1992 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1992 throughout the world.

List of years in baseball

Champions

Major League Baseball

  League Championship Series
CBS
World Series
CBS
                 
East Toronto Blue Jays 4  
West Oakland Athletics 2  
    AL Toronto Blue Jays 4
  NL Atlanta Braves 2
East Pittsburgh Pirates 3
West Atlanta Braves 4  

Other champions

Awards and honors

MLB statistical leaders

  American League National League
Type Name Stat Name Stat
AVG Edgar Martínez SEA .343 Gary Sheffield SDP .330
HR Juan González TEX 43 Fred McGriff SDP 35
RBI Cecil Fielder DET 124 Darren Daulton PHI 109
Wins Kevin Brown TEX
Jack Morris TOR
21 Tom Glavine ATL
Greg Maddux CHC
20
ERA Roger Clemens BOS 2.41 Bill Swift SFG 2.08

Major league baseball final standings

American League
Rank Club Wins Losses Win % GB
EAST
1st Toronto Blue Jays 96 66 .593    --
2nd Milwaukee Brewers 92 70 .568   4.0
3rd Baltimore Orioles 89 73 .549   7.0
4th Cleveland Indians 76 86 .469 20.0
4th New York Yankees 76 86 .469 20.0
6th Detroit Tigers 75 87 .463 21.0
7th Boston Red Sox 73 89 .451 23.0
WEST
1st Oakland Athletics 96 66 .593    --
2nd Minnesota Twins 90 72 .556   6.0
3rd Chicago White Sox 86 76 .531 10.0
4th Texas Rangers 77 85 .475 19.0
5th California Angels 72 90 .444 24.0
5th Kansas City Royals 72 90 .444 24.0
7th Seattle Mariners 64 98 .395 32.0
National League
Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
East Division
1st Pittsburgh Pirates 96 66 .593    --
2nd Montreal Expos 87 75 .537   9.0
3rd St. Louis Cardinals 83 79 .512 13.0
4th Chicago Cubs 78 84 .481 18.0
5th New York Mets 72 90 .444 24.0
6th Philadelphia Phillies 70 92 .432 26.0
West Division
1st Atlanta Braves 98 64 .605    --
2nd Cincinnati Reds 90 72 .556   8.0
3rd San Diego Padres 82 80 .506 16.0
4th Houston Astros 81 81 .500 17.0
5th San Francisco Giants 72 90 .444 26.0
6th Los Angeles Dodgers 63 99 .389 35.0

Buck Showalter

American League

Team Manager Comments
Baltimore Orioles Johnny Oates
Boston Red Sox Butch Hobson
California Angels Buck Rodgers after a May bus accident John Wathan was acting manager for the remainder of the season
Chicago White Sox Gene Lamont
Cleveland Indians Mike Hargrove
Detroit Tigers Sparky Anderson
Kansas City Royals Hal McRae
Milwaukee Brewers Phil Garner
Minnesota Twins Tom Kelly
New York Yankees Buck Showalter
Oakland Athletics Tony La Russa
Seattle Mariners Bill Plummer
Texas Rangers Bobby Valentine was replaced during the season by Toby Harrah
Toronto Blue Jays Cito Gaston Won the World Series

National League

Team Manager Comments
Atlanta Braves Bobby Cox Won the National League pennant
Chicago Cubs Jim Lefebvre
Cincinnati Reds Lou Piniella
Houston Astros Art Howe
Los Angeles Dodgers Tommy Lasorda
Montreal Expos Tom Runnells was replaced during the season by Felipe Alou
New York Mets Jeff Torborg
Philadelphia Phillies Jim Fregosi
Pittsburgh Pirates Jim Leyland
St. Louis Cardinals Joe Torre
San Diego Padres Jim Riggleman
San Francisco Giants Roger Craig

Events

January

February

March

April

May

June

  • June 8 - Steve Howe of the New York Yankees is banned from baseball for life by Commissioner Fay Vincent. Howe was arrested earlier in the year for striking a light pole with his vehicle and leaving the scene of an accident. The trial was postponed to May and Howe took a plea deal on a charge of attempted drug possession.

