1985 National League Championship Series

The 1985 National League Championship Series was played between the St. Louis Cardinals and Los Angeles Dodgers from October 9–16. It was the first championship series played under the new best-of-seven format. In previous years, the NLCS had been settled by a best-of-five format. This series is best known for Ozzie Smith's dramatic walk-off home run in Game 5.

Dodger announcer Vin Scully and former Cardinal player Joe Garagiola called the games for NBC. Both were announcers on the year-long Game of the Week.

1985 National League Championship Series
Teams
Team (Wins) Manager Season
St. Louis Cardinals (4) Whitey Herzog 101–61, .623, GA: 3
Los Angeles Dodgers (2) Tommy Lasorda 95–67, .586, GA: 5½
DatesOctober 9–16
MVPOzzie Smith (St. Louis)
UmpiresDick Stello, Bruce Froemming, John McSherry, Terry Tata, Paul Runge, Jerry Crawford
Broadcast
TelevisionNBC
TV announcersVin Scully and Joe Garagiola
RadioCBS
Radio announcersBrent Musburger and Johnny Bench

Background

The Cardinals made it to the series by winning 101 games and edging the New York Mets in the National League East. The Dodgers were led by Pedro Guerrero, and their talented pitching staff with a team ERA of 2.96. They beat the Cincinnati Reds by ​5 12 games.

Summary

Los Angeles Dodgers vs. St. Louis Cardinals

St. Louis won the series, 4–2.

Game Date Score Location Time Attendance 
1 October 9 St. Louis Cardinals – 1, Los Angeles Dodgers – 4 Dodger Stadium 2:42 55,270[1] 
2 October 10 St. Louis Cardinals – 2, Los Angeles Dodgers – 8 Dodger Stadium 3:04 55,222[2] 
3 October 12 Los Angeles Dodgers – 2, St. Louis Cardinals – 4 Busch Stadium (II) 3:21 53,708[3] 
4 October 13 Los Angeles Dodgers – 2, St. Louis Cardinals – 12 Busch Stadium (II) 2:47 53,708[4] 
5 October 14 Los Angeles Dodgers – 2, St. Louis Cardinals – 3 Busch Stadium (II) 2:56 53,706[5] 
6 October 16 St. Louis Cardinals – 7, Los Angeles Dodgers – 5 Dodger Stadium 3:32 55,208[6]

Game summaries

Game 1

Wednesday, October 9, 1985, at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 8 1
Los Angeles 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 X 4 8 0
WP: Fernando Valenzuela (1–0)   LP: John Tudor (0–1)   Sv: Tom Niedenfuer (1)

The opening contest in Los Angeles pitted Dodgers screwballer Fernando Valenzuela against the Cardinals' twenty one-game winner, John Tudor. The pitchers matched zeroes through the first three innings, but in the bottom of the fourth an error by Terry Pendleton allowed Bill Madlock to reach first. After stealing second, Madlock came home on a Guerrero single to give the Dodgers a 1–0 lead. In the Dodgers' sixth, Madlock struck again when he doubled and then scored on a single by Mike Scioscia. Prior to Scioscia's single, the Cardinals had intentionally walked Guerrero, who later scored on a bunt by Candy Maldonado. A double by Steve Sax scored Maldonado, and Tudor got the hook. Ken Dayley ended the inning with a strikeout of Valenzuela, but the Dodgers had a 4–0 lead en route to a 4–1 victory with the Cardinals scoring the only run in the seventh on Tito Landrum's RBI single with two on. The win gave the Dodgers a 1–0 lead in the best-of-seven series.

Game 2

Thursday, October 10, 1985, at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 8 1
Los Angeles 0 0 3 2 1 2 0 0 X 8 13 1
WP: Orel Hershiser (1–0)   LP: Joaquín Andújar (0–1)
Home runs:
STL: None
LAD: Greg Brock (1)

In Game 2, another Cardinal twenty-game winner, Joaquín Andújar, squared off against the Dodgers' new ace, Orel Hershiser, who had compiled a 19–3 record during the regular season and had not lost at home. After two scoreless innings, the Cardinals scored first when batting champion (and eventual National League MVP) Willie McGee singled, went to second on a walk to Tommy Herr, and scored on a wild pitch by Hershiser to give the Cardinals their first lead of the series. In the bottom of the third, Sax singled for the Dodgers. Andujar had Sax picked off first, but a throwing error allowed him to scamper all the way to third with one out. He then scored on a single by Hershiser, who would score himself on Ken Landreaux's double. The hot-hitting Madlock then singled Landreaux home, giving the Dodgers a 3–1 lead.

