1992 Major League Baseball season

The 1992 Major League Baseball season saw the Toronto Blue Jays defeat the Atlanta Braves in the World Series, becoming the first team outside the United States to win the World Series.

Also a resurgence in pitching dominance occur during this season. On average, one out of every seven games pitched that season was a shutout; in 2,106 MLB regular-season games, 298 shutouts were pitched (up from 272 in 2,104 regular-season games in 1991).[1][2] Two teams pitched at least 20 shutouts each; the Atlanta Braves led the Majors with 24 and the Pittsburgh Pirates finished second with 20. In the National League, no team hit more than 138 home runs and no team scored 700 runs. The San Francisco Giants were shut out 18 times, the most in the Majors.[3][4] The effect was similar in the American League. In 1991, two AL teams had scored at least 800 runs and three had collected 1,500 hits.[5] In 1992, no team scored 800 runs and only one reached 1,500 hits.[6] The California Angels were shut out 15 times, the most in the AL.[7]

1992 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 6 – October 24, 1992
Draft
Top draft pickPhil Nevin
Picked byHouston Astros
Regular Season
Season MVPAL: Dennis Eckersley (OAK)
NL: Barry Bonds (PIT)
League Postseason
AL championsToronto Blue Jays
  AL runners-upOakland Athletics
NL championsAtlanta Braves
  NL runners-upPittsburgh Pirates
World Series
ChampionsToronto Blue Jays
  Runners-upAtlanta Braves
Finals MVPPat Borders (TOR)
Arlington Stadium 1992 - 2
The Texas Rangers playing host to the Detroit Tigers at Arlington Stadium during a 1992 regular season game.

Awards and honors

Baseball Writers' Association of America Awards
BBWAA Award National League American League
Rookie of the Year Eric Karros (LAD) Pat Listach (MIL)
Cy Young Award Greg Maddux (CHC) Dennis Eckersley (OAK)
Manager of the Year Jim Leyland (PIT) Tony La Russa (OAK)
Most Valuable Player Barry Bonds (PIT) Dennis Eckersley (OAK)
Gold Glove Awards
Position National League American League
Pitcher Greg Maddux (CHC) Mark Langston (CAL)
Catcher Tom Pagnozzi (STL) Iván Rodríguez (TEX)
First Baseman Mark Grace (CHC) Don Mattingly (NYY)
Second Baseman José Lind (PIT) Roberto Alomar (TOR)
Third Baseman Terry Pendleton (ATL) Robin Ventura (CHW)
Shortstop Ozzie Smith (STL) Cal Ripken Jr. (BAL)
Outfielders Barry Bonds (PIT) Kirby Puckett (MIN)
Larry Walker (MON) Devon White (TOR)
Andy Van Slyke (PIT) Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)
Silver Slugger Awards
Pitcher/Designated Hitter Dwight Gooden (NYM) Dave Winfield (TOR)
Catcher Darren Daulton (PHI) Mickey Tettleton (DET)
First Baseman Fred McGriff (SD) Mark McGwire (OAK)
Second Baseman Ryne Sandberg (CHC) Roberto Alomar (TOR)
Third Baseman Gary Sheffield (SD) Edgar Martínez (SEA)
Shortstop Barry Larkin (CIN) Travis Fryman (DET)
Outfielders Barry Bonds (PIT) Joe Carter (TOR)
Andy Van Slyke (PIT) Juan González (TEX)
Larry Walker (MON) Kirby Puckett (MIN)

Statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVG Edgar Martínez SEA .343 Gary Sheffield SD .330
HR Juan González TEX 43 Fred McGriff SD 35
RBI Cecil Fielder DET 124 Darren Daulton PHI 109
Wins Kevin Brown TEX
Jack Morris TOR
21 Tom Glavine ATL
Greg Maddux CHC
20
ERA Roger Clemens BOS 2.41 Bill Swift SF 2.08
SO Randy Johnson SEA 241 John Smoltz ATL 215
SV Dennis Eckersley OAK 51 Lee Smith STL 43
SB Kenny Lofton CLE 66 Marquis Grissom MTL 78

Major league baseball final standings

American League

AL East W L Pct. GB Home Road
Toronto Blue Jays 96 66 0.593 53–28 43–38
Milwaukee Brewers 92 70 0.568 4 53–28 39–42
Baltimore Orioles 89 73 0.549 7 43–38 46–35
Cleveland Indians 76 86 0.469 20 41–40 35–46
New York Yankees 76 86 0.469 20 41–40 35–46
Detroit Tigers 75 87 0.463 21 38–42 37–45
Boston Red Sox 73 89 0.451 23 44–37 29–52
AL West W L Pct. GB Home Road
Oakland Athletics 96 66 0.593 51–30 45–36
Minnesota Twins 90 72 0.556 6 48–33 42–39
Chicago White Sox 86 76 0.531 10 50–32 36–44
Texas Rangers 77 85 0.475 19 36–45 41–40
California Angels 72 90 0.444 24 41–40 31–50
Kansas City Royals 72 90 0.444 24 44–37 28–53
Seattle Mariners 64 98 0.395 32 38–43 26–55

