1988 American League Championship Series

The 1988 American League Championship Series was a best-of-seven series that pitted the East Division champion Boston Red Sox against the West Division champion Oakland Athletics. It was the second meeting between the two in ALCS play. The Athletics swept the Series four games to none and would go on to lose to the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1988 World Series.

1988 American League Championship Series
Teams
Team (Wins) Manager Season
Oakland Athletics (4) Tony La Russa 104–58, .642, GA: 13
Boston Red Sox (0) Joe Morgan 89–73, .549, GA: 1
DatesOctober 5–9
MVPDennis Eckersley (Oakland)
UmpiresDon Denkinger, Ted Hendry, Tim McClelland, Greg Kosc, Ken Kaiser, John Shulock
Broadcast
TelevisionABC
TV announcersGary Bender, Joe Morgan and Reggie Jackson
RadioCBS
Radio announcersDick Stockton and Johnny Bench

Summary

Boston Red Sox vs. Oakland Athletics

Oakland won the series, 4–0.

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 5 Oakland Athletics – 2, Boston Red Sox – 1 Fenway Park 2:55 34,104[1] 
2 October 6 Oakland Athletics – 4, Boston Red Sox – 3 Fenway Park 3:14 34,605[2] 
3 October 8 Boston Red Sox – 6, Oakland Athletics – 10 Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum 3:14 49,261[3] 
4 October 9 Boston Red Sox – 1, Oakland Athletics – 4 Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum 2:55 49,406[4]

Game summaries

Game 1

Wednesday, October 5, 1988, at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Oakland 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 6 0
Boston 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 6 0
WP: Rick Honeycutt (1–0)   LP: Bruce Hurst (0–1)   Sv: Dennis Eckersley (1)
Home runs:
OAK: José Canseco (1)
BOS: None

In an interview conducted before Game 1, José Canseco denied reports in that day's Washington Post by baseball reporter Thomas Boswell that he had used steroids. Canseco was supported in this denial by former slugger Reggie Jackson.

The opening game in Fenway Park pitted Bruce Hurst against Oakland's newfound ace, Dave Stewart. The game was scoreless until the fourth when Canseco, coming off the first 40–40 season in major league history, drilled a homer to give the A's a 1-0 lead. It stayed that way until the seventh. In the bottom of the seventh, Jim Rice walked and gave way to pinch-runner Kevin Romine. Jody Reed reached when Stewart hit him with a pitch. A single by Rich Gedman loaded the bases with one out and Stewart gave way to reliever Rick Honeycutt. Honeycutt induced a line out to left field by Wade Boggs that plated Romine and tied the game at one. Marty Barrett grounded out and the game was tied after seven innings.

A Carney Lansford double and a Dave Henderson single gave the A's a 2–1 lead, and Dennis Eckersley held on for the save as the A's prevailed, 2–1. Hurst went the distance allowing only six hits and two runs but wound up with the loss, while Honeycutt got the win.

The victory gave the A's a 1–0 lead in games.

Game 2

Thursday, October 6, 1988, at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Oakland 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 4 10 1
Boston 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 4 1
WP: Gene Nelson (1–0)   LP: Lee Smith (0–1)   Sv: Dennis Eckersley (2)
Home runs:
OAK: José Canseco (2)
BOS: Rich Gedman (1)

Game 2 saw Storm Davis take the mound against Roger Clemens. After five innings, the A's had two hits, the Red Sox one, and the game was still scoreless. In the bottom of the sixth, a sequence of errors gave the Red Sox two unearned runs. With two outs, Dwight Evans and Mike Greenwell walked. With two on and two out, Davis appeared out of the inning, but an error by Dave Henderson allowed Evans to score the first run of the game. Ellis Burks then singled home Greenwell to make it 2–0 Boston. Davis then threw a wild pitch that moved Burks to second but retired the side on a strikeout of Todd Benzinger.

Trailing for the first time in the series, the A's deficit only lasted two batters. Henderson singled and José Canseco hit his second home run in two games to tie the score at two. Dave Parker singled but was forced at second by Lansford. Lansford got to go to second when Clemens balked and to third on a wild pitch. Lansford then scored on Mark McGwire's single to give the A's a 3–2 lead.