In the next inning, Scioscia singled and scored on Greg Brock's two-run home run to give the Dodgers a 5–1 lead. Next inning, the Dodgers extended their lead to 6–1 on Mike Marshall's RBI single with two on that knocked Andujar out of the game. In the sixth, Ricky Horton allowed a two-out double and walk, then back-to-back RBI singles by Bill Madlock and Pedro Guerrero off of Bill Campbell made it 8–1 Dodgers. In the ninth, Hershiser allowed a leadoff single and walk, then two outs later, Vince Coleman's RBI single made it 8–2 Dodgers before Willie McGee grounded out to finish Hershiser's complete game and give the Dodgers a 2–0 series lead heading to St. Louis.

Game 3

Saturday, October 12, 1985, at Busch Stadium (II) in St. Louis, Missouri

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 7 2
St. Louis 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 X 4 8 0
WP: Danny Cox (1–0)   LP: Bob Welch (0–1)   Sv: Ken Dayley (1)
Home runs:
LAD: None
STL: Tom Herr (1)

In past years, a 2–0 hole would have occasioned a must-win game, but the Cardinals still had a little breathing room due to the best-of-seven nature of the series. They did, however, need a win to get back on track in the series, and they got it with a 4–2 win behind Danny Cox to cut the Dodgers' series lead to 2–1. The Cardinals got roaring quickly when leadoff hitter Vince Coleman singled and stole second. After a walk to McGee, Dodgers starter Bob Welch seemed to have picked Coleman off, but a throwing error, reminiscent of Andújar's in Game 2, scored Coleman and put McGee on third. Herr then walked and promptly stole second to give the Cardinals runners on second and third with nobody out. After an intentional walk to Andy Van Slyke, McGee scored on Terry Pendleton's ground out to give the Cardinals a 2–0 lead.

The next inning, Vince Coleman again singled—and was again picked off base, only to advance to third on a throwing error. McGee singled Coleman home and was promptly caught stealing. Herr followed up with a home run to give the Cardinals a 4–0 lead in the second. The game was for all purposes over. The Dodgers scored single runs in the fourth on back-to-back doubles by Pedro Guerrero and Mike Marshall and in the seventh when Enos Cabell singled off of Cox, then scored on Ken Landreaux's one-out single off of Ricky Horton. Danny Cox got the win and Ken Dayley got the save with Bob Welch the losing pitcher. The victory cut the Dodger lead to two games to one.

Game 4

Sunday, October 13, 1985, at Busch Stadium (II) in St. Louis, Missouri

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 5 1
St. Louis 0 9 0 1 1 0 0 1 X 12 15 0
WP: John Tudor (1–1)   LP: Jerry Reuss (0–1)
Home runs:
LAD: Bill Madlock (1)
STL: None

The most important event of Game 4 occurred over two hours before the first pitch was thrown. Rainy conditions in St. Louis---combined with the stadium's lack of a dome---mandated deployment of the protective tarpaulin. The tarp in Busch Stadium was automated and came out of the ground. Standing next to it was Cardinal rookie Vince Coleman, the catalyst in the Cardinals' Game 3 win. Coleman was trapped under the tarp and several players had to lift the tarp so Coleman could escape. But the damage was done: Coleman suffered a broken ankle and would miss the rest of the 1985 postseason. The question entering the fourth game was whether the Cards could win with their catalyst on the bench. And the resounding answer from Game 4 was "No problem!"

The pitching matchup for this game was the Cardinals' Tudor against Jerry Reuss for the Dodgers. In the first, both pitchers allowed no hits, and Tudor continued his mastery in the top half of the second. But the bottom of the second saw the floodgates open on Reuss. Three straight singles by Jack Clark, Tito Landrum (Coleman's replacement) and César Cedeño gave the Cardinals a 1–0 lead. Back-up catcher Tom Nieto, starting his first game in the series, walked after a Pendleton ground out scored Cedeño. With the score 2–0 and runners at first and third, Tudor tried a squeeze play that worked beyond the Cardinals' dreams. A throwing error by Reuss put the Cards up, 3–0, and sent Nieto to second with Tudor on first. McGee's hit lined out to Mike Marshall in right, moving Nieto to third. With two outs, Ozzie Smith hit an infield single to the shortstop that scored Nieto, and when Herr followed with his own single, Reuss departed in a 5–0 hole.

