1995–96 NBA season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the 50th season of the National Basketball Association (NBA), though the 50th anniversary was not celebrated until the following season. The Chicago Bulls defeated the Seattle SuperSonics 4 games to 2 in the NBA Finals to win their fourth championship.

1995–96 NBA season
LeagueNational Basketball Association
SportBasketball
DurationNovember 3, 1995 – April 21, 1996
April 25 – June 2, 1996 (Playoffs)
June 5 – 16, 1996 (Finals)
Number of teams29
TV partner(s)NBC, TBS, TNT
Draft
Top draft pickJoe Smith
Picked byGolden State Warriors
Regular season
Top seedChicago Bulls
Season MVPMichael Jordan (Chicago)
Top scorerMichael Jordan (Chicago)
Playoffs
Eastern championsChicago Bulls
  Eastern runners-upOrlando Magic
Western championsSeattle SuperSonics
  Western runners-upUtah Jazz
Finals
ChampionsChicago Bulls
  Runners-upSeattle SuperSonics
Finals MVPMichael Jordan (Chicago)

1995 NBA lockout

The 1995 NBA lockout was the first lockout of four in the history of the NBA. When the previous collective bargaining agreement expired after the 1993–94 season, a no-strike, no-lockout agreement was made in October 1994, with a moratorium on signing or restructuring player contracts. That moratorium expired on June 15, 1995, one day after the NBA Finals concluded. The expansion draft (which was held on June 24) and the NBA draft (which was held on June 28) were allowed to take place, but all other league business, including trades, free-agent signings, contract extensions, and summer leagues were suspended[1] from July 1 until September 12; no games were lost due to the lockout, as a new collective bargaining agreement was reached well before the start of the 1995–96 season.[2][3][4][5] Among the key issues in the labor dispute were the salary cap, free agency, a rookie salary cap, and revenue sharing.[1]

Notable occurrences

Coaching changes
Offseason
Team 1994–95 coach 1995–96 coach
Boston Celtics Chris Ford M.L. Carr
Detroit Pistons Don Chaney Doug Collins
Golden State Warriors Bob Lanier Rick Adelman
Miami Heat Alvin Gentry Pat Riley
New York Knicks Pat Riley Don Nelson
Toronto Raptors Do not exist Brendan Malone
Vancouver Grizzlies Brian Winters
In-season
Team Outgoing coach Incoming coach
Minnesota Timberwolves Bill Blair Flip Saunders
New York Knicks Don Nelson Jeff Van Gundy
Phoenix Suns Paul Westphal Cotton Fitzsimmons

1995–96 NBA changes

  • The Atlanta Hawks changed their logo and uniforms. The road jerseys were both red and black faded together.
  • The Boston Celtics moved into the FleetCenter
  • The Chicago Bulls got new black alternate uniforms with pinstripes.
  • The Houston Rockets changed their logo and uniforms, adding pinstripes to their jerseys and navy to their color scheme.
  • The Miami Heat added new red alternate uniforms.
  • The Milwaukee Bucks added new green alternate uniforms.
  • The New York Knicks added the "New York" script to their logo, and got new blue alternate uniforms with black on the side of their jerseys.
  • The Portland Trail Blazers moved into the Rose Garden.
  • The Seattle SuperSonics changed their logo and uniforms, replacing their primary green and yellow colors with dark green and red.
  • The expansion Toronto Raptors got a new logo and new pinstripe uniforms, adding purple and red to their color scheme.
  • The expansion Vancouver Grizzlies got a new logo and new uniforms, adding teal and brown to their color scheme.

