1995 FIFA Women's World Cup

The 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, the second edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in Sweden and won by Norway.[1][2][3] The tournament featured 12 women's national teams from six continental confederations. The 12 teams were drawn into three groups of four and each group played a round-robin tournament. At the end of the group stage, the top two teams and two best third-ranked teams advanced to the knockout stage, beginning with the quarter-finals and culminating with the final at Råsunda Stadium on 18 June 1995.

Sweden became the first country to host both men's and women's World Cup, having hosted the men's in 1958.

Australia, Canada, and England made their debuts in the competition. The tournament also hosted as qualification for the 1996 Olympic games, with the eight quarter-finalists being invited to the Olympics. In the second edition of the Women's World Cup, matches were lengthened to the standard 90 minutes, and three points were awarded for a win.[4]

1995 FIFA Women's World Cup
Världsmästerskapet i fotboll för damer 1995
1995 FIFA Women's World Cup
Official logo
Tournament details
Host countrySweden
Dates5–18 June
Teams12 (from 6 confederations)
Venue(s)5 (in 5 host cities)
Final positions
Champions Norway (1st title)
Runners-up Germany
Third place United States
Fourth place China PR
Tournament statistics
Matches played26
Goals scored99 (3.81 per match)
Attendance112,213 (4,316 per match)
Top scorer(s)Norway Ann Kristin Aarønes (6 goals)
Best player(s)Norway Hege Riise
Fair play award Sweden

Summary

Bulgaria was originally awarded hosting rights for the tournament, but had to relinquish the rights and FIFA ended up awarding the tournament to Sweden.[5] About 112,000 tickets were sold for the entire tournament.[6]

As a FIFA rules experiment, each team was allowed a two-minute time out each half.[7]

Norway won the 1995 title, with one of four Norwegians watching the game on television. Norway's team plane was escorted back to Oslo by two F-16s on their way to a victory celebration.[8]

Venues

Teams

FIFA Womens World Cup 1995
Qualifying countries and their results of the 1995 Women's World Cup

As in the previous edition of the FIFA Women's World cup, held in 1991, 12 teams participated in the final tournament. The teams were:

Squads

For a list of the squads that disputed the final tournament, see 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup squads.

Match officials

Africa
  • Guinea Engage Camara
  • Mali Mamadou Toure
  • South Africa Petros Mathabela
  • Sudan Mohamed Hamid Osman
Asia
North, Central America and Caribbean
Oceania
  • New Zealand Linda May Black
South America
  • Brazil Ana Bia Batista
  • Brazil Maria Edilene Siqueira
  • Chile Eduardo Gamboa
  • Peru Manuel Yupanqui Souza
Europe
  • Denmark Gitte Holm
  • France Corinne Lagrange
  • Germany Christine Frai
  • Luxembourg Alain Hamer
  • Norway Bente Skogvang
  • Switzerland Veronika Schluchter-Maerki
  • Sweden Eva Ödlund
  • Sweden Ingrid Jonsson

Group stage

Teams were awarded three points for a win, one point for a draw, and none for a defeat.[4]

Group A

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1  Germany 3 2 0 1 9 4 +5 6
2  Sweden (H) 3 2 0 1 5 3 +2 6
3  Japan 3 1 0 2 2 4 −2 3
4  Brazil 3 1 0 2 3 8 −5 3

(H): Host.

Sweden 0–1 Brazil
Report Roseli Goal 37'
Germany 1–0 Japan
Neid Goal 23' Report
Sweden 3–2 Germany
Andersson Goal 65' (pen.) Goal 86'
Sundhage Goal 80'
Report Wiegmann Goal 9' (pen.)
Lohn Goal 42'
Brazil 1–2 Japan
Pretinha Goal 7' Report Noda Goal 13'45'
Sweden 2–0 Japan
Videkull Goal 66'
Andelen Goal 88'
Report
Brazil 1–6 Germany
Roseli Goal 19' Report Prinz Goal 5'
Meinert Goal 22'
Wiegmann Goal 42' (pen.)
Mohr Goal 78'89'
Bernhard Goal 90'