Rick Honeycutt came in to put out the fire, but Clark's single scored Smith. Cedeno's walk loaded the bases, and an infield single by Landrum made it 7–0 with the bases still loaded. Pendleton then singled to score both Clark and Cedeño, and Tudor had a nine-run lead. Honeycutt was pulled in favor of Bobby Castillo, who struck out Tom Nieto to end the inning.

Next inning, Cesar Cedeno hit a leadoff double and scored on Tito Landrum's single. Next inning, Willie McGee hit a leadoff double, moved to third on a groundout and scored on Tom Herr's sacrifice fly. Madlock homered off Tudor in the seventh, the only run he permitted, but by that point the Dodgers were trailing 11–1. They got another run in the eighth when Len Matuszek hit a leadoff single off of Ricky Horton, moved to second on a groundout and scored on Pedro Guerrero's single, but the Cardinals got that run back in the bottom half off of Carlos Diaz when Jack Clark singled with two outs and scored on Andy Van Slyke's single. Bill Campbell retired the Dodgers in order in the ninth en route to a 12–2 Cardinals' win that tied the series at two. Tudor went seven innings for the win while Castillo hung around until the ninth.

In past years, this would set the stage for the clinching Game 5, but the new format gave leeway to each team's pitching arrangement.

Game 5

Monday, October 14, 1985, at Busch Stadium (II) in St. Louis, Missouri

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Los Angeles 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 5 1
St. Louis 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 5 1
WP: Jeff Lahti (1–0)   LP: Tom Niedenfuer (0–1)
Home runs:
LAD: Bill Madlock (2)
STL: Ozzie Smith (1)

High drama unfolded when the Dodgers and Cardinals met for Game 5 tied at two victories apiece. The Dodgers sent Valenzuela for his second start of the series against the Cardinals' number four starter, Bob Forsch. Cardinals manager Whitey Herzog felt comfortable starting Forsch to give extra rest to his pair of twenty-game winners, Andujar and Tudor. Prior to the game, Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda declared, "If they can beat Valenzuela and Hershiser, then we're not as good as we thought." Dodger/NBC announcer Vin Scully repeated this several times during the broadcasts of Games 5 and 6.

As in Games 3 and 4, the Cardinals got the ball rolling quickly. McGee and Smith led off with walks, and then Herr doubled, scoring both runners. At second with nobody out, the Dodgers—for the fifth time in the series—picked a runner off base, Herr in this case, only to see him advance on a throwing error by Valenzuela. With Herr at third and nobody out, Valenzuela masterfully got out of the jam with no further damage, and the Cardinals led, 2–0.

Ozzie Smith 1983
Game 5 hero, Ozzie Smith.

In the fourth inning, Landreaux singled and Madlock homered for the second time in the series to tie the game at two. Ken Dayley replaced Forsch and got out of a two on and nobody out jam. And that ended the scoring until the ninth.

Tom Niedenfuer came in to hold the Cardinals at bay in the ninth. After inducing McGee to pop up to third, Ozzie Smith came to bat from the left side of the plate. Never before in his career had Smith homered from the left side—until now. He golfed a Niedenfuer fastball down the right field line and over the fence for a home run, ending Game 5 as a 3–2 Cardinal victory. The ball hit the front facing of the lower deck and bounded back onto the field, but it was clearly above the home run line and Smith scored the winning run. Reliever Jeff Lahti got the win and Niedenfuer took the loss. The home run was voted the greatest moment in the history of Busch Stadium in 2005, and was the source of Jack Buck's famous call "Go crazy, folks! Go crazy!".

This was the game where a fan blew water from the top of the visitors dugout into the eyes of Steve Sax as he came back after making an out. Sax attempted to enter the stands but was halted by security. Sax later pointed out that the water was mixed with beer and hurt him. The fan was evicted by security with no further incident.

Game 6

Wednesday, October 16, 1985, at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 3 7 12 1
Los Angeles 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 5 8 0
WP: Todd Worrell (1–0)   LP: Tom Niedenfuer (0–2)   Sv: Ken Dayley (2)
Home runs:
STL: Jack Clark (1)
LAD: Bill Madlock (3), Mike Marshall (1)

The St. Louis Cardinals won their second National League title in four years by beating the Dodgers 7–5, in what many consider to be one of the most exciting playoff games ever played. The Dodgers returned to Los Angeles trailing three games to two, but comfortable knowing the last two games would be played in Chavez Ravine. For Game 6, it was Hershiser for the Dodgers against Andujar for St. Louis.

