1986 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1986 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 57th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 15, 1986, at the Astrodome in Houston, Texas, the home of the Houston Astros of the National League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 3-2 and ended a streak where the NL won 13 of the last 14 games. Boston Red Sox pitcher Roger Clemens was named the Most Valuable Player.

1986 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
1986 MLB All Star Game Logo
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 5 0
National League 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 5 0
DateJuly 15, 1986
VenueAstrodome
CityHouston, Texas
Managers
MVPRoger Clemens (BOS)
Attendance45,774
Ceremonial first pitchVice President George H.W. Bush
TelevisionABC
TV announcersAl Michaels, Tim McCarver and Jim Palmer
RadioCBS
Radio announcersBrent Musburger, Jerry Coleman and Johnny Bench

Rosters

Players in italics have since been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

American League

Starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Roger Clemens Red Sox 1
C Lance Parrish Tigers 6
1B Wally Joyner Angels 1
2B Lou Whitaker Tigers 4
3B Wade Boggs Red Sox 2
SS Cal Ripken, Jr. Orioles 4
OF Kirby Puckett Twins 1
OF Dave Winfield Yankees 10
OF Rickey Henderson Yankees 6
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Don Aase Orioles 1
P Willie Hernández Tigers 3
P Teddy Higuera Brewers 1
P Charlie Hough Rangers 1
P Dave Righetti Yankees 1
P Ken Schrom Indians 1
P Mike Witt Angels 1
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Rich Gedman Red Sox 2
1B Don Mattingly Yankees 3
1B Eddie Murray[1] Orioles 6
2B Frank White Royals 5
3B George Brett[1] Royals 11
3B Brook Jacoby Indians 1
3B Jim Presley[1] Mariners 1
SS Tony Fernández Blue Jays 1
SS Alan Trammell[1] Tigers 3
OF Harold Baines White Sox 2
OF Jesse Barfield Blue Jays 1
OF José Canseco[1] Athletics 1
OF Lloyd Moseby Blue Jays 1
OF Jim Rice Red Sox 8

National League

Starters
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Dwight Gooden Mets 3
C Gary Carter Mets 9
1B Keith Hernandez Mets 4
2B Ryne Sandberg Cubs 3
3B Mike Schmidt Phillies 10
SS Ozzie Smith Cardinals 6
OF Tony Gwynn Padres 3
OF Dale Murphy Braves 6
OF Darryl Strawberry Mets 3
Pitchers
Position Player Team All-Star Games
P Sid Fernandez Mets 1
P John Franco Reds 1
P Mike Krukow Giants 1
P Shane Rawley Phillies 1
P Jeff Reardon Expos 2
P Rick Rhoden Pirates 2
P Mike Scott Astros 1
P Dave Smith Astros 1
P Fernando Valenzuela Dodgers 6
Reserves
Position Player Team All-Star Games
C Jody Davis Cubs 2
C Tony Peña Pirates 4
1B Glenn Davis Astros 1
2B Steve Sax Dodgers 3
3B Chris Brown Giants 1
SS Hubie Brooks Expos 1
OF Kevin Bass Astros 1
OF Chili Davis Giants 2
OF Dave Parker Reds 6
OF Tim Raines Expos 6

Game

Wally Joyner was the first rookie to be elected to the starting team of an All-Star squad by the fans and the fifteenth rookie overall to actually start in a Midsummer Classic but the evening belonged to Roger Clemens. Roger Clemens made his All-Star Game debut and the game was held in his hometown of Houston. With help from Ted Higuera, Charlie Hough, Dave Righetti and Don Aase, Clemens shut down the National League and started his record setting All-Star Game career.

Clemens pitched three perfect innings, had no hits allowed and no walks allowed, which included only three balls and twenty-one strikes, against the formidable National League lineup earning him the All-Star Most Valuable Player Award. The National League pitching staff stuck out twelve batters, a total equaled only three times before in All-Star History: 1934 All-Star Game [National League], 1956 All-Star Game [American League] and 1959 All-Star Game [National League].

In the second inning, Tigers second baseman Lou Whitaker followed a Dave Winfield double with a homer off Mets pitcher Dwight Gooden. By the fourth inning, Fernando Valenzuela had achieved five consecutive strikeouts. This tied him with the All Star record set during the 1934 All-Star Game by Carl Hubbell. Valenzuela struck out Don Mattingly, Cal Ripken, Jr., Jesse Barfield, Lou Whitaker and fellow Mexican Teddy Higuera. In the seventh inning, Frank White pinch-hit for Lou Whitaker and hit an 0-2 pitch from Astros pitcher Mike Scott over the wall. White became the 14th player in the history of the All-Star Game to have a pinch-hit home run. The last player to do so was Lee Mazzilli at the 1979 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

The National League made it interesting in the bottom of the eighth by roughing up Rangers pitcher Charlie Hough for two runs. In the ninth, the National League had runners at first and third with one out when Don Aase got Chris Brown to hit a check-swing grounder for a double play.

This was the last All-Star Game to be entirely played indoors until 2011, when it was played at Chase Field in Phoenix.