July

August

September

October

November

December

  • December 1 – During the Major League Baseball Players Association annual executive board meeting, its executive director Don Fehr tells the membership that the union needs “to save the owners from themselves.”
  • December 7 – At the winter meetings in Louisville, the MLB owners vote 15-13 to reopen the Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) one year early, as they have the right to do. Two days later, MLBPA director Don Fehr calls a 1993 lockout a “foregone conclusion.”

Movies

Births

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Deaths

January

  • January   1 – Jean Lovell, 65, who set home runs all-time records for All-American Girls Professional Baseball League catchers both in career and regular season.
  • January   1 – Buck Stanton, 85, outfielder for the 1931 St. Louis Browns.
  • January   3 – George Meyer, 82, second baseman for the 1938 Chicago White Sox.
  • January 11 – Orville Jorgens, 83, pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies from 1935 to 1937.
  • January 15 – Charlie Gassaway, 73, pitcher who spent three seasons with the Chicago Cubs (1944), Philadelphia Athletics (1945) and Cleveland Indians (1946).
  • January 17 – Red Durrett, 70, outfielder for the 1944 Brooklyn Dodgers.
  • January 18 – Philomena Gianfrancisco, 68, outfielder who played from 1945 through 1948 in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.
  • January 21 – Chuck Rowland, 92, backup catcher for the 1923 Philadelphia Athletics.
  • January 30 – Eddie Taylor, 90, third baseman and shortstop for the 1926 Boston Braves.
  • January 30 – Coaker Triplett, 80, left fielder for the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies from 1938 to 1945, who later posted four .300 seasons with the Buffalo Bisons of the International League, including the 1950 batting title.

February

  • February 8 – Fabian Gaffke, 78, outfielder for the Boston Red Sox and the Cleveland Indians between 1936 and 1942.
  • February 8 – Wally Shannon, 59, middle infielder for the St Louis Cardinals from 1959 to 1960.
  • February 13 – Byron Humphrey, 80, pitcher for the 1938 Boston Red Sox.
  • February 13 – Earl Rapp, 70, outfielder who played with the Detroit Tigers, Chicago White Sox, New York Giants, St. Louis Browns and Washington Senators in parts of three seasons spanning 1949–1952.
  • February 24 – Betty McKenna, 60, All-American Girls Professional Baseball League infielder in three seasons from 1951 to 1953.
  • February 26 – Jean R. Yawkey, 83, majority owner of the Boston Red Sox since 1976.

March

  • March 4 – Larry Rosenthal, 81, backup outfielder for the Chicago White Sox, Cleveland Indians, New York Yankees and Philadelphia Athletics in part of eight seasons spanning 1936–1945.
  • March 8 – Sherman Edwards, 82, relief pitcher for the 1934 Cincinnati Reds.
  • March 14 – Glenn Liebhardt, 81, pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics and the St. Louis Browns in three seasons between 1930 and 1938.
  • March 31 – Ken Silvestri, 75, backup catcher who played with three different teams between 1941 and 1951, most prominently for the World Champion 1941 Yankees and the 1950 ′′Whiz Kids′′ Phillies.