Boston tied the game in the bottom of the seventh when Rich Gedman hit a home run off Oakland reliever Greg Cadaret. Three ninth-inning singles by Ron Hassey, Tony Phillips, and Walt Weiss scored Hassey with what proved to be the winning run. Eckersley retired the side again in the ninth for his second save and Oakland carried a two games to none lead with them back to California.

Gene Nelson got the win while Boston reliever Lee Smith was the losing pitcher.

Game 3

Saturday, October 8, 1988, at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum in Oakland, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Boston 3 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 12 0
Oakland 0 4 2 0 1 0 1 2 X 10 15 1
WP: Gene Nelson (2–0)   LP: Mike Boddicker (0–1)   Sv: Dennis Eckersley (3)
Home runs:
BOS: Mike Greenwell (1)
OAK: Mark McGwire (1), Carney Lansford (1), Ron Hassey (1), Dave Henderson (1)

After two calm games in Boston, Game 3 saw both teams mount offense and go wild, scoring eleven runs in the first three innings (the first two games combined saw only eleven runs scored in eighteen total innings). Game 3 saw two former post-season heroes square off against one another as Oakland threw Bob Welch, famous for striking out Reggie Jackson to end Game 2 of the 1978 World Series, and Boston turned to Mike Boddicker, the Orioles' post-season hero of 1983. Neither pitcher would last the first three innings.

The Red Sox began quickly in the first. Ellis Burks singled and went to second on a balk. He reached third when Marty Barrett singled. A Wade Boggs single scored Burks and put Barrett at second. Mike Greenwell then doubled both home, and the Red Sox had a 3–0 lead after only four batters. After a ground out by Jim Rice, Welch promptly loaded the bases with walks to Evans and Gedman. With the bases loaded and only one out, Welch induced short outfield pop flies by Reed and Benzinger to get out of the first trailing only 3–0.

The Red Sox had batted through in the first, so Burks led off the second with a double. Barrett bunted Burks to third, and Burks scored on a sacrifice fly to left by Boggs. Mike Greenwell, who had doubled home two runs in the first, hit a home run to make the score 5–0 and send Welch to the showers. Gene Nelson came on in relief and got Rice to stop the deficit at 5–0.

In the bottom of the second, the A's came back. Mark McGwire led off with a home run. Consecutive fielder's choice grounders put Mike Gallego at first with two outs. Walt Weiss doubled and Carney Lansford homered, and the score after two was Red Sox 5, A's 4.

With two outs in the third, the A's took the lead. Mark McGwire singled, and Ron Hassey drilled a two-run homer to put the A's in front, 6–5. Boddicker left and Wes Gardner came in to relieve.

In the fifth, a McGwire single and Hassey double scored McGwire to make the score, 7–5. In the seventh, Boggs hit a single and went to second on Henderson's error. Boggs then scored on a single by Dwight Evans to make it 7–6. A Dave Parker double Stan Javier single made it 8–6. In the bottom of the eighth, a Lansford single and Dave Henderson home run closed out the scoring as the A's prevailed, 10–6, to take a three games to none lead in the best-of-seven series.

Gene Nelson got his second win in two games while Eckersley got his third save. Boddicker got the loss.

Game 4

Sunday, October 9, 1988, at Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum in Oakland, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Boston 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 4 0
Oakland 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 X 4 10 1
WP: Dave Stewart (1–0)   LP: Bruce Hurst (0–2)   Sv: Dennis Eckersley (4)
Home runs:
BOS: None
OAK: José Canseco (3)

The Oakland Athletics completed a four-game sweep against the Boston Red Sox to make their first World Series appearance since 1974. They would face the Los Angeles Dodgers who coincidentally were their opponent in that 1974 World Series.

Game 4 was a rematch of Game 1 as Bruce Hurst squared off against Dave Stewart. José Canseco drilled his third home run in the bottom of the first to give the A's a 1–0 lead. In the third, two singles by Weiss and Lansford followed by a Dave Henderson double made it 2–0 A's. In the top of the sixth, the Red Sox cut the lead in half when Marty Barrett walked, went to second on a single, and scored on consecutive fielder's choice ground outs.

