1990 Major League Baseball draft

The 1990 Major League Baseball (MLB) Draft was held in June 1990.[1] The draft placed amateur baseball players onto major league teams. 1,487 players were distributed to 26 teams. The draft consisted of first round selections, supplemental first round selections, compensation picks, and many more rounds, in fact, it went a record 101 rounds with 40 first round selections. With a league-worst record of 63 wins and 97 losses[2] in the 1989 MLB Season, the Atlanta Braves selected shortstop, Chipper Jones out of the Bolles School with the first pick of the draft. 9 NBA and NFL players were drafted in 1990. 7 of the first 10 picks were selected directly out of high school.

1990 Major League Baseball draft
General information
Date(s)June 1990
Overview
1,487 total selections
First selectionChipper Jones
Atlanta Braves
First round selections40
Chipper Jones!!
Number 1 pick in the 1990 draft and MLB Hall of Fame member Chipper Jones.

First-round selections

The following are the first-round picks in the 1990 Major League Baseball draft.[3]

= All-Star = Baseball Hall of Famer
Pick Player Team Position Hometown/School
1 Chipper Jones Atlanta Braves SS Pierson, Florida
2 Tony Clark Detroit Tigers OF El Cajon, California
3 Mike Lieberthal Philadelphia Phillies C Glendale, California
4 Alex Fernandez Chicago White Sox RHP Miami Dade College
5 Kurt Miller Pittsburgh Pirates RHP Bakersfield, California
6 Marc Newfield Seattle Mariners 1B Huntington Beach, California
7 Dan Wilson Cincinnati Reds C University of Minnesota
8 Timothy Costo Cleveland Indians SS University of Iowa
9 Ronnie Walden Los Angeles Dodgers LHP Blanchard, Oklahoma
10 Carl Everett New York Yankees OF Tampa, Florida
11 Shane Andrews Montreal Expos SS Carlsbad, New Mexico
12 Todd Ritchie Minnesota Twins RHP Duncanville, Texas
13 Donovan Osborne St. Louis Cardinals LHP University of Nevada, Las Vegas
14 Todd Van Poppel Oakland Athletics[Compensation 1] RHP Arlington, Texas
15 Adam Hyzdu San Francisco Giants[Compensation 2] OF Cincinnati
16 Daniel Smith Texas Rangers LHP Creighton University
17 Jeromy Burnitz New York Mets OF Oklahoma State University
18 Aaron Holbert St. Louis Cardinals[Compensation 3] SS Long Beach, California
19 Eric Christopherson San Francisco Giants[Compensation 4] C San Diego State University
20 Mike Mussina Baltimore Orioles RHP Stanford University
21 Thomas Nevers Houston Astros[Compensation 5] SS Edina, Minnesota
22 Steve Karsay Toronto Blue Jays RHP College Point, New York
23 Lance Dickson Chicago Cubs LHP University of Arizona
24 Rondell White Montreal Expos[Compensation 6] OF Gray, Georgia
25 Robert Beckett San Diego Padres[Compensation 7] LHP Austin, Texas
26 Donald Peters Oakland Athletics RHP St. Francis College

Supplemental First Round Selections

Pick Player Team Position Hometown/School
27 Mike Zimmerman Pittsburgh Pirates[Compensation 8] RHP University of South Alabama
28 Gabe White Montreal Expos[Compensation 9] RHP Sebring, Florida
29 Midre Cummings Minnesota Twins[Compensation 10] OF Miami, Florida
30 Paul Ellis St. Louis Cardinals[Compensation 11] C University of California, Los Angeles
31 Brian Williams Houston Astros[Compensation 12] RHP University of South Carolina
32 Scott Sanders San Diego Padres[Compensation 13] RHP Nicholls State University
33 Marcus Jensen San Francisco Giants[Compensation 14] C Oakland, California
34 Dave Zancanaro Oakland Athletics[Compensation 15] LHP University of California, Los Angeles
35 Stan Spencer Montreal Expos[Compensation 16] RHP Stanford University
36 Kirk Dressendorfer Oakland Athletics[Compensation 17] RHP University of Texas at Austin
37 Ben Van Ryn Montreal Expos[Compensation 18] LHP Kendallville, Indiana
38 Tony Manahan Seattle Mariners SS Arizona State University
39 Samuel Hence Cleveland Indians OF Wiggins, Mississippi
40 Stan Robertson Montreal Expos OF Plainview, Texas

