1989 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1989 team came down to earth after the success of the 1988 season, finishing further down in the standings falling to fourth place in the Western Division of the National League.

1989 Los Angeles Dodgers
Major League affiliations
Location
Results
Record77–83 (.481)
Divisional place4th
Other information
Owner(s)Peter O'Malley
General manager(s)Fred Claire
Manager(s)Tommy Lasorda
Local televisionKTTV (11)
Vin Scully, Ross Porter, Don Drysdale
Z Channel
Eddie Doucette, Don Sutton
Local radioKABC
Vin Scully, Ross Porter, Don Drysdale
KWKW
Jaime Jarrín, René Cárdenas
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Offseason

Regular season

Season standings

NL West W L Pct. GB Home Road
San Francisco Giants 92 70 0.568 53–28 39–42
San Diego Padres 89 73 0.549 3 46–35 43–38
Houston Astros 86 76 0.531 6 47–35 39–41
Los Angeles Dodgers 77 83 0.481 14 44–37 33–46
Cincinnati Reds 75 87 0.463 17 38–43 37–44
Atlanta Braves 63 97 0.394 28 33–46 30–51

Record vs. opponents

1989 National League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12]
Team ATL CHC CIN HOU LAD MON NYM PHI PIT SD SF STL
Atlanta 5–7 8–10 8–10 6–10 6–6 2–10 8–4 4–8 7–11 6–12 3–9
Chicago 7–5 7–5 5–7 7–5 10–8 10–8 10–8 12–6 8–4 6–6 11–7
Cincinnati 10–8 5–7 8–10 8–10 4–8 4–8 4–8 7–5 9–9 8–10 8–4
Houston 10–8 7–5 10–8 10–8 4–8 6–6 9–3 7–5 8–10 8–10 7–5
Los Angeles 10–6 5–7 10–8 8–10 7–5 5–7 6–6 7–5 6–12 10–8 3–9
Montreal 6–6 8–10 8–4 8–4 5–7 9–9 9–9 11–7 5–7 7–5 5–13
New York 10–2 8–10 8–4 6–6 7–5 9–9 12–6 9–9 5–7 3–9 10–8
Philadelphia 4-8 8–10 8–4 3–9 6–6 9–9 6–12 10–8 2–10 4–8 7–11
Pittsburgh 8–4 6–12 5–7 5–7 5–7 7–11 9–9 8–10 3–9 5–7 13–5
San Diego 11–7 4–8 9–9 10–8 12–6 7–5 7–5 10–2 9–3 8–10 2–10
San Francisco 12–6 6–6 10–8 10–8 8–10 5–7 9–3 8–4 7–5 10–8 7–5
St. Louis 9–3 7–11 4–8 5–7 9–3 13–5 8–10 11–7 5–13 10–2 5–7

Notable games

  • June 3–4, 1989 – The Dodgers lost 5–4 in 22 innings to the Houston Astros when Jeff Hamilton allowed a RBI single to Rafael Ramírez, scoring Bill Doran. The game lasted 7 hours, 14 minutes and did not finish until 2:49 a.m. Central time (12:49 a.m. Pacific). KTTV, which normally aired a postgame show in this era, canceled it on this night and went straight to a newscast. Whether it was due to the length of the game or due to the confluence of two huge breaking news stories (the death of Ayatollah Khomeini and the Tiananmen Square massacre) was never publicly revealed.[1]
  • August 23–24, 1989 – The Dodgers played another 22-inning game, this one against the Montreal Expos. It eventually ended when Rick Dempsey homered for the Dodgers in the top half of the 22nd inning off Expos pitcher Dennis Martínez, who was making a very rare relief performance; the Dodgers won 1–0 in what was the Expos' longest game ever. Rex Hudler would be caught stealing second in the bottom half of the 22nd to end the game. The game almost ended earlier when an Expo scored from third on a sacrifice fly. The Dodgers' appeal, that the runner left the base too soon, was recognized by the third base umpire and the third out was recorded. The game also marked the first time a mascot was ejected by an umpire. When Youppi! dressed in a nightgown and nightcap pretended to go to sleep on top of the Dodgers' dugout, Dodgers' manager Tommy Lasorda demanded that Youppi! be run from the game. In the end, the game took over 6 hours to finish and ended close to 2 a.m. Eastern time (11 p.m. PT).[2]