Needing two runs to win, the Red Sox took the field with one series of at-bats left in the bottom of the eighth. Lee Smith, ineffective in Game 2, was again ineffective as the A's pushed across two insurance runs. Canseco singled, stole second, and came home on a McGwire single. Stan Javier bunted to move McGwire to second and wound up on first due to poor execution by the Red Sox. A walk to Luis Polonia loaded the bases with nobody out. Don Baylor hit a sacrifice fly that scored McGwire and made the score 4–1. Smith retired the next two hitters, but the Red Sox were finished. Eckersley finished the ninth to get his fourth save in only four games, an all-time record (since matched by John Wetteland in the 1996 World Series and Greg Holland in the 2014 ALCS). Eckersley won the Most Valuable Player Award for his efforts.

Composite box

1988 ALCS (4–0): Oakland Athletics over Boston Red Sox

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Oakland Athletics 1 4 3 1 1 0 4 5 1 20 41 3
Boston Red Sox 3 2 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 11 26 1
Total attendance: 167,376   Average attendance: 41,844

References

  1. ^ "1988 ALCS Game 1 - Oakland Athletics vs. Boston Red Sox". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  2. ^ "1988 ALCS Game 2 - Oakland Athletics vs. Boston Red Sox". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  3. ^ "1988 ALCS Game 3 - Boston Red Sox vs. Oakland Athletics". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  4. ^ "1988 ALCS Game 4 - Boston Red Sox vs. Oakland Athletics". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.

External links

1988 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1988 San Francisco 49ers season was their 43rd season in the National Football League. The season was highlighted by their third Super Bowl victory. In 1988, the 49ers struggled. At one point, they were 6–5 and in danger of missing the playoffs but rose to defeat the Washington Redskins on a Monday night, eventually finishing the season at 10–6. They gained a measure of revenge by thrashing the Minnesota Vikings 34–9 in the first round. The 49ers then traveled to Chicago's Soldier Field, where the chill factor at gametime was 26 degrees below zero. They defeated the Chicago Bears 28–3 in the NFC Championship.

For the 49ers, it was their first Super Bowl appearance since they defeated the Miami Dolphins in Super Bowl XIX. They had made the playoffs in the three seasons between Super Bowl XIX and Super Bowl XXIII, but were eliminated each time in the first round, primarily because of the poor performances by their offensive stars in those games; quarterback Joe Montana, receiver Jerry Rice and running back Roger Craig all failed to produce a single touchdown.

The 49ers alternated quarterbacks as Montana and Steve Young both started at various points of the season. The broadcast booth of the 49ers radio network also saw change, as Joe Starkey substituted for longtime 49ers play by play announcer Lon Simmons during several games, mostly in October when Simmons called the Oakland Athletics 1988 American League Championship Series and 1988 World Series games for the Oakland A's flagship station, KSFO–AM. The 1988 season was the last for Simmons as 49ers broadcaster. With the regular season and postseason, the 49ers compiled a total of 13 victories (a .684 win percentage) on the season, a record-low for Super Bowl champions. In 2011, the New York Giants would tie this record (but with a .650 win percentage as they suffered seven losses as opposed to the 49ers six).

Bash Brothers

The Bash Brothers are a duo of former baseball players consisting of Jose Canseco and Mark McGwire. Both prolific home run hitters, the two were teammates in Major League Baseball (MLB) for seven seasons with the Oakland Athletics, helping the team win a World Series title in 1989.

The two began celebrating homers by bashing each other's forearms, which spawned a marketing campaign that was a takeoff on The Blues Brothers. After retiring from playing, Canseco and McGwire both admitted to using anabolic steroids during their careers.

Bruce Hurst

Bruce Vee Hurst (born March 24, 1958) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed starting pitcher. He is best remembered for his performance for the Boston Red Sox in the 1986 postseason, named 1986 World Series MVP prior to the New York Mets' miraculous comeback in Game 6 of the World Series.

Dave Stewart (baseball)

David Keith Stewart (born February 19, 1957), nicknamed "Smoke", is an American professional baseball executive, pitching coach, sports agent, and retired starting pitcher, and also served as the general manager of the Arizona Diamondbacks of Major League Baseball (MLB). The Los Angeles Dodgers' 16th-round selection in the 1975 MLB draft, Stewart's MLB playing career spanned from 1978 through 1995, winning three World Series championships while compiling a career 3.95 earned run average (ERA) and a 168–129 won–lost record, including winning 20 games in four consecutive seasons. He pitched for the Dodgers, Texas Rangers, Philadelphia Phillies, Oakland Athletics, and Toronto Blue Jays.