Coaching staff

Description AL NL
Managers Dick Howser Whitey Herzog
Coaches Pat Corrales Davey Johnson
Coaches John McNamara Tommy Lasorda
Honorary Captains Charlie Gehringer Rusty Staub

The 1986 All-Star Game turned out to be the final game that Dick Howser (then managing the defending American League and World Champions, the Kansas City Royals) would ever manage. Broadcasters noticed he was messing up signals when he changed pitchers, and Howser later admitted he felt sick before the game. Shortly thereafter, Howser was diagnosed with a brain tumor and underwent surgery. On June 17, 1987, Dick Howser died at the age of 51.

Umpires

Home Plate Bruce Froemming (NL)
First Base Steve Palermo (AL)
Second Base Paul Runge (NL)
Third Base Rick Reed (AL)
Left field Eric Gregg (NL)
Right field Tim McClelland (AL)

Starting lineups

American League National League
Order Player Team Position Order Player Team Position
1 Kirby Puckett Twins CF 1 Tony Gwynn Padres LF
2 Rickey Henderson Yankees LF 2 Ryne Sandberg Cubs 2B
3 Wade Boggs Red Sox 3B 3 Keith Hernandez Mets 1B
4 Lance Parrish Tigers C 4 Gary Carter Mets C
5 Wally Joyner Angels 1B 5 Darryl Strawberry Mets RF
6 Cal Ripken, Jr. Orioles SS 6 Mike Schmidt Phillies 3B
7 Dave Winfield Yankees RF 7 Dale Murphy Braves CF
8 Lou Whitaker Tigers 2B 8 Ozzie Smith Cardinals SS
9 Roger Clemens Red Sox P 9 Dwight Gooden Mets P

Game summary

Tuesday, July 15, 1986 7:35 pm (CT) at Houston Astrodome in Houston, Texas
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
American League 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 5 0
National League 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 5 1
WP: Roger Clemens (1-0)   LP: Dwight Gooden (0-1)   Sv: Don Aase (1)
Home runs:
AL: Lou Whitaker (1), Frank White (1)
NL: None
Attendance: 45,774, Time of Game: 2:28

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Player declined or was unable to play.
1986 Houston Astros season

The Houston Astros' 1986 season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Houston Astros attempting to win the National League West, which they did for their third time in seven seasons.

1986 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1986 Los Angeles Dodgers finished the season in fifth place in the Western Division of the National League.

1986 Montreal Expos season

The 1986 Montreal Expos season was the 18th season in franchise history.

1986 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1986 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 104th season for the Phillies. Under second-year manager John Felske, the Phillies stayed just below the .500 mark for roughly two-thirds of the season, until a charge after the All-Star break pushed the club past the St. Louis Cardinals and Montreal Expos into second place in the NL East. The eventual World Series champions rival New York Mets finished with a Major League best 108-54 record, and finished 21​1⁄2 games ahead of the Phillies. The Mets and the Phillies were the only teams in the National League East to post winning records. Mike Schmidt became the first third baseman in the history of the National League to win the MVP Award three times.

1986 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1986 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 105th season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise; and their 100th in the National League. This was their 17th season at Three Rivers Stadium. The Pirates finished sixth and last in the National League East with a record of 64–98. This was also the rookie season of left fielder Barry Bonds, who led the Pirates with 36 stolen bases and finished second on the club with 16 home runs.

1986 San Diego Padres season

The 1986 San Diego Padres season was the 18th season in franchise history.

1986 in sports

1986 in sports describes the year's events in world sport.

1987 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1987 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 58th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 14, 1987, at the Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum in Oakland, California, the home of the Oakland Athletics of the American League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 2-0 in 13 innings. Montreal Expos outfielder Tim Raines was named the Most Valuable Player.

Charlie Gehringer

Charles Leonard Gehringer (May 11, 1903 – January 21, 1993), nicknamed The Mechanical Man, was an American professional baseball second baseman, coach, general manager, and team vice president, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Detroit Tigers, for 19 seasons (1924–1942). He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, in 1949.

Dick Howser

Richard Dalton Howser (May 14, 1936 – June 17, 1987) was an American Major League Baseball shortstop, coach, and manager who was best known as the manager of the Kansas City Royals during the 1980s and for guiding them to the franchise's first World Series title in 1985.

Frank White (baseball)

Frank White Jr. (born September 4, 1950) is an American politician and former professional baseball player, who spent 18 years with the Kansas City Royals of Major League Baseball (MLB). After his playing career, he has worked as a professional baseball coach and sports commentator, and has been elected to public office in Jackson County, Missouri.

Hubie Brooks

Hubert "Hubie" Brooks (born September 24, 1956) is an American former professional baseball right fielder, third baseman, and shortstop. He played fifteen seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1980 to 1994 for the New York Mets, Montreal Expos, Los Angeles Dodgers, California Angels, and Kansas City Royals. Brooks was selected third overall in the 1978 Major League Baseball draft by the New York Mets and went on to play for five different teams over a 15-year career, and was twice named an All-Star. MLB pitcher Donnie Moore, who died in 1989, was Brooks' cousin.

Games
Players
Events
Results and Awards
See also
AL East
AL West
NL East
NL West
Related programs
Related articles
Commentators
Key figures
Lore
World Series
AL Championship Series
NL Championship Series
AL Division Series
NL Division Series
All-Star Game
Music
Seasons
Related programs
Related articles
Commentators
Key figures
Lore
AL Championship Series
NL Championship Series
AL Division Series
NL Division Series
All-Star Game
World Series

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.