Final standings

By division

Atlantic Division W L PCT GB Home Road Div GP
y-Orlando Magic 60 22 .732 12.0 37–4 23–18 21–3 82
x-New York Knicks 47 35 .573 25.0 26–15 21–20 16–8 82
x-Miami Heat 42 40 .512 30.0 26–15 16–25 13–12 82
Washington Bullets 39 43 .476 33.0 25–16 14–27 10–14 82
Boston Celtics 33 49 .402 39.0 18–23 15–26 12–12 82
New Jersey Nets 30 52 .366 42.0 20–21 10–31 8–17 82
Philadelphia 76ers 18 64 .220 54.0 11–30 7–34 5–19 82
Central Division W L PCT GB Home Road Div GP
z-Chicago Bulls 72 10 .878 0.0 39–2 33–8 24–4 82
x-Indiana Pacers 52 30 .634 20.0 32–9 20–21 19–9 82
x-Cleveland Cavaliers 51 31 .622 21.0 33–8 18–23 15–9 82
x-Atlanta Hawks 46 36 .561 26.0 26–15 20–21 15–13 82
x-Detroit Pistons 46 36 .561 26.0 30–11 16–25 15–13 82
Charlotte Hornets 41 41 .500 31.0 25–16 16–25 13–15 82
Milwaukee Bucks 25 57 .305 47.0 14–27 11–30 8–20 82
Toronto Raptors 21 61 .256 51.0 15–26 6–35 5–23 82
Midwest Division W L PCT GB Home Road Div
y-San Antonio Spurs 59 23 .720 33–8 26–15 19–5
x-Utah Jazz 55 27 .671 4 34–7 21–20 14–10
x-Houston Rockets 48 34 .585 11 27–14 21–20 15–9
Denver Nuggets 35 47 .427 24 24–17 11–30 13–11
Minnesota Timberwolves 26 56 .317 33 17–24 9–32 10–14
Dallas Mavericks 26 56 .317 33 16–25 10–31 10–14
Vancouver Grizzlies 15 67 .183 44 10–31 5–36 3–21
Pacific Division W L PCT GB Home Road Div
y-Seattle SuperSonics 64 18 .780 38–3 26–15 21–3
x-Los Angeles Lakers 53 29 .646 11 30–11 23–18 17–7
x-Portland Trail Blazers 44 38 .537 20 26–15 18–23 11–13
x-Phoenix Suns 41 41 .500 23 25–16 16–25 9–15
x-Sacramento Kings 39 43 .476 25 26–15 13–28 11–13
Golden State Warriors 36 46 .439 28 23–18 13–28 7–17
Los Angeles Clippers 29 53 .354 35 19–22 10–31 7–17

By conference

Eastern Conference
# Team W L PCT GB GP
1 z-Chicago Bulls * 72 10 .878 82
2 y-Orlando Magic * 60 22 .732 12.0 82
3 x-Indiana Pacers 52 30 .634 20.0 82
4 x-Cleveland Cavaliers 51 31 .622 21.0 82
5 x-New York Knicks 47 35 .573 25.0 82
6 x-Atlanta Hawks 46 36 .561 26.0 82
7 x-Detroit Pistons 46 36 .561 26.0 82
8 x-Miami Heat 42 40 .512 30.0 82
9 Charlotte Hornets 41 41 .500 31.0 82
10 Washington Bullets 39 43 .476 33.0 82
11 Boston Celtics 33 49 .402 39.0 82
12 New Jersey Nets 30 52 .366 42.0 82
13 Milwaukee Bucks 25 57 .305 47.0 82
14 Toronto Raptors 21 61 .256 51.0 82
15 Philadelphia 76ers 18 64 .220 54.0 82
Western Conference
# Team W L PCT GB GP
1 c-Seattle SuperSonics * 64 18 .780 82
2 y-San Antonio Spurs * 59 23 .720 5 82
3 x-Utah Jazz 55 27 .671 9 82
4 x-Los Angeles Lakers 53 29 .646 11 82
5 x-Houston Rockets 48 34 .585 16 82
6 x-Portland Trail Blazers 44 38 .537 20 82
7 x-Phoenix Suns 41 41 .500 23 82
8 x-Sacramento Kings 39 43 .476 25 82
9 Golden State Warriors 36 46 .439 28 82
10 Denver Nuggets 35 47 .427 29 82
11 Los Angeles Clippers 29 53 .354 35 82
12 Minnesota Timberwolves 26 56 .317 38 82
13 Dallas Mavericks 26 56 .317 38 82
14 Vancouver Grizzlies 15 67 .183 49 82

Notes

  • z – Clinched home court advantage for the entire playoffs
  • c – Clinched home court advantage for the conference playoffs
  • y – Clinched division title
  • x – Clinched playoff spot

Playoffs

Teams in bold advanced to the next round. The numbers to the left of each team indicate the team's seeding in its conference, and the numbers to the right indicate the number of games the team won in that round. The division champions are marked by an asterisk. Home court advantage does not necessarily belong to the higher-seeded team, but instead the team with the better regular season record; teams enjoying the home advantage are shown in italics.