Group B

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1  Norway 3 3 0 0 17 0 +17 9
2  England 3 2 0 1 6 6 0 6
3  Canada 3 0 1 2 5 13 −8 1
4  Nigeria 3 0 1 2 5 14 −9 1
Norway 8–0 Nigeria
Sandberg Goal 30'44'82'
Riise Goal 49'
Aarønes Goal 60'90'
Medalen Goal 67'
Svensson Goal 76' (pen.)
Report
England 3–2 Canada
Coultard Goal 51' (pen.)85'
Spacey Goal 76' (pen.)
Report Stoumbos Goal 87'
Donnelly Goal 90+1'
Norway 2–0 England
Haugen Goal 7'
Riise Goal 37'
Report
Nigeria 3–3 Canada
Nwadike Goal 26'
Avre Goal 60'
Okoroafor Goal 77'
Report Burtini Goal 12'55'
Donnelly Goal 20'
Norway 7–0 Canada
Aarønes Goal 4'21'90+3'
Riise Goal 12'
Pettersen Goal 71'89'
Leinan Goal 84'
Report
Nigeria 2–3 England
Okoroafor Goal 13'
Nwadike Goal 74'
Report Farley Goal 10'38'
Walker Goal 27'

Group C

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1  United States 3 2 1 0 9 4 +5 7
2  China PR 3 2 1 0 10 6 +4 7
3  Denmark 3 1 0 2 6 5 +1 3
4  Australia 3 0 0 3 3 13 −10 0

Group C started with back-and-forth 3–3 draw between the United States and China with the Chinese coming back from a 3–1 deficit. Denmark's opening 5–0 win over Australia, in which Sonia Gegenhuber was sent off in the 45th minute for the Aussies, ultimately led to their securing one of the best third place runner up spots as they would lose their next two matches.[9]

United States goalkeeper Brianna Scurry was sent off in the 88th minute of the second group game against Denmark. With all three substitutions used, U.S. manager Tony DiCicco called upon striker Mia Hamm to play goalkeeper. Hamm made two saves over eight minutes of stoppage time to secure the 2–0 win.[10] In the other game, Angela Iannotta scored Australia's first-ever World Cup goal, but China defeated the Matildas 4–2.[9]

United States 3–3 China PR
Venturini Goal 22'
Milbrett Goal 34'
Hamm Goal 51'
Report Liping Goal 38'
Wei Goal 74'
Sun Goal 79'
Denmark 5–0 Australia
Krogh Goal 12'48'
Nielsen Goal 25'
Jensen Goal 37'
Hansen Goal 86'
Report
United States 2–0 Denmark
Lilly Goal 9'
Milbrett Goal 49'
Report
China PR 4–2 Australia
Zhou Goal 23'
Shi Goal 54'78'
Liu Goal 90+3'
Report Iannotta Goal 25'
Hughes Goal 89'
United States 4–1 Australia
Foudy Goal 69'
Fawcett Goal 72'
Overbeck Goal 90+2' (pen.)
Keller Goal 90+4'
Report Casagrande Goal 54'
China PR 3–1 Denmark
Shi Goal 21'
Sun Goal 76'
Wei Goal 90'
Report Bonde Goal 44'

Ranking of third-placed teams

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1  Denmark 3 1 0 2 6 5 +1 3
2  Japan 3 1 0 2 2 4 −2 3
3  Canada 3 0 1 2 5 13 −8 1

Knockout stage

Bracket

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
13 June — Arosvallen
 
 
 Germany 3
 
15 June — Olympia Stadion
 
 England 0
 
 Germany 1
 
13 June — Olympia Stadion
 
 China PR 0
 
 Sweden 1 (3)
 
18 June — Råsunda
 
 China PR 1 (4)
 
 Germany 0
 
13 June — Strömvallen
 
 Norway 2
 
 United States 4
 
15 June — Arosvallen
 
 Japan 0
 
 United States 0
 
13 June — Tingvallen
 
 Norway 1 Third place
 
 Norway 3
 
17 June — Strömvallen
 
 Denmark 1
 
 China PR 0
 
 
 United States 2
 

Quarter-finals

Germany 3–0 England
Voss Goal 41'
Meinert Goal 55'
Mohr Goal 82'
Report
Sweden 1–1 (a.e.t.) China PR
Kalte Goal 90+3' Report Sun Q. Goal 29'
Penalties
Andersson Penalty missed
Videkull Penalty scored
Pohjanen Penalty scored
Sundhage Penalty scored
Nessvold Penalty missed
3–4 Penalty scored Wen
Penalty scored Huilin
Penalty scored Yufeng
Penalty scored Qingxia
Penalty missed Ailing
United States 4–0 Japan
Lilly Goal 8'42'
Milbrett Goal 45'
Venturini Goal 80'
Report
Norway 3–1 Denmark
Espeseth Goal 21'
Medalen Goal 64'
Riise Goal 85'
Report Krogh Goal 86'