National League

NL East W L Pct. GB Home Road
Pittsburgh Pirates 96 66 0.593 53–28 43–38
Montreal Expos 87 75 0.537 9 43–38 44–37
St. Louis Cardinals 83 79 0.512 13 45–36 38–43
Chicago Cubs 78 84 0.481 18 43–38 35–46
New York Mets 72 90 0.444 24 41–40 31–50
Philadelphia Phillies 70 92 0.432 26 41–40 29–52
NL West W L Pct. GB Home Road
Atlanta Braves 98 64 0.605 51–30 47–34
Cincinnati Reds 90 72 0.556 8 53–28 37–44
San Diego Padres 82 80 0.506 16 45–36 37–44
Houston Astros 81 81 0.500 17 47–34 34–47
San Francisco Giants 72 90 0.444 26 42–39 30–51
Los Angeles Dodgers 63 99 0.389 35 37–44 26–55

Postseason

  League Championship Series
CBS
World Series
CBS
                 
East Toronto 4  
West Oakland 2  
    AL Toronto 4
  NL Atlanta 2
East Pittsburgh 3
West Atlanta 4  

Managers

American League

Team Manager Comments
Baltimore Orioles± Johnny Oates
Boston Red Sox Butch Hobson
California Angels Buck Rodgers after a May bus accident John Wathan was acting manager for the remainder of the season
Chicago White Sox Gene Lamont
Cleveland Indians Mike Hargrove
Detroit Tigers Sparky Anderson
Kansas City Royals Hal McRae
Milwaukee Brewers Phil Garner
Minnesota Twins Tom Kelly
New York Yankees Buck Showalter
Oakland Athletics Tony La Russa
Seattle Mariners Bill Plummer
Texas Rangers Bobby Valentine was replaced during the season by Toby Harrah
Toronto Blue Jays Cito Gaston Won the World Series

National League

Team Manager Comments
Atlanta Braves Bobby Cox Won the National League pennant
Chicago Cubs Jim Lefebvre
Cincinnati Reds Lou Piniella
Houston Astros Art Howe
Los Angeles Dodgers Tommy Lasorda
Montreal Expos Tom Runnells was replaced during the season by Felipe Alou
New York Mets Jeff Torborg
Philadelphia Phillies Jim Fregosi
Pittsburgh Pirates Jim Leyland
St. Louis Cardinals Joe Torre
San Diego Padres± Jim Riggleman
San Francisco Giants Roger Craig

Television coverage

Network Day of week Announcers
CBS Saturday afternoons Sean McDonough, Tim McCarver, Dick Stockton, Jim Kaat
ESPN Sunday nights
Tuesday nights
Wednesday nights
Friday nights
Jon Miller, Joe Morgan

Events

January–June

July–December

Movies

External links

References

  1. ^ "1992 Major League Baseball Standard Pitching". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 26, 2014.
  2. ^ "1991 Major League Baseball Standard Pitching". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 26, 2014.
  3. ^ "1992 National League Standard Pitching". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 26, 2014.
  4. ^ "1992 San Francisco Giants". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 26, 2014.
  5. ^ "1991 American League Standard Batting". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 26, 2014.
  6. ^ "1992 American League Standard Batting". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 26, 2014.
  7. ^ "1992 California Angels". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved December 26, 2014.
  8. ^ "Today In All Teams History – September 26". nationalpastime.com. Retrieved 26 September 2015.
1992 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1992 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing third in the American League East with a record of 89 wins and 73 losses.

Having played almost 40 years at Memorial Stadium, the 1992 campaign was the inaugural season for the Orioles' new ballpark, Oriole Park at Camden Yards, where they play to this day.

1992 Boston Red Sox season

The 1992 Boston Red Sox season was the 92nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished last in the seven-team American League East with a record of 73 wins and 89 losses, 23 games behind the Toronto Blue Jays. It was the last time the Red Sox finished last in their division until 2012. The Red Sox hit seven grand slams, the most in MLB in 1992.

1992 California Angels season

The California Angels 1992 season involved the Angels finishing 5th in the American League West with a record of 72 wins and 90 losses.

1992 Chicago Cubs season

The 1992 Chicago Cubs season was the 121st season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 117th in the National League and the 77th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished fourth in the National League East with a record of 78–84.

