1989 National League Championship Series

The 1989 National League Championship Series was played between the National League West champion San Francisco Giants and the National League East champion Chicago Cubs. The Giants won the series four games to one, en route to losing to the Oakland Athletics in four games in the 1989 World Series.

1989 National League Championship Series
Teams
Team (Wins) Manager Season
San Francisco Giants (4) Roger Craig 92–70, .568, GA: 3
Chicago Cubs (1) Don Zimmer 93–69, .574, GA: 6
DatesOctober 4–9
MVPWill Clark (San Francisco)
UmpiresDoug Harvey, Bruce Froemming, Terry Tata, Jim Quick, Charlie Williams, Randy Marsh
Broadcast
TelevisionNBC
TV announcersVin Scully (Game 1, 3–5), Bob Costas (Game 2) and Tom Seaver
RadioCBS
Radio announcersJohn Rooney and Jerry Coleman

Summary

Chicago Cubs vs. San Francisco Giants

San Francisco won the series, 4–1.

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 4 San Francisco Giants – 11, Chicago Cubs – 3 Wrigley Field 2:51 39,195[1] 
2 October 5 San Francisco Giants – 5, Chicago Cubs – 9 Wrigley Field 3:08 39,195[2] 
3 October 7 Chicago Cubs – 4, San Francisco Giants – 5 Candlestick Park 2:48 62,065[3] 
4 October 8 Chicago Cubs – 4, San Francisco Giants – 6 Candlestick Park 3:13 62,078[4] 
5 October 9 Chicago Cubs – 2, San Francisco Giants – 3 Candlestick Park 2:47 62,084[5]

Game summaries

Game 1

Wednesday, October 4, 1989, at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco 3 0 1 4 0 0 0 3 0 11 13 0
Chicago 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 10 1
WP: Scott Garrelts (1–0)   LP: Greg Maddux (0–1)
Home runs:
SF: Will Clark 2 (2), Kevin Mitchell (1)
CHC: Mark Grace (1), Ryne Sandberg (1)

The Giants entered the series as slight favorites due to the MVP season of Kevin Mitchell, the solid play of Will Clark, and the best ERA in baseball by pitcher Scott Garrelts. The Cubs had won their second NL East title in six seasons behind the excellent rookie performances of Jerome Walton and Dwight Smith, who finished one-two in the 1989 NL Rookie of the Year balloting. The Cubs also had three pitchers with sixteen or more victories, Rick Sutcliffe, Mike Bielecki, and Greg Maddux, coming off his third full season in the majors. The opener pitted Maddux against Garrelts.

By the time the Cubs came to bat, the Giants led, 3–0. Brett Butler led off with a single and moved to third on Rick Wrona's passed ball. Clark drove in his first run of the series with a double. Clark moved to third on Mitchell's single and scored along with Mitchell on Matt Williams' double. Maddux had given up three runs and recorded only one out, but he retired Terry Kennedy and Pat Sheridan to end the first. The Cubs came right back in the bottom of the first. Ryne Sandberg doubled and Mark Grace drilled a two-out, two-run homer to cut the Giants lead to 3–2. Clark got a run back when he homered in the third, but Sandberg's solo homer cut the Giants lead back to one. With the score 4–3, the Giants came to bat against Maddux in the fourth.

Pat Sheridan and José Uribe singled, and Uribe's steal put runners at second and third. Garrelts struck out, and the Cubs walked Butler intentionally hoping for a double play. Robby Thompson popped to shortstop, and the infield fly rule resulted in an automatic out. Bases loaded and two out with Clark batting. Having already driven in two runs, Clark tied the NLCS record for RBIs for an entire series in less than four innings when he drilled a grand slam to right that finished Maddux and the Cubs. The 8–3 lead ended in an 11–3 Giants victory when Mitchell nailed a three-run homer to close the scoring in the eighth. The Giants had drawn first blood and taken back home-field advantage.

