1994 NBA playoffs

The 1994 NBA playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Association's 1993-94 season. The tournament concluded with the Western Conference champion Houston Rockets defeating the Eastern Conference champion New York Knicks 4 games to 3 in the NBA Finals. Hakeem Olajuwon was named NBA Finals MVP.

This was also the first time that the Boston Celtics since 1979, and Los Angeles Lakers since 1976, missed the playoffs and their first-ever absence since the playoff field expanded to 16 teams in 1984. This was the first time that both missed the playoffs in the same year. This would not occur again until 2014.

The biggest upset came in the first round, when the Denver Nuggets came back from a 2–0 deficit to beat the Seattle SuperSonics in five games, marking the first time in NBA history that an eighth seed had defeated a #1 seed. Denver stretched their improbable playoff run with the Utah Jazz to seven games after being down 0–3, but Utah defeated them in Game 7 91–81.

The playoffs also featured the very first playoff series victory for the Indiana Pacers in their 18-year NBA existence, as they swept the Orlando Magic (who were making their first playoff appearance in franchise history) in the first round, then eliminated the top-seeded Atlanta Hawks 4–2 in the second round. The Pacers advanced within one game of the NBA Finals, but lost Games 6 and 7 of the Eastern Conference Finals to the Knicks.

This was the first time since the ABA–NBA merger prior to the 1976–77 season that all former ABA teams (Pacers, Nuggets, Spurs, and Nets) made the playoffs in the same year.

The Chicago Bulls, who made the playoffs despite the retirement of Michael Jordan, swept the Cleveland Cavaliers in the first round, but then lost in seven games to the Knicks in the Eastern Conference Semifinals.

The Knicks made history by playing a record 25 playoff games (one short of the maximum), the most postseason games that an NBA team had ever played. The 2005 Detroit Pistons tied this record.[1] However, it was broken by the 2008 Celtics.[1] Their easiest series was the first-round 3–1 win over the Nets. New York then forced three consecutive Game 7s, eliminating the Bulls 4–3 in the Conference Semifinals, knocking off the Pacers 4–3 in the Conference Finals, both times at Madison Square Garden, before losing in Game 7 to the Rockets at The Summit in the NBA Finals, which meant New York was denied NBA and NHL titles. Game 4 of the Finals took place at the Garden a day after the New York Rangers won their first Stanley Cup in 54 years in Game 7 of the 1994 Stanley Cup Finals. Knicks coach Pat Riley made history by becoming the first (and to this date, the only) person in NBA history to have coached a Game 7 in the NBA Finals for two teams, having been with the Lakers in 1984 and 1988. However, he had the distinction to have become the first (and as of 2019, only) coach to lose a Game 7 in the NBA Finals on two teams, as his Lakers lost to the Celtics in 1984. It also denied him the distinction of becoming the first coach to win a Game 7 in the NBA Finals with two teams, as his Lakers defeated the Detroit Pistons in 1988.

In the Western Conference, the Golden State Warriors made their last playoff appearance until 2007.

Game 3 of the Bulls-Cavaliers series was the last game ever played at the Richfield Coliseum.

Game 6 of the Bulls-Knicks series was the last game ever played at Chicago Stadium.

Game 5 of the Nuggets-Sonics series was the last to be played at Seattle Center Coliseum before the renovations and renaming into KeyArena two years later. The Sonics played the intervening 1994–95 NBA season at Tacoma Dome in nearby Tacoma, Washington.

1994 NBA playoffs
DatesApril 28–June 22, 1994
Season1993–94
Teams16
ChampionsHouston Rockets (1st title)
Runners-upNew York Knicks (7th finals appearance)
Semifinalists
1993 1995

The Clock Incident

The Clock Incident happened in the last moments of Game 4 of the Western Conference Finals between the Rockets and Jazz. Tom Chambers inbounded the ball to Jeff Hornacek with 13.5 seconds left and Utah down 2. As play resumed, the Jazz timekeeper didn't start the clock as they were trying to look for an open shot. After 8 seconds, the clock finally started as Chambers got the ball down low. However, Utah didn't take advantage of the extra time they were given, and after Chambers attempted a shot and missed, there was a mad scramble for the ball. It ended up in Robert Horry's hands, who passed it to Kenny Smith; Houston ran out the clock to win 80–78.