First Round Conference Semifinals Conference Finals NBA Finals
            
1 Seattle 3
8 Sacramento 1
1 Seattle 4
5 Houston 0
4 L.A. Lakers 1
5 Houston 3
1 Seattle 4
Western Conference
3 Utah 3
3 Utah 3
6 Portland 2
3 Utah 4
2 San Antonio 2
2 San Antonio 3
7 Phoenix 1
W1 Seattle 2
E1 Chicago 4
1 Chicago 3
8 Miami 0
1 Chicago 4
5 New York 1
4 Cleveland 0
5 New York 3
1 Chicago 4
Eastern Conference
2 Orlando 0
3 Indiana 2
6 Atlanta 3
6 Atlanta 1
2 Orlando 4
2 Orlando 3
7 Detroit 0

Statistics leaders

Category Player Team Stat
Points per game Michael Jordan Chicago Bulls 30.4
Rebounds per game Dennis Rodman Chicago Bulls 14.9
Assists per game John Stockton Utah Jazz 11.2
Steals per game Gary Payton Seattle SuperSonics 2.85
Blocks per game Dikembe Mutombo Denver Nuggets 4.49
FG% Gheorghe Mureșan Washington Bullets .584
FT% Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf Denver Nuggets .930
3FG% Tim Legler Washington Bullets .522

NBA awards

Yearly awards

Note: All information on this page were obtained on the History section on NBA.com

Player of the week

The following players were named NBA Player of the Week.

Week Player
Nov. 3 – Nov. 12 Anfernee Hardaway (Orlando Magic)
Nov. 13 – Nov. 19 Cedric Ceballos (Los Angeles Lakers)
Nov. 20 – Nov. 26 Shawn Kemp (Seattle SuperSonics)
Nov. 27 – Dec. 3 Terrell Brandon (Cleveland Cavaliers)
Dec. 4 – Dec. 10 Dikembe Mutombo (Denver Nuggets)
Dec. 11 – Dec. 17 Scottie Pippen (Chicago Bulls)
Dec. 18 – Dec. 24 Michael Jordan (Chicago Bulls)
Dec. 25 – Dec. 30 Karl Malone (Utah Jazz)
Jan. 2 – Jan. 7 Clifford R. Robinson (Portland Trail Blazers)
Jan. 8 – Jan. 14 David Robinson (San Antonio Spurs)
Jan. 15 – Jan. 21 Michael Jordan (Chicago Bulls)
Jan. 22 – Jan. 28 Reggie Miller (Indiana Pacers)
Jan. 29 – Feb. 4 Jason Kidd (Dallas Mavericks)
Feb. 13 – Feb. 18 Armon Gilliam (New Jersey Nets)
Feb. 19 – Feb. 25 Shawn Kemp (Seattle SuperSonics)
Feb. 26 – Mar. 3 (tie) Hakeem Olajuwon (Houston Rockets)
Feb. 26 – Mar. 3 (tie) Shaquille O'Neal (Orlando Magic)
Mar. 4 – Mar. 10 Michael Jordan (Chicago Bulls)
Mar. 11 – Mar. 17 Grant Hill (Detroit Pistons)
Mar. 18 – Mar. 24 Chris Gatling (Miami Heat)
Mar. 25 – Mar. 31 Arvydas Sabonis (Portland Trail Blazers)
Apr. 1 – Apr. 7 Kevin Johnson (Phoenix Suns)

Player of the month

The following players were named NBA Player of the Month.

Month Player
November Anfernee Hardaway (Orlando Magic)
December Scottie Pippen (Chicago Bulls)
January Michael Jordan (Chicago Bulls)
February Charles Barkley (Phoenix Suns)
March David Robinson (San Antonio Spurs)
April Juwan Howard (Washington Bullets)

Rookie of the month

The following players were named NBA Rookie of the Month.

Month Rookie
November Damon Stoudamire (Toronto Raptors)
December Joe Smith (Golden State Warriors)
January Damon Stoudamire (Toronto Raptors)
February Joe Smith (Golden State Warriors)
March Jerry Stackhouse (Philadelphia 76ers)
April Arvydas Sabonis (Portland Trail Blazers)

Coach of the month

The following coaches were named NBA Coach of the Month.