Game 2

Thursday, October 5, 1989, at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 5 10 0
Chicago 6 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 X 9 11 0
WP: Les Lancaster (1–0)   LP: Rick Reuschel (0–1)
Home runs:
SF: Kevin Mitchell (2), Matt Williams (1), Robby Thompson (1)
CHC: None

Giving the Giants a dose of their own Game 1 medicine, the Cubs ended Game 2 early with a six-run first inning, five of the runs coming against Giants starter and loser Rick Reuschel. After Mike Bielecki picked Butler off first and retired the side, the Cubs went to work. Jerome Walton singled and scored on Ryne Sandberg's triple. After Dwight Smith lined out to first, Mark Grace doubled Sandberg home. Reuschel struck out Andre Dawson, but Luis Salazar singled to score Grace and moved to second on a single by Shawon Dunston. The Giants walked Joe Girardi to get to the pitcher's spot, and Bielecki responded with a single that scored Salazar and Dunston to make it 5–0. Walton again singled, scoring Girardi, and when Kelly Downs retired Sandberg on a pop-up, the Cubs went back into the field with a 6–0 lead.

The game was essentially over after the first inning. The Giants cut the lead to 6–2 in the fourth when Will Clark singled and Kevin Mitchell homered for the second time in the series. But the Cubs got those runs plus another back in the sixth when Grace doubled with the bases loaded, scoring all three runners and giving the Cubs a 9–2 lead. The Giants got three cosmetic runs when Williams homered in the eighth and Robby Thompson homered in the ninth. But the Cubs' early scoring made it one game apiece as the series headed to San Francisco for Game 3.

Game 3

Saturday, October 7, 1989, at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 4 10 0
San Francisco 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 X 5 8 3
WP: Don Robinson (1–0)   LP: Les Lancaster (1–1)   Sv: Steve Bedrosian (1)
Home runs:
CHC: None
SF: Robby Thompson (2)

Tied at one apiece, the series converged on Candlestick Park for Game 3. The pitching match-up featured sixteen-game winner Rick Sutcliffe against Mike LaCoss. Neither pitcher would be involved in the decision.

Following the trend of the first two games—five runs by the two teams combined in the first inning of Game 1 and six in the first inning of Game 2—the Cubs roared out of the gate with two first-inning runs courtesy of back-to-back singles by Walton and Smith, a wild pitch by LaCoss that put them on second and third, and a single by Andre Dawson that scored both and put the Cubs in the lead, 2–0. The Giants answered with three in their half of the first. Butler and Thompson singled, and Will Clark's fielder's choice ground out moved the runners to second and third. Kevin Mitchell was given an intentional pass, and Matt Williams grounded out to the pitcher to score Butler. Two more walks gave the Giants a second run when Thompson scored, and Jose Uribe's infield single scored Mitchell. The Giants now led, 3–2, but Sutcliffe avoided further damage by getting LaCoss to pop up.

The Cubs tied it in the fourth, but they settled for one run with a chance to open up the game. They loaded the bases against LaCoss with nobody out, and Roger Craig summoned reliever Jeff Brantley. Brantley got Sutcliffe to hit into a double play, including a force on Salazar at the plate. With runners at second and third and two out, the Giants nearly escaped, but a wild pitch from Brantley scored Dunston and tied the game. Walton flied out to end the inning.

The Cubs regained the lead in the seventh when Sutcliffe doubled and went to third on Walton's bunt. Greg Maddux was sent in to pinch-run for Sutcliffe, and he scored on Ryne Sandberg's fly to center. Dwight Smith popped out, but the Cubs led, 4–3.

The Giants, however, came back to put the game away in the bottom of the seventh. Les Lancaster took the mound to face the Giants. He was the winning pitcher in Game 2, but he gave up a home run to Robby Thompson. Lancaster inherited Brett Butler at first and his first hitter was Thompson. Moments later, Thompson had his second home run in his last two at-bats against Lancaster, and the Giants had a 5–4 lead they held the rest of the way. Don Robinson got the win in relief and Steve Bedrosian got the save. Lancaster got the loss, and the Giants had a 2–1 series lead.