April

  • April 2 – Dib Williams, 82, middle infielder for the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox from 1930 through 1935, and a member of the 1931 Athletics American League champion team.
  • April 12 – Betty Bays, 61, All-American Girls Professional Baseball League outfielder and catcher.
  • April 13 – Steve Shemo, 77, backup infielder for the Boston Braves from 1944 to 1945.
  • April 15 – Ralph Weigel, 70, catcher/outfielder who played in part of three seasons with the Cleveland Indians (1946), Chicago White Sox (1948) and Washington Senators (1949).
  • April 20 – Pat Creeden, 85, second baseman for the 1931 Boston Red Sox.
  • April 20 – Orval Grove, 72, All-Star pitcher who posted a 63-73 record and a 3.78 ERA for the Chicago White Sox from 1940 to 1949, while setting a team-record by winning his first nine decisions in 1943.
  • April 23 – Deron Johnson, 53, first and third baseman who spent 16 seasons in the majors, while hitting .287 with 32 home runs and a National League-best 130 RBIs for the 1965 Cincinnati Reds, and also a member of the World Series champion Oakland Athletics in 1973.
  • April 24 – Elio Chacón, 55, Venezuelan middle infielder who led the New York Mets in stolen bases in their 1962 inaugural season.
  • April 25 – Bob Hazle, 61, right fielder for the Cincinnati Reds, Milwaukee Braves and Detroit Tigers in part of three seasons spanning 1955–1958, and a member of the 1957 World Series champion Braves.
  • April 27 – Harlond Clift, 79, All-Star third baseman for the St. Louis Browns (1934–1942) and Washington Senators (1942–1945); the first man at his position to hit at least 30 home runs (34, in 1938), who also scored 100 runs seven times, set a record with 405 assists in 1937, and compiled a career-mark of 309 double plays which ranks him 23rd in the MLB all-time list.

May

  • May 1 – Celerino Sánchez, 48, Mexican third baseman for the Yankees from 1972 to 1973, who won the 1966 Triple Crown in the Mexican League, also a member of the Mexican and Caribbean Baseball Halls of Fame.
  • May 1 – Justin Stein, 80, backup infielder who played for the Philadelphia Phillies and the Cincinnati Reds during the 1938 season.
  • May 8 – Joyce Ricketts, 59, two-time All-Star outfielder in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.
  • May 10 – Tom Seats, 81, pitcher for the Detroit Tigers (1940) and the Brooklyn Dodgers (1945).
  • May 25 – Otto Denning, 79, catcher who played from 1942 through 1943 for the Cleveland Indians, later a minor league manager.
  • May 28 – Charley Schanz, 72, hard-throwing pitcher whose career extended for 17 seasons (1938–1954), including stints with the Philadelphia Phillies (1944–1947) and Boston Red Sox (1950).
  • May 31 – Karl Schnell, 92, relief pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds in the 1922 and 1923 seasons.

June

  • June 4 – Carl Stotz, 82, founder of Little League Baseball in 1939 who left the organization in 1955 in a litigious leadership dispute, shortly after serving as a pallbearer at Cy Young's funeral.
  • June 12 – Randy Moore, 85, right fielder for the Chicago White Sox (1927–28), Boston Braves (1930–35), Brooklyn Dodgers (1936–37) and St. Louis Cardinals (1937).
  • June 13 – Len Rice, 73, backup catcher for the Cincinnati Reds (1944) and the Chicago Cubs (1945).
  • June 15 – Eddie Lopat, 73, All-Star pitcher who combined with Allie Reynolds and Vic Raschi to form the heart of the New York Yankees rotation through five World Series championships from 1949 through 1953, while also leading the American League in both earned run average (2.42) and won-lost percentage (.800) in 1953.
  • June 16 – Rita Meyer, 65, shortstop and pitcher who played in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.
  • June 24 – Vern Curtis, 72, pitcher in parts of three seasons for the Washington Senators between 1943 and 1946.
  • June 27 – Sandy Amorós, 62, Cuban left fielder for the Brooklyn Dodgers, best remembered for a spectacular catch in Game 7 of the 1955 World Series.
  • June 27 – Frank Jelincich, 74, outfielder who played briefly for the Chicago Cubs in the 1941 season.
  • June 27 – Woody Main, 70, pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates in parts of four seasons spanning 1948–1953.