Month Coach
November Garry St. Jean (Sacramento Kings)
December Mike Fratello (Cleveland Cavaliers)
January Phil Jackson (Chicago Bulls)
February George Karl (Seattle SuperSonics)
March Bob Hill (San Antonio Spurs)
April Phil Jackson (Chicago Bulls)

Milestones

Debuts

The following is a list of players of note who played their first NBA game in 1995–96, listed with their first team:

Last games

The following is a list of players of note that played their last game in the NBA in 1995–96, listed with their last team:

References

  1. ^ a b Brown, Clifton. "1995 NBA playoffs; NBA. Talks resume as lockout looms."The New York Times, Houston, 13 June 1995. Retrieved on 2 June 2015.
  2. ^ Friend, Tom (June 15, 1995). "Stern Says Labor Deal Could Be Struck Soon". The New York Times. Retrieved November 17, 2011.
  3. ^ Brown, Clifton (June 13, 1995). "NBA Talks Resume as Lockout Looms". The New York Times. Retrieved November 17, 2011.
  4. ^ "NBA Lockout Chronology". CNN Sports Illustrated. Time Warner Company. January 6, 1999. Retrieved November 17, 2011.
  5. ^ "10 Game-Changing Pro Sports Lockouts and Strikes – National Basketball Association (1995)". CNBC.com. CNBC LLC. Archived from the original on 2012-08-09. Retrieved November 17, 2011.
1995 NBA draft

The 1995 NBA draft took place on June 28, 1995, at SkyDome in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. It marked the first NBA draft to be held outside the United States and was the first draft for the two Canadian expansion teams, Toronto Raptors and Vancouver Grizzlies. Kevin Garnett, who was taken fifth in this draft, is notable for being the first player in two decades to be selected straight out of high school. Garnett would go on to gather fifteen All Star selections, eight All-NBA selections (four of those being First-Teams), one NBA MVP award, and multiple other accolades. Rasheed Wallace and Jerry Stackhouse also had

successful careers, being four-time and two-time All-Stars respectively. Wallace won an NBA championship in 2004 with the Detroit Pistons, while Stackhouse scored the most total points in the league in 2000, also with the Pistons.

The other remaining top selections had relatively productive careers, but were considered to have never reached their full potential. Joe Smith put up solid, but unspectacular numbers throughout his career and is generally considered a disappointment for a first overall selection. He was also involved in a salary cap scandal with the Minnesota Timberwolves. Antonio McDyess was a one-time All-Star, but serious and continuing knee injuries decreased much of his effectiveness in the prime of his career. Damon Stoudamire was the 1995–96 NBA Rookie of the Year and had a solid career although he was arrested, suspended and fined several times for marijuana possession. Bryant Reeves impressed early in his career but a season after being granted a six-year, $61.8 million contract extension, his numbers went down due to weight and back problems and he retired after only playing six NBA seasons, all with the Vancouver Grizzlies.This draft was also notable for two of the biggest busts in NBA history, Ed O'Bannon and Shawn Respert. O'Bannon had received national accolades for leading the UCLA Bruins to the NCAA Championship, but only played two years in the NBA. Respert played only four seasons in the NBA, while secretly hiding that he was suffering from stomach cancer.

1995 NBA expansion draft

The 1995 NBA Expansion Draft was the tenth expansion draft of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The draft was held on June 24, 1995, so that the newly founded Toronto Raptors and Vancouver Grizzlies could acquire players for the upcoming 1995–96 season. Toronto was awarded an expansion team on September 30, 1993, while Vancouver was awarded the league's 29th franchise on April 27, 1994. They were the first NBA teams based in Canada since the 1946–47 season Toronto Huskies.In an NBA expansion draft, new NBA teams are allowed to acquire players from the previously established teams in the league. Not all players on a given team are available during an expansion draft, since each team can protect a certain number of players from being selected. In this draft, each of the twenty-seven other NBA teams had protected eight players from their roster, and the Raptors and the Grizzlies selected fourteen and thirteen unprotected players respectively, one from each team.

Prior to the draft, the league conducted a coin flip between the Raptors and the Grizzlies to decide their draft order in this expansion draft and in the 1995 NBA draft. The Grizzlies won the coin flip and chose to have the higher pick in the 1995 Draft, allowing the Raptors to receive the first selection and the right to select fourteen players in the expansion draft.The Raptors were formed and owned by a group headed by Toronto businessman John Bitove. Brendan Malone was hired as the franchise's first head coach. The Raptors used their first pick to select three-time NBA champion B. J. Armstrong from the Chicago Bulls. However, Armstrong refused to report for training and was traded to the Golden State Warriors for five other players. The Raptors' other selections included four-time NBA champion John Salley and six other former first-round picks, Doug Smith, Willie Anderson, Ed Pinckney, Acie Earl, B. J. Tyler and Oliver Miller. Seven players from the expansion draft joined the Raptors for their inaugural season, but only Miller, Earl and Žan Tabak played more than one season for the team. Tabak and Andrés Guibert were the only international players in the draft.