Bracket

  1st Round Conference Semifinals Conference Finals NBA Finals
                                     
1 Atlanta 3  
8 Miami 2  
  1 Atlanta 2  
  5 Indiana 4  
4 Orlando 0
5 Indiana 3  
  5 Indiana 3  
Eastern Conference
  2 New York 4  
3 Chicago 3  
6 Cleveland 0  
  3 Chicago 3
  2 New York 4  
2 New York 3
7 New Jersey 1  
  E2 New York 3
  W2 Houston 4
1 Seattle 2  
8 Denver 3  
  8 Denver 3
  5 Utah 4  
4 San Antonio 1
5 Utah 3  
  5 Utah 1
Western Conference
  2 Houston 4  
3 Phoenix 3  
6 Golden State 0  
  3 Phoenix 3
  2 Houston 4  
2 Houston 3
7 Portland 1  

Western Conference

Champion: Houston Rockets

1st Round

(1) Seattle SuperSonics vs. (8) Denver Nuggets: Nuggets win series 3–2

This was the third playoff meeting between these two teams, with each team winning one series apiece.

(2) Houston Rockets vs. (7) Portland Trail Blazers: Rockets win series 3–1

  • Game 1 @ The Summit, Houston (April 29): Houston 115, Portland 104
  • Game 2 @ The Summit, Houston (May 1): Houston 114, Portland 104 (Hakeem's big block on Rod Strickland's layup)
  • Game 3 @ Memorial Coliseum, Portland (May 3): Portland 118, Houston 115
  • Game 4 @ Memorial Coliseum, Portland (May 6): Houston 92, Portland 89

This was the second playoff meeting between these two teams, with the Rockets winning the first meeting.

(3) Phoenix Suns vs. (6) Golden State Warriors: Suns win series 3–0

This was the third playoff meeting between these two teams, with the Suns winning the first two meetings.

(4) San Antonio Spurs vs. (5) Utah Jazz: Jazz win series 3–1

  • Game 1 @ Alamodome, San Antonio (April 28): San Antonio 106, Utah 89
  • Game 2 @ Alamodome, San Antonio (April 30): Utah 96, San Antonio 84
  • Game 3 @ Delta Center, Salt Lake City (May 3): Utah 105, San Antonio 72
  • Game 4 @ Delta Center, Salt Lake City (May 5): Utah 95, San Antonio 90

This was the first playoff meeting between the Spurs and the Jazz.[5]

Conference Semifinals

(2) Houston Rockets vs. (3) Phoenix Suns: Rockets win series 4–3

  • Game 1 @ The Summit, Houston (May 8): Phoenix 91, Houston 87
  • Game 2 @ The Summit, Houston (May 11): Phoenix 124, Houston 117 (OT)
  • Game 3 @ America West Arena, Phoenix (May 13): Houston 118, Phoenix 102
  • Game 4 @ America West Arena, Phoenix (May 15): Houston 107, Phoenix 96 (Kevin Johnson's famous dunk on Hakeem Olajuwon)
  • Game 5 @ The Summit, Houston (May 17): Houston 109, Phoenix 86
  • Game 6 @ America West Arena, Phoenix (May 19): Phoenix 103, Houston 89
  • Game 7 @ The Summit, Houston (May 21): Houston 104, Phoenix 94 (The Rockets become the second team to win a playoff series after losing the first 2 games at home.)

This was the first playoff meeting between the Rockets and the Suns.[6]

(5) Utah Jazz vs. (8) Denver Nuggets: Jazz win series 4–3

This was the third playoff meeting between these two teams, with each team winning one series apiece.

Conference Finals

(2) Houston Rockets vs. (5) Utah Jazz: Rockets win series 4–1

  • Game 1 @ The Summit, Houston (May 23): Houston 100, Utah 88 TNT 9:00ET
  • Game 2 @ The Summit, Houston (May 25): Houston 104, Utah 99 TNT 9:00ET
  • Game 3 @ Delta Center, Salt Lake City (May 27): Utah 95, Houston 86 TNT 9:00ET
  • Game 4 @ Delta Center, Salt Lake City (May 29): Houston 80, Utah 78 NBC 3:30ET
  • Game 5 @ The Summit, Houston (May 31): Houston 94, Utah 83 NBC 9:00ET

This was the second playoff meeting between these two teams, with the Jazz winning the first meeting.

Eastern Conference

Champion: New York Knicks

1st Round

(1) Atlanta Hawks vs. (8) Miami Heat: Hawks win series 3–2

  • Game 1 @ The Omni, Atlanta (April 28): Miami 93, Atlanta 88
  • Game 2 @ The Omni, Atlanta (April 30): Atlanta 104, Miami 86
  • Game 3 @ Miami Arena, Miami (May 3): Miami 90, Atlanta 86
  • Game 4 @ Miami Arena, Miami (May 5): Atlanta 103, Miami 89
  • Game 5 @ The Omni, Atlanta (May 8): Atlanta 102, Miami 91

This was the first playoff meeting between the Hawks and the Heat.[9]

(2) New York Knicks vs. (7) New Jersey Nets: Knicks win series 3–1

This was the second playoff meeting between these two teams, with the Knicks winning the first meeting.

