1985 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1985 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 56th playing of the game, annually played between the All-Stars of the National League and the All-Stars of the American League. The game was played on July 16, 1985, in the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis, Minnesota, home of the Minnesota Twins.

1985 Major League Baseball All-Star Game
1985 MLB ASG
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
National League 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 6 9 1
American League 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 0
DateJuly 16, 1985
VenueHubert H. Humphrey Metrodome
CityMinneapolis
Managers
MVPLaMarr Hoyt (SD)
Attendance54,960
Ceremonial first pitchPete Rose and Nolan Ryan
TelevisionNBC
TV announcersVin Scully and Joe Garagiola
RadioCBS
Radio announcersBrent Musburger, Jerry Coleman and Johnny Bench

Roster

Players in italics have since been inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Starters

National League

NL Batting Order

American League

AL Batting Order

Pitchers

National League

American League

Reserves

National League

American League

Umpires

Position Umpire
Home Plate Larry McCoy (AL)
First Base John Kibler (NL)
Second Base Nick Bremigan (AL)
Third Base Charlie Williams (NL)
Left Field Drew Coble (AL)
Right Field Randy Marsh (NL)

Game summary

Tuesday, July 16, 1985 7:40 pm (CT) at Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis, Minnesota
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
National League 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 6 9 1
American League 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 0
WP: LaMarr Hoyt (1-0)   LP: Jack Morris (0-1)

The National League won the game 6–1, with the winning pitcher being LaMarr Hoyt of the San Diego Padres and the losing pitcher being Jack Morris of the Detroit Tigers. Hoyt also won the game's MVP award. The National League was managed by the Padres' Dick Williams, while the American League was managed by Sparky Anderson of the Tigers.

Williams was backed by coaches Jim Frey and Bob Lillis and Anderson was aided by coaches Bobby Cox and Dick Howser.

The teams' honorary captains each starred in the 1965 All-Star game, also held in Minnesota -- Harmon Killebrew for the AL, and Sandy Koufax for the NL. In the game two decades ago, Koufax earned the NL win, and Killebrew hit the AL's second home run.

Attendance was announced as 54,960.

External