Game 4

Sunday, October 8, 1989, at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 4 12 1
San Francisco 1 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 X 6 9 1
WP: Kelly Downs (1–0)   LP: Steve Wilson (0–1)   Sv: Steve Bedrosian (2)
Home runs:
CHC: Luis Salazar (1)
SF: Matt Williams (2)

In keeping with the first three games, the scoring began early in Game 4 as the Cubs sought to tie the series and the Giants hoped to take a 3–1 lead in the series. The pitching match-up featured a rematch of first-game pitchers Scott Garrelts and Greg Maddux. Garrelts had triumphed in round one, but neither pitcher would be involved in the decision in the rematch.

The Cubs opened the first playing small ball. A double by Sandberg followed by a short single by Smith and a line out to right by Mark Grace scored Sandberg to give the Cubs a 1–0 lead. The Giants mimicked the Cubs in the bottom of the first when Thompson walked, went to third on a Clark single, and scored on a Kevin Mitchell ground out. Luis Salazar then stunned the Giants faithful with a homer to give the Cubs a 2–1 lead in the second. But a bases-loaded single by Matt Williams in the bottom of the third scored two runs and put the Giants back in front. José Uribe doubled in the fourth. Maddux seemingly had him picked off, but a throwing error put Uribe at third, and he scored on Maddux's wild pitch to make it 4–2 Giants. In the top of the fifth, Walton singled and scored on Grace's triple. Grace then scored on Dawson's double and the score was tied at four. But in the bottom of the fifth, Clark doubled and Matt Williams (after fouling off seven pitches in a twelve-pitch at-bat) hit his second homer of the series to give the Giants a 6–4 lead that was the final score.

The Giants' win gave them a three games to one edge and a chance to finish the series the next day at home. Kelly Downs was the winning pitcher, and Steve Wilson was the loser. Steve Bedrosian got his second save in as many days.

Game 5

Monday, October 9, 1989, at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Chicago 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 10 1
San Francisco 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 X 3 4 1
WP: Rick Reuschel (1–1)   LP: Mike Bielecki (0–1)   Sv: Steve Bedrosian (3)

Before the game, the Tower of Power horn section played the National Anthem.

The Giants made it to their first World Series since 1962 with a 3–2 win over the Cubs to win the 1989 National League pennant, four games to one. The final game pitted Mike Bielecki against a well-rested (due to his quick exit from Game 2) Rick Reuschel. Reuschel made amends for his poor start in Game 2 by giving up only one run over eight innings. The one run Reuschel gave up was an unearned run the Cubs scored when Walton reached on an error by Mitchell and then scored on Sandberg's double. The Cubs held the 1–0 lead until the seventh inning when Will Clark tripled and scored on Mitchell's sacrifice fly.

With two outs in the eighth, the Cubs appeared ready to perhaps send the series back to Chicago, but Candy Maldonado pinch-hit for Reuschel and walked. Bielecki then proceeded to load the bases by walking both Butler and Thompson. Don Zimmer sent for Mitch Williams to end the jam, but Clark drove home the pennant-winning runs with a single to center that gave the Giants a 3–1 lead. Les Lancaster got Matt Williams out to end the inning but the Cubs were finished.

They did rally, however, in the ninth with three straight singles that made it 3–2. But Sandberg grounded out and the Giants were in their first World Series since 1962. Clark's stellar performance earned him Most Valuable Player honors for the Giants. Clark hit .650 with eight RBIs.

Giants pitcher Dave Dravecky, who would ultimately have his pitching arm amputated due to cancer, broke his arm during the Giants' on-field celebration following Game 5.