Opening Day lineup

Opening Day Starters
Name Position
Willie Randolph Second baseman
Alfredo Griffin Shortstop
Kirk Gibson Left fielder
Eddie Murray First baseman
Mike Marshall Right fielder
John Shelby Center fielder
Jeff Hamilton Third baseman
Mike Scioscia Catcher
Tim Belcher Starting pitcher

Roster

1989 Los Angeles Dodgers
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Notable transactions

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Mike Scioscia 133 408 102 .250 10 44
1B Eddie Murray 160 594 147 .247 20 88
2B Willie Randolph 145 549 155 .282 2 36
3B Jeff Hamilton 151 548 134 .245 12 56
SS Alfredo Griffin 136 506 125 .247 0 29
LF Kirk Gibson 71 253 54 .213 9 28
CF John Shelby 108 345 63 .183 1 12
RF Mike Marshall 105 377 98 .260 11 42

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Other pitchers

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Relief pitchers

Player G W L SV ERA SO

1989 Awards

Farm system

Level Team League Manager
AAA Albuquerque Dukes Pacific Coast League Kevin Kennedy
AA San Antonio Missions Texas League John Shoemaker
High A Bakersfield Dodgers California League Tim Johnson
High A Vero Beach Dodgers Florida State League Joe Alvarez
A-Short Season Salem Dodgers Northwest League Tom Beyers
Rookie Great Falls Dodgers Pioneer League Joe Vavra
Rookie Gulf Coast Dodgers Gulf Coast League Jerry Royster
Rookie DSL Dodgers Dominican Summer League

Teams in BOLD won League Championships

Major League Baseball Draft

The Dodgers drafted 65 players in this draft. Of those, seven of them would eventually play Major League baseball. The Dodgers had three first round picks this season as they gained the New York Yankees first round pick and a supplemental pick for the loss of free agent Steve Sax. They also gained an extra second round pick from the Cleveland Indians as compensation for the loss of pitcher Jesse Orosco.

With their first pick in the 1st round, the Dodgers selected pitcher Kiki Jones from Hillsborough High School in Tampa, Florida. Despite concerns that he was too small to make it, the Dodgers drafted him and their scouting director said "he's got the best arm around and the best curveball in the country."[3] He was 8-0 with a 1.58 ERA his first season in the rookie leagues with the Great Falls Dodgers but then began to experience arm injuries and legal problems.[4] The Dodgers released him after the 1993 season, though he attempted comebacks in 1998–1999 and 2001. In 8 total minor league seasons he was 23-20 with a 4.13 ERA in 77 games (61 starts).

Their next first round pick was outfielder Tom Goodwin from California State University, Fresno. He would play 14 seasons in the Majors (5 of them with the Dodgers) and hit .268 while stealing 369 bases. The supplemental pick was pitcher Jamie McAndrew of the University of Florida. He was subsequently selected by the Florida Marlins in the 1992 expansion draft and eventually pitched in 15 games in the Majors with the Milwaukee Brewers in 1995 and 1997.

The most successful pick was Eric Young drafted in the 43rd round out of Rutgers University as an outfielder. He was selected by the Colorado Rockies in the 1992 expansion draft and spent most of his 15-season career as a second baseman. He hit .283 in 1,730 career games with 79 homers, 543 RBI and 465 steals while playing with seven different teams.

References

  1. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/HOU/HOU198906030.shtml Boxscore from Baseball Reference
  2. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/MON/MON198908230.shtml Boxscore from Baseball Reference
  3. ^ Sullivan, Paul (June 12, 1989). "Dodgers Size Up Jones As Promising". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved November 10, 2014.
  4. ^ "SPORTS PEOPLE: BASEBALL; Dodger Pitching Hopeful Arrested". New York Times. May 17, 1992. Retrieved November 10, 2014.
  5. ^ 1989 Los Angeles Dodgers Picks in the MLB June Amateur Draft

External links

1989 Draft Picks

[5]

