1989 FA Cup Final

The 1989 FA Cup Final was the final of the 1988–89 FA Cup, the top football knockout competition in England. The match was a Merseyside derby between Liverpool and Everton, played at Wembley Stadium, London, on 20 May 1989. Liverpool won 3–2 after extra time, with goals from John Aldridge and two from Ian Rush. Stuart McCall scored both Everton goals. The final was played only five weeks after the Hillsborough disaster, in which 96 Liverpool fans were killed in a crush, and before kick-off there was a minute's silence and the teams wore black armbands as a sign of respect. Gerry Marsden, lead singer of Gerry & the Pacemakers, led the crowd in a rendition of his hit "You'll Never Walk Alone", which had become synonymous with Liverpool Football Club.[1]

1989 FA Cup Final
Old Wembley Stadium (external view)
Event1988–89 FA Cup
Liverpool Everton
3 2
Date20 May 1989
VenueWembley Stadium, London
RefereeJoe Worrall (Cheshire)
Attendance82,800
WeatherWarm and fine, with hazy sunshine

Summary

Liverpool took the lead in the match after four minutes through John Aldridge, and held onto that lead until the ninetieth minute, when Everton substitute Stuart McCall equalised, and a pitch invasion by Everton fans ensued. McCall had scored just once for Everton before the FA Cup final, having joined them from Bradford City at the start of the season.

McCall's goal was the last kick of the 90 minutes and the match went into extra time. On 95 minutes, Liverpool substitute Ian Rush scored with a half-volley on the turn to give Liverpool a 2–1 lead. Everton again equalised five minutes later when McCall scored his second, chesting and volleying past Bruce Grobbelaar and into the corner of the net, becoming the first substitute to score twice in a final. However, Rush – who had scored twice in Liverpool's 3–1 win in the first Merseyside derby Final three years earlier – scored his second goal in the 104th minute, with a header from a floated John Barnes cross.[2]

Liverpool had continued their domination of the English game (they were league champions in 1988 and runners-up in 1987), but Everton had declined since their 1987 title triumph and finished sixth in the league in 1989.

UEFA voted for the ban on English clubs in European competitions to continue for a fifth season, ruling out Liverpool's hopes of competing in the Cup Winners' Cup – although they were still in contention for the league title at this stage, and ultimately were only deprived of the title (and a unique second double) by a last-gasp goal in their final game of the season. Had the ban on English clubs in European competitions been lifted and Liverpool had won the league, Everton would have been able to compete in the Cup Winners' Cup.

Liverpool striker Ian Rush had now scored four goals in FA Cup finals (both two-goal hauls against Everton) and was one of 11 players (five for Liverpool) to have featured in both of the all-Merseyside FA Cup finals. Stuart McCall made FA Cup history when he became the first substitute to score 2 goals in an FA Cup final. However, Ian Rush matched the feat two minutes later.[3]

Match details

Liverpool3–2 (a.e.t.)Everton
Aldridge Goal 4'
Rush Goal 95'104'
Report McCall Goal 90'102'
Liverpool
Everton
GK 1 Zimbabwe Bruce Grobbelaar
CB 2 England Gary Ablett
LB 3 Republic of Ireland Steve Staunton Substituted off 90'
RB 4 Scotland Steve Nicol
CM 5 Republic of Ireland Ronnie Whelan (c)
CB 6 Scotland Alan Hansen
CF 7 England Peter Beardsley
CF 8 Republic of Ireland John Aldridge Substituted off 73'
RM 9 Republic of Ireland Ray Houghton
LM 10 England John Barnes
CM 11 England Steve McMahon
Substitutes:
DF 12 England Barry Venison Substituted in 90'
FW 14 Wales Ian Rush Substituted in 73'
Manager:
Scotland Kenny Dalglish
GK 1 Wales Neville Southall
RB 2 England Neil McDonald
LB 3 Wales Pat Van Den Hauwe
CB 4 Wales Kevin Ratcliffe (c)
CB 5 England Dave Watson
CM 6 England Paul Bracewell Substituted off 59'
RM 7 Scotland Pat Nevin
CM 8 England Trevor Steven
CF 9 Scotland Graeme Sharp
CF 10 England Tony Cottee
LM 11 Republic of Ireland Kevin Sheedy Substituted off 78'
Substitutes:
MF 12 Scotland Ian Wilson Substituted in 78'
MF 14 Scotland Stuart McCall Substituted in 59'
Manager:
England Colin Harvey