Composite box

1989 NLCS (4–1): San Francisco Giants over Chicago Cubs

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
San Francisco Giants 7 0 3 7 2 0 3 7 1 30 44 5
Chicago Cubs 11 1 2 1 2 3 1 0 1 22 53 3
Total attendance: 264,617   Average attendance: 52,923

Television coverage

NBC play-by-play man Vin Scully was unable to call Game 2 (on Thursday, October 5) because he had come down with laryngitis. Thus, number two play-by-play man, Bob Costas filled-in for him. Around the same time, Costas was assigned to call the American League Championship Series between Oakland and Toronto. Game 2 of the NLCS occurred on Thursday, October 5, which was an off day for the ALCS. NBC then decided to fly Costas from Toronto to Chicago to substitute for Scully on Thursday night. Afterwards, Costas flew back to Toronto, where he resumed work on the ALCS the next night.

Game 5 of the 1989 NLCS (October 9, 1989) was the last Major League Baseball game that NBC, who had broadcast baseball games in some shape or form since 1947, would televise for five years (CBS would become the exclusive broadcast television network home for Major League Baseball in the mean time); the ensuing World Series was broadcast on ABC, with those four games being that network's last in the same timeframe. NBC would next televise a Major League Baseball game on July 12, 1994 (the All-Star Game from Pittsburgh); that same year, ABC began to broadcast Saturday night games via The Baseball Network. During the 1995 season, NBC began broadcasting Friday night games, with ABC still continuing Saturday night games, and the two networks would rotate postseason series, as well as games in the World Series, in which the Atlanta Braves defeated the Cleveland Indians, 4 games to 2. After The Baseball Network was dissolved, Fox took over the exclusive broadcast rights for MLB regular season games, although NBC would still broadcast select postseason games and alternate with Fox for World Series coverage. By 2001, Fox became the exclusive broadcast home for the MLB postseason as well, and continues to hold that position today.

Notes

  1. ^ "1989 NLCS Game 1 - San Francisco Giants vs. Chicago Cubs". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  2. ^ "1989 NLCS Game 2 - San Francisco Giants vs. Chicago Cubs". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  3. ^ "1989 NLCS Game 3 - Chicago Cubs vs. San Francisco Giants". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  4. ^ "1989 NLCS Game 4 - Chicago Cubs vs. San Francisco Giants". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  5. ^ "1989 NLCS Game 5 - Chicago Cubs vs. San Francisco Giants". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.

External links

1989 Chicago Cubs season

The 1989 Chicago Cubs season was the team's 118th season, the 114th in the National League and the 74th at Wrigley Field. Highlighting the season was the Cubs' second National League Eastern Division championship with a record of 93–69. The Cubs had All-Star seasons from Ryne Sandberg, Andre Dawson, Rick Sutcliffe and Mitch Williams; Jerome Walton was the NL Rookie of the Year. Ultimately, the team was defeated four games to one by the San Francisco Giants in the 1989 National League Championship Series.

1989 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1989 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 44th season in the National Football League and first under head coach George Seifert. After going 14–2 in the regular season, the 49ers completed the season with the most dominant playoff run in NFL history, outscoring opponents 126–26 and winning their fourth Super Bowl victory.

In 2007, ESPN.com's Page 2 ranked the 1989 49ers as the greatest team in Super Bowl history.This was the season where the 49ers added the black trim on the SF logo on the helmets which lasted until the 1995 season and the final season the team wore screen printed numbers on jerseys.

Quarterback Joe Montana had one of the greatest passing seasons in NFL history in 1989. Montana set a then-NFL record with a passer rating of 112.4, with a completion percentage of 70.2%, and a 26/8 touchdown-to-interception ratio. In the playoffs, Montana was even more dominant, with a 78.3% completion percentage, 800 yards, 11 touchdowns, no interceptions, and a 146.4 rating. Cold Hard Football Facts calls Montana's 1989 season "the one by which we must measure all other passing seasons."

1994 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1994 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 65th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 12, 1994, at Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the home of the Pittsburgh Pirates of the National League—tying the Indians for the all-time record of most All-Star Games hosted by one franchise, as the Pirates had also hosted in 1944, 1959, and 1974 (and would again in 2006). The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 8–7 in 10 innings. It was the National League's first win since 1987.