(3) Chicago Bulls vs. (6) Cleveland Cavaliers: Bulls win series 3–0

  • Game 1 @ Chicago Stadium, Chicago (April 29): Chicago 104, Cleveland 96
  • Game 2 @ Chicago Stadium, Chicago (May 1): Chicago 105, Cleveland 96
  • Game 3 @ The Coliseum, Richfield (May 3): Chicago 95, Cleveland 92 (OT) (Final Cavaliers game at Richfield Coliseum)

This was the fifth playoff meeting between these two teams, with the Bulls winning the first four meetings.

(4) Orlando Magic vs. (5) Indiana Pacers: Pacers win series 3–0

This was the first playoff meeting between the Pacers and the Magic.[12]

Conference Semifinals

(1) Atlanta Hawks vs. (5) Indiana Pacers: Pacers win series 4–2

  • Game 1 @ The Omni, Atlanta (May 10): Indiana 96, Atlanta 85
  • Game 2 @ The Omni, Atlanta (May 12): Atlanta 92, Indiana 69
  • Game 3 @ Market Square Arena, Indianapolis (May 14): Indiana 101, Atlanta 81
  • Game 4 @ Market Square Arena, Indianapolis (May 15): Indiana 102, Atlanta 86
  • Game 5 @ The Omni, Atlanta (May 17): Atlanta 88, Indiana 76
  • Game 6 @ Market Square Arena, Indianapolis (May 19): Indiana 98, Atlanta 79

This was the second playoff meeting between these two teams, with the Hawks winning the first meeting.

(2) New York Knicks vs. (3) Chicago Bulls: Knicks win series 4–3

This was the sixth playoff meeting between these two teams, with the Bulls winning the first five meetings.

Conference Finals

(2) New York Knicks vs. (5) Indiana Pacers: Knicks win series 4–3

This was the second playoff meeting between these two teams, with the Knicks winning the first meeting.

NBA Finals

(2) Houston Rockets vs. (2) New York Knicks: Rockets win series 4–3

  • Game 1 @ The Summit, Houston (June 8 9:00ET NBC): Houston 85, New York 78
  • Game 2 @ The Summit, Houston (June 10 9:00ET NBC): New York 91, Houston 83
  • Game 3 @ Madison Square Garden, New York City (June 12 7:00ET NBC): Houston 93, New York 89 (Sam Cassell hits the game-winning 3 with 32.6 seconds left)
  • Game 4 @ Madison Square Garden, New York City (June 15 9:00ET NBC): New York 91, Houston 82
  • Game 5 @ Madison Square Garden, New York City (June 17 9:00ET NBC): New York 91, Houston 84
  • Game 6 @ The Summit, Houston (June 19 7:00ET NBC): Houston 86, New York 84 (Hakeem Olajuwon blocks John Starks' title-winning 3-point attempt)
  • Game 7 @ The Summit, Houston (June 22 9:00ET NBC): Houston 90, New York 84

This was the second playoff meeting between these two teams, with the Rockets winning the first meeting.

References

  1. ^ a b Beck, Howard (June 17, 2008). "Celtics Remain Mindful Of a Missed Opportunity". The New York Times. p. D2.
  2. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — Denver Nuggets versus Oklahoma City Thunder (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  3. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — Houston Rockets versus Portland Trail Blazers (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  4. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — Golden State Warriors versus Phoenix Suns (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  5. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — San Antonio Spurs versus Utah Jazz (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  6. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — Houston Rockets versus Phoenix Suns (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  7. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — Denver Nuggets versus Utah Jazz (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  8. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — Houston Rockets versus Utah Jazz (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  9. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — Atlanta Hawks versus Miami Heat (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  10. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — Brooklyn Nets versus New York Knicks (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  11. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — Chicago Bulls versus Cleveland Cavaliers (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  12. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — Indiana Pacers versus Orlando Magic (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  13. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — Atlanta Hawks versus Indiana Pacers (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  14. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — Chicago Bulls versus New York Knicks (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  15. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — Indiana Pacers versus New York Knicks (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  16. ^ "Team Rivalry Finder — Houston Rockets versus New York Knicks (Playoffs)". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 1, 2015.

External links

1993 NBA Finals

The 1993 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1992–93 NBA season, featuring the Chicago Bulls, led by Michael Jordan, and the Phoenix Suns, winners of 62 games and led by regular season MVP Charles Barkley. The Bulls became the first team since the legendary Boston Celtics of the 1960s to win three consecutive championship titles, clinching the "three-peat" with John Paxson's game-winning 3-pointer that gave them a 99–98 victory in Game 6. Remarkably, the away team won every game except for Chicago's win at home in Game 4.