Semi-finals

Germany 1–0 China PR
Wiegmann Goal 88' Report
United States 0–1 Norway
Report Aarønes Goal 10'

Third place play-off

China PR 0–2 United States
Report Venturini Goal 24'
Hamm Goal 55'

Final

Germany 0–2 Norway
Report Riise Goal 37'
Pettersen Goal 40'

Statistics

Goalscorers

There were 99 goals scored in 26 matches, for an average of 3.81 goals per match. Ann Kristin Aarønes of Norway won the Golden Shoe award for scoring six goals.

6 goals

5 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

Awards

The following awards were given at the conclusion of the tournament:[11]

Golden Ball Silver Ball Bronze Ball
Norway Hege Riise Norway Gro Espeseth Norway Ann Kristin Aarønes
Golden Shoe Silver Shoe Bronze Shoe
Norway Ann Kristin Aarønes Norway Hege Riise China Shi Guihong
6 goals 5 goals 3 goals, 2 assists
FIFA Fair Play Award
 Sweden

Tournament ranking

Per statistical convention in football, matches decided in extra time are counted as wins and losses, while matches decided by penalty shoot-outs are counted as draws. Teams eliminated in the quarter-finals are ranked by their quarter-final goal differential.

Pos Grp Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Final result
1 B  Norway 6 6 0 0 23 1 +22 18 Champions
2 A  Germany 6 4 0 2 13 6 +7 12 Runners-up
3 C  United States 6 4 1 1 15 5 +10 13 Third place
4 C  China PR 6 2 2 2 11 10 +1 8 Fourth place
5 A  Sweden 4 2 1 1 6 4 +2 7 Eliminated in
quarter-finals
6 C  Denmark 4 1 0 3 7 8 −1 3
7 B  England 4 2 0 2 6 9 −3 6
8 A  Japan 4 1 0 3 2 8 −6 3
9 A  Brazil 3 1 0 2 3 8 −5 3 Eliminated in
group stage
10 B  Canada 3 0 1 2 5 13 −8 1
11 B  Nigeria 3 0 1 2 5 14 −9 1
12 C  Australia 3 0 0 3 3 13 −10 0

References

  1. ^ "WOMEN'S WORLD CUP; Norway's Rivalry With U.S. Is Intense – New York Times". Nytimes.com. 13 June 1999. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  2. ^ "Norway Women Win World Cup – Chicago Tribune". Articles.chicagotribune.com. 19 June 1995. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  3. ^ "Raising Their Game: Enjoying it in 1995". YouTube. 14 June 2012. Retrieved 2 August 2012.
  4. ^ a b Williams, Jean (1 November 2007). A Beautiful Game: International Perspectives on Women's Football. Berg Publishers. p. 4. ISBN 978-1-84788-345-2. Some of the terms and conditions had been changed this time: 90 minutes of play instead of 80 in China, a full group of 20 players instead of 18, three points for a win, and the experiment with time out.
  5. ^ Russo, Anthony. "1995 Women's World Cup".
  6. ^ "WOMEN'S WORLD CUP: Soccer's biggest event a week away". Kitsap Sun. 13 June 1999.
  7. ^ Goff, Steven (4 June 1995). "Women's World Cup '95 Sweden". Washington Post.
  8. ^ Longman, Jere (13 June 1999). "WOMEN'S WORLD CUP; Norway's Rivalry With U.S. Is Intense". New York Times.
  9. ^ a b Peter Georgaras; Steve Darby; Andre Kruger; Thomas Esamie. "Matildas Internationals for 1995". OzFootball.
  10. ^ Yoesting, Travis (4 April 2019). "TBT: Remember When Mia Hamm Played Goalie At The Women's World Cup?". the18.com.
  11. ^ Awards 1995
  12. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup 1995 – Technical Report, Part 1: Table" (PDF). FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. p. 14 (15 of PDF). Retrieved 1 July 2019.

External links

1995 FIFA Women's World Cup Final

The 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup Final was a football match that took place at Råsunda Stadium in Stockholm, Sweden on 18 June 1995. It pitted Germany and Norway to determine the winner of the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup. Norway won 2–0 with goals from Hege Riise and Marianne Pettersen.