This All-Star Game also marked the inaugural telecast for The Baseball Network, a joint-venture between Major League Baseball, ABC and NBC. This was NBC's first television broadcast of a Major League Baseball game since Game 5 of the 1989 National League Championship Series on October 9 of that year.

1994 in American television

The following is a list of events affecting American television during 1994. Events listed include television series debuts, finales, cancellations, and channel initiations, closures and re-brandings, as well as information about controversies and disputes.

2016 National League Division Series

The 2016 National League Division Series were two best-of-five-game series to determine the participating teams in the 2016 National League Championship Series. The three divisional winners (seeded 1-3) and a fourth team—the winner of a one-game Wild Card playoff— played in two series. FS1 and MLB Network carried all the games in the United States.These matchups were:

(1) Chicago Cubs (Central Division champions) versus (5) San Francisco Giants (Wild Card Winner)

(2) Washington Nationals (East Division champions) vs (3) Los Angeles Dodgers (West Division champions)This was the second postseason meeting between the Dodgers and the Nationals franchise. Their most recent meeting was in the 1981 National League Championship Series, in which the Dodgers won the National League pennant over the then-Montreal Expos in five games. The Dodgers defeated the Nationals in five games and reached the National League Championship Series for the first time since 2013.The Cubs and Giants also met for the second time in postseason play after the Giants defeated the New York Mets 3–0 in the National League Wild Card Game. Their last meeting was in the 1989 National League Championship Series, which the Giants won in five games. However, they did meet in a Wild Card tiebreaker in 1998 where the Cubs advanced, beating the Giants 5–3. The Cubs won the Division Series three games to one and advanced to the NLCS for the second consecutive year.

Bob Costas

Robert Quinlan Costas (born March 22, 1952) is an award-winning American sportscaster, who is employed by MLB Network, where he does play-by-play and hosts an interview show called Studio 42 with Bob Costas. He is known for his long tenure with NBC Sports from 1980 through 2018, and for many Emmy awards. He was the prime-time host of 11 Olympic Games from 1992 until 2016.

Charlie Williams (umpire)

Charles Herman Williams (December 20, 1943 – September 10, 2005) was an American baseball umpire who officiated in the National League from 1978 to 1999, and in both leagues in 2000. In 1993 he became the first African American umpire to work behind home plate in a World Series game. He wore uniform number 25.

Williams was born in Denver, Colorado, attended George Washington High School, and became an All-America football player at Long Beach City College, later attending California State University, Los Angeles.

In his rookie season, Williams umpired third base for Tom Seaver's only no-hitter on June 16, 1978.Williams was the only umpire to eject Steve Garvey from a game, which occurred during the 1986 season and received media coverage for the incident.

Williams was the first base umpire in a 1990 game between the Mets and Braves, when he was involved in a well-known incident. With two Braves' on base, Met pitcher David Cone induced a chopper from Mark Lemke, fielded by Gregg Jefferies, who threw to Cone at first base. Williams mistakenly ruled Lemke safe. Cone argued vociferously with Williams while still holding the ball (Cone thought time had been called), and both Braves' runners scored while Cone was distracted.Williams was the home plate umpire for the longest game in World Series history, Game 4 of the 1993 World Series between the Philadelphia Phillies and Toronto Blue Jays, which lasted 4 hours and 14 minutes and ended with a 15–14 Toronto victory and a 3–1 Series lead for the Blue Jays.

He was the first base umpire on June 3, 1995 when Pedro Martínez pitched 9 perfect innings before giving up a hit in the 10th.

In 1999, he was shoved by Mets third base coach Cookie Rojas after Rojas had argued a foul ball that clearly, on replay, was a foul ball by inches. Rojas was suspended for five games.He also worked the All-Star games in 1985 and 1995, the 1989 National League Championship Series between the San Francisco Giants and the Chicago Cubs, the 1997 NLCS between the Florida Marlins and the Atlanta Braves, and the 1999 National League Division Series. He ejected San Diego Padres first baseman Steve Garvey from a June, 1986 game between the Padres and the Atlanta Braves, the only ejection of Garvey's career, then ejected Padres manager Steve Boros the next day when Boros tried to present a videotape of the call Williams ejected Garvey over. He was also an umpire on September 28, 1988 when Orel Hershiser set the Major League record for consecutive scoreless innings pitched. He remained an umpire until his retirement in 2000 due to health problems, and died at age 61 in Chicago, Illinois after a long illness related to diabetes and kidney failure.