Unlike the previous three games, it was the Dodgers and not the Cardinals who got the scoring started quickly when Mariano Duncan's double and Madlock's single put the Dodgers ahead, 1–0. An inning later, a walk to Greg Brock and singles by Hershiser and Duncan scored Brock to give the Dodgers a 2–0 lead.

Both pitchers helped themselves with hits. After Hershiser's single in the second, Andújar led off the third with a double off the wall and scored on Herr's single to cut the lead to 2–1. But Andújar hurt himself with a throwing error in the fifth that put Duncan on base. Duncan promptly stole second and went to third on a ground out by Landreaux. He then scored on Pedro Guerrero's deep fly to center field. Madlock homered for the third time in the series, and the Dodgers led, 4–1.

In the top of the seventh, Darrell Porter singled, as did Tito Landrum. Steve Braun pinch-hit for Andújar and grounded out, but moved the runners to second and third. McGee's single then plated both runners, leading Tommy Lasorda to call on reliever Tom Niedenfuer. Niedenfuer's last pitch had landed in the seats to end Game 5, and the first batter he faced was the same—Ozzie Smith. Ozzie drilled a triple that just barely missed being a second left-handed homer, but Niedenfuer struck out Jack Clark on three fastballs to end the threat. But the Cardinals had now tied the game at four.

In the bottom of the eighth, Mike Marshall lifted a towering fly ball to right off of Todd Worrell. It looked like a routine out, but the wind carried the ball just out of Andy Van Slyke's reach and over the wall for a home run. The Dodgers were now just three outs from forcing Game 7.

In the ninth, Niedenfuer struck out César Cedeño, but McGee singled and stole second. With Ozzie Smith's prior success against Niedenfuer—a homer and triple in his last two at-bats—the Dodgers walked him and induced a ground out from Tommy Herr. With runners at second and third and two out, the obvious question faced Lasorda: "do you walk Clark to the open first base or do you pitch to him?" Niedenfuer had struck out Clark in the seventh. By contrast, the next two hitters in the Cardinal line-up, Van Slyke and Pendleton, were having miserable series. But Lasorda opted to pitch to Clark. Clark promptly drilled Niedenfuer's first fastball 450 feet into the left field stands for a pennant-winning home run. Demoralized, the Dodgers went 1-2-3 in the bottom of the ninth, with Pedro Guerrero popping up for the final out.

The Cardinals would eventually lose in 7 games to the Kansas City Royals in the World Series.

Composite box

1985 NLCS (4–2): St. Louis Cardinals over Los Angeles Dodgers

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
St. Louis Cardinals 4 11 2 1 1 0 4 1 5 29 56 4
Los Angeles Dodgers 1 1 3 6 3 5 2 2 0 23 46 5
Total attendance: 326,822   Average attendance: 54,470

References

  1. ^ "1985 NLCS Game 1 - St. Louis Cardinals vs. Los Angeles Dodgers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  2. ^ "1985 NLCS Game 2 - St. Louis Cardinals vs. Los Angeles Dodgers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  3. ^ "1985 NLCS Game 3 - Los Angeles Dodgers vs. St. Louis Cardinals". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  4. ^ "1985 NLCS Game 4 - Los Angeles Dodgers vs. St. Louis Cardinals". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  5. ^ "1985 NLCS Game 5 - Los Angeles Dodgers vs. St. Louis Cardinals". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.
  6. ^ "1985 NLCS Game 6 - St. Louis Cardinals vs. Los Angeles Dodgers". Retrosheet. Retrieved September 13, 2009.

External links

1985 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1985 Los Angeles Dodgers won the National League West before losing to the St. Louis Cardinals in the National League Championship Series. Fernando Valenzuela set a major league record for most consecutive innings at the start of a season without allowing an earned run (41).

Bob Forsch

Robert Herbert Forsch (January 13, 1950 – November 3, 2011) was an American right-handed starting pitcher who spent most of his sixteen years in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the St. Louis Cardinals (1974–1988) before finishing his playing career with the Houston Astros (1988–1989). He was a member of the 1982 World Series Champions and National League (NL) pennant winners in 1985 and 1987.

