1991 Major League Baseball season

The 1991 Major League Baseball season saw the Minnesota Twins defeat the Atlanta Braves for the World Series title, in a series where every game was won by the home team.

1991 MLB season
League Major League Baseball
Sport Baseball
Duration April 8 – October 27, 1991
Draft
Top draft pick Brien Taylor
Picked by New York Yankees
Regular Season
Season MVP AL: Cal Ripken, Jr. (BAL)
NL: Terry Pendleton (ATL)
League Postseason
AL champions Minnesota Twins
  AL runners-up Toronto Blue Jays
NL champions Atlanta Braves
  NL runners-up Pittsburgh Pirates
World Series
Champions Minnesota Twins
  Runners-up Atlanta Braves
Finals MVP Jack Morris (MIN)
Baltimore Memorial Stadium 1991
The Baltimore Orioles at play during a 1991 home game at Memorial Stadium.

Awards and honors

Statistical leaders

Statistic American League National League
AVG Julio Franco TEX .341 Terry Pendleton ATL .319
HR José Canseco OAK
Cecil Fielder DET
44 Howard Johnson NYM 38
RBI Cecil Fielder DET 133 Howard Johnson NYM 117
Wins Scott Erickson MIN
Bill Gullickson DET
20 Tom Glavine ATL
John Smiley PIT
20
ERA Roger Clemens BOS 2.62 Dennis Martínez MTL 2.39
SO Roger Clemens BOS 241 David Cone NYM 241
SV Bryan Harvey CAL 46 Lee Smith STL 47
SB Rickey Henderson OAK 58 Marquis Grissom MTL 76

Major league baseball final standings

There was quite a bit of parity in the American League, as 10 teams finished within 10 games of each other, and only 3 teams (Yankees, Orioles, and Indians) had losing records. The standings in the American League West were quite notable because all the teams in that division finished with at least a .500 record.

American League

AL East W L Pct. GB Home Road
Toronto Blue Jays 91 71 0.562 46–35 45–36
Boston Red Sox 84 78 0.519 7 43–38 41–40
Detroit Tigers 84 78 0.519 7 49–32 35–46
Milwaukee Brewers 83 79 0.512 8 43–37 40–42
New York Yankees 71 91 0.438 20 39–42 32–49
Baltimore Orioles 67 95 0.414 24 33–48 34–47
Cleveland Indians 57 105 0.352 34 30–52 27–53
AL West W L Pct. GB Home Road
Minnesota Twins 95 67 0.586 51–30 44–37
Chicago White Sox 87 75 0.537 8 46–35 41–40
Texas Rangers 85 77 0.525 10 46–35 39–42
Oakland Athletics 84 78 0.519 11 47–34 37–44
Seattle Mariners 83 79 0.512 12 45–36 38–43
Kansas City Royals 82 80 0.506 13 40–41 42–39
California Angels 81 81 0.500 14 40–41 41–40

National League

NL East W L Pct. GB Home Road
Pittsburgh Pirates 98 64 0.605 52–32 46–32
St. Louis Cardinals 84 78 0.519 14 52–32 32–46
Philadelphia Phillies 78 84 0.481 20 47–36 31–48
Chicago Cubs 77 83 0.481 20 46–37 31–46
New York Mets 77 84 0.478 20½ 40–42 37–42
Montreal Expos 71 90 0.441 26½ 33–35 38–55
NL West W L Pct. GB Home Road
Atlanta Braves 94 68 0.580 48–33 46–35
Los Angeles Dodgers 93 69 0.574 1 54–27 39–42
San Diego Padres 84 78 0.519 10 42–39 42–39
San Francisco Giants 75 87 0.463 19 43–38 32–49
Cincinnati Reds 74 88 0.457 20 39–42 35–46
Houston Astros 65 97 0.401 29 37–44 28–53

Postseason

  League Championship Series
(ALCS, NLCS)
World Series
                 
East Toronto 1  
West Minnesota 4  
    AL Minnesota 4
  NL Atlanta 3
East Pittsburgh 3
West Atlanta 4  

Managers

American League

Team Manager Comments
Baltimore Orioles Frank Robinson Replaced during the season by Johnny Oates
Boston Red Sox Joe Morgan
California Angels Doug Rader Replaced during the season by Buck Rodgers
Chicago White Sox Jeff Torborg
Cleveland Indians John McNamara Replaced during the season by Mike Hargrove
Detroit Tigers Sparky Anderson
Kansas City Royals John Wathan Replaced during the season by Hal McRae
Milwaukee Brewers Tom Trebelhorn
Minnesota Twins Tom Kelly Won the World Series
New York Yankees Stump Merrill
Oakland Athletics Tony La Russa
Seattle Mariners Jim Lefebvre
Texas Rangers Bobby Valentine
Toronto Blue Jays Cito Gaston Replaced temporarily by Gene Tenace while undergoing treatment for a herniated disc

National League

Team Manager Comments
Atlanta Braves Bobby Cox Won National League pennant
Chicago Cubs Don Zimmer Replaced during the season by Jim Essian
Cincinnati Reds Lou Piniella
Houston Astros Art Howe
Los Angeles Dodgers Tommy Lasorda
Montreal Expos Buck Rodgers Replaced during the season by Tom Runnels
New York Mets Bud Harrelson Replaced during the season by Mike Cubbage
Philadelphia Phillies Nick Leyva Replaced during the season by Jim Fregosi
Pittsburgh Pirates Jim Leyland
St. Louis Cardinals Joe Torre
San Diego Padres Greg Riddoch
San Francisco Giants Roger Craig

Events

January–March

  • January 6 – Alan Wiggins, former leadoff hitter for the San Diego Padres and a key member of their 1984 pennant run, becomes the first baseball player known to die of AIDS. He was 32.
  • January 7 – Pete Rose is released from Marion Federal Prison after serving a five-month sentence for tax evasion.
  • January 8 – Rod Carew, Gaylord Perry and Ferguson Jenkins are elected to the Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers' Association of America, with Carew becoming the 22nd player to be named in his first year of eligibility.
  • February 4 – The 12 members of the board of directors of the Hall of Fame vote unanimously to bar Pete Rose from the ballot. He will become eligible again only if the commissioner reinstates him by December 2005.
  • February 26 – New York Yankees second baseman Tony Lazzeri and major league owner Bill Veeck are elected to the Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee.

April–June

July–September

October–December

External links

References

  1. ^ Giuliotti, Ed (April 14, 1991). "Van Slyke Creates Sticky Situation Over Helmet Decals". Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved 8 December 2017.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.