Dwight Smith (baseball)

John Dwight Smith (born November 8, 1963) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder with the Chicago Cubs, California Angels, Baltimore Orioles and the Atlanta Braves between 1989 and 1996. He was born in Tallahassee, Florida.

In 1989, playing for the Chicago Cubs, Smith finished second in balloting for National League Rookie of the Year behind teammate Jerome Walton, who collected 22 of 24 first-place votes. Smith hit .324 as a rookie, getting 111 hits, which would turn out to be a career-high. He went 3-for-15 for the Cubs in the 1989 National League Championship Series, which they dropped to the San Francisco Giants.

On July 21, 1989 at Wrigley Field, Smith became the first and only rookie in MLB history to sing the National Anthem before a game against the San Francisco Giants.

Smith appeared in the 1995 World Series as a member of the Atlanta Braves, who won the Series that season over the Cleveland Indians.

His son, Dwight Smith Jr., was selected by the Toronto Blue Jays in the first round of the 2011 Major League Baseball draft.

Hank Greenwald

Howard "Hank" Greenwald (June 26, 1935 — October 22, 2018) was a Major League Baseball announcer, known best for being a play-by-play announcer for the San Francisco Giants.

List of Major League Baseball All-Star Game broadcasters

The following is a list of the American radio and television networks and announcers that have broadcast the Major League Baseball All-Star Game over the years.

Major League Baseball on NBC

Major League Baseball on NBC is the de facto branding for weekly broadcasts of Major League Baseball (MLB) games produced by NBC Sports, and televised on the NBC television network. Major League Baseball games first aired on the network from 1947 to 1989, when CBS acquired the broadcast television rights; games returned to the network in 1994 with coverage lasting until 2000. There have been several variations of the program dating back to the 1940s, including The NBC Game of the Week and Baseball Night in America.

Major League Baseball on television in the 1980s

In 1980, 22 teams (all but the Atlanta Braves, Houston Astros, New York Mets, and St. Louis Cardinals) took part in a one-year cable deal with UA-Columbia. The deal involved the airing of a Thursday night Game of the Week in markets at least 50 miles (80 km) from a major league park. The deal earned Major League Baseball less than $500,000, but led to a new two-year contract for 40-45 games per season.

Mitch Williams

Mitchell Steven Williams (born November 17, 1964), nicknamed "Wild Thing", is a former relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for six teams from 1986 to 1997. He was also a studio analyst for the MLB Network from 2009 to 2014.

Williams, a left-hander with a high-90s fastball and major control issues, was largely effective, especially in the early part of his career earning 192 saves in his 11 seasons including a career high of 43 in 1993. He is best known for giving up a walk-off home run to Joe Carter of the Toronto Blue Jays in the sixth game of the 1993 World Series, which gave Toronto a World Series championship over the Phillies. Williams' career went into immediate and noticeable decline afterward, although he played in parts of three more major league seasons.

Orlando Cepeda

Orlando Manuel "Peruchin" Cepeda Pennes (Spanish pronunciation: [oɾˈlando seˈpeða]; born September 17, 1937) is a Puerto Rican former Major League Baseball first baseman and a member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. The 1958 National League Rookie of the Year, Cepeda was voted the National League Most Valuable Player in 1967, the year his team, the St. Louis Cardinals, won the World Series. Overall, he appeared in three World Series and was the first winner of the American League's Outstanding Designated Hitter Award in 1973. He batted .300 or better 9 times in the 14 seasons he appeared in over 100 games, much of it played in what is now called the "Second Deadball Era."Cepeda was born to a poor family. His father, Pedro "Perucho" Cepeda, was also a baseball player in Puerto Rico, which influenced Cepeda's interest in the sport from a young age. His first contact with professional baseball was as a bat boy for the Santurce Crabbers of Puerto Rico. Pedro Zorilla, the team's owner, persuaded Cepeda's family to let him attend a New York Giants tryout. He played for several Minor League Baseball teams before attracting the interest of the Giants, who had just moved to San Francisco.