The Grizzlies were formed and owned by Vancouver sports magnate Arthur Griffiths. Former Atlanta Hawks assistant coach Brian Winters was hired as the franchise's first head coach. The Grizzlies used their first pick to select former first-round pick Greg Anthony from the New York Knicks. The Grizzlies' other selections included three-time NBA champion Byron Scott and three other former first-round picks, Benoit Benjamin, Doug Edwards and Blue Edwards. On draft day, the Grizzlies acquired a second-round draft pick from the Orlando Magic in exchange for selecting Rodney Dent, who had never played in the NBA. Eight players from the expansion draft joined the Grizzlies for their inaugural season, but only Anthony and Blue Edwards played more than one season for the team.

1995–96 Boston Celtics season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the 50th season for the Boston Celtics in the National Basketball Association. A new era began for the Celtics as they moved into their current home, a state of the art new arena then known as the Fleet Center (now TD Garden). In addition, this also ended their practice of playing home games in Hartford's Civic Center.

There was lots of speculation during the previous off-season over who would coach the team after the firing of Chris Ford, with candidates that included former Celtics coaches Dave Cowens and K.C. Jones, and even former Celtic player Paul Silas. Ultimately, General Manager M.L. Carr decided to hire himself as the team's coach. The Celtics signed free agent Dana Barros, who won the Most Improved Player award the previous season with the Philadelphia 76ers. Early into the season, they traded Sherman Douglas to the Milwaukee Bucks for Todd Day and Alton Lister as they played around .500 with a 12–12 start. However, the magic was clearly gone for the Celtics as they lost 15 of their next 18 games, finishing fifth in the Atlantic Division with a 33–49 record. Dino Radja led the team in scoring with 19.7 points per game, but was out for the remainder of the season with an ankle injury after 53 games. Following the season, second-year center Eric Montross was traded to the Dallas Mavericks.

1995–96 Dallas Mavericks season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the Mavericks' 16th season in the National Basketball Association. The Mavericks got off to a fast start winning their first four games. However, after a 5–1 start to the season, they would struggle losing 21 of their next 24 games, as Jamal Mashburn went down with a knee injury after playing just 18 games. With Mashburn out for the remainder of the season, George McCloud would take his place in the lineup, averaging 18.9 points per game while finishing second in the league with 257 three-point field goals. However, second-year star Jason Kidd and Jim Jackson had trouble getting along, and Roy Tarpley was banned from the NBA for violating their drug policy. The Mavericks suffered an 11-game losing streak in March, and finished fifth in the Midwest Division with a 26–56 record. Kidd was selected to play in the 1996 NBA All-Star Game, which marked his first All-Star appearance.

Also in March, Ross Perot, Jr. purchased the team from founder Don Carter. Following the season, Popeye Jones was traded to the Toronto Raptors, Lucious Harris signed as a free agent with the Philadelphia 76ers, and Lorenzo Williams signed with the Washington Bullets.

1995–96 Detroit Pistons season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the Pistons' 48th season in the National Basketball Association, and 39th season in the city of Detroit. During the offseason, the Pistons hired Doug Collins as head coach while acquiring Otis Thorpe from the Portland Trail Blazers, who won a championship as a member of the Houston Rockets in the 1994 NBA Finals. Under Collins, the Pistons who were now led by second-year star Grant Hill and Allan Houston, played .500 basketball in the first half of the season, as the team signed free agent Michael Curry along the way. However, Joe Dumars' production would slip as he averaged just 11.8 points per game. The Pistons reemerged as a playoff contender finishing fifth in the Central Division with a 46–36 record, and returned to the playoffs after a three-year absence thanks to the stellar play of Hill, who was selected for the 1996 NBA All-Star Game.

However, in the first round of the playoffs, they would be swept by the Orlando Magic in three straight games. Following the season, Houston signed as a free agent with the New York Knicks.

