1990 FIFA World Cup Final

The 1990 FIFA World Cup Final was a football match played between West Germany and Argentina to determine the winner of the 1990 FIFA World Cup. The game took place on 8 July 1990 at the Stadio Olimpico in Italy's capital and largest city, Rome, and was won 1–0 by West Germany, with a late penalty kick taken by Andreas Brehme being the game's only goal.

The match marked several firsts in World Cup history. This was the first-ever rematch of a final and, to date, the only back-to-back rematch, as Argentina defeated West Germany in the previous final. Argentina became both the first team to fail to score in a World Cup final, and the first defending champion to reach the final and lose. West Germany's victory over Argentina marked the first time a UEFA side defeated a CONMEBOL side in a final (all previous finals between the two continents were won by South Americans.) West Germany became the first team to play in three consecutive finals (they played in the 1982 and 1986 finals), a feat only repeated by Brazil in 1994, 1998, and 2002. It was West Germany's last World Cup match; the team played three more games before a unified German team was formed.[1]

1990 FIFA World Cup Final
Stadio Olimpico 2008
The final was played at the Stadio Olimpico
Event1990 FIFA World Cup
West Germany Argentina
West Germany Argentina
1 0
Date8 July 1990
VenueStadio Olimpico, Rome
RefereeEdgardo Codesal (Mexico)
Attendance73,603

Route to the final

West Germany Round Argentina
Opponent Result First round Opponent Result
 Yugoslavia 4–1 Match 1  Cameroon 0–1
 United Arab Emirates 5–1 Match 2  Soviet Union 2–0
 Colombia 1–1 Match 3  Romania 1–1
Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 West Germany 3 2 1 0 10 3 +7 5
 Yugoslavia 3 2 0 1 6 5 +1 4
 Colombia 3 1 1 1 3 2 +1 3
 United Arab Emirates 3 0 0 3 2 11 −9 0
Final standing
Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Cameroon 3 2 0 1 3 5 −2 4
 Romania 3 1 1 1 4 3 +1 3
 Argentina 3 1 1 1 3 2 +1 3
 Soviet Union 3 1 0 2 4 4 0 2
Opponent Result Knockout stage Opponent Result
 Netherlands 2–1 Round of 16  Brazil 1–0
 Czechoslovakia 1–0 Quarter-finals  Yugoslavia 0–0 (aet) (3–2 pen.)
 England 1–1 (aet) (4–3 pen.) Semifinals  Italy 1–1 (aet) (4–3 pen.)

Match

Summary

The 1990 final is often cited as one of the most cynical and ugliest World Cup finals.[2] It was an ill-tempered game, notable for the first two sendings off in a World Cup final. During the match, Mexican referee Edgardo Codesal refused to award a penalty kick to German player Klaus Augenthaler. Later, he incurred the wrath of the Argentinians by not awarding them a penalty kick after the German team captain Lothar Matthäus fouled Gabriel Calderón.[3] Pedro Monzón had the distinction of being the first player in the 14 final games of the FIFA World Cup to be sent off, after being shown a straight red card for a reckless studs up challenge on Jürgen Klinsmann; FIFA had warned its officials to enforce the rules and Monzón had raised his foot during the tackle, a foul that Klinsmann claims left a 15-centimetre (5.9 in) gash on his shin.[4] Gustavo Dezotti, already cautioned earlier, received a straight red card late in the match when he hauled down Jürgen Kohler with what The New York Times described as a "neck tackle right out of professional wrestling", after Kohler refused to give-up the ball in an alleged attempt to waste time. After dismissing Dezotti, Codesal was surrounded and jostled by the rest of the Argentinian team.[5] Maradona burst into tears at the final whistle and blamed the referee for the loss.[6] Argentina entered the game with four players suspended and ended it with nine men on the field, overall losing over half their squad due to injury or suspension.[7][8][9]

It was also the lowest-scoring final yet seen with Argentina becoming the first team not to score during a World Cup Final, having only one shot on goal, while Germany had 16 scoring chances out of 23 shots.[6] Argentina's strategy had been to defend at all costs and reach the penalty shootout, having already advanced twice in the tournament by this means.[7][8][9] The only goal of the contest arrived in the 85th minute when Codesal awarded a penalty to West Germany, after Roberto Sensini fouled Rudi Völler [10] which led to Argentinian protests. Andreas Brehme (who took the place of regular penalty taker Matthäus) converted the spot kick with a low right footed shot to the goalkeeper's right.[6]

This victory gave West Germany their third FIFA World Cup title, also making them the team to have played in the most FIFA World Cup finals at the time (three wins, three second places), as well as avenging their defeat at the hands of Argentina in the previous final. It also meant that Germany coach Franz Beckenbauer became the only person to have won both silver and gold medals at the World Cup as a player (1966 and 1974) and as a coach (1986 and 1990).