1993–94 Chicago Bulls season

The 1993–94 NBA season was the Bulls' 28th season in the National Basketball Association. The Bulls entered the season as the three time defending NBA champions, having defeated the Phoenix Suns in the 1993 NBA Finals in six games, winning their third NBA championship, their first of two threepeats in the 1990s.

In the offseason, the Bulls signed free agents Steve Kerr, Bill Wennington and Pete Myers. Without star guard Michael Jordan, who retired during the offseason, the Bulls were now led by Scottie Pippen. The team continued to play solid basketball winning ten straight games after an 8–8 start. Midway through the season, they traded Stacey King to the Minnesota Timberwolves for Luc Longley. The Bulls posted another 10-game winning streak between March and April finishing second overall in the Central Division, and third overall in the Eastern Conference with a 55–27 record. However, they would not be able to win a fourth consecutive NBA championship. After sweeping the Cleveland Cavaliers in three straight games in the first round, they would lose in the second round of the 1994 NBA Playoffs to the New York Knicks in seven games.This was also the Bulls' last season at Chicago Stadium before moving to the new United Center. Following the season, Horace Grant signed as a free agent with the Orlando Magic, Bill Cartwright signed with the Seattle SuperSonics, Scott Williams signed with the Philadelphia 76ers, and John Paxson retired.

1994 NBA Finals

The 1994 NBA Finals was the championship round of the National Basketball Association (NBA)'s 1993–94 season, and the culmination of the season's playoffs. The Western Conference champion Houston Rockets played the Eastern Conference champion New York Knicks for the championship, with the Rockets holding home-court advantage in the best-of-seven series. The Rockets defeated the Knicks 4 games to 3 to win the team's first NBA championship.

This matchup was Hakeem Olajuwon's second NBA Finals appearance, his other being in 1986, where Larry Bird and the Boston Celtics defeated the Houston Rockets four games to two. The series was Patrick Ewing's first NBA Finals appearance. The Rockets came in with strong determination to win not only the franchise's first NBA championship, but the city's first championship in a league that still existed, while the Knicks were looking to add a third NBA championship trophy, as the Knicks' last trophy came from the 1973 NBA Finals. The Knicks also hoped to impress their new owners Viacom, who had just bought Paramount Communications (formerly Gulf+Western), their longtime owners (after the series however, Viacom sold the Knicks and the rest of the Madison Square Garden properties).

The series was hailed as a meeting of the two great centers who had previously played for a championship in college. In 1984 while Olajuwon was with the University of Houston and Ewing was with Georgetown University, Georgetown had beaten Houston 84–75 in the 1984 NCAA Championship game. In this series, however, Olajuwon outperformed Ewing, outscoring him in every game of the series and posting numbers of 26.9 ppg on 50.0% shooting compared to Ewing's 18.9 ppg on 36.3% shooting. However, Ewing set an NBA finals record in the series with a total of 30 blocks, and he tied the single-game record of 8 blocks in Game 5. Tim Duncan would later set the record for most blocks in a Finals series (2003) with 32 blocks in six games while Dwight Howard would set the record for most blocked shots in a Finals game with 9 blocked shots in Game 4 of the 2009 Finals while with the Orlando Magic.

During the series, the Houston Rockets played seven low-scoring, defensive games against the New York Knicks. After splitting the first two games in Houston, the Knicks won two out of three games at Madison Square Garden, which also hosted the Rangers first Stanley Cup celebration in 54 years during the series.

In Game 6, however, Rockets center Hakeem Olajuwon blocked a last-second championship-winning shot attempt by John Starks, giving the Rockets an 86–84 victory and forcing a Game 7, which made Knicks Coach Pat Riley the first (and to this date, the only) coach in a Game 7 NBA Finals on two teams, having been with the Los Angeles Lakers in 1984 and 1988. In addition, the Knicks set a record for most playoff games played in one season, with 25. The Detroit Pistons tied this record in 2005. The Boston Celtics, coached by Doc Rivers, would surpass it during their championship season of 2008 when they played 26.The Rockets beat the Knicks in Game 7, 90–84, enabling the city of Houston to not only celebrate its first NBA and fifth professional sports championship (first in an existing league), but also deny New York from having both NBA and NHL championships in the same year (Chicago had suffered this fate two years earlier in 1992, with the Bulls winning their second NBA championship and the Blackhawks losing in the Stanley Cup Finals). For his efforts Olajuwon was named NBA Finals Most Valuable Player. For the Knicks, Riley had the unfortunate distinction of having become the first (and to this date, the only) coach to lose a Game 7 NBA Finals on two teams, having lost to the Celtics in 1984. It also denied him the distinction of being the first coach to win a Game 7 NBA Finals with two teams, having defeated the Detroit Pistons in 1988.