1995–96 Golden State Warriors season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the Warriors' 50th season in the National Basketball Association, and 34th in the San Francisco Bay Area. The Warriors won the Draft Lottery, and selected Joe Smith from the University of Maryland with the first overall pick in the 1995 NBA draft. During the offseason, the team acquired B.J. Armstrong from the expansion Toronto Raptors and signed free agent Jerome Kersey. With Armstrong in the lineup at point guard, Tim Hardaway played off the bench for most of the first half of the season. Midway through the season, he was traded along with Chris Gatling to the Miami Heat for Kevin Willis and Bimbo Coles.Under new head coach Rick Adelman, the Warriors posted a 10–win improvement, finishing sixth in the Pacific Division with a 36–46 record, missing the playoffs by three games. Smith averaged 15.3 points and 8.7 rebounds per game while being selected to the All-Rookie First Team. Following the season, Willis signed as a free agent with the Houston Rockets, and Kersey signed with the Los Angeles Lakers.

1995–96 Indiana Pacers season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the Pacers' 20th season in the National Basketball Association, and 29th season as a franchise. During the offseason, the Pacers signed free agents Ricky Pierce and Eddie Johnson. The team struggled with a 6–8 start to the season, which included a brawl in a 119–95 home loss to the Sacramento Kings on November 10, with a total of 16 players, eight from each team suspended. However, the Pacers posted a 14–2 record in January, and later on won eight of their final nine games of the season. The Pacers finished second in the Central Division with a 52–30 record, with Reggie Miller being selected for the 1996 NBA All-Star Game. They were also the only team in the league to beat the Chicago Bulls twice during their historic 72–10 season. However, during the final month of the regular season, Miller suffered an eye socket injury.Without Miller, the Pacers struggled in the first round of the playoffs against the 6th-seeded Atlanta Hawks. With the series tied at 2–2, Miller would return to play in Game 5, but the Pacers would lose 89–87. Following the season, Pierce and Mark Jackson were both traded to the Denver Nuggets.

1995–96 Los Angeles Lakers season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the Lakers' 48th season in the National Basketball Association, and 36th in the city of Los Angeles. It was also the highlight of All-Star guard Magic Johnson making a comeback. The Lakers played around .500 in the first few months before Johnson's arrival in late January. The team won ten of their twelve games in February. However, in March after a game against the Seattle SuperSonics, scoring leader Cedric Ceballos missed the team's charter flight to Seattle without explanation. The Lakers were scheduled to play the Sonics again. Ceballos went missing for a few days, and was suspended without pay. Their troubles continued as Nick Van Exel shoved a referee in a game against the Denver Nuggets on April 9, and was suspended for the final seven games of the season. The Lakers finished second in the Pacific Division with a 53–29 record.

In the Western Conference First Round, the Lakers lost to the 5th-seeded Houston Rockets in four games. After the defeat, Magic decided to retire for the second time. Following the season, Vlade Divac was traded to the Charlotte Hornets, Anthony Peeler and George Lynch were both dealt to the Vancouver Grizzlies, and Sedale Threatt was released.

1995–96 Milwaukee Bucks season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the Bucks' 28th season in the National Basketball Association. During the offseason, the Bucks re-signed free agent and former All-Star Terry Cummings. Early into the season, they traded Todd Day and Alton Lister to the Boston Celtics for Sherman Douglas, and dealt Eric Murdock to the expansion Vancouver Grizzlies for Benoit Benjamin. The Bucks, led by developing superstars Vin Baker and Glenn Robinson were considered a team with playoff potential. However, their struggles continued as they posted a 15-game losing streak in March. The Bucks missed the playoffs for the fifth straight season, finishing seventh in the Central Division with a disappointing 25–57 record. Baker was selected for the 1996 NBA All-Star Game.

Following the season, head coach Mike Dunleavy was fired, Lee Mayberry signed as a free agent with the Vancouver Grizzlies, Marty Conlon signed with the Boston Celtics, and Cummings and Benjamin were both released.

For the season, the Bucks added green alternate road uniforms which lasted until 1999.

1995–96 Minnesota Timberwolves season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the Timberwolves' 7th season in the National Basketball Association. In the 1995 NBA draft, the Timberwolves selected high school star Kevin Garnett with the fifth pick, and signed free agent Terry Porter while re-signing Sam Mitchell during the offseason. The Timberwolves got off to a bad start losing nine of their first ten games. Head coach Bill Blair was fired after a 6–14 start, and was replaced with Flip Saunders. Midway through the season, Christian Laettner and Sean Rooks were traded to the Atlanta Hawks for Andrew Lang and Spud Webb. Despite posting an 8–8 record in March, the Timberwolves finished fifth in the Midwest Division with a 26–56 record, missing the playoffs for the seventh consecutive season. Following the season, Isaiah Rider, who dealt with off-the-court troubles was traded to the Portland Trail Blazers, Lang signed as a free agent with the Milwaukee Bucks and Webb was released.