Match rules

  • 90 minutes
  • 30 minutes of extra-time if necessary
  • Replay if scores still level
  • Two named substitutes
  • Maximum of two substitutions

References

  1. ^ You'll Never Walk Alone
  2. ^ Harris, Harry (22 May 1989). "My Finest Hour". Daily Mirror. Retrieved 17 June 2011.
  3. ^ "Everton Firsts".

External links

1989 FA Charity Shield

The 1989 FA Charity Shield (also known as the Tennent's FA Charity Shield for sponsorship reasons) was the 67th Charity Shield, an annual English football match played between the winners of the previous season's Football League and FA Cup. It was held at Wembley Stadium on 12 August 1989. The match was contested by Arsenal, champions of the 1988–89 Football League and Liverpool, who beat Everton in the final of the 1988–89 FA Cup. Watched by a crowd of 63,149, Liverpool won the match 1–0.

This was Arsenal's 10th Shield appearance and Liverpool's 14th. The two clubs had met in the last game of the previous season, in a title decider at Anfield which Arsenal won 2–0 with a late goal from Michael Thomas. Both clubs also faced each other in the Makita International Tournament at Wembley the previous month; Arsenal won the match 1–0. Journalists previewing the game argued this year's Shield had lost its spectacle given Liverpool's recent successes in the event as well as the prospect of Arsenal beating Liverpool for a third time.

New signing Glenn Hysén made his competitive debut for Liverpool and Ian Rush started ahead of fellow striker John Aldridge. For Arsenal, Gus Caesar replaced Steve Bould in the starting team. The only goal of the match came in the first half – a long ball from Barry Venison floated around the Arsenal defence and found Peter Beardsley in the penalty area to score. Afterwards Liverpool manager Kenny Dalglish spoke of his delight at his team's performance and the Arsenal manager George Graham was complimentary of his opponents.

1989 in the United Kingdom

Events from the year 1989 in the United Kingdom.

1989–90 Arsenal F.C. season

The 1989–90 season was Arsenal's 70th consecutive season in the top division of English football. After winning the title the previous season, Arsenal finished fourth in 1989–90, behind champions Liverpool, runners-up Aston Villa and third-placed Tottenham Hotspur in the title challenge.

Alan Hansen

Alan David Hansen (born 13 June 1955) is a Scottish former football player and BBC television football pundit. He played as a central defender for Partick Thistle, for the successful Liverpool team of the late '70s and '80s, and for Scotland. As a football pundit, Hansen is known for his outspoken views, particularly on teams' defensive performances, frequently criticising what he believed was "diabolical" or "shocking" defending. He made his name as a pundit on Match of the Day from 1992 to 2014.

Everton F.C.

Everton Football Club () is a football club in Liverpool, England, that competes in the Premier League, the top flight of English football. The club have competed in the top division for a record 116 seasons, missing the top division only four times (1930–31 and three consecutive seasons starting with 1951–52) since The Football League was created in 1888. Everton have won 15 major trophies: the League Championship nine times (fourth most as of 2017–18), the FA Cup five times (ninth most) and the UEFA Cup Winners Cup once.

Formed in 1878, Everton were founding members of The Football League in 1888 and won their first League Championship two seasons later. Following four League Championship and two FA Cup wins, Everton experienced a lull in the immediate post World War Two period, until a revival in the 1960s, which saw the club win two League Championships and an FA Cup. The mid-1980s represented their most recent period of sustained success, with two League Championships, an FA Cup, and the 1985 European Cup Winners' Cup. The club's most recent major trophy was the 1995 FA Cup.

The club's supporters are known as Evertonians. Everton have a rivalry with neighbours Liverpool, and the two sides contest the Merseyside derby. The club has been based at Goodison Park in Walton, Liverpool, since 1892, after moving from Anfield following a row over its rent. The club's home colours are royal blue shirts with white shorts and socks.