A twenty-game winner in 1977, he is third amongst all Cardinals pitcher in victories with 163. He is also the only player in team history to pitch more than one no-hitter, achieving it twice in 1978 and 1983. He and Ken Forsch are the only brothers to have each performed the feat in the majors.

Cheers (season 4)

The fourth season of Cheers, an American television sitcom, originally aired on NBC in the United States between September 26, 1985, and May 15, 1986, as part of the network's Thursday lineup. This season marks Woody Harrelson's television debut as Woody Boyd after Nicholas Colasanto, who portrayed Coach Ernie Pantusso, died during the previous season. The show was created by director James Burrows and writers Glen and Les Charles, under production team Charles Burrows Charles Productions, in association with Paramount Television.

Danny Cox (baseball)

Danny Bradford Cox (born September 21, 1959) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. He pitched for the St. Louis Cardinals from 1983 to 1988, the Philadelphia Phillies from 1991 to 1992, the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1992, and the Toronto Blue Jays from 1993 to 1995, when he retired. Over his eleven-year career, Cox won 74, lost 75, recorded a 3.64 ERA, 21 complete games, 5 shutouts and 8 saves. He won Game 3 of the 1985 National League Championship Series with the Cardinals trailing 2 games to none. Cox pitched well in the 1985 World Series, but earned two no-decisions. He pitched a shutout in Game 7 of the 1987 National League Championship Series, and was the winning pitcher in Game 5 of the 1987 World Series, making Cox only the third European born pitcher to start a World Series game. After being removed in Game 7, Cox argued with umpire Dave Phillips and got ejected as he left the field. Cox is the most recent player to be ejected in a World Series game.He managed the Gateway Grizzlies, a Frontier League team based in Sauget, Illinois from 2003–2006, compiling a record of 197-175 and one league championship. In 2008, he coached the New Athens, Illinois High School baseball team, however he resigned mid-season. Cox currently frequents clinics in the St. Louis area, and offers pitching lessons to young players near his Freeburg, Illinois home.

In February 2009, he was named pitching coach for the Springfield Sliders of the Prospect League.

On December 17, 2009, the Lancaster Barnstormers of the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball named him pitching coach for the 2010 season.

Dick Enberg

Richard Alan Enberg (January 9, 1935 – December 21, 2017) was an American sportscaster. Over the course of an approximately 60-year career, he provided play-by-play of various sports for several radio and television networks, including NBC (1975–1999), CBS (2000–2014), and ESPN (2004–2011), as well for individual teams, such as UCLA Bruins basketball, Los Angeles Rams football, and California Angels and San Diego Padres baseball.

Enberg was well known for his signature on-air catchphrases "Touch 'em all" (for home runs) and "Oh, my!" (for particularly exciting and outstanding athletic plays). He also announced or hosted the Tournament of Roses Parade for many years, sometimes with the help of family members. Enberg retired from broadcasting in 2016, after seven seasons as the Padres' primary television announcer.

Jack Buck

John Francis "Jack" Buck (August 21, 1924 – June 18, 2002) was an American sportscaster, best known for his work announcing Major League Baseball games of the St. Louis Cardinals. His play-by-play work earned him recognition from numerous Halls of Fame, such as the National Baseball Hall of Fame, the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and the National Radio Hall of Fame. He has also been inducted as a member of the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame Museum.

Joaquín Andújar

Joaquín Andújar (Spanish: [xoaˈkin anˈduxaɾ]; December 21, 1952 – September 8, 2015) was a Dominican professional baseball pitcher who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Houston Astros, St. Louis Cardinals, and Oakland Athletics from 1976 through 1988. Andújar was a four-time MLB All-Star and a Gold Glove Award winner.

Major League Baseball on NBC

Major League Baseball on NBC is the de facto branding for weekly broadcasts of Major League Baseball (MLB) games produced by NBC Sports, and televised on the NBC television network. Major League Baseball games first aired on the network from 1947 to 1989, when CBS acquired the broadcast television rights; games returned to the network in 1994 with coverage lasting until 2000. There have been several variations of the program dating back to the 1940s, including The NBC Game of the Week and Baseball Night in America.

Orel Hershiser

Orel Leonard Hershiser IV (born September 16, 1958) is an American former baseball pitcher who played 18 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1983 to 2000. He later became a broadcast color analyst for the Dodgers. He is also a professional poker player.