1995–96 New York Knicks season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the 50th season for the Knicks in the National Basketball Association in New York City, New York. After Pat Riley left to coach the Miami Heat, the Knicks hired Don Nelson (their "Plan B" after Chuck Daly rejected their offer) and won ten of their first twelve games. However, the team never seemed to get under Nelson down the stretch, as he was replaced by long time assistant Jeff Van Gundy after 59 games. At midseason, the Knicks traded Charles D. Smith to the San Antonio Spurs for J.R. Reid, and dealt Doug Christie to the expansion Toronto Raptors for Willie Anderson. Under Van Gundy, the Knicks finished the season playing around .500 to post a 47–35 record, second in the Atlantic Division, with Patrick Ewing being selected for the 1996 NBA All-Star Game.

In the first round of the playoffs, the Knicks swept the 4th-seeded Cleveland Cavaliers in three straight games. However, they would lose four games to one to the Chicago Bulls in the semifinals. Following the season, Anthony Mason was traded to the Charlotte Hornets, Derek Harper re-signed as a free agent with the Dallas Mavericks, Hubert Davis was traded to the Toronto Raptors, and Reid and Anderson were both released.For the season, the Knicks added the "New York" script to their logo. They also had new alternate uniforms, which they wore on the road so often, that they would become their primary road jerseys for the 1997–98 season.

1995–96 Philadelphia 76ers season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the 76ers 47th season in the National Basketball Association, and 33rd season in Philadelphia. During the offseason, the Sixers signed free agent Vernon Maxwell, then later on signed second-year guard Trevor Ruffin in December. Top draft pick Jerry Stackhouse and Clarence Weatherspoon both provided a nice young nucleus from which to build. However, finding talent to surround them was often difficult, as the Sixers suffered an 11-game losing streak after a 2–2 start. Early into the season, Shawn Bradley was traded to the New Jersey Nets for Derrick Coleman, who only played in just eleven games due to an irregular heartbeat. At midseason, second-year forward Sharone Wright was dealt to the expansion Toronto Raptors as Jeff Malone was released to free agency. The Sixers had their worst season since the infamous 73-loss 1972–73 season, finishing last place in the Atlantic Division with an 18–64 record.

Stackhouse led them with 19.2 points per game and made the All-Rookie First Team. This would also be the final season the Sixers would play in The Spectrum. Following the season, Maxwell re-signed with the San Antonio Spurs, head coach John Lucas II was fired and Ruffin was released.

1995–96 Portland Trail Blazers season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the 26th season for the Portland Trail Blazers in the National Basketball Association. After spending their first 25 years at the Memorial Coliseum, the Blazers began playing at the new Rose Garden Arena this season. The Blazers struggled through most of the season posting a 26–34 record around March 5. However, they would win 18 of their final 22 games to finish the season with a 44–38 record. Fourth in the Pacific Division and sixth in the Western Conference, making their 14th straight trip to the postseason and 19th in 20 years. Rookie Arvydas Sabonis was selected to the All-Rookie First Team.

In the playoffs, the Blazers were knocked out in the first round again losing to the Utah Jazz in five games, suffering a 38-point margin in a 102–64 loss in Game 5. Following the season, Rod Strickland demanded a trade no longer wanting to play for the Blazers. He was traded along with Harvey Grant to the Washington Bullets, while Buck Williams signed as a free agent with the New York Knicks, and James Robinson was traded to the Minnesota Timberwolves.

1995–96 Sacramento Kings season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the Kings' 47th season in the National Basketball Association, and 11th season in Sacramento. During the offseason, the Kings acquired Šarūnas Marčiulionis from the Seattle SuperSonics, and Tyrone Corbin from the Atlanta Hawks. The Kings would play their best basketball winning their first five games of the season. However, things turned ugly as a brawl occurred in a 119–95 road win over the Indiana Pacers on November 10, with a total of 16 players, eight from each team suspended. After a 24–17 start, the Kings struggled losing eleven straight games in February, as they traded Corbin and Walt Williams to the Miami Heat for Billy Owens and Kevin Gamble.