Compensation picks

  1. ^ Pick from Milwaukee Brewers as compensation for signing of free agent Dave Parker
  2. ^ Pick from Houston Astros as compensation for signing of free agent Ken Oberkfell
  3. ^ Pick from Boston Red Sox as compensation for signing of free agent Tony Peña
  4. ^ Pick from San Diego Padres as compensation for signing of free agent Craig Lefferts
  5. ^ Pick from San Francisco Giants as compensation for signing of free agent Kevin Bass
  6. ^ Pick from California Angels as compensation for signing of free agent Mark Langston
  7. ^ Pick from Kansas City Royals as compensation for signing of free agent Mark Davis
  8. ^ Supplemental pick for loss of free agent Jim Gott
  9. ^ Supplemental pick for loss of free agent Mark Langston
  10. ^ Supplemental pick for loss of free agent Jeff Reardon
  11. ^ Supplemental pick for loss of free agent Tony Peña
  12. ^ Supplemental pick for loss of free agent Kevin Bass
  13. ^ Supplemental pick for loss of free agent Mark Davis
  14. ^ Supplemental pick for loss of free agent Craig Lefferts
  15. ^ Supplemental pick for loss of free agent Storm Davis
  16. ^ Supplemental pick for loss of free agent Hubie Brooks
  17. ^ Supplemental pick for loss of free agent Dave Parker
  18. ^ Supplemental pick for loss of free agent Pascual Perez

Background

The draft went a record 101 rounds, surpassing 1989's total of 88, and included a record 1,487 selections. The Astros had the most selections with a 100. Seattle followed second with 75, and then the Yankees with. The 1990 draft included two Class A clubs, the Erie Sailors of the New York–Penn League and the Miami Miracle of the Florida State League. Rule 4 draft regulations permitted minor league clubs to participate. Erie made one selection, 24-year-old Brigham Young outfielder Gary Daniels. Miami made 16 selections, signing 15 of them, including All-American outfielder Paul Carey of Stanford in the fourth round. Atlanta made Chipper Jones, a high school shortstop from the Bolles School in Jacksonville, Florida, the draft's top pick. Detroit followed by picking outfielder Tony Clark out of Christian High School in El Cajon, California. The top three picks and seven of the top 10 choices were out of high school.

In the weeks leading up to the draft, the Atlanta Braves, awarded the top selection after finishing with the league's worst record from the year before, had narrowed down their options and were still largely undecided on whom they would take. One name most frequently mentioned was Todd Van Poppel, a right-handed prep pitcher who could scrape triple-digits with his fastball. Van Poppel, however, adamantly stated that he would not sign with the club if they drafted him, and fell to 14th overall due to his massive signing bonus demands. The Braves instead chose a shortstop from Jacksonville's Bolles School named Chipper Jones, who would go on to be not just one of the greatest draft picks of all time, but one of the consensus greatest third basemen and switch-hitters in baseball history. Van Poppel, on the other hand, found very little success in the majors, and professional hitters exploited the lack of movement on his fastball and erratic command. Jones' endearing, easygoing Southern persona and remarkable consistency over his nearly 20-year career (all as a Brave) earned him a first ballot Hall of Fame selection.[4]

Other notable players

† All-Star
‡ Hall of Fame

NFL/NBA players drafted

References

  1. ^ "MLB Draft 2017 Results - Baseball America". www.baseballamerica.com. Retrieved 2018-02-07.
  2. ^ "1990 Major League Baseball Standings & Expanded Standings | Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2018-02-07.
  3. ^ "MLB First Round Draft picks - 1990". Retrieved 2008-07-25.
  4. ^ "Background on the 1990 MLB Draft". Archived from the original on 21 June 2008. Retrieved 2008-07-25.