After playing baseball in high school at Cherry Hill High School East and at Bowling Green State University, Hershiser was drafted by the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1979. After several years in the minor leagues, he made his major league debut with the Dodgers in 1983. During his tenure with the team, Hershiser was a three-time All-Star. Hershiser's most successful season came in 1988, when he set a major league record by pitching 59 consecutive innings without allowing a run. He helped lead the Dodgers to a championship in the 1988 World Series, and was named the National League (NL) Championship Series Most Valuable Player (MVP) and the World Series MVP. That season, he won the NL Cy Young Award and an NL Gold Glove Award. He later pitched in two more World Series and earned the American League Championship Series MVP Award. After 12 seasons with the Dodgers, Hershisher spent time with the Cleveland Indians, San Francisco Giants, and New York Mets before returning to Los Angeles for his final season. After retirement as a player, he briefly worked as a coach and team executive for the Texas Rangers before serving as a color analyst for ESPN and then the Dodgers.

Known for his slight frame and fierce competitive spirit, Hershiser was nicknamed "Bulldog" by former Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda, who managed Hershiser during his time with the Dodgers.

Ozzie Smith

Osborne Earl Smith (born December 26, 1954) is an American former baseball shortstop who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the San Diego Padres and St. Louis Cardinals from 1978 to 1996. Nicknamed "The Wizard" for his defensive brilliance, Smith set major league records for career assists (8,375) and double plays (1,590) by a shortstop (the latter since broken by Omar Vizquel), as well as the National League (NL) record with 2,511 career games at the position; Smith won the NL Gold Glove Award for play at shortstop for 13 consecutive seasons (1980–92). A 15-time All-Star, he accumulated 2,460 hits and 580 stolen bases during his career, and won the NL Silver Slugger Award as the best-hitting shortstop in 1987. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility in 2002. He was also elected to the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame in the inaugural class of 2014.

Smith was born in Mobile, Alabama, but his family moved to Watts, Los Angeles, when he was six years old. While participating in childhood athletic activities, Smith developed quick reflexes; he went on to play baseball in high school and college, at Los Angeles' Locke High School and Cal Poly-San Luis Obispo respectively. Drafted as an amateur player by the Padres, Smith made his major league debut in 1978. He quickly established himself as an outstanding fielder, and later became known for performing backflips on special occasions while taking his position at the beginning of a game. Smith won his first Gold Glove Award in 1980, and made his first All-Star Game appearance in 1981. When conflict with Padres' ownership developed, he was traded to the Cardinals for shortstop Garry Templeton in 1982.

Upon joining the Cardinals, Smith helped the team win the 1982 World Series. Three years later, his game-winning home run during Game 5 of the 1985 National League Championship Series prompted broadcaster Jack Buck's "Go crazy, folks!" play-by-play call. Despite a rotator cuff injury during the 1985 season, Smith posted career highs in multiple offensive categories in 1987. Smith continued to earn Gold Gloves and All-Star appearances on an annual basis until 1993. During 1995 season, Smith had shoulder surgery and was out nearly three months. After tension with his new manager Tony La Russa developed in 1996, Smith retired at season's end, and his uniform number (No. 1) was subsequently retired by the Cardinals.

Smith served as host of the television show This Week in Baseball from 1997 to 1998.

Tito Landrum

Terry Lee Landrum (born October 25, 1954) is a former professional baseball player who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) primarily as an outfielder from 1980 to 1988.

Vin Scully

Vincent Edward Scully (born November 29, 1927) is an American retired sportscaster. Scully is best known for his 67 seasons calling games for Major League Baseball's Los Angeles Dodgers, beginning in 1950 (when the franchise was located in Brooklyn) and ending in 2016. His run constitutes the longest tenure of any broadcaster with a single team in professional sports history, and he is second only to Tommy Lasorda (by two years) in terms of number of years associated with the Dodgers organization in any capacity. He retired at age 88 in 2016, ending his record-breaking run as their play-by-play announcer.

In his final season behind the microphone, Scully announced most Dodger home games (and selected road games) on SportsNet LA television and KLAC radio. He is known for his dulcet voice, lyrically descriptive style, and signature introduction to Dodger games: "It's time for Dodger baseball! Hi, everybody, and a very pleasant good (afternoon/evening) to you, wherever you may be." He is considered by many to be the greatest baseball broadcaster of all time, according to fan rankings, Bleacher Report and Fox Sports.

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