NBC Sports used Ahmad Rashād (Knicks sideline) and Hannah Storm (Rockets sideline).

Hal Douglas narrated the season-ending documentary Clutch City for NBA Entertainment.

1994 in basketball

The following are the basketball events of the year 1994 throughout the world.

1994–95 Seattle SuperSonics season

The 1994–95 NBA season was the 27th season for the Seattle SuperSonics in the National Basketball Association. During the offseason, the Sonics acquired Šarūnas Marčiulionis from the Golden State Warriors. For the duration of the season, the Sonics switched venues and played their home games at the Tacoma Dome while their original stadium, the Seattle Center Coliseum, was being rebuilt to keep pace with NBA standards. The Sonics posted a 10-game winning streak in January, which led them to a successful 33–12 start before the All-Star break. The team finished second in the Pacific Division with a 57–25 record. Three members of the team, Gary Payton, Shawn Kemp and Detlef Schrempf were all selected for the 1995 NBA All-Star Game.

However, after a shocking first round exit in the 1994 NBA Playoffs against the Denver Nuggets, the Seattle franchise would once again exit early in the 1995 Playoffs, losing in four games to the 5th-seeded Los Angeles Lakers in the first round after winning Game 1. Following the season, Kendall Gill was traded back to the Charlotte Hornets, and Marčiulionis was dealt to the Sacramento Kings.

2014 NBA playoffs

The 2014 NBA playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Association's 2013–14 season. The tournament concluded with the Western Conference champion San Antonio Spurs defeating the Eastern Conference champion Miami Heat 4 games to 1 in the NBA Finals. Kawhi Leonard was named NBA Finals MVP.

For the first time since 1984, the NBA Finals were played in a 2–2–1–1–1 format (the higher seed hosts Games 1, 2, 5, and 7, the lower seed hosts Games 3, 4, and 6). They were also the first playoffs overseen by Commissioner Adam Silver.

The Spurs continued the longest active playoff streak in the NBA at 17 straight appearances. The Toronto Raptors and Washington Wizards made their first playoff appearances since 2008, while the Charlotte Bobcats, in their final playoff appearance before renaming themselves the Hornets, returned after a four-year absence. All three teams from Texas made the playoffs for the first time since 2009. For the first time since 2005, the Los Angeles Lakers and New York Knicks did not qualify for the playoffs in the same year. For the first time since 1994, the Lakers and Celtics missed the playoffs in the same season. In addition, this was the first time in NBA history that the Knicks, Celtics, and Lakers missed the playoffs in the same year (the Celtics last missed the playoffs in 2007) The Denver Nuggets also missed the playoffs for the first time since 2003.

The first round of the 2014 Playoffs is generally considered one of the greatest postseason rounds in NBA history. The first 11 days of the playoffs saw at least one road team win on its opponent's home floor. That ended on April 30 with the Raptors, Spurs, and Houston Rockets all winning at home against the Brooklyn Nets, Dallas Mavericks, and Portland Trail Blazers, respectively. The 24 road wins is an NBA playoffs record for the first round. In addition, the 2014 playoffs featured a record eight first-round games that went into overtime, including four straight between the Memphis Grizzlies and Oklahoma City Thunder (Games 2–5), another NBA record.

Five of the eight first-round series were extended to game sevens. Three of the series, Atlanta Hawks at Indiana Pacers, Memphis Grizzlies at Oklahoma City Thunder, and Golden State Warriors at Los Angeles Clippers, were played on May 3, which marked the first time in NBA history that three Game 7s were played on the same day. Two other game sevens were played on the following day, featuring Dallas at San Antonio and Brooklyn at Toronto. The five game sevens in the first round already tied the record for the most number of game sevens in any NBA playoffs, set in the 1994 NBA Playoffs. However, the NBA only adopted a best-of-seven format for the first round beginning in 2003. The Hawks–Pacers series was the first series to force a Game 7, making this postseason the 15th consecutive postseason to have at least one Game 7. The 1999 NBA Playoffs were the last time a Game 7 wasn't played.

This postseason and the previous year's postseason marked the first time since the 2000 and 2001 playoffs that both number 5 seeds knocked out both number 4 seeds in back-to-back years.

This was the first postseason (and the seventh time since 1972, when the current playoff system was put in place) in which the top two seeds played in the Conference Finals both in the East and the West.

When they defeated Indiana on the road in Game 2 of the Eastern Conference Finals, the Heat set an NBA record by recording their 15th straight playoff series in which they earned at least one road win. The Heat then extended the record to 16 straight road wins in playoff series by winning Game 2 of the NBA Finals in San Antonio.