External links

Preceded by
Ben McDonald
1st Overall Picks
Chipper Jones
Succeeded by
Brien Taylor
Brent Brede

Brent David Brede (born September 13, 1971) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder.

Drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the 5th round of the 1990 Major League Baseball draft, Brede made his MLB debut with the Twins on September 8, 1996. He was a member of the inaugural Arizona Diamondbacks team that began play in Major League Baseball in 1998, and appeared in his final major game for them on September 27 of that year. He played one season with the Chiba Lotte Marines in 1999 before retiring in September 2000.

Chris Haney

Christopher Deane Haney (born November 19, 1968) is an American former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher. He pitched from 1991–2000 and in 2002 for the Montreal Expos, Kansas City Royals, Chicago Cubs, Cleveland Indians, and Boston Red Sox.

Haney is the son of former catcher Larry Haney.

He attended Orange County High School in Orange, Virginia. Haney pitched for the Charlotte 49ers and was the All-Sun Belt selection in both 1989 and 1990 and remains the program's leader with 20 complete games.He was drafted by the Montreal Expos in the second round of the 1990 Major League Baseball draft. A year after signing, Haney made his major league debut for the Expos, and pitched for them for 1.5 years, then was traded to the Kansas City Royals on August 29, 1992 with Bill Sampen for Sean Berry and Archie Corbin.

Haney pitched for the Royals from 1992 to 1998. He had his best season in 1996, when he served as a full-time starter, finishing the year with a 10-14 record and a 4.67 earned run average.

On August 7, 1999, Wade Boggs, of the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, became the first major leaguer to hit a home run for his 3,000th hit, connecting against Haney. That October, Haney was left off the Indians' playoff roster. The decision to exclude him was blamed by some for the team's collapse against the Boston Red Sox in the 1999 American League Division Series.In 2001, he played in Japan for the Fukuoka Daiei Hawks. After retiring from baseball, he returned to Orange, Virginia, the town where he grew up.

Danny Young (baseball)

Daniel Bracy Young (born November 3, 1971) is a former professional baseball pitcher. He appeared in four games in Major League Baseball for the Chicago Cubs in 2000.

Young was drafted by the Houston Astros in the 83rd round of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft. Young holds the distinction of the being the lowest draft pick ever to reach the major leagues. This will likely remain the case for the foreseeable future because MLB's annual draft no longer lasts 83 rounds.

Young had a very brief career in the major leagues, pitching in only four games for the Chicago Cubs during the 2000 season. His most memorable outing was likely his major league debut on March 30, 2000 against the New York Mets at the Tokyo Dome in Tokyo, Japan. In that contest, Young was summoned to pitch the top of the 11th inning with the goal of preserving a 1-1 tie. He quickly recorded the first two outs, but then loaded the bases before surrendering a grand slam home run to the Mets' Benny Agbayani. The four runs allowed proved to be the margin of victory, as the Cubs failed to score in the bottom of the inning and fell to the Mets 5-1.

Dave Fleming

David Anthony Fleming (born November 7, 1969) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who played from 1991 to 1995, mostly for the Seattle Mariners.

Fleming was born in Jackson Heights, Queens, New York, and went to high school in Mahopac, New York. He pitched for the University of Georgia, leading them to a College World Series title in 1990.Fleming was selected in the third round of the 1990 Major League Baseball draft by the Seattle Mariners. He won a career high 17 games, including 9 in a row, for the Mariners in his rookie season of 1992. His ERA that year was 3.39, and he took third place in the AL Rookie of the Year voting (behind winner Pat Listach).

After going 29-15 in his first two MLB seasons, Fleming began to struggle with arm trouble. On 7 July 1995, he was traded by the Mariners to the Kansas City Royals for Bob Milacki. He pitched only 9 games for the Royals before undergoing surgery, and never pitched in the Major Leagues again.

Dave is currently a 5th grade teacher at Chatfield-LoPresti School in Seymour, CT.