1992 Chicago White Sox season

The 1992 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 94th season. They finished with a record 86-76, good enough for 3rd place in the American League West, 10 games behind the 1st place Oakland Athletics.

1992 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1992 Cincinnati Reds season saw the Reds finish in second place in the National League West with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses.

This was the final season in which the Reds donned the pullover jersey and beltless pants uniform style (the Reds being the last MLB team still wearing them). Following this season they switched back to a traditional baseball uniform.

1992 Cleveland Indians season

The Indians were named "Organization of the Year" by Baseball America in 1992, in response to the appearance of offensive bright spots and an improving farm system.

1992 Detroit Tigers season

The Detroit Tigers' 1992 season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Detroit Tigers attempting to win the American League East.

1992 Houston Astros season

The Houston Astros' 1992 season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Astros finishing fourth in the National League West with a record of 81 wins and 81 losses.

The Astros were forced to play 26 consecutive road games from July 27 through August 23, due to the Republican National Convention being held at the Astrodome from August 17–20. Houston went a respectable 12-14 on the trip, which saw the Astros play in all National League cities except Montreal, New York City, and Pittsburgh.

Following the road trip, the Astros won 25 of their final 38 games to finish at .500, an improvement of 16 games upon their franchise-worst 65-97 mark of 1991.

The Astros won six games on walk-off home runs, the most of any MLB team in 1992.

1992 Kansas City Royals season

The 1992 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 5th in the American League West with a record of 72 wins and 90 losses.

1992 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1992 Los Angeles Dodgers season was a poor one for the team as it finished last in the Western Division of the National League with a record of 63 wins and 99 losses. Despite boasting what was nicknamed the "Outfield of Dreams", being manned by Eric Davis, Brett Butler, and Darryl Strawberry, injuries to key players and slumps from others contributed to the franchise's worst season since moving to Los Angeles. Additionally, the Dodgers cancelled four home games during the season due to the L.A. Riots. Despite the poor finish, the Dodgers had some hope for the future as first baseman Eric Karros won the National League Rookie of the Year Award, the first of five consecutive Dodger players to do so. The 1992 season also saw the Dodgers drop television station KTTV Ch.11 as their chief broadcaster of Dodger baseball, ending a 34 year-35 consecutive season association with that station. Additionally, it was the first time the Dodgers lost 90 games in a season since 1944.

1992 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1992 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 63rd playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 14, 1992, at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego, the home of the San Diego Padres of the National League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 13–6.

1992 Major League Baseball draft

The 1992 Major League Baseball draft took place on June 1, 1992, through a conference call involving all 28 MLB teams of the time. Phil Nevin of Cal State Fullerton was the first overall selection, chosen by the Houston Astros. Derek Jeter, widely considered a future member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame, was selected by the New York Yankees with the sixth selection. In addition to Nevin, Paul Shuey, B. J. Wallace, Jeffrey Hammonds, and Chad Mottola were selected ahead of Jeter. The supplemental draft of ‘92 also consisted of three eastern collegiate All stars Sean Jordan of Penn State, Darryl Mcclish of Rutgers , and John DeSalvo of Stockton University.

1992 Milwaukee Brewers season

The 1992 Milwaukee Brewers season featured the team finishing in second place in the American League East with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses.

1992 San Diego Padres season

The 1992 San Diego Padres season was the 24th season in franchise history. It saw the team finish in third place in the National League West with a record of 82 wins and 80 losses. They also hosted the 1992 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

1992 San Francisco Giants season

The 1992 San Francisco Giants season was the Giants' 110th season in Major League Baseball, their 35th season in San Francisco since their move from New York following the 1957 season, and their 33rd at Candlestick Park. The team finished in fifth place in the National League West with a record of 72 wins and 90 losses.

This year, Giants owner Bob Lurie agreed in principle to sell his team to a Tampa Bay-based group of investors led by Vince Naimoli, who would then move the team to St. Petersburg. However, in November 1992, National League owners nixed the move under pressure from San Francisco officials, and the Giants were sold to a group that kept them in San Francisco.

1992 Seattle Mariners season

The Seattle Mariners 1992 season was their 16th since the franchise creation, and ended the season finishing 7th in the American League West, finishing with a record of 64–98 (.395). Randy Johnson won the first of four consecutive strikeout titles with 241.

1992 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1992 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 111th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 101st season in the National League. The Cardinals went 83-79 during the season and finished third in the National League East division, 13 games behind the NL East champion Pittsburgh Pirates.

1992 Texas Rangers season

The 1992 Texas Rangers season saw the Rangers finishing fourth in the American League West with a record of 77 wins and 85 losses.

1992 MLB season by team
AL East
AL West
NL East
NL West
Pre-modern era
Modern era
See also

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.