July

  • July 3 – George Staller, 76, backup outfielder for the 1943 Philadelphia Athletics, who later developed a distinguished career as a scout, also serving as first base coach on Earl Weaver's Baltimore Orioles staff from 1968 to 1975, while working on the Orioles' three consecutive American League championship teams (1969–1971) and the 1970 World Series champion.
  • July 10 – Walt Masters, 85, Canadian pitcher who played for the Washington Senators (1931), Philadelphia Phillies (1937) and Philadelphia Athletics (1939), and also an American football halfback and quarterback in the National Football League during three seasons between 1936 and 1944.
  • July 27 – Salty Parker, 80, backup infielder for the 1936 Detroit Tigers, who later posted a 20-year minor league managing record of 920–858 (.517), and also coached for the San Francisco Giants, Cleveland Indians, Los Angeles/California Angels, New York Mets and Houston Astros between 1958 and 1972, while serving brief stints as manager of the Mets (1967) and the Astros (1972).

August

  • August 5 – Jim Marquis, 91, pitcher who played briefly for the New York Yankees during the 1925 season.
  • August 5 – Lefty Wilkie, 77, Canadian pitcher who played for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1941 to 1942 and again in 1946.
  • August 29 – Andy Gilbert, 78, outfielder for the Boston Red Sox in 1942 and 1946, who later became a successful minor league manager, while posting a record of 2055–1959 (.512) during 29 seasons spanning 1950–1982, which included five League Championships.

September

  • September 5 – Ron Davis, 50, outfielder who played from 1962 through 1969 for the Houston Colt .45s/Astros, St. Louis Cardinals and Pittsburgh Pirates, while collecting a .233 average with 10 home runs and 79 RBIs in 295 games.
  • September 5 – Billy Herman, 83, Hall of Fame second baseman and a 10-time All-Star for the Chicago Cubs, Brooklyn Dodgers, Boston Braves and Pittsburgh Pirates between 1931 and 1947, who batted a .304 lifetime average, scored 100 runs five times, and led the National League in hits, doubles and triples once each and in putouts seven times, while also managing the Pirates in 1947 and the Boston Red Sox from 1964 through 1966.
  • September 22 – Aurelio López, 44, All-Star Mexican relief pitcher who posted a 62-36 record with a 3.56 ERA and 93 saves in 11 seasons for the Kansas City Royals, St. Louis Cardinals, Detroit Tigers and Houston Astros, which included two seasons of 21 saves for the Tigers from 1979 to 1980 and was also a member of the 1984 World Series champion Tigers.
  • September 23 – Bernice Gera, 61, who became the first female umpire to officiate a professional baseball game, which took place on June 24, 1972, in the New York–Penn League in Geneva, New York.
  • September 27 – Hal Smith, 90, middle-relief pitcher who posted a 12-11 record and a 3.77 ERA in 51 games for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1932 to 1935.

October

  • October 4 – Augie Prudhomme, 89, pitcher for the 1929 Detroit Tigers.
  • October 9 – Mike Guerra, 79, Cuban catcher who played for the Washington Senators, Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox during 10 seasons spanning 1937–1951, and also a manager in the minors and the Mexican and Venezuelan winter leagues.
  • October 15 – Jackie Sullivan, 74, second baseman who played in one game for the Detroit Tigers in 1944.
  • October 17 – John O'Connell, 88, backup catcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1928 and 1929.
  • October 19 – Atley Donald, 82, New York Yankees pitcher who had a lifetime record of 65-33 for a winning percentage of .663, and also was a member of the 1941 World Series champion Yankees.
  • October 20 – Spider Wilhelm, 63, shorstop for the 1953 Philadelphia Athletics.
  • October 21 – Joe Dwyer, 89, pinch-hitter in 12 games for the 1937 Cincinnati Reds.
  • October 22 – Red Barber, 84, broadcaster for the Cincinnati Reds, Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Yankees from 1934 to 1966 who, along with pal Mel Allen, earned the Ford Frick Award honors in its first class from the Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.
  • October 23 – Lou Rochelli, 73, second baseman in five games for the 1944 Brooklyn Dodgers; one of many ballplayers who only appeared in the major leagues during World War II.
  • October 26 – Dottie Green, 71, catcher and chaperone, who participated in all 12 seasons of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League.