Details

West Germany 1–0 Argentina
Brehme Goal 85' (pen.) Report
West Germany
Argentina
GK 1 Bodo Illgner
SW 5 Klaus Augenthaler
CB 6 Guido Buchwald
CB 4 Jürgen Kohler
RWB 14 Thomas Berthold Substituted off 73'
LWB 3 Andreas Brehme
CM 8 Thomas Häßler
CM 10 Lothar Matthäus (c)
CM 7 Pierre Littbarski
CF 9 Rudi Völler Yellow card 52'
CF 18 Jürgen Klinsmann
Substitutes:
GK 12 Raimond Aumann
DF 2 Stefan Reuter Substituted in 73'
MF 15 Uwe Bein
MF 20 Olaf Thon
FW 13 Karl-Heinz Riedle
Manager:
Franz Beckenbauer
FRG-ARG 1990-07-08
GK 12 Sergio Goycochea
SW 20 Juan Simón
CB 18 José Serrizuela
CB 19 Oscar Ruggeri Substituted off 46'
RWB 4 José Basualdo
LWB 17 Roberto Sensini
DM 13 Néstor Lorenzo
CM 7 Jorge Burruchaga Substituted off 53'
CM 21 Pedro Troglio Yellow card 84'
SS 10 Diego Maradona (c) Yellow card 87'
CF 9 Gustavo Dezotti Yellow card 5' Red card 87'
Substitutes:
GK 22 Fabián Cancelarich
DF 5 Edgardo Bauza
DF 15 Pedro Monzón Red card 65' Substituted in 46'
MF 6 Gabriel Calderón Substituted in 53'
FW 3 Abel Balbo
Manager:
Carlos Bilardo

Linesmen:
Armando Pérez Hoyos (Colombia)
Michał Listkiewicz (Poland)

Match rules:

  • 90 minutes
  • 30 minutes of extra-time if necessary
  • Penalty shoot-out if scores still level
  • Five substitutes named, two of which may be used

References

  1. ^ Portugal v W Germany (29 August 1990), Sweden v W Germany (10 October), Luxembourg v W Germany (31 October). Unified team's first game: Germany v Switzerland (19 December)
  2. ^ Chacoff, Alejandro (6 April 2018). "The fall: how diving became football's worst crime". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 January 2019.
  3. ^ Brian Glanville, The story of the World Cup: The essential Guide to South Africa, 2010, pp. 325 to 327.
  4. ^ "Klinsmann: the rise...and the falls". Guardian News and Media. 7 March 2004. Retrieved 21 June 2014.
  5. ^ http://soccernet.espn.go.com/columns/story?id=365940&root=worldcup&cc=5901
  6. ^ a b c https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/dcunited/argentina-germany-have-rich-world-cup-history/2014/07/11/2b3c1b6e-092f-11e4-ba5b-b9d8a4daba13_story.html
  7. ^ a b Glanville, Brian (2005). The Story of the World Cup. Faber. p. 303. ISBN 0-571-22944-1.
  8. ^ a b Vecsey, George (9 July 1990). "Winning Ugly, Losing Ugly, Just Plain Ugly". The New York Times.
  9. ^ a b "A poor display bare of class". The Times. London. 9 July 1990.
  10. ^ Glanville, Brian (2018). The Story of the World Cup. Faber and Faber. p. 326. ISBN 978-0-571-32556-6. After half-time, the game grew harsher, when Klaus Augenthaler was blantanly tripped in the box by Goycoecha, Germany had far stronger claims for a penalty than that which won the match. Sensini bought down Völler in the area Codesal gave a penalty, Argentina protested furiously, and seemed to have a pretty good case.
1990

1990 (MCMXC)

was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1990th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 990th year of the 2nd millennium, the 90th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1990s decade.

Important events of 1990 include the Reunification of Germany and the unification of Yemen, the formal beginning of the Human Genome Project (finished in 2003), the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope, the separation of Namibia from South Africa, and the Baltic states declaring independence from the Soviet Union amidst Perestroika. Yugoslavia's communist regime collapses amidst increasing internal tensions and multiparty elections held within its constituent republics result in separatist governments being elected in most of the republics marking the beginning of the breakup of Yugoslavia. Also in this year began the crisis that would lead to the Gulf War in 1991 following the Iraq invasion and the largely internationally unrecognized annexation of Kuwait resulting in a crisis in the Persian Gulf involving the issue of the sovereignty of Kuwait and fears by Saudi Arabia over Iraqi aggression against their oil fields near Kuwait, this resulted in Operation Desert Shield being enacted with an international coalition of military forces being built up on the Kuwaiti-Saudi border with demands for Iraq to peacefully withdraw from Kuwait. Also in this year, Nelson Mandela was released from prison, and Margaret Thatcher resigned as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom after over 11 years.