Stewart was an MLB All-Star and was known for his postseason performance – winning one World Series Most Valuable Player Award and two League Championship Series Most Valuable Player Awards – and for staring down batters when pitching to them. After his playing career, he served as a pitching coach for the San Diego Padres, Milwaukee Brewers, and Blue Jays and as an assistant GM. General managers he has worked under include: Sandy Alderson, Kevin Towers, Gord Ash, and Dean Taylor. He later became a sports agent based in San Diego until the Diamondbacks hired him as GM at the end of the 2014 season.

Gary Bender

Gary Nedrow Bender (born September 1, 1940) is a retired American sportscaster and 2008 inductee into the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame. He officially retired, April 13, 2011, from Fox Sports Arizona network after 18 years calling the NBA's Phoenix Suns games.

Jody Reed

Jody Eric Reed (born July 26, 1962) is an American former professional baseball second baseman. He played eleven seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) between 1987 and 1997 for the Boston Red Sox, Los Angeles Dodgers, Milwaukee Brewers, San Diego Padres, and Detroit Tigers.

Joe Morgan

Joe Leonard Morgan (born September 19, 1943) is an American former professional baseball second baseman who played Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Houston Astros, Cincinnati Reds, San Francisco Giants, Philadelphia Phillies, and Oakland Athletics from 1963 to 1984. He won two World Series championships with the Reds in 1975 and 1976 and was also named the National League Most Valuable Player (MVP) in each of those years. Considered one of the greatest second basemen of all-time, Morgan was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1990. After retiring as an active player, Morgan became a baseball broadcaster for the Reds, Giants, and ESPN. He currently hosts a weekly nationally-syndicated radio show on Sports USA, while serving as a special advisor to the Reds.

Major League Baseball on ABC

Major League Baseball on ABC is the de facto title of a program that televises Major League Baseball games on the American Broadcasting Company (ABC). The program has appeared in various forms c. 1953-1965 (ABC Game of the Week), 1976–1989 (Monday Night Baseball, Thursday Night Baseball, and Sunday Afternoon Baseball), and 1994–1995 (Baseball Night in America). ABC has not televised Major League Baseball since Game 5 of the 1995 World Series (October 26).

Mike Smithson (baseball)

Billy Mike Smithson (born January 21, 1955) is an American former professional baseball player. He was a right-handed pitcher who appeared in 240 games in the Major Leagues over eight seasons (1982–1989) for the Texas Rangers. Minnesota Twins and Boston Red Sox. Smithson stood 6 feet 8 inches (2.03 m) tall and weighed 215 pounds (98 kg).

After attending the University of Tennessee, Smithson was selected by the Red Sox in the fifth round of the 1976 Major League Baseball Draft. During the course of his seven-year minor league apprenticeship, he participated in the longest baseball game in history between the Pawtucket Red Sox and Rochester Red Wings during the 1981 season. During the early morning hours of Sunday, April 19, 1981, he worked the full 15th, 16th and 17th innings, and got two outs in the 18th inning before turning the ball over to Win Remmerswaal. Smithson allowed two hits and three bases on balls in 3​2⁄3 innings pitched—but no runs. The game was suspended after 32 innings, and resumed June 23; Smithson's PawSox won it in the bottom of the 33rd frame.

After attending spring training with the 1982 Red Sox, Smithson was traded to the Rangers on April 9 for left-handed relief pitcher John Henry Johnson. He was recalled by the Rangers from the Triple-A Denver Bears and began his MLB career late in August as a starting pitcher—the role he would play for much of his big-league tenure.

As a member of the Twins, Smithson led the American League in games started in 1984 and 1985. He won 15 games in each season. The Red Sox brought Smithson back as a free agent in 1988, and he spent two seasons with them as a swing man, making 37 starts in 71 games. Along the way, he pitched against the Oakland Athletics in the 1988 American League Championship Series, his only postseason appearance, providing 2​1⁄3 innings of scoreless relief in Game 4, which Oakland won to complete a sweep over the Red Sox.