Bill Cartwright

James William Cartwright (born July 30, 1957) is an American retired NBA basketball player and a former head coach with the Chicago Bulls. A 7'1" (2.16 m) center, he played 16 seasons for the New York Knicks, Chicago Bulls and Seattle SuperSonics, helping the Bulls capture consecutive championships in 1991, 1992 and 1993. He attended Elk Grove High School in Elk Grove, California, and played college basketball at the University of San Francisco.

Clock incident

Clock incident may refer to:

1994 NBA Playoffs - The Clock Incident, an event which occurred in Game 4 of the 1994 NBA Playoffs between teams Houston Rockets and Utah Jazz

2001 Michigan vs. Michigan State football game, called the "Clock incident"

Ahmed Mohamed clock incident, an event that happened at a school in Texas in 2015

Clutch City

Clutch City is a nickname given to the city of Houston, Texas after the city's National Basketball Association (NBA) club, the Houston Rockets.

Dennis Rodman

Dennis Keith Rodman (born May 13, 1961) is an American retired professional basketball player who played for the Detroit Pistons, San Antonio Spurs, Chicago Bulls, Los Angeles Lakers, and Dallas Mavericks in the National Basketball Association (NBA). He was nicknamed "The Worm" and is famous for his fierce defensive and rebounding abilities.

Rodman played at the small forward position in his early years before becoming a power forward. He earned NBA All-Defensive First Team honors seven times and won the NBA Defensive Player of the Year Award twice. He also led the NBA in rebounds per game for a record seven consecutive years and won five NBA championships. His biography at NBA.com states that he is "arguably the best rebounding forward in NBA history". On April 1, 2011, the Pistons retired Rodman's No. 10 jersey, and he was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame later that year.Rodman experienced an unhappy childhood and was shy and introverted in his early years. After aborting a suicide attempt in 1993, he reinvented himself as a "bad boy" and became notorious for numerous controversial antics. He repeatedly dyed his hair in artificial colors, had many piercings and tattoos, and regularly disrupted games by clashing with opposing players and officials. He famously wore a wedding dress to promote his 1996 autobiography Bad As I Wanna Be. Rodman pursued a high-profile affair with singer Madonna and was briefly married to actress Carmen Electra. Rodman also attracted international attention for his visits to North Korea and his subsequent befriending of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in 2013.

In addition to being a retired professional basketball player, Rodman is a retired part-time professional wrestler and actor. He was a member of the nWo and fought alongside Hulk Hogan at two Bash at the Beach events. In professional wrestling, Rodman was the first ever winner of the Celebrity Championship Wrestling tournament. He had his own TV show, The Rodman World Tour, and had lead roles in the action films Double Team (1997) and Simon Sez (1999). Both films were critically panned, with the former earning Rodman a triple Razzie Award. He appeared in several reality TV series and was the winner of the $222,000 main prize of the 2004 edition of Celebrity Mole.

Game seven

A game seven is the final game of a best of seven series. This game can occur in the postseasons for Major League Baseball (MLB) (League Championship Series and World Series), the National Basketball Association (NBA) (all rounds of the NBA playoffs), and the National Hockey League (NHL) (all rounds of the Stanley Cup playoffs).

The game is generally played at the site of the team holding the home advantage across the series.

The nature of a best-of-seven series requires that the series be tied 3–3 going into game seven, such that either team can take the series (advancing further in the playoffs or winning the championship) by winning the game. Because of this decisive nature, game sevens add an element of drama to their sports.

Aside from North American sports leagues, game sevens are also a fixture in many other sports around the world, mostly in baseball, basketball, and ice hockey leagues. Most codes of football do not employ a best-of-seven series (or any best-of-x series in general), hence game sevens are not played in those leagues.

Some playoff rounds (such as MLB's current Division Series) are played in a best of five format, such that game 5 has similar qualities to those described above, though the suspense and drama have less time to build in a shorter series. Furthermore, the World Series of 1903, 1919, 1920, and 1921 were played in a best of nine format, though none of the four went to a decisive game 9.

The game seven is comparable to a final or to a single game in a single-elimination tournament or to a one-game playoff. A championship series' game seven is equivalent to the Super Bowl game in the National Football League in that the game's winner is the league's champion for the season.

History of the Cleveland Cavaliers

The Cleveland Cavaliers first began play in the NBA in 1970 as an expansion team under the ownership of Nick Mileti. Jerry Tomko, the father of future Major League Baseball pitcher Brett Tomko, submitted the winning entry to name the team the "Cavaliers" through a competition sponsored by The Plain Dealer; supporters preferred it to "Jays", "Foresters" and "Presidents". Playing their home games at Cleveland Arena under the direction of head coach Bill Fitch, they compiled a league-worst 15–67 record in their inaugural season. The team hoped to build around the number one 1971 draft pick Austin Carr, who had set numerous scoring records at Notre Dame, but Carr severely injured his leg shortly into his pro career and never was able to realize his potential.