Hillsborough disaster

The Hillsborough disaster was a fatal crush of people during an FA Cup semi-final football match between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest at Hillsborough Stadium in Sheffield, England, on 15 April 1989. With 96 fatalities and 766 injuries, it remains the worst disaster in British sporting history. The crush occurred in the two standing-only central pens in the Leppings Lane stand, allocated to Liverpool supporters. Shortly before kick-off, in an attempt to ease overcrowding outside the entrance turnstiles, the police match commander, chief superintendent David Duckenfield, ordered exit gate C to be opened, leading to an influx of even more supporters to the already overcrowded central pens.In the days and weeks following the disaster, police fed false stories to the press suggesting that hooliganism and drunkenness by Liverpool supporters were the root causes of the disaster. Blaming of Liverpool fans persisted even after the Taylor Report of 1990, which found that the main cause of the disaster was a failure of control by South Yorkshire Police (SYP). Following the Taylor report, the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) ruled there was no evidence to justify prosecution of any individuals or institutions. The disaster also led to a number of safety improvements in the largest English football grounds, notably the elimination of fenced standing terraces in favour of all-seater stadiums in the top two tiers of English football.The first coroner's inquests into the Hillsborough disaster, completed in 1991, ruled all deaths that occurred that day to be accidental. Families strongly rejected the original coroner's findings, and their fight to have the matter re-opened persisted, despite Lord Justice Stuart-Smith concluding in 1997 there was no justification for a new inquiry. Private prosecutions brought by the Hillsborough Families Support Group against Duckenfield and his deputy Bernard Murray failed in 2000.In 2009, a Hillsborough Independent Panel was formed to review all evidence. Reporting in 2012, it confirmed Taylor's 1990 criticisms, while also revealing new details about the extent of police efforts to shift blame onto fans, the role of other emergency services, and the error of the first coroner's inquests. The panel's report resulted in the previous findings of accidental death being quashed, and the creation of new coroner's inquests. It also produced two criminal investigations led by police in 2012: Operation Resolve to look into the causes of the disaster, and by the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) to examine actions by police in the aftermath.The second coroner's inquests were held from 1 April 2014 to 26 April 2016. They ruled that the supporters were unlawfully killed due to grossly negligent failures by police and ambulance services to fulfil their duty of care to the supporters. The inquests also found that the design of the stadium contributed to the crush, and that supporters were not to blame for the dangerous conditions. Public anger over the actions of his force during the second inquests led the SYP chief constable David Crompton to be suspended following the verdict. In June 2017, six people were charged with various offences including manslaughter by gross negligence, misconduct in public office and perverting the course of justice for their actions during and after the disaster. The Crown Prosecution Service subsequently dropped all charges against one of the defendants.

Ian Rush

Ian James Rush, (born 20 October 1961) is a Welsh former professional footballer who played as a forward. At club level Rush played for Liverpool from 1980–1987 and 1988–1996. He is the club's all-time leading goalscorer, having scored a total of 346 goals in all competitions at the club, including a record 25 goals versus Merseyside derby rival Everton. At international level, Rush made 73 appearances for the Wales national football team and remained the record goalscorer for his country until 2018, with 28 goals between 1980 and 1996.

Regarded as one of the greatest ever Liverpool players, Rush came 3rd in the 100 Players Who Shook The Kop – an official Liverpool fan poll. He also had short spells with Chester City, Juventus, Leeds United, Newcastle United, Sheffield United, Wrexham and Sydney Olympic. Since retiring as a player in 2000, Rush has had a stint as manager of Chester City (2004–05), and has worked as a television football pundit.

Ian Wilson (footballer, born 1958)

Ian Wilson (born 27 March 1958, in Aberdeen) is a former Scottish international football player and football manager.

Liverpool F.C. 0–2 Arsenal F.C. (26 May 1989)

The final match of the 1988–89 Football League season was contested at Anfield between Liverpool and Arsenal, the top two teams in the First Division, on 26 May 1989. The clubs were close enough on points for the match to act as a decider for the championship. Arsenal won by two goals, the margin they required to take the title. Midfielder Michael Thomas scored the second goal in the final seconds of the match, ending Arsenal's 18-year wait to be crowned champions.