Round Name Position School Signed Career span Highest level
1 Kiki Jones RHP Hillsborough High School Yes 1989–2001 AA
1 Tom Goodwin OF California State University, Fresno Yes 1989–2005 MLB
1s Jamie McAndrew RHP University of Florida Yes 1989–1997 MLB
2 Bily Lott OF Petal High School Yes 1989–1997 AAA
2 Stan Payne LHP Clarke Central High School No
Athletics-1992
1992 A-
3 Phil Nevin SS El Dorado High School No
Astros-1992
1993–2006 MLB
4 Javier De La Hoya RHP Grant High School Yes 1989–2007 AAA
5 John Deutsch 1B Montclair State University Yes 1989–1993 AA
6 Tim Barker SS Virginia Commonwealth University Yes 1989–1998 AAA
7 Bryan Baar C Western Michigan University Yes 1989–1992 AAA
8 Jason Brosnan LHP California State University, Fresno Yes 1989–2002 AAA
9 Barry Parisotto RHP Gonzaga University Yes 1989–1993 A+
10 Kevin Jordan 2B Cañada College No
Yankees-1990
1990–2005 MLB
11 Dennis Burbank RHP Cypress College No
Yankees-1991
1991–1993 A+
12 Garett Teel C William Paterson University Yes 1989–1994 A+
13 Lee DeLoach SS Rutgers University–Camden Yes 1989 Rookie
14 Michael Wismer OF Villanova University Yes 1989–1990 A+
15 Keith Daniel RHP Pender High School Yes 1989–1990 Rookie
16 Frank Humber LHP Wake Forest University Yes 1989–1990 A+
17 Pete Gonzalez C Miami Dade College Yes 1989–1996 AAA
18 Audelle Cummings RHP Ohio Dominican University Yes 1989 Rookie
19 Michael Potthoff RHP University of Missouri Yes 1989–1991 A+
20 Gary Forrester SS University of Nevada, Las Vegas Yes 1989–1991 A+
21 Michael Galle 3B Purdue University Yes 1990–1991 A+
22 William Miller OF San Diego State University Yes 1989–1990 A+
23 Craig White SS Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania Yes 1989–1990 A-
24 Red Peters 1B California State University, Fullerton Yes 1989–1991 AA
25 Javier Puchales OF Yes 1989–1995 AA
26 Craig Bishop LHP Erie Community College Yes 1989–1994 A+
27 Raymond Bielanin RHP Niagara University Yes 1989 Rookie
28 Ray Calhoun RHP Spartanburg Methodist College Yes 1989–1992 AA
29 Tim Patrick LHP Sacramento City College Yes 1989–1991 A+
30 Jerome Santivasci RHP Clemson University No
31 Darnell Whims OF Governor Thomas Johnson High School Yes 1989 Rookie
32 Yale Fowler OF California State University, San Bernardino Yes 1989–1990 A-
33 John Farren C Villanova University No
34 Matt Howard 2B Pepperdine University Yes 1989–1999 MLB
35 Al Drumheller LHP Shenandoah High School No
Yankees – 1993
1993–2002 AAA
36 Stephen O'Donnell 1B La Salle University Yes 1989–1992 A+
37 Helmut Bohringer 3B Adelphi University Yes 1989–1991 A+
38 Daniel Stupur 2B George Fox University Yes 1989 A-
39 Joe Seals C Belmont University Yes 1989–1996 Rookie
40 Jimmy Brown SS Carlos Escobar Lopez High School Yes 1989–1991 A-
41 Ross Farnsworth LHP Pinole Valley High School Yes 1990–1996 A+
42 Roger Sweeney OF San Rafael High School No
Dodgers-1990
1991–1992 A-
43 Eric Young OF Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey Yes 1989–2006 MLB
44 Garey Ingram C Middle Georgia College Yes 1990–2002 MLB
45 Melvin Warren OF Fairfield High School No
Dodgers-1990
1991–1992 Rookie
46 Ray Bowen LHP San Diego Mesa College No
47 Martin Kilian RHP San Jose City College No
48 Mark Lundeen LHP Napa High School No
49 Daniel Poulton RHP Minidoka High School No
50 Brannon Veal OF Middle Georgia College No
51 Patrick Reed SS Castlemont High School No
Dodgers-1990
1991–1993 A-
52 Don Meyers 1B Sacramento City College Yes 1990–1992 A+
53 Gaither Bagsby RHP Roane State Community College No
54 Robert Hoffman C Contra Costa College Yes 1990 Rookie
55 Timothy McDermott C Iowa Western Community College No
56 Brian Van Horn LHP Pinconning High School No
57 Richard Josepher 1B St. Rita High School No
Yankees-1993
1993 A-
58 Bradley Cohen OF Meridian Community College No
59 Charles Williams OF Lumberton High School No
60 Pete Altenberger RHP Purdue University No
61 Brent Prudhomme 1B Butler County Community College No
62 Richard Crane LHP California State University, Fresno Yes 1989–1991 A+
AL East
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Key personnel
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(23)
Division titles (17)
Wild card berths (2)
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