Duane Singleton

Duane Earl Singleton (born August 6, 1972) is a former Major League Baseball center fielder. Singleton was drafted by the Milwaukee Brewers in the fifth round of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft. He played with the team at the Major League level for two seasons before being traded to the Detroit Tigers for minor league player Henry Santos in 1996. Singleton played one season with the Tigers before being released by the team later in the year.

Izzy Molina

Islay "Izzy" Molina (born June 3, 1971 in New York City, New York) is a former Major League Baseball catcher for the Oakland Athletics and Baltimore Orioles. Molina is not related to the brothers Bengie, Jose, and Yadier Molina, although like Izzy, all three are catchers.

Molina was drafted out of high school by the Oakland Athletics in the 22nd round of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft and made his professional debut that same year for the Arizona League Athletics where he batted .339 in 39 games. He made his major league debut for Oakland on August 15, 1996. Molina left the Athletics via free agency after the 1998 season. On October 26, 1998, he signed with the Arizona Diamondbacks, but was traded to the New York Yankees with Ben Ford for Darren Holmes in spring training 1999.

Over the next three years, Molina did not play in the majors while spending time in the minors with the Yankees, Royals, and Blue Jays organization.

He signed a minor-league contract with the Baltimore Orioles on November 20, 2001. He began the 2002 season with the Double-A Bowie Baysox and was promoted to the Triple-A Rochester Red Wings. Two weeks after his contract was purchased from the Red Wings on May 3, he cleared waivers and was outrighted to the Baysox on May 17. During this stint he made his only appearance with the Orioles in a 9–4 defeat to the Cleveland Indians at Camden Yards on May 6. He had a fifth-inning single in three at bats and scored a run as the starting catcher. Molina last played professional baseball in 2003 with the Orioles Single-A, Double-A, and Triple-A teams.

Jason Hardtke

Jason Robert Hardtke (born September 15, 1971 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is a former Major League Baseball second baseman.

Drafted by the Cleveland Indians in the 3rd round of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft, Hardtke made his major league debut with the New York Mets on September 8, 1996, and appear in his final game on July 13, 1998.

He also played in Japan for the Hanshin Tigers in the 2000 season, and has managed the Visalia Rawhide. He is the president of a baseball training academy in Campbell, California, Hardtke World of Baseball.

Jayhawk Owens

Claude Jayhawk Owens II (born February 10, 1969 in Cincinnati, Ohio) is a former Major League Baseball catcher. He played four seasons in the majors, from 1993 to 1996, all for the Colorado Rockies.

A graduate of Glen Este High School in Cincinnati, Owens played college baseball at Middle Tennessee State University. He was drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the second round of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft, and began his professional career that season with the Kenosha Twins. After playing two more seasons in their organization, he was left unprotected in the 1992 expansion draft, where he was selected by the Rockies with the 23rd pick.

Owens was a member of the inaugural Colorado Rockies team that began play in Major League Baseball in 1993. He split four seasons between the Rockies and their top farm team, the Colorado Springs Sky Sox, playing his final MLB game on September 28, 1996. After spending the entire 1997 season with the Sky Sox, he became a free agent, returning to the Twins organization to start 1998. He moved to the Cincinnati Reds system partway through the season, spending the rest of 1998 and all of 1999 with their organization before retiring.

Following his playing career, Owens remained with the Reds organization as a minor league coach and manager. In his first season as a manager, he guided the Stockton Ports to the California League championship. The next season, he managed the Potomac Cannons, then spent four seasons as the manager of the minor league Chattanooga Lookouts, with his last season coming in 2007. He has a daughter named Grace, a son named Walker, and a wife named Jennifer.

Owens has Cherokee heritage from his paternal grandmother, and his middle name "Jayhawk" reflects this. During his college career and the early days of his professional career, he was simply listed on rosters as "J. Owens", until the story of his name was discovered by a member of the media. Since then, he has used "Jayhawk" as his preferred form of address.

Jeff Barry (baseball)

Jeffrey Finis Barry (born September 22, 1969) was a Major League Baseball outfielder. He is an alumnus of the San Diego State University.

Drafted by the Montreal Expos in the 4th round of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft, Barry made his Major League Baseball debut with the New York Mets on June 9, 1995, and appear in his final game on October 3, 1999. In 2000, Barry played in Japan for the Chiba Lotte Marines.