1990 was an important year in the Internet's early history. In the fall of 1990, Tim Berners-Lee created the first web server and the foundation for the World Wide Web. Test operations began around December 20 and it was released outside CERN the following year. 1990 also saw the official decommissioning of the ARPANET, a forerunner of the Internet system and the introduction of the first content search engine, Archie on September 10.September 14, 1990 saw the first case of successful somatic gene therapy on a patient.Due to the early 1990s recession that began that year and uncertainty due to the collapse of the socialist governments in Eastern Europe, birth rates in many countries stopped rising or fell steeply in 1990. In most western countries the Echo Boom peaked in 1990; fertility rates declined thereafter.Encyclopædia Britannica, which ceased printing in 2012, saw its highest all time sales in 1990; 120,000 volumes were sold that year. The number of librarians in the United States also peaked around 1990.

1990 FIFA World Cup squads

This article lists the national football squads for the 1990 FIFA World Cup final tournament held in Italy, between 8 June and 8 July 1990. Each country's final squad consisted of 22 players and had to be confirmed by 29 May.

Replacement of injured players was permitted during the tournament at the discretion of FIFA. Two goalkeepers (for Argentina and England) were allowed to replace their injured counterparts under this ruling. Players marked (c) were named as captain for their national squad. Number of caps counts until the start of the World Cup, including all pre-tournament friendlies. A player's age is also at the start of the tournament.

1990 French Grand Prix

The 1990 French Grand Prix was a Formula One motor race held at Paul Ricard on 8 July 1990. It was the seventh race of the 1990 Formula One season. It was the 68th French Grand Prix and the 14th and last to be held at Paul Ricard until 2018. It was held over 80 laps of the four kilometre circuit for a race distance of 305 kilometres. This race was held the same day as the 1990 FIFA World Cup Final in Rome, Italy, but that event took place later in the day from this Grand Prix.

The race almost saw one of the most remarkable upsets in Formula One history with the Leyton House Racing team of Italian driver Ivan Capelli and Brazilian driver Maurício Gugelmin running first and second for an extended period of the race in their Leyton House CG901s. French driver Alain Prost claimed the lead late in the race to take the win in his Ferrari 641 by eight seconds over Capelli. Brazilian driver Ayrton Senna finished third in his McLaren MP4/5B.

The win, Prost's third for the season, closed the gap to championship points leader Senna to just three points.

2014 FIFA World Cup Final

The 2014 FIFA World Cup Final was a football match that took place on 13 July 2014 at the Maracanã Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil to determine the 2014 FIFA World Cup champion. Germany defeated Argentina 1–0 in extra time, with the only goal being scored by Mario Götze, who collected André Schürrle's cross from the left on his chest before volleying a high left-footed shot into the net. The match was the third final between the two countries, a World Cup record, after their 1986 and 1990 matches, and billed as the world's best player (Lionel Messi) versus the world's best team (Germany).Before the match, Germany had reached the World Cup final seven times (six times as West Germany from 1954 to 1990), winning three (1954, 1974, 1990) and being runners-up four times (1966, 1982, 1986, 2002); Argentina had reached four finals, winning twice (1978, 1986) and placing second twice (1930, 1990).

The result marked Germany's fourth World Cup title and their first World championship as a unified nation. The victory meant that three consecutive World Cups have been won by teams from the same continent, following Italy and Spain in 2006 and 2010 respectively, the first time this has happened in World Cup history. It was also the first time that three consecutive World Cup finals were still tied after 90 minutes. The final marked the first time a World Cup hosted in the Americas was not won by a team from the continent.

In the winning German team, Miroslav Klose, who had become the top scorer in World Cup history in the semi-final victory over Brazil, became one of the very few players ever to have won gold, silver and bronze medals in the World Cup (bronze in 2006 and 2010, silver in 2002 and gold in 2014), joining a club with earlier German players like Franz Beckenbauer, Sepp Maier and Wolfgang Overath (1966–1974), as well as Italian Franco Baresi (1982–1994).

According to FIFA, 1.013 billion individuals globally watched the final match of this tournament.