Altogether, Smithson allowed 1,473 hits and 383 bases on balls in 1,356​1⁄3 innings of big-league work. He made 204 starts out of his 240 total games pitched, and recorded 731 strikeouts, 41 complete games, six shutouts and two saves. He retired after the 1989 campaign. In 2009, he was named to the University of Tennessee's All Century Team.

Reggie Jackson

Reginald Martinez Jackson (born May 18, 1946) is an American former professional baseball right fielder who played 21 seasons for the Kansas City / Oakland Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, New York Yankees, and California Angels of Major League Baseball (MLB). Jackson was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1993.

Jackson was nicknamed "Mr. October" for his clutch hitting in the postseason with the Athletics and the Yankees. He helped Oakland win five consecutive American League West divisional pennants, three consecutive American League pennants and three consecutive World Series titles, from 1972 to 1974. Jackson helped New York win four American League East divisional pennants, three American League pennants and two consecutive World Series titles, from 1977 to 1981. He also helped the California Angels win two AL West divisional pennants in 1982 and 1986. Jackson hit three consecutive home runs at Yankee Stadium in the clinching game six of the 1977 World Series.Jackson hit 563 career home runs and was an American League (AL) All-Star for 14 seasons. He won two Silver Slugger Awards, the AL Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in 1973, two World Series MVP Awards, and the Babe Ruth Award in 1977. The Yankees and Athletics retired his team uniform number in 1993 and 2004. Jackson currently serves as a special advisor to the Yankees.Jackson led his teams to first place ten times over his 21 year career.

Stan Javier

Stanley Julián Antonio Javier [hah-ve-ERR] (born January 9, 1964) is a former Major League Baseball outfielder. He is the son of long time St. Louis Cardinals second baseman Julián Javier, and was named after his father's teammate and close friend, Stan Musial.

A switch-hitter with good production from both sides of the plate, he also had a strong arm with the ability to play all three outfield positions exceptionally well.

Wes Gardner

Wesley Brian Gardner (born April 29, 1961) is a retired Major League Baseball pitcher drafted by the New York Mets in the 22nd round of the 1982 Major League Baseball draft out of the University of Central Arkansas.

Yankees–Red Sox rivalry

The Yankees–Red Sox rivalry is a Major League Baseball (MLB) rivalry between the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox. The two teams have competed in MLB's American League (AL) for over 100 seasons and have since developed one of the fiercest rivalries in American sports. In 1919, Red Sox owner Harry Frazee sold star player Babe Ruth to the Yankees, which was followed by an 86-year period in which the Red Sox did not win a World Series. This led to the popularization of a superstition known as the "Curse of the Bambino", which was one of the most well-known aspects of the rivalry.The rivalry is often a heated subject of conversation, especially in the home region of both teams, the Northeastern United States.

Until the 2014 season, every season's postseason had featured one or both of the AL East rivals since the inception of the wild card format and the resultant additional Division Series; they have faced each other in the AL Championship Series (ALCS) three times. The Yankees won twice, in 1999 and 2003; while the Red Sox won in 2004. The two teams have also met once in the AL Division Series (ALDS), in 2018, with Boston winning 3-1, a series which included a 16-1 Red Sox win in Game 3 at Yankee Stadium, the most lopsided postseason loss for the Yankees in their history. In addition, the teams have twice met in the last regular-season series of a season to decide the league title, in 1904 (when the Red Sox, then known as the Americans, won) and 1949 (when the Yankees won).The Yankees and the Red Sox finished tied for first in 1978; subsequently, the Yankees won a high-profile tie-breaker game for the division title. The first-place tie came after the Red Sox had a 14-game lead over the Yankees more than halfway through the season. Similarly, in the 2004 ALCS, the Yankees ultimately lost a best-of-7 series after leading 3–0. The Red Sox comeback was the only time in baseball history that a team has come back from a 0–3 deficit to win a series. The Red Sox went on to win the World Series, ending the 86-year-old curse.This match-up is regarded by some sports journalists as the greatest rivalry in sports. Games between the two teams often generate considerable interest and receive extensive media coverage, including being broadcast on national television. National carriers of Major League Baseball coverage, including Fox/FS1, ESPN, and MLB Network carry most of the games in the rivalry across the nation, regardless of team standings or playoff implications. Yankees–Red Sox games are some of the most-watched MLB games each season. Outside of baseball, the rivalry has led to violence between fans, along with attention from politicians and other athletes.

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