Jeff Motuzas

Jeffrey R. Motuzas (born October 1, 1971 in Nashua, New Hampshire) is a baseball bullpen catcher for the Arizona Diamondbacks but now throws batting practice for the Washington Nationals after being out of the game for years.

Motuzas attended Nashua High School where he was a Rawlings First Team All American his senior year. He was drafted by the New York Yankees in the 13th round (343rd overall) of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft. Motuzas played for the Yankees minor league system until he retired from playing in 1996 at AAA.

Motuzas has served as the bullpen catcher for the Diamondbacks since 1998 and retired in 2012. Also of note has been Motuzas participating in the Home Run Derby as a Derby pitcher for Luis Gonzalez, Barry Bonds, Todd Helton, Lance Berkman and Sammy Sosa, a role that is almost always filled by players other than actual pitchers.

Jeff also coached travel ball during the time he wasn't working for an MLB Team. He was a catching coach for AZ T-Rex Baseball. He always brought peanuts instead of seeds. Jeff was the best BP thrower in the organization even better than Rex Gonzalez the team owner. Tuzes would end up leaving because his favorite/best catcher (Donovan McMullen) was too advanced for him.

Jermaine Allensworth

Jermaine Lamont Allensworth (born January 11, 1972) is an American former professional baseball outfielder. He played four seasons in Major League Baseball, from 1996 until 1999, for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Kansas City Royals and the New York Mets.

Allensworth was the California Angels' 15th round selection and 422nd overall selection of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft, but did not sign with them. He instead attended Purdue University, where he was a Big Ten Conference All-Star in 1993. He was drafted 34th overall by the Pittsburgh Pirates that year, with whom he signed.

He was an All-Star in the Pacific Coast League in 1996, leading to a promotion to the majors, where he batted .262 in 61 games with the Pirates. He played two more seasons with the Pirates before being traded to the Kansas City Royals, then sent to the New York Mets, where he finished his career.

After his major league career, Allensworth continued to play in the minor leagues. After being released by the Atlanta Braves following the 2002 season, he spent a year away from professional baseball. In 2004, he joined the independent Northern League, where he played for five seasons, most recently for the Schaumburg Flyers in 2008. In 2007, he led the Gary SouthShore RailCats to the League Championship.Allensworth was portrayed by Tracy Morgan in a sketch on a 1997 episode of Saturday Night Live.

Midre Cummings

Midre Almeric Cummings (born October 14, 1971) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder. Cummings played for the Pittsburgh Pirates (1993-1997), Philadelphia Phillies (1997), Boston Red Sox (1998 and 2000), Minnesota Twins (1999-2000), Arizona Diamondbacks (2001), Tampa Bay Devil Rays (2004) and Baltimore Orioles (2005).

Cummings was drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the 1st round (29th overall) of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft. On March 17, 1992, he was traded by the Twins along with Denny Neagle to the Pirates for John Smiley, making his major league debut for the Pirates in 1993. In his fifth season with the Pirates, he was claimed off waivers by the Phillies on July 8. Cummings was released by the Phillies on February 24, 1998, and signed with the Cincinnati Reds three days later only to be claimed off waivers by the Red Sox in spring training. The Red Sox released him on March 30, 1999, and Cummings signed with the Twins on May 14. On August 31, 2000, he was traded to the Red Sox for minor leaguer Hector De Los Santos. Cummings became a free agent after the season and signed with the Arizona Diamondbacks.

He helped the Diamondbacks win the 2001 World Series over the New York Yankees, scoring the tying run in the ninth inning during Game 7. It would be three years before Cummings played in the majors again, spending time in the Milwaukee Brewers and Chicago Cubs minor league systems from 2002-2003. On February 10, 2004, he signed with the Devil Rays and batted .278 in 54 at bats that year. He was released after the season and signed with the Baltimore Orioles, but got only two at bats that year and retired after the season.