The two clubs had been due to meet a month earlier, but the stadium disaster at Hillsborough, which killed 96 of Liverpool's supporters, meant the fixture was postponed out of respect. It was moved to late May, days after the FA Cup Final which Liverpool won. Arsenal manager George Graham adjusted his usual formation to a defensive one to stop Liverpool's attacking threat; David O'Leary was employed as a sweeper in a back five.

A peak British television audience of over 12 million saw a first half of few chances as Arsenal successfully nullified Liverpool. Striker Alan Smith scored from a header as play resumed in the second half, but as the game drew to a close with the score 1–0, Arsenal needed a second goal to win the title. In stoppage time, Arsenal's Thomas made a run through the Liverpool midfield and scored a last-minute goal, in the process denying Liverpool the chance of a second League and Cup double.

The match is considered to be one of the most dramatic conclusions to a league season in the history of the English game, and is sometimes seen as the starting point of a renaissance in English football. The ban on English clubs playing in European football was lifted a year later and a new top division - the Premier League - was formed in 1992, which generated more revenue for clubs. The title decider also formed the centrepiece of Nick Hornby's book Fever Pitch.

Merseyside derby

The Merseyside derby is the name given to football matches between Everton and Liverpool, two major clubs from Liverpool, Merseyside, England. It is the longest running top-flight derby in England, having been played continuously since the 1962–63 season. Part of the rivalry is due to the proximity of the two clubs, whose home grounds are within eyesight of each other across Stanley Park, Everton at Goodison Park and Liverpool at Anfield.Traditionally, the Merseyside derby was referred to as the "friendly derby" because of the large number of families with both Liverpool and Everton supporters and was one of the few that did not enforce total fan segregation. The 1984 Football League Cup Final at Wembley saw almost all sections of the ground mixed and combined chants of "Merseyside, Merseyside" and "Are you watching Manchester?" Since the mid-1980s, however, the rivalry has intensified on and off the field, and since the inception of the Premier League has had more red cards than any other game.

Neil McDonald (footballer)

Neil Raymond McDonald (born 2 November 1965 in Wallsend, North Tyneside) is a football manager, coach and former player, in the right back and midfield positions. He is the current assistant manager at League Two club Swindon Town.

During his career he played for the England under 21 team. As a manager, he has been in charge at Carlisle United and Östersunds FK. On 18 December 2008 he was appointed Assistant Manager of Blackburn Rovers, and was sacked on 13 December 2010 along with manager Sam Allardyce. On 1 June 2011, Allardyce announced McDonald as his assistant manager at West Ham United. On 2 June 2015, McDonald was appointed as manager of Blackpool on a rolling one-year contract, leaving the post on 18 May 2016.

He was previously assistant manager of English League One side Scunthorpe United.

Neville Southall

Neville Southall MBE (born 16 September 1958) is a Welsh former international footballer. He has been described as one of the best goalkeepers of his generation and won the FWA Footballer of the Year award in 1985.He joined Bury from Winsford United for a £6,000 fee in 1980, and turned professional in his early 20s after a number of years as a semi-professional and amateur player. During his teenage years he worked as a binman, waiter and hod carrier. He moved on to Everton for £150,000 in 1981 and established himself as the club's first-choice goalkeeper by the 1983–84 season. He went on to make a club record 578 appearances in the Football League and Premier League (750 in all competitions); his honours with the club consist of a European Cup Winners' Cup medal in 1985, a First Division championship medal in 1984–85 and 1986–87, an FA Cup winners medal in 1984 and 1995, and an FA Charity Shield winners medal in 1984, 1985, and 1995. He also played in the 1985 and 1989 FA Cup finals, the League Cup final in 1984, and helped Everton to a second place in the league in 1985–86. After leaving Everton in 1998, he became Torquay United's regular goalkeeper for two years. He also made a handful of appearances for numerous other clubs.