Andreas Brehme

Andreas "Andy" Brehme (born 9 November 1960) is a German football coach and former football defender. At international level, he is best known for scoring the winning goal for Germany in the 1990 FIFA World Cup Final against Argentina from an 85th-minute penalty kick. At club level, he played for several teams in Germany, and also had spells in Italy and Spain.

A versatile attacking full back with an eye for goal, Brehme was capable of playing anywhere along the flank on either side of the pitch, and was known for his crossing ability, ambidexterity, and his accuracy from free-kicks and penalties, possessing a powerful shot.

Berti Vogts

Hans-Hubert "Berti" Vogts (German pronunciation: [ˈbɛɐ̯tiː ˈfoːkts]; born 30 December 1946) is a former German footballer who played as a defender. He played for Borussia Mönchengladbach in the Bundesliga his whole professional club career and won the FIFA World Cup with West Germany in 1974. He later managed the national teams of Germany (winning Euro 96), Scotland, Nigeria and Azerbaijan.

Bids for the 2020 Summer Olympics

There were a total of six bids which were initially submitted for the 2020 Summer Olympics. Tokyo was ultimately elected as the host city at the 125th IOC Session in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on 7 September 2013.

Carreras Domingo Pavarotti in Concert

Carreras Domingo Pavarotti in Concert (re-released as The Three Tenors in Concert) is a live album by José Carreras, Plácido Domingo and Luciano Pavarotti with conductor Zubin Mehta. The album was recorded on July 7, 1990 in Rome as the first Three Tenors concert with the orchestra of the Maggio Musicale Fiorentino and the orchestra of Teatro dell'Opera di Roma on the evening before the 1990 FIFA World Cup Final. The recording, released on the Decca Classics label, won the Grammy Award for Best Classical Vocal Performance in 1991 at the 33rd Grammy Awards. It is the best-selling classical album of all time and led to a shift in the way the music industry marketed classical recordings.

Edgardo Codesal

Edgardo Codesal Méndez (Spanish pronunciation: [eðˈɣaɾðo koˈðesal]; born 2 June 1951 in Montevideo, Uruguay) is an Uruguayan-Mexican football (soccer) referee, who controlled the final match of the 1990 World Cup held in Italy.

Gustavo Dezotti

Gustavo Abel Dezotti (born 14 February 1964) is an Argentine former football striker. He played most of his career for Newell's Old Boys in Argentina, he was part of the team that won the Primera Division Argentina championship of 1987–1988.

Being part of a title winning side brought him to the attention of Major European clubs, and in 1988 he moved to Italy where he played for S.S. Lazio and then U.S. Cremonese. In 1994, he moved to Mexico to play for Club León and then Club Atlas. Dezotti's final club were Defensor Sporting Club of Uruguay where he retired in 1998.

The most notorious moment of his career came when he was sent off in the 1–0 1990 FIFA World Cup final defeat against West Germany.

Luciano Pavarotti

Luciano Pavarotti, Cavaliere di Gran Croce OMRI (; Italian: [luˈtʃaːno pavaˈrɔtti]; 12 October 1935 – 6 September 2007) was an Italian operatic tenor who also crossed over into popular music, eventually becoming one of the most commercially successful tenors of all time. He made numerous recordings of complete operas and individual arias, gaining worldwide fame for the quality of his tone, and eventually established himself as one of the finest tenors of the 20th century, achieving the honorific title The King Of High C's.As one of the Three Tenors who performed their first concert during the 1990 FIFA World Cup before a global audience, Pavarotti became well known for his televised concerts and media appearances. From the beginning of his professional career as a tenor in 1961 in Italy to his final performance of "Nessun dorma" at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Pavarotti was at his best in bel canto operas, pre-Aida Verdi roles, and Puccini works such as La bohème, Tosca, Turandot and Madama Butterfly. He sold over 100 million records, and the first Three Tenors recording became the best-selling classical album of all time. Pavarotti was also noted for his charity work on behalf of refugees and the Red Cross, amongst others. He died from pancreatic cancer on 6 September 2007.

Nessun dorma

"Nessun dorma" (Italian: [nesˌsun ˈdɔrma]; English: "None shall sleep") is an aria from the final act of Giacomo Puccini's opera Turandot and one of the best-known tenor arias in all opera. It is sung by Calaf, il principe ignoto (the unknown prince), who falls in love at first sight with the beautiful but cold Princess Turandot. Any man who wishes to wed Turandot must first answer her three riddles; if he fails, he will be beheaded. In the aria, Calaf expresses his triumphant assurance that he will win the princess.

