mitchley and Srinivas Venkataraghavan
Player of the match: Mark Waugh (Aus)

Semi-finals

13 March
Scorecard
Sri Lanka 
251/8 (50 overs)
v
 India
120/8 (34.1 overs)
Aravinda de Silva 66 (47)
Javagal Srinath 3/34 (7 overs)
Sachin Tendulkar 65 (88)
Sanath Jayasuriya 3/12 (7 overs)
Sri Lanka won by default
Eden Gardens, Kolkata
Umpires: Steve Dunne and Cyril Mitchley
Player of the match: Aravinda de Silva (SL)
14 March
Scorecard
Australia 
207/8 (50 overs)
v
 West Indies
202 all out (49.3 overs)
Stuart Law 72 (105)
Curtly Ambrose 2/26 (10 overs)
Shivnarine Chanderpaul 80 (126)
Shane Warne 4/36 (9 overs)
Australia won by 5 runs
Punjab C.A. Stadium, Mohali
Umpires: B.C. Cooray and S Venkataraghavan
Player of the match: Shane Warne (Aus)

Final

17 March
Scorecard
Australia 
241/7 (50 overs)
v
 Sri Lanka
245/3 (46.2 overs)
Mark Taylor 74 (83)
Aravinda de Silva 3/42 (9 overs)
Aravinda de Silva 107 (124)
Damien Fleming 1/43 (6 overs)
Sri Lanka won by 7 wickets
Gaddafi Stadium, Lahore
Umpires: Steve Bucknor and David Shepherd
Player of the match: Aravinda de Silva (SL)

Sri Lanka won the toss and chose to field. Mark Taylor (74 from 83 balls, 8 fours, 1 six) and Ricky Ponting (45 from 73 balls, 2 fours) shared a second-wicket partnership of 101 runs. When Ponting and Taylor were dismissed, however, Australia fell from 137/1 to 170/5 as the famed four-pronged spin attack of Sri Lanka took its toll. Despite the slump, Australia struggled on to 241/7 from their 50 overs.

Statistics

Sachin at Castrol Golden Spanner Awards
Sachin Tendulkar, the leading run scorer in the tournament
Anil Kumble
Anil Kumble, the leading wicket taker in the tournament
Leading run scorers
Runs Player Country
523 Sachin Tendulkar  India
484 Mark Waugh  Australia
448 Aravinda de Silva  Sri Lanka
391 Gary Kirsten  South Africa
329 Saeed Anwar  Pakistan
Leading wicket takers
Wickets Player Country
15 Anil Kumble  India
13 Waqar Younis  Pakistan
12
Paul Strang  Zimbabwe
Roger Harper  West Indies
Damien Fleming  Australia
Shane Warne  Australia

List of centuries

Name Score Balls 4s 6s S/R Team Opposition Venue Date ODI #.
NJ Astle 101 132 8 2 76.51  New Zealand  England Ahmedabad 14 February 1996 1048
G Kirsten 188* 159 13 4 118.23  South Africa  United Arab Emirates Rawalpindi 16 February 1996 1049
SR Tendulkar 127* 138 15 1 92.02  India  Kenya Barabati Stadium, Cuttack 18 February 1996 1052
GA Hick 104* 133 6 2 78.19  England  Netherlands Peshawar 22 February 1996 1057
ME Waugh 130 128 14 1 101.56  Australia  Kenya Visakhapatnam 23 February 1996 1058
ME Waugh 126 135 8 3 93.33  Australia  India Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai 27 February 1996 1065
Aamer Sohail 111 139 8 0 79.85  Pakistan  South Africa National Stadium, Karachi 29 February 1996 1067
SR Tendulkar 137 137 8 5 100.00  India  Sri Lanka FSK, Delhi 2 March 1996 1070
RT Ponting 102 112 5 1 91.07  Australia  West Indies Jaipur 4 March 1996 1072
AC Hudson 161 132 13 4 121.96  South Africa  Netherlands Rawalpindi 5 March 1996 1073
PA de Silva 145 115 14 5 126.08  Sri Lanka  Kenya Kandy 6 March 1996 1074
VG Kambli 106 110 11 0 96.36  India  Zimbabwe Green Park, Kanpur 6 March 1996 1075
BC Lara 111 94 16 0 118.08  West Indies  South Africa National Stadium, Karachi 11 March 1996 1079
CZ Harris 130 124 13 4 104.83  New Zealand  Australia Chennai 11 March 1996 1080
ME Waugh 110 112 6 2 98.21  Australia  New Zealand Chennai 11 March 1996 1080
PA de Silva 107* 124 13 0 86.29  Sri Lanka  Australia Gaddafi Stadium, Lahore 17 March 1996 1083