Rodney Myers

Rodney Luther Myers (born June 26, 1969) is an American former professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Chicago Cubs, San Diego Padres, and Los Angeles Dodgers, and in Nippon Professional Baseball (NPB) for the Hanshin Tigers.

Myers was drafted by the Kansas City Royals in the 12th round of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft out of the University of Wisconsin–Madison. In the Royals system, he played for the Eugene Emeralds (A-, 1990), Appleton Foxes (A, 1991), Lethbridge Mounties (Rookie, 1992), Memphis Chicks (AA, 1993–1994), and Omaha Royals (AAA, 1995).

Myers was selected by the Chicago Cubs in the Rule 5 Draft in 1996 and spent the entire season in the Cubs major league bullpen. He alternated between the Cubs and their triple A team (Iowa Cubs) from 1997–1999 and then was traded to the San Diego Padres for Gary Matthews Jr.

Myers pitched for the Padres from 2000–2002 and then for the Los Angeles Dodgers for two seasons. After being released in midseason in 2004, he signed with the Hanshin Tigers in Japan, where he finished the season. After playing independent league ball in 2005, Myers retired from baseball.

Steve Gajkowski

Stephen Robert Gajkowski (born December 30, 1969) is a retired Major League Baseball pitcher. He played during one season at the major league level for the Seattle Mariners. He was drafted by the Cleveland Indians in the 18th round of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft. Gajkowski played his first professional season with their Rookie league Burlington Indians in 1990, and his last season with the Oakland Athletics' Double-A Midland RockHounds and Triple-A Sacramento River Cats in 2000.

Tavo Álvarez

César Octavio "Tavo" Álvarez (born November 25, 1971) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. He played during two seasons at the major league level, pitching for the Montreal Expos.

He attended high school at Tucson High School in Tucson, Arizona. His senior year, he was one of 25 high school baseball players in USA Today's "Super 25" for the 1990 season. He was also named the Arizona Gatorade Player of the Year for baseball in 1990. After his senior season, he was drafted by the Montreal Expos in the second round of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft, and he signed with the team on June 19.After signing the contract, he played the rest of the 1990 season with the Expos' rookie affiliate, winning five games and losing two. Alvarez played his full first professional season with the Class A Sumter Flyers in 1991, posting a 12–10 record and a 3.24 earned run average (ERA). He had a career year in 1992, playing for both the West Palm Beach Expos and Harrisburg Senators, combining for 17 wins, five losses, and a 1.74 ERA. He spent the full 1993 season with the Ottawa Lynx, and finished the season with a 7–10 record and a 4.21 ERA.After spending 1994 in the Mexican League, Alvarez did not re-sign with the Expos until April 1995 due to visa problems. Combined with arm surgery, in July 1995 he made his first minor league start since 1993. A month later on August 21, he made his major league debut against the Los Angeles Dodgers. He started eight games for the Expos during the 1995 Montreal Expos season, winning one game, losing five, striking out 17 and posting an ERA of 6.75. He split the 1996 season between Montreal and Ottawa. He pitched in 20 games for Ottawa, winning four and losing nine. During the 1996 Montreal Expos season, he pitched in 11 games and posted a 2–1 record and a 3.00 ERA. Despite better success, his pitching appearance on September 29, 1996 was the last of his major league career.Álvarez tried to remain on the major league roster in 1997. During spring training, on one of the scoreboards, he was introduced as "Taco Alvarez." He spent the 1997 season in Ottawa, winning four games and losing eight. His last professional season was with the Pittsburgh Pirates' Triple-A club, the Nashville Sounds, in 1998. He pitched in 15 games for them and had an ERA of 4.83.

Todd Ritchie

Todd Everett Ritchie (born November 7, 1971) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who played in the major leagues from 1997-2004.

Ritchie was drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the 1st round (12th overall) of the 1990 Major League Baseball draft and made his major league debut on April 3, 1997. He pitched in 57 games for the Twins in 1997 and 1998.