Although "Nessun dorma" has long been a staple of operatic recitals, Luciano Pavarotti popularized the piece beyond the opera world in the 1990s following his performance of it for the 1990 World Cup, which captivated a global audience. Both Pavarotti and Plácido Domingo released singles of the aria, with Pavarotti reaching number 2 in the UK, and it appeared on the best selling classical album of all time, The Three Tenors in Concert. The Three Tenors, which includes José Carreras, performed the aria at three subsequent World Cup Finals, in 1994 in Los Angeles, 1998 in Paris, and 2002 in Yokohama. Since 1990, many crossover artists have performed and recorded it. The aria has been sung often in movies and on television.

Roberto Sensini

Roberto Néstor Sensini (born 12 October 1966) is an Argentine football manager and former defender. As a player with the Argentina national team, he won both the 1991 and 1993 Copa América, also finishing in third place in the 1989 edition of the tournament. He also represented his nation in the 1990, 1994, and 1998 FIFA World Cup finals, finishing in second place at the 1990 World Cup. Furthermore, he won an Olympic silver medal with Argentina at the 1996 Olympics.

Romualdo Arppi Filho

Romualdo Arppi Filho (born Santos January 7, 1939) is a retired football referee from Brazil. He is mostly known for supervising three matches in the 1986 FIFA World Cup in Mexico, including the 1986 FIFA World Cup final between Germany and Argentina. Argentina eventually won the game 3–2. He was the second successive Brazilian to referee a World Cup final.

Sergio Goycochea

Sergio Javier Goycochea (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈseɾxjo xaˈβjeɾ ɣoikoˈtʃea]; born 17 October 1963) is an Argentine former football goalkeeper and male model. He is best known for helping his country reach the 1990 FIFA World Cup Final with his penalty kick saves.

Stadio Olimpico

The Stadio Olimpico is the main and largest sports facility of Rome, Italy. It is located within the Foro Italico sports complex, north of the city. The structure is an asset of the Italian National Olympic Committee and it is used primarily for association football. The Stadio Olimpico is the home stadium of Lazio and Roma and also hosts the Coppa Italia final. It was rebuilt for the 1990 FIFA World Cup and it hosted the tournament final.

Rated an UEFA category four stadium, it has also hosted four European Cup finals, the most recent being the 2009 UEFA Champions League Final. Outside football, the stadium is used by the Italian national rugby union team and it is Italy's national athletics stadium. Occasionally, it hosts concerts and events.

Sándor Puhl

Sándor Puhl (born 14 July 1955) is a retired Hungarian football referee. He is mostly known for supervising four matches in the 1994 FIFA World Cup in the United States, including the final between Brazil and Italy. He also refereed UEFA Champions League matches, including the 1997 UEFA Champions League Final between Borussia Dortmund and Juventus. Dortmund ended up being 3–1 winners.

He was elected as IFFHS' World's Best Referee of the Year four times in a row between 1994 and 1997.After retiring as a referee, he was Deputy Chairman of the Hungarian Football Association from 2000 to 2006. He has also worked as a co-commentator for a Hungarian sports TV channel.

Puhl speaks Hungarian, German, Italian and English.

The Three Tenors

The Three Tenors were a popular operatic singing group during the 1990s and early 2000s, consisting of Spaniards Plácido Domingo and José Carreras and the Italian Luciano Pavarotti. The trio began their collaboration with a performance at the ancient Baths of Caracalla in Rome, Italy on 7 July 1990, the eve of the 1990 FIFA World Cup Final. Zubin Mehta conducted the orchestra of Maggio Musicale Fiorentino and the orchestra of Teatro dell'Opera di Roma. The image of three tenors in formal evening dress singing in a World Cup concert captivated the global audience. The recording of this debut concert became the best-selling classical album of all time and led to additional performances and live albums. They performed to a global television audience at three further World Cup Finals, 1994 in Los Angeles, 1998 in Paris, and 2002 in Yokohama. Around 1.3 billion viewers worldwide watched the 1994 performance at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. They last performed together at an arena in Columbus, Ohio on 28 September 2003.

Timeline of the city of Rome

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Rome, Italy.

Stages
General information
Champions
Runners-up
Third place
Fourth place
Quarter-finals
Round of 16
Group stage
Tournaments
Qualification
Finals
Squads
Seedings
Broadcasters
Bids
Statistics
Disciplinary record
Team appearances
Overall records and statistics
Miscellaneous
Summer Olympics Final
FIFA World Cup Finals
FIFA Confederations Cup Finals
Copa América Finals
FIFA World Cup play-offs Final
Superclásico de las Américas
Other matches
FIFA World Cup Finals
FIFA Confederations Cup Finals
UEFA European Championship Finals
Other matches

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