Notes and references

  1. ^ "Wills World Cup, 1995/96, Final". Cricinfo. Retrieved 29 April 2007.
  2. ^ Records / One-Day Internationals / Team records / Highest innings totals – ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 3 March 2015.

External links

1996 Cricket World Cup Final

The 1996 ICC Cricket World Cup Final was the sixth instalment of the ICC Cricket World Cup since its inception in 1975 in England. The match was played on 17 March 1996 at Lahore's 62,645 capacity Gaddafi Stadium in Pakistan for the first time.

The match was contested between former World Cup winners Australia and underdog Sri Lanka. It was Australia's 3rd World Cup final appearance after their win in the 1987 edition and the loss to West Indies in the 1975 ICC Cricket World Cup final.

Sri Lankan captain Arjuna Ranatunga won the toss and sent Australia out to bat. After a blazing start from captain Mark Taylor and young superstar and future captain Ricky Ponting, Australia fell from being 1–137 to 5–170 after which Sri Lanka's 4 prong spin attack took its toll. After Australia limped to 7–241 in its quota of 50 overs, Sri Lanka overcame a nervous start where they lost both openers before the score was 30, to win in 45 overs. Sri Lankan batting sensation Aravinda De Silva played a match-winning knock of 107 not out and was assisted ably by fellow veterans Asanka Gurusingha (65) and captain Ranatunga (47 not out). De Silva was named man of the match after he had taken 3–42 in his 10 overs eairlier in the Australian innings as well & Sanath Jayasuriya got man of the series award.

1996 Cricket World Cup squads

This is a list of the final 14-man squads named for the 1996 Cricket World Cup in India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka which took place from 14 February 1996 to 17 March 1996.

1996 Cricket World Cup statistics

This is a list of statistics for the 1996 Cricket World Cup.

Bastiaan Zuiderent

Bastiaan ("Bas") Zuiderent (born 3 March 1977) is a former Dutch cricketer. He is a right-handed batsman and a right-arm medium-pace bowler. He is one of very few Dutchmen, who appeared in six ICC events as well.

Craig Spearman

Craig Murray Spearman (born 4 July 1972) is a former New Zealand cricketer who played 19 Tests and 51 One Day Internationals for New Zealand from 1995–2001.

He took his education from Kelston Boys High School, Auckland and then to Massey University, New Zealand.

Craig White

Craig White (born 1969) is a former English cricketer, who played Tests and ODIs. He is currently a cricket coach.

Gaddafi Stadium

Gaddafi Stadium (Urdu: قذافی اسٹیڈیم‎ / ALA-LC: Qaẕẕāfī Isṭeḍiyam) is a cricket ground in Lahore, Pakistan. It was designed by famous architect and engineer Nasreddin Murat-Khan, and constructed by Mian Abdul Khaliq and Company in 1959. The stadium was renovated for the 1996 Cricket World Cup when it hosted the final. The headquarters of the Pakistan Cricket Board are situated at Gaddafi Stadium making it the home of Pakistan cricket team. The stadium has a capacity of 27,000 seats, making it one of the biggest in Pakistan.

Hashan Tillakaratne

Deshabandu Hashan Prasantha Tillakaratne (born 14 July 1967, in Colombo) is a former Sri Lankan cricketer and a former Test captain for Sri Lanka. He was a key member for 1996 Cricket World Cup winning team for Sri Lanka. He is currently a politician and also involved in many aspects of cricket within the country.