During a 17-year career, he played with the San Francisco Giants (1958–66), St. Louis Cardinals (1966–68), Atlanta Braves (1969–72), Oakland Athletics (1972), Boston Red Sox (1973), and Kansas City Royals (1974). Cepeda was selected to play in seven Major League Baseball All-Star Games during his career, becoming the first player from Puerto Rico to start one. In 1978, Cepeda was sentenced to five years in prison on drug possession charges, of which he served ten months in prison and the rest on probation. In 1987, Cepeda was contracted by the San Francisco Giants to work as a scout and "goodwill ambassador." In 1999, Cepeda was inducted into the Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee.

Robby Thompson

Robert Randall Thompson (born May 10, 1962) is an American former professional baseball player and coach. He played his entire career in Major League Baseball (1986–1996) as the second baseman for the San Francisco Giants. During the Giants' resurgence in the late 1980s, he was known as a team leader who played the game with a gritty determination. Thompson most recently served as the bench coach for the Seattle Mariners, for the 2011 through 2013 seasons.

Roger Craig (baseball)

Roger Lee Craig (born February 17, 1930) is an American former pitcher, coach and manager in Major League Baseball (MLB). Craig played for five National League teams over all or parts of 12 seasons (1955–1966)—most notably as a member of the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers, and New York Mets—and then forged a successful post-playing career as a pitching coach and manager. As a player and coach, Craig was part of four World Series championship teams. As a manager, he led the 1989 San Francisco Giants to the team's first National League championship in 27 years. He was born in Durham, North Carolina, and attended North Carolina State University.

The '89 Cubs

The '89 Cubs are a power trio hailing from Omaha, Nebraska. The band features members from Bright Eyes, Desaparecidos, and The Good Life, all bands that are signed to Saddle Creek Records. Their sole full-length, There Are Giants in the Earth was released in November 2004.

The name is presumably in reference to the Chicago Cubs, who, after winning the National League East division championship, lost the 1989 National League Championship Series to the San Francisco Giants.

Vin Scully

Vincent Edward Scully (born November 29, 1927) is an American retired sportscaster. Scully is best known for his 67 seasons calling games for Major League Baseball's Los Angeles Dodgers, beginning in 1950 (when the franchise was located in Brooklyn) and ending in 2016. His run constitutes the longest tenure of any broadcaster with a single team in professional sports history, and he is second only to Tommy Lasorda (by two years) in terms of number of years associated with the Dodgers organization in any capacity. He retired at age 88 in 2016, ending his record-breaking run as their play-by-play announcer.

In his final season behind the microphone, Scully announced most Dodger home games (and selected road games) on SportsNet LA television and KLAC radio. He is known for his dulcet voice, lyrically descriptive style, and signature introduction to Dodger games: "It's time for Dodger baseball! Hi, everybody, and a very pleasant good (afternoon/evening) to you, wherever you may be." He is considered by many to be the greatest baseball broadcaster of all time, according to fan rankings, Bleacher Report and Fox Sports.

Will Clark

William Nuschler Clark Jr. (born March 13, 1964) is a former first baseman in Major League Baseball best known for his years with the San Francisco Giants from 1986 to 1993. Clark was known by the nickname of "Will the Thrill." The nickname has often been truncated to simply, "The Thrill."After a sensational career at Jesuit High School in New Orleans, Clark attended Mississippi State University, where he continued to flourish. Clark was inducted into the Mississippi State University Hall of Fame in 2003. Clark was inducted into the College Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006. He was inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame on April 26, 2007 and the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame on August 1, 2008.He currently works in the San Francisco Giants front office after spending five seasons as an advisor for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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