Despite their struggles, the Kings would finally end their nine-year playoff drought by winning 14 of their final 24 games. They would capture the eighth and final playoff spot in the Western Conference with a 39–43 record, fifth in the Pacific Division with Mitch Richmond being selected for the 1996 NBA All-Star Game. In the first round of the playoffs, the Kings faced the top-seeded Seattle SuperSonics. Despite winning Game 2 on the road 90–81, the Kings would lose the series in four games as Richmond sprained his ankle in Game 4, which the Kings lost 101–87 to the Sonics. It was also their only playoff appearance with Richmond on the team. Following the season, Marčiulionis was traded to the Denver Nuggets.

1995–96 San Antonio Spurs season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the Spurs' 20th season in the National Basketball Association, and 29th season as a franchise. San Antonio hosted the 1996 NBA All-Star Game. Without Dennis Rodman, who was dealt to the Chicago Bulls for Will Perdue, the Spurs had a solid team chemistry led by David Robinson and Sean Elliott, who were both selected for the All-Star Game. At midseason, they traded J.R. Reid to the New York Knicks for Charles D. Smith and second-year forward Monty Williams. The Spurs posted a 17-game winning streak in March, and went on to win their second straight Division title with a 59–23 record. Robinson was named to the All-NBA First Team and All-Defensive Second Team. In the playoffs, the Spurs would easily beat the Phoenix Suns in four games in the first round. However, in the semifinals, the Spurs would again stumble in the postseason losing to the 3rd-seeded Utah Jazz in six games, including a 108–81 road loss in Game 6. Following the season, Doc Rivers retired.

1995–96 Washington Bullets season

The 1995–96 NBA season was the Bullets' 35th season in the National Basketball Association. During the offseason, the Bullets acquired All-Star guard Mark Price from the Cleveland Cavaliers, Robert Pack from the Denver Nuggets, and signed free agents Tim Legler and Chris Whitney. In his second season, Juwan Howard emerged as a star on the court and in the community, averaging 22.1 points per game while being selected to the 1996 NBA All-Star Game. However, Injuries would be an issue as Chris Webber was limited to 15 games following the lingering effect to his injured shoulder. Meanwhile, Price only appeared in just seven games due to a sore left heel, and Pack who played in 31 games was out with nerve damage in his right leg.

After a 7-game winning streak, the Bullets lost their final four games and finished fourth in the Atlantic Division with a 39–43 record, which was an impressive 18-game improvement over their previous season. However, they missed the playoffs for the eighth consecutive season. 7'7" center Gheorghe Mureșan was named Most Improved Player of The Year, and top draft pick Rasheed Wallace made the All-Rookie Second Team.

Following the season, Wallace was traded to the Portland Trail Blazers, Pack was dealt to the New Jersey Nets, Price signed as a free agent with the Golden State Warriors while his brother Brent Price signed with the Houston Rockets, and second-year center Jim McIlvaine signed with the Seattle SuperSonics.

1996 NBA All-Star Game

The 1996 NBA All-Star Game was the 46th edition of the NBA All-Star Game, an exhibition basketball game played on Sunday February 11, 1996. The event was held at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas and was a part of the 50th season of the NBA. The game was televised nationally by NBC in the United States and by CTV in Canada. There were 36,037 people in attendance. Michael Jordan put on a show for the fans in his first game back from retirement and ended up receiving the game's most valuable player award.

1996 NBA Finals

The 1996 NBA Finals was the championship series of the National Basketball Association (NBA)'s 1995–96 season, and the culmination of the season's playoffs. The Western Conference champion Seattle SuperSonics (64–18) played the Eastern Conference champion Chicago Bulls (72–10), with the Bulls holding home court advantage. The teams' 136 combined regular season wins shattered the previous record of 125, set in 1985. The series was played under a best-of-seven format. This was the first championship in the Chicago Bulls second three-peat.Chicago won the series 4 games to 2. Michael Jordan was named NBA Finals MVP.

NBC Sports used Ahmad Rashād (Bulls sideline) and Hannah Storm (SuperSonics sideline).

Hal Douglas narrated the season-ending documentary Unstoppabulls for NBA Entertainment.

This was the 50th NBA Finals played.

List of 1995–96 NBA season transactions

This is a list of all transactions occurring in the 1995-96 NBA season.

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