Kumar Dharmasena

Handunnettige Deepthi Priyantha Kumar Dharmasena (born 24 April 1971) more commonly known as Kumar Dharmasena (Sinhalese: කුමාර ධර්මසේන) or by his nickname Unanduwa, is a Sri Lankan cricket umpire and former international cricketer, who played Tests and ODIs for Sri Lanka. He was a key member of the Sri Lanka team that won the 1996 Cricket World Cup. He was a right-handed batsman and a right-arm off break bowler.

Nayan Mongia

Nayan Ramlal Mongia pronunciation (born 19 December 1969 in Baroda) is a former Indian cricketer. He was a right-handed batsman and a wicketkeeper.

Neil Fairbrother

Neil Fairbrother (born Neil Harvey Fairbrother, 9 September 1963) is a former English cricketer, named by his mother after her favourite player, the Australian cricketer Neil Harvey. He was educated at Lymm Grammar School.

Fairbrother retired from all cricket in 2002, and became Director of Cricket at International Sports Management. In February 2018, Fairbrother set up Phoenix Management.

Paul Reiffel

Paul Ronald Reiffel (born 19 April 1966) is an Australian former cricketer who played in 35 Tests and 92 One Day Internationals (ODIs) from 1992 to 1999. He was part of Australia's victorious 1999 World Cup team. After retirement he became a first-class cricket umpire. He is currently a member of the Elite Panel of ICC Umpires.

Pramodya Wickramasinghe

Gallage Pramodya Wickramasinghe (born August 14, 1971 in Matara), commonly known as Pramodya Wickramasinghe, is a Sri Lankan cricketer. He is a right-handed batsman and a right-arm-fast bowler. He was a key member of 1996 Cricket World Cup winning team.

Rameez Raja

Rameez Hasan Raja (Urdu: رميز حسن راجہ) (born 14 August 1962) is a Pakistani cricket commentator and former cricketer, who represented Pakistan (sometimes as captain) during the 1980s and the 1990s. Since retiring from cricket, he has been a commentator in international cricket matches.

Roger Harper

Roger Andrew Harper (b. 17 March 1963, Georgetown, Demerara, Guyana) is a former West Indies cricketer turned coach, who played both Test and ODI cricket for the West Indies. His international career lasted 13 years, from 1983 to 1996, and he was later described as a "fabulous" fielder.His Test bowling average of 28.06 is superior to that of Lance Gibbs, giving him the leading average among all West Indian spinners with at least 25 Test wickets. One of his most notable performances was against South Africa in the Quarter Finals of the 1996 Cricket World Cup when he took 4/47 to allow the West Indies to seize control of the match.

Harper was an all-rounder who batted right-handed and bowled off breaks with his right arm; as a player, he recorded 535 runs and 46 wickets in his 25 Tests, and he played 200 first class matches. After his playing career, he became coach, taking over the West Indies team between 2000 and 2003, and then as team manager of the West Indies youth team in 2005. However, he was approached by the Cricket Kenya in late December 2005 with an offer of taking over the Kenyan national team after interim coach Mudassar Nazar, and the appointment was made official in January 2006. Harper said it "was great to be back" coaching players "at a relatively high level."

Shane Lee

Shane Lee (born 8 August 1973) is the elder brother of Australian pace bowler Brett Lee and a former Australian first-class cricketer. He was an all-rounder known for his hard batting and medium-pace bowling.

Steve Tikolo

Stephen Ogonji Tikolo (born 25 June 1971) is a former Kenya cricketer, and a former ODI captain. Widely regarded as the greatest Kenyan cricketer ever, Tikolo has scored the most runs and taken the second most wickets for the team in ODI's.

Thomas Odoyo

Thomas Odoyo Migai (born May 12, 1978 in Nairobi) is a former Kenyan cricketer and a former ODI captain. He is a right-handed batsman and a right-handed medium-fast bowler, often regarded as the best ever bowler produced by Kenya in international arena.

Upul Chandana

Umagiliya Durage Upul Chandana (born May 7, 1972 in Galle), or Upul Chandana, is a former Sri Lankan cricketer. He was more specifically a leg spin bowler and was also an outstanding fielder. He was a key member of the 1996 Cricket World Cup winning team.

Chandana is considered to be one of the best leg spinners ever played for Sri Lanka. He was also a competent lower-order batsman, having scored a total of seven half-centuries at international level.

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1996 Cricket World Cup
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