1988 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1988 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 59th playing of the "Midsummer Classic" between Major League Baseball's American League (AL) and National League All-Star teams. The All-Star Game was held on July 12, 1988, at Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio, the home of the NL's Cincinnati Reds.

The game resulted in the AL defeating the NL 2-1. Terry Steinbach, a catcher for the AL's Oakland Athletics, won the All-Star game's most valuable player award. Steinbach was credited with both of the AL's two runs in the game. Frank Viola of the Minnesota Twins was the winning pitcher.

1988 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
1988 MLB ASG
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 2
National League 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 0
DateJuly 12, 1988
VenueRiverfront Stadium
CityCincinnati, Ohio
Managers
MVPTerry Steinbach (OAK)
Attendance55,837
Ceremonial first pitchVice President George H.W. Bush
TelevisionABC
TV announcersAl Michaels, Jim Palmer, Tim McCarver
RadioCBS
Radio announcersBrent Musburger, Jerry Coleman, Johnny Bench

All-Star rosters

Players in italics have since been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

American League

Starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Frank Viola Twins 1
C Terry Steinbach Athletics 1
1B Mark McGwire Athletics 2
2B Paul Molitor Brewers 3
3B Wade Boggs Red Sox 4
SS Cal Ripken, Jr. Orioles 6
OF José Canseco Athletics 2
OF Dave Winfield Yankees 12
OF Rickey Henderson Yankees 8
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Doyle Alexander Tigers 1
P Roger Clemens Red Sox 2
P Dennis Eckersley Athletics 3
P Mark Gubicza Royals 2
P Doug Jones Indians 1
P Dan Plesac Brewers 2
P Jeff Reardon Twins 3
P Jeff Russell Rangers 1
P Dave Stieb Blue Jays 6
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Tim Laudner Twins 1
1B George Brett Royals 13
1B Don Mattingly Yankees 6
2B Johnny Ray Angels 1
2B Harold Reynolds Mariners 2
3B Gary Gaetti Twins 1
3B Carney Lansford Athletics 1
SS Ozzie Guillén[1] White Sox 1
SS Kurt Stillwell Royals 1
SS Alan Trammell[1] Tigers 5
OF Mike Greenwell Red Sox 1
OF Kirby Puckett Twins 3

National League

Starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Dwight Gooden Mets 4
C Gary Carter Mets 11
1B Will Clark Giants 1
2B Ryne Sandberg Cubs 5
3B Bobby Bonilla Pirates 1
SS Ozzie Smith Cardinals 8
OF Darryl Strawberry Mets 5
OF Vince Coleman Cardinals 1
OF Andre Dawson Cubs 5
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P David Cone Mets 1
P Mark Davis Padres 1
P Kevin Gross Phillies 1
P Orel Hershiser Dodgers 2
P Danny Jackson Reds 1
P Bob Knepper Astros 2
P Greg Maddux Cubs 1
P Bob Walk Pirates 1
P Todd Worrell Cardinals 1
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Lance Parrish Phillies 7
1B Andrés Galarraga Expos 1
1B Gerald Perry Braves 1
2B Robby Thompson[1] Giants 1
3B Vance Law Cubs 1
3B Chris Sabo Reds 1
SS Shawon Dunston Cubs 1
SS Barry Larkin Reds 1
OF Willie McGee Cardinals 4
OF Rafael Palmeiro Cubs 1
OF Andy Van Slyke Pirates 1

All-Star Game

Coaching staff

Description AL NL
Managers Tom Kelly Whitey Herzog
Coaches Tom Trebelhorn Roger Craig
Coaches Bobby Valentine Buck Rodgers
Honorary Captains Bobby Doerr Willie Stargell

Umpires

Home Plate Frank Pulli (NL)
First Base Larry Barnett (AL)
Second Base Terry Tata (NL)
Third Base Dale Ford (AL)
Left field Randy Marsh (NL)
Right field Dan Morrison (AL)