On October 3, 1998, the Twins released him, and he signed with the Pittsburgh Pirates on December 22. Ritchie was used as a starting pitcher by the Pirates and in 1999, he won a career-high 15 games. He was their Opening Day starter in 2001, on in which he went 11-15; on July 13 of that year, in a scoreless game against the Kansas City Royals at PNC Park, he had a no-hitter broken up with one out in the ninth by a Luis Alicea single. The Pirates won the game in the bottom of the ninth as Aramis Ramírez singled in Brian Giles with the winning run. [1]

After the 2001 season, on December 13, Ritchie was traded to the Chicago White Sox along with Lee Evans for Kip Wells, Sean Lowe, and Josh Fogg. He struggled in 2002 though, losing 15 games with a 6.06 ERA, and becoming a free agent after the season. On January 14, 2003, he signed with the Milwaukee Brewers, but missed nearly the entire season with an injury. Ritchie signed as a free agent with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays for 2004, but spent most of the season in the minors. He signed with the Pirates for the 2005 season, but retired from baseball during spring training. He came out of retirement in 2008, signing a contract with the Colorado Rockies. Assigned to Single-A Modesto, Ritchie had a 3.18 ERA in 4 appearances before being promoted to Double-A Tulsa on June 25. In his one appearance for Tulsa, he gave up 8 earned runs in 5.2 innings and retired again.

Todd and his wife Kristi have six children named Karley (23), Kyndall (18), Kamdyn (16), Kallyn (14), Kannon (11) and Krayton (11).

Tom Allison (baseball)

Thomas Ray Allison (September 13, 1967) is the top scouting executive for the Seattle Mariners baseball team. Prior to his role as an executive, he played minor league baseball from 1990 to 1994.

He was born in Klamath Falls, Oregon. Prior to playing professionally, he attended Susitna Valley High School near Talkeetna, Alaska, then Cal State Fullerton and then Chapman College. The New York Mets drafted him in the 48th round of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft, a few picks ahead of infielder Marty Malloy. The infielder reached Triple-A in 1992 and 1993, but never played in the major leagues. He slashed .241/.344/.320 in 303 games over five seasons.From 1995 to 1996, he was an assistant scouting director for the Mets and was an area scouting director from 1996 to 1999. he was a scouting cross checker for the Milwaukee Brewers from 2000 to 2006. He was then the scouting director for the Arizona Diamondbacks before being replaced by Ray Montgomery for 2011. He drafted players like Paul Goldschmidt, Josh Collmenter, Jarrod Parker, Bryan Shaw, Collin Cowgill, Ryan Wheeler, A.J. Pollock, Matt Davidson and Chris Owings during his tenure with the club. He joined the Boston Red Sox system for 2011 and 2012, working as the Regional Crosschecker for the Midwest. In 2013, he became the Mariners scouting director. In 2015, he was promoted to head of all baseball scouting operations.

Tom Singer

Tom Singer (born 27 April 1969) was a British-born US baseball player. He spent seven years in minor league baseball and represented the United States national baseball team.

Singer was born in Banbury, England. He attended Monsignor McClancy High School and then St. John's University. With St. John's, he pitched against Mike Mussina and Stanford University in the 1988 College World Series regionals. In 1989, he played for Team USA in that year's Intercontinental Cup.He was drafted by the Toronto Blue Jays in the 10th round of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft. He threw a no-hitter on 5 May 1992, while pitching for the Dunedin Blue Jays against the Fort Myers Miracle. Overall, Singer was 39–45 with a 4.62 ERA in 161 professional games (116 starts).

Travis Baptist

Travis Steven Baptist (born December 30, 1971) is a retired Major League Baseball pitcher. He was drafted by the Toronto Blue Jays in the 45th round of the 1990 Major League Baseball Draft.

Baptist played his first professional season with their Rookie league Medicine Hat Blue Jays in 1990, and his last with the independent Central Baseball League's Rio Grande Valley WhiteWings in 2003.

On December 9, 1996 he was drafted by the Minnesota Twins from the Toronto Blue Jays organization in the 1996 rule 5 draft and went on to later play his only season at the major league level with them in 1998.

He played his affiliated season in 2001 for the Chicago White Sox's Double-AA Birmingham Barons and Triple-AAA Charlotte Knights.

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