November

  • November 3 – Boze Berger, 82, infielder for the Cleveland Indians, Chicago White Sox and Boston Red Sox during six seasons between 1932 and 1939.
  • November 3 – Chris Van Cuyk, 65, pitcher who played from 1950 through 1952 for the Brooklyn Dodgers.
  • November 4 – Andy Varga, 61, pitcher for the Chicago Cubs during the 1950–1952 seasons.
  • November 5 – Dick Hahn, 76, backup catcher for the 1940 Washington Senators.
  • November 5 – Rod Scurry, 36, middle relief pitcher who posted a 19-32 record with a 3.24 ERA and 39 saves for three teams between 1980 and 1988, mostly with the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1980–1985.
  • November 10 – Chuck Connors, 71, first baseman for the 1951 Chicago Cubs who gained stardom as an actor on the television series The Rifleman.
  • November 13 – Johnny Ostrowski, 75, utility outfielder/third baseman who played for the Chicago Cubs, Boston Red Sox, Chicago White Sox and Washington Senators from 1943 to 1950.
  • November 13 – Wally Shaner, 92, left fielder who played from 1923 to 1929 for the Cleveland Indians, Boston Red Sox and Cincinnati Reds.
  • November 13 – Claude Wilborn, 80, right fielder for the 1940 Boston Bees.
  • November 16 – Gene Schott, 79, pitcher who played from 1935 through 1939 with the Cincinnati Reds, Philadelphia Phillies and Brooklyn Dodgers.
  • November 27 – Walt Tauscher, 90, pitcher for the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1928 and the Washington Senators in 1931, who also won 263 games in the minor leagues and managed at that level for five seasons.
  • November 29 – Tuck Stainback, 81, backup outfielder for seven different major league teams from 1934 to 1946, who single-handedly prevented Carl Hubbell from pitching a perfect game in 1938.

December

  • December 1 – Chile Gómez, 91, Mexican infielder for the Philadelphia Phillies between 1935 and 1942.
  • December 1 – Sam Lowry, 72, pitcher who played for the Philadelphia Athletics during the 1942 and 1943 seasons.
  • December 10 – Babe Phelps, 84, catcher for the Washington Senators, Chicago Cubs, Brooklyn Dodgers and Pittsburgh Pirates in a span of 11 seasons from 1931 to 1942, whose .367 batting average in 1936 remains the highest for any major league catcher in the modern era (1901–present).
  • December 12 – Rube Walker, 66, backup catcher for the Chicago Cubs and the Dodgers in Brooklyn and Los Angeles, later a longtime pitching coach for the Washington Senators, New York Mets and Atlanta Braves, who developed and nurtured the five-man rotation, including the pitching staff of the 1969 Amazin' Mets.
  • December 15 – Dick Mulligan, 74, pitcher who played in parts of three seasons with the Washington Senators (1941), Philadelphia Phillies (1946) and Boston Braves (1946–1947).
  • December 25 – Ed Donnelly, 60, pitcher for the 1959 Chicago Cubs.
  • December 26 – Tom Gorman, 67, relief pitcher who played from 1952 to 1959 for the New York Yankees and the Kansas City Athletics.
  • December 28 – Sal Maglie, 75, All-Star pitcher for all three New York teams during the 1950s, whose hardnosed style personified the rivalry between the Big Apple Franchises, while posting a 119-62 record and a 3.15 ERA in 303 career appearances, including National League's top marks in wins (1951) and ERA (1950).

References

  1. ^ May 9, 1992 Atlanta Braves at St. Louis Cardinals Play by Play and Box Score
  2. ^ Murray Chass (1992-11-11). "BASEBALL; Look What Wind Blew Back: Baseball's Giants". The New York Times. p. B11.

External links

1992 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1992 followed the system in place since 1978.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected two, Rollie Fingers and Tom Seaver.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro Leagues.

It selected two, Bill McGowan and Hal Newhouser.

1992 Big League World Series

The 1992 Big League World Series took place from August 14–22 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States. Host Broward County, Florida defeated Maracaibo, Venezuela twice in the championship game.