Starting lineups

American League National League
Order Player Team Position Order Player Team Position
1 Rickey Henderson Yankees CF 1 Vince Coleman Cardinals LF
2 Paul Molitor Brewers 2B 2 Ryne Sandberg Cubs 2B
3 Wade Boggs Red Sox 3B 3 Andre Dawson Cubs CF
4 José Canseco Athletics LF 4 Darryl Strawberry Mets RF
5 Dave Winfield Yankees RF 5 Bobby Bonilla Pirates 3B
6 Cal Ripken, Jr. Orioles SS 6 Will Clark Giants 1B
7 Mark McGwire Athletics 1B 7 Gary Carter Mets C
8 Terry Steinbach Athletics C 8 Ozzie Smith Cardinals SS
9 Frank Viola Twins P 9 Dwight Gooden Mets P

Game summary

Tuesday, July 12, 1988 8:35 pm (ET) at Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati, Ohio
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 6 2
National League 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 0
WP: Frank Viola (1-0)   LP: Dwight Gooden (0-1)   Sv: Dennis Eckersley (1)
Home runs:
AL: Terry Steinbach (1)
NL: None

Footnotes and references

  1. ^ a b c Player declined or was unable to play.

External links

1988 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1988 season marked the last of four consecutive winning seasons for the Reds, all of which resulted in second place finishes in the National League West. Led by manager Pete Rose, the Reds finished with the best record of these four seasons at 87 wins and 74 losses, but finished seven games back of the eventual World Series champion Los Angeles Dodgers. The 1988 season would be Pete Rose's last full season as Reds manager.

1988 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1988 season was a memorable one for the Dodgers as a squad that was picked to finish fourth wound up winning the World Series, beating the heavily favored New York Mets and Oakland Athletics on the way. Kirk Gibson carried the Dodger offense, winning the National League Most Valuable Player Award. Orel Hershiser dominated on the mound, throwing a record 59 consecutive scoreless innings on his way to winning the Cy Young Award.

1988 Montreal Expos season

The 1988 Montreal Expos season was the 20th season in franchise history.

1988 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1988 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished sixth in the National League East with a record of 65 wins and 96 losses.

1988 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1988 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 107th season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; the 102nd in the National League. This was their 19th season at Three Rivers Stadium. The Pirates finished second in the National League East with a record of 85–75.

1988 San Diego Padres season

The 1988 San Diego Padres season was the 20th season in franchise history. Tony Gwynn set a National League record by having the lowest batting average (.313) to win a batting title.

1989 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1989 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 60th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 11, 1989, at Anaheim Stadium in Anaheim, California, the home of the California Angels of the American League. The game is noted for being the first in All-Star Game history to include the designated hitter. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 5-3. The game is remembered for Bo Jackson's monstrous lead-off home run to center field. Jackson was named the game's MVP. The game also featured former U.S. President and former baseball announcer Ronald Reagan sharing the NBC broadcast booth with Vin Scully for the first inning.

The pregame ceremonies featured Disney characters joining this year's players in sprinting onto the field for the introduction of the starting lineups. Mike Schmidt of the Philadelphia Phillies, who had retired on May 29, was still elected by the fans as the starting third baseman for the NL All-Star team. Schmidt decided not to play, but he did participate in the game's opening ceremony in uniform. Doc Severinsen later led The Tonight Show Band in the playing of the Canadian and U.S. national anthems. Severinsen and The Tonight Show Band's performance of the U.S. National Anthem was the last non-vocal performance of the Anthem at the All-Star Game to date. The ceremonial first pitch was thrown by longtime Angels coach Jimmie Reese.

This was the second All-Star Game to be played in Anaheim, which last hosted the Midsummer Classic in 1967. It would return to the by-now renovated and renamed Angel Stadium of Anaheim in 2010.

Dan Morrison (umpire)

Daniel Guthrie Morrison (born January 21, 1948) is a former professional baseball umpire who worked in the American League from 1979 to 1999, and throughout both major leagues in 2000 and 2001. He wore uniform number 34 when the AL adopted them for its umpires in 1980 and retained the number when the AL and NL umpiring staffs merged in 2000. Morrison umpired 2,660 major league games in his 23-year career. He umpired in the 1992 World Series, the 1988 Major League Baseball All-Star Game, three American League Championship Series (1989, 1996 and 1999), and two Division Series (1995, 1997, and 2000).

Rich Hacker

Richard Warren Hacker (born October 6, 1947 in Belleville, Illinois) is a former Major League Baseball player, base coach and scout. Hacker played 16 games for the Montreal Expos in the 1971 season as a shortstop. He had a .121 batting average, with four hits in 33 at-bats. Hacker attended Southern Illinois University. After his playing career Hacker became a coach.

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