Hue Hollins

Hue Spencer Hollins, Sr. (November 28, 1940 - July 4, 2013) [1] was an American professional basketball referee for the National Basketball Association (NBA). During his 27-year career in the NBA, Hollins officiated 19 NBA Finals games and five NBA All-Star Games. He is notable for working the Finals every year during the 1990s and for a notorious call during a 1994 NBA Playoffs game between the Chicago Bulls and New York Knicks. Hollins was probed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) over the 2007 NBA betting scandal involving former referee Tim Donaghy.

Jazz–Rockets rivalry

The Jazz–Rockets rivalry is a National Basketball Association (NBA) rivalry between the Utah Jazz and the Houston Rockets. The rivalry began in the 1990s when the Rockets, led by dominant center Hakeem Olajuwon and college teammate Clyde Drexler, and the Jazz, led by the pick-and-roll duo of Karl Malone and John Stockton, were playoff powers in the Midwest Division. The teams faced each other four times in the NBA playoffs during the decade. In all four instances, the winner was the eventual Western Conference champion and played in the NBA Finals. In 2007, the rivalry was restored as the two teams met again in the playoffs and a showdown of two of the best 1–2 combos of Tracy McGrady and Yao Ming of the Rockets and Deron Williams and Carlos Boozer of the Jazz. In 2018, the rivalry was once again restored as the two teams met in the Western Conference Semifinals, where the Rockets won the series 4–1. In 2019, the two teams met once again in the playoffs, but in the First Round, with the Rockets once again winning the series 4–1.

Knicks–Nets rivalry

The Knicks–Nets rivalry is a crosstown rivalry between New York City's two National Basketball Association (NBA) teams, the New York Knicks and Brooklyn Nets. Both teams compete in Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference. The New York Knicks were established in 1946 as one of the charter franchises of the NBA, and have been based at Madison Square Garden in Midtown Manhattan since 1968. The Nets were established in 1967 as a member of the now-defunct American Basketball Association, and joined the NBA in 1976. They have been based at Barclays Center in Brooklyn since 2012, though have played in the New York metropolitan area their entire existence.

The rivalry began in 1976 when the Nets joined the NBA as part of the ABA–NBA merger. At the time, the team was known as the New York Nets and played at Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in suburban Long Island. The team became the New Jersey Nets the following season when they relocated to suburban New Jersey, playing temporarily in Piscataway before moving to Brendan Byrne Arena in East Rutherford in 1981, their home until 2010. The Nets played their final two seasons in New Jersey at Prudential Center in downtown Newark. The rivalry became an intra-city series when the Nets relocated to Brooklyn in 2012.

When the Nets played in New Jersey, the rivalry had several nicknames, including the Turnpike Classic, The Function at the Junction, and The War Between the States.After the Nets' move to Brooklyn, due to the close proximity of the two teams and the overall histories of Brooklyn and Manhattan, media outlets have dubbed the rivalry the Battle of the Boroughs, or Clash of the Boroughs. The two teams have met in the playoffs three times over the course of their history, with the most recent meeting in 2004. This rivalry can also be called the "Cross-Bridges Rivalry".

List of career achievements by Hakeem Olajuwon

This page details the career achievements of Nigerian American basketball player Hakeem Olajuwon.

NBA post-season records

This article lists all-time records achieved in the NBA post-season in major categories recognized by the league, including those set by teams and individuals in single games, series, and careers. The NBA also recognizes records from its original incarnation, the Basketball Association of America.

Scottie Pippen

Scotty Maurice Pippen (born September 25, 1965), commonly spelled Scottie Pippen, is an American former professional basketball player. He played 17 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA), winning six NBA championships with the Chicago Bulls. Pippen, along with Michael Jordan, played an important role in transforming the Bulls into a championship team and in popularizing the NBA around the world during the 1990s.Considered one of the greatest small forwards of all time, Pippen was named to the NBA All-Defensive First Team eight consecutive times and the All-NBA First Team three times. He was a seven-time NBA All-Star and was the NBA All-Star Game MVP in 1994. He was named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History during the 1996–97 season, and is one of four players to have his jersey retired by the Chicago Bulls (the others being Jerry Sloan, Bob Love, and Michael Jordan). He played a main role on both the 1992 Chicago Bulls Championship team and the 1996 Chicago Bulls Championship team which were selected as two of the Top 10 Teams in NBA History. His biography on the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame's website states, "The multidimensional Pippen ran the court like a point guard, attacked the boards like a power forward, and swished the nets like a shooting guard." During his 17-year career, he played 12 seasons with the Bulls, one with the Houston Rockets and four with the Portland Trail Blazers, making the postseason sixteen straight times.