1995 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification

The qualification process for the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup saw 54 teams from the six FIFA confederations compete for the 12 places in the tournament's finals. Sweden qualified automatically as hosts. The places were divided as follows:

Africa - represented by the CAF: 1 berth

Asia - AFC: 2

Europe - UEFA: 5 (Sweden qualified automatically as hosts)

North, Central America & the Caribbean - CONCACAF: 2

Oceania - OFC: 1

South America - CONMEBOL: 1A total of 52 teams played at least one qualifying match. A total of 135 qualifying matches were played, and 655 goals were scored (an average of 4.85 per match).

1995 FIFA Women's World Cup squads

Below are the rosters for the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup tournament in Sweden.

Alison Forman

Alison Leigh Forman (born 17 March 1969 in Maitland, New South Wales) is a retired Australian international soccer player. Among her accomplishments, Forman played for the Australia women's national soccer team at the 1995 and 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup finals and at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia.

Angela Kelly (soccer)

Angela Kelly (born 10 March 1971) is a Canadian footballer who played as a midfielder for the Canada women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup. She was a 2004 inductee into the Canada Soccer Hall of Fame.

Brenda Sempare

Brenda Sempare (born 9 November 1961) is an English former international women's footballer. She played in all four games of England's 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup appearance.

Helen Nilsson (footballer)

Helen Nilsson (born 24 November 1970) is a Swedish footballer who played as a forward for the Sweden women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup and 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup. At the club level she played for Gideonsbergs IF in Sweden.

Jane Oakley

Jane Oakley (born 25 June 1966) is an Australian former footballer who played as a defender for the Australia women's national soccer team. She was part of the team at the 1994 OFC Women's Championship and 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup. At the club level, she played for Berwick City in Australia.In 2004, she was inducted into the Australian Soccer Association Hall of Fame (HOF).

In 2012, she was inducted into the Football Federation Victoria Hall of Fame.

Janine Helland

Janine Helland (born 24 April 1970) is a Canadian footballer who played as a defender for the Canada women's national soccer team. She was part of the teams at the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup and 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Joan McEachern

Joan McEachern (born 4 December 1963) is a Canadian footballer who played as a midfielder for the Canada women's national soccer team. She was part of the team at the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup.In 1999, McEachern was inducted into the Canadian Soccer Hall of Fame.

Karina Christensen

Karina Christensen (born 1 July 1973) is a Danish footballer who played as a forward for the Denmark women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup and 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Lisa Casagrande

Lisa Maree Casagrande (born 29 May 1978, Lismore, New South Wales) is an Australian retired footballer. She played at the FIFA Women's World Cup in 1995 (scoring a goal) and 1999, and at the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney.

Nalvinha

Nalvinha (born 14 July 1965) is a Brazilian footballer who played as a forward for the Brazil women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup and 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Patience Avre

Patience Avre (born 10 June 1976) is a Nigerian former football forward who played for the Nigeria women's national football team at the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup, 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup and 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup as well as the 2000 Summer Olympics.

Sacha Wainwright

Sacha Wainwright (born 6 February 1972) is an Australian retired soccer defender who played for the Australia women's national soccer team at the 2004 Summer Olympics. At the club level, she played for Canberra Eclipse.

Sonia Gegenhuber

Sonia Gegenhuber is a retired Australian soccer player who played 75 times (including 60 full international matches) for Australia and was a national captain.

Sunni Hughes

Linda "Sunni" Hughes (born 9 June 1968) is an Australian former women's association football player. She participated in 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup and 2000 Olympics. Hughes played professional club football in Denmark and Japan. In December 2013 she was inducted to Australia's Soccer Hall of Fame.

Tracey Wheeler

Tracey Wheeler (born 26 September 1967) is an Australian former football goalkeeper who played for the Australia women's national soccer team at the 2000 Summer Olympics.

Ursula Lohn

Ursula Lohn (born 7 November 1966 in Cologne) is a German footballer who played as a midfielder for the Germany women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup. At the club level, she played for TuS Ahrbach in Germany.

1995 FIFA Women's World Cup
Stages
General information
1995 FIFA Women's World Cup finalists
Champions
Runner-up
Third Place
Fourth Place
Quarter-finals
Group stage
Tournaments
Qualification
Finals
Squads
Miscellaneous
Predecessors
1995 FIFA Women's World Cup stadiums

Languages

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