He played internationally for Wales, winning 92 caps between 1982 and 1998, though he did not feature in any major international competitions. As an individual, he was named on the PFA Team of the Year four consecutive times, and was listed as one of the world's top ten goalkeepers by the International Federation of Football History & Statistics on four occasions. He is a member of the Gwladys Street's Hall of Fame. He has been named as one of the 100 'Greatest Players of the 20th Century' by World Soccer magazine. In the 1996 Birthday Honours, he was appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) for his services to football.Since his retirement as a player, Southall has briefly managed Dover Athletic, Hastings United and Margate, and has coached at numerous clubs as well as the Welsh national youth teams. He has also worked extensively with disadvantaged children, and set up his own educational consultancy.

Phil Thompson

Philip Bernard Thompson (born 21 January 1954) is an English retired footballer, who played as a defender for Liverpool team of the 1970s and 1980s. During this time, he also represented the England national football team on 42 occasions, and captained England on six occasions. After retiring as a player, he later served Liverpool as assistant manager and, during the 2001–02 season, acted as caretaker for 6 months while manager Gérard Houllier was ill. He is currently a pundit on Soccer Saturday on Sky Sports, does on and off work as a pundit for TV 2 (Norway), and is a regular Visiting Fellow at the University of Liverpool where he teaches on the Football Industries MBA.

Stuart McCall

Andrew Stuart Murray McCall (born 10 June 1964), commonly known as Stuart McCall, is a professional football manager and former player. He played in a total of 763 league games and in 40 full international matches for Scotland during his playing career. He was most recently the manager of League Two club Scunthorpe United.

McCall started his career with Bradford City, where he made his first-team debut in 1982. He played six seasons at Valley Parade, during which time he won the Division Three championship, a title which was overshadowed by the Bradford City stadium fire when 56 people died and in which his father Andy was injured. After missing out on promotion in 1987–88, McCall moved to Everton, for whom he scored twice but finished on the losing side in the 1989 FA Cup Final. In 1991, he moved to Rangers, with whom he spent seven seasons and won five league titles, three Scottish Cups and two Scottish League Cups. McCall returned to Bradford City as captain to take them into the top division of English football for the first time in 77 years. After four seasons he moved to Sheffield United, where he retired as a player in 2005.

Born and raised in England, McCall qualified to play for Scotland through his Scottish father. He won 40 international caps and scored one goal in the 1990 FIFA World Cup in Italy. He also played in two European Championships but his international career ended after he was left out of the 1998 World Cup squad.

McCall was part of the coaching staff during his second spell at Bradford City, briefly serving as caretaker-player manager in 2000. He continued his coaching at Sheffield United and was assistant manager to Neil Warnock until May 2007, when he returned to Bradford City for a third time, this time as manager. He spent two-and-a-half seasons in charge of Bradford City, leaving in February 2010. Just before the end of 2010, he was appointed Motherwell manager. He stayed at Fir Park for four years, helping the club finish second in the league twice. After a poor start to the 2014–15 season, he resigned in November 2014. McCall was appointed manager of Rangers in March 2015, but left the club at the end of a short-term contract.

The Spinners (UK band)

The Spinners were a folk group from Liverpool, England, that formed in September 1958. The group was unusual for its time in having a multiracial membership.

They variously had four albums in the UK Albums Chart between September 1970 and April 1972. One of them, Spinners Live Performance (1971), spent three months in the listing and peaked at No. 14.

Tony Cottee

Antony Richard Cottee (born 11 July 1965 in Forest Gate, London) is an English former professional footballer and manager who now works as a television football commentator.

As a player, he was a striker from 1982 until 2001, notably playing in the top flight of English football for West Ham United, Everton and Leicester City. He was capped seven times by England, and played in the Football League for Birmingham City, Norwich City and Millwall. He also had a spell in Malaysia with Selangor and spent a season as player-manager of Barnet.

He played in the 1989 FA Cup Final defeat to Liverpool, and won the League Cup with Leicester City in 2000. His final career tally was 579 league games and 226 goals (99 of which for Everton). In all competitions, he managed 712 games and 293 goals. He exceeded his ambition to score 200 league goals in his career, but fell just short of his target of 300 goals in all competitions. Still, he was one of the most prolific goalscorers that English football saw during the 1980s and 1990s.

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