Pippen is the only NBA player to have won an NBA title and Olympic gold medal in the same year twice (1992, 1996). He was a part of the 1992 U.S. Olympic "Dream Team" which beat its opponents by an average of 44 points. Pippen was also a key figure in the 1996 Olympic team, alongside former Dream Team members Karl Malone, John Stockton, and Charles Barkley as well as newer faces such as Anfernee "Penny" Hardaway and Grant Hill. He wore number 8 during both years.

Pippen is a two-time inductee into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (for his individual career, and as a member of the "Dream Team"), having been inducted for both on August 13, 2010. On December 8, 2005, the Chicago Bulls retired his number #33, while his college, University of Central Arkansas, retired his number #33 on January 21, 2010, as well.

The Comeback (American football)

The Comeback, sometimes known as The Choke or 35-3, was an NFL playoff game between the Buffalo Bills and the Houston Oilers. The game was played at Rich Stadium in Orchard Park, New York on January 3, 1993. It featured the Bills recovering from a 32-point deficit to win in overtime, 41–38, and as of the end of the 2018–19 season, it remains the largest comeback in NFL history. It was played in what was then known as Rich Stadium (now called New Era Field), and was televised by NBC, with Charlie Jones and Todd Christensen calling the action.

Regular-season series
Tied 2–2 in the regular-season series
Previous playoff series[2]
Tied 1–1 in all-time playoff series
Regular-season series
Houston won 4–0 in the regular-season series
Previous playoff series[3]
Houston leads 1–0 in all-time playoff series
Regular-season series
Phoenix won 3–2 in the regular-season series
Previous playoff series[4]
Phoenix leads 2–0 in all-time playoff series
Regular-season series
Utah won 5–0 in the regular-season series
February 23, 1994
San Antonio Spurs 102, Utah Jazz 106 (OT)
Regular-season series
Tied 2–2 in the regular-season series
February 19, 1994
Phoenix Suns 88, Houston Rockets 106
Regular-season series
Utah won 4–1 in the regular-season series
Previous playoff series[7]
Tied 1–1 in all-time playoff series
Regular-season series
Tied 3–3 in the regular-season series
November 24, 1993
Houston Rockets 95, Utah Jazz 93 (OT)
January 22, 1994
Utah Jazz 101, Houston Rockets 106
February 26, 1994
Utah Jazz 95, Houston Rockets 85
Previous playoff series[8]
Utah leads 1–0 in all-time playoff series
Regular-season series
Atlanta won 3–1 in the regular-season series
November 19, 1993
Atlanta Hawks 95, Miami Heat 92
February 10, 1994
Miami Heat 98, Atlanta Hawks 114
March 26, 1994
Miami Heat 90, Atlanta Hawks 100
Regular-season series
New Jersey won 4–1 in the regular-season series
December 28, 1993
New Jersey Nets 97, New York Knicks 95
Madison Square Garden, New York City
March 3, 1994
New Jersey Nets 86, New York Knicks 97
Madison Square Garden, New York City
Previous playoff series[10]
New York leads 1–0 in all-time playoff series
Regular-season series
Cleveland won 3–1 in the regular-season series
Previous playoff series[11]
Chicago leads 4–0 in all-time playoff series
Regular-season series
Tied 2–2 in the regular-season series
Regular-season series
Atlanta won 3–2 in the regular-season series
November 5, 1993
Indiana Pacers 110, Atlanta Hawks 116
December 16, 1993
Indiana Pacers 99, Atlanta Hawks 81
Previous playoff series[13]
Atlanta leads 1–0 in all-time playoff series
Regular-season series
New York won 3–1 in the regular-season series
February 20, 1994
Chicago Bulls 68, New York Knicks 86
Madison Square Garden, New York City
March 22, 1994
Chicago Bulls 78, New York Knicks 87
Madison Square Garden, New York City
Previous playoff series[14]
Chicago leads 5–0 in all-time playoff series
Regular-season series
New York won 4–0 in the regular-season series
December 11, 1993
Indiana Pacers 91, New York Knicks 98
Madison Square Garden, New York City
March 15, 1994
Indiana Pacers 82, New York Knicks 88
Madison Square Garden, New York City
Previous playoff series[15]
New York leads 1–0 in all-time playoff series
Regular-season series
Houston won 2–0 in the regular-season series
December 2, 1993
Houston Rockets 94, New York Knicks 85
Madison Square Garden, New York City
Previous playoff series[16]
Houston leads 1–0 in all-time playoff series
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2010s
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