1992 Caribbean Series

The thirty-fourth edition of the Caribbean Series (Serie del Caribe) was played in 1992. It was held from February 2 through February 9 with the champions teams from the Dominican Republic, Leones del Escogido; Mexico, Naranjeros de Hermosillo; Puerto Rico, Indios de Mayagüez, and Venezuela, Águilas del Zulia. The format consisted of 12 games, each team facing the other teams twice, and was played at Héctor Espino Baseball Stadium in Hermosillo, Mexico.

1992 International League season

The 1992 International League season took place from April to September 1992.

The Columbus Clippers defeated the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Red Barons to win the league championship. The 1992 Clippers were recognized on The National Baseball Association's top 100 minor league teams of all time list, placing at #72.

1992 Junior League World Series

The 1992 Junior League World Series took place from August 17–22 in Taylor, Michigan, United States. Tucson, Arizona defeated Lake Charles, Louisiana twice in the championship game.

1992 Little League World Series

The 1992 Little League World Series took place between August 24 and August 29 in South Williamsport, Pennsylvania. The team representing the Zamboanga City Little League, the Filipino representative in the Far East Region, won the International Championship while Long Beach, California, the United States West Region representative, won the U.S. Championship.

In the championship game, Zamboanga City defeated Long Beach 15–4 to become the first Asian team outside of Taiwan, South Korea, or Japan to be champion. However, upon further review it was discovered that the Filipino team violated age and residency rules and Little League stripped them of their title. Long Beach was awarded a 6–0 victory by forfeit as per Little League rules and became only the fourth American team in twenty years to be Little League World Champions.

The championship game did not feature a team from Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) for the first time since 1985. This tied the record of six consecutive finals set by Taiwan from 1977 through 1982. As of 2017, this record has not been seriously approached by one country or state.

1992 MLB Japan All-Star Series

The 1992 MLB Japan All-Star Series was the fourth edition of the championship, a best-of-eight series between the All-Star teams from Major League Baseball (MLB) and Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB), then-called All-Japan.

MLB won the series by 6–1–1 and Mark Grace was named MVP.

1992 Nippon Professional Baseball season

The 1992 Nippon Professional Baseball season was the 43rd season of operation for the league.

1992 Senior League World Series

The 1992 Senior League World Series took place from August 16–22 in Kissimmee, Florida, United States. Pingtung, Taiwan defeated Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic in the championship game. It was Taiwan's fifth straight championship, and 17th overall.

1992 Topps

This a list with brief descriptions of Topps trading card products for 1992. All cards listed are standard size (2½ × 3½ inches). Exceptions are noted.

Baseball at the 1992 Summer Olympics

Baseball had its debut as an official medal sport at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona. Eight nations competed, with the preliminary phase consisting of each team playing every other team. Playoffs were then held, with the four highest ranked teams advancing. For the semifinals, the 1st place team played the 4th place team and the 2nd place team played against the 3rd place team. The winners of those semifinals competed against each other for the gold medal, with the loser getting the silver medal. The teams defeated in the semifinal played a match for the bronze medal.

Baseball was an event open only to amateurs.

Homer at the Bat

"Homer at the Bat" is the seventeenth episode of The Simpsons' third season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on February 20, 1992. The episode follows the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant softball team, led by Homer, having a winning season and making the championship game. Mr. Burns makes a large bet that the team will win and brings in nine ringers from the "big leagues" to ensure his success. It was written by John Swartzwelder, who is a big baseball fan, and directed by Jim Reardon.

Roger Clemens, Wade Boggs, Ken Griffey, Jr., Steve Sax, Ozzie Smith, José Canseco, Don Mattingly, Darryl Strawberry and Mike Scioscia all guest starred as themselves, playing the ringers hired by Mr. Burns. Terry Cashman sang a song over the end credits. The guest stars were recorded over several months, with differing degrees of cooperation. The episode is often named among the show's best, and was the first to beat The Cosby Show in the ratings on its original airing. In 2014, showrunner Al Jean selected it as one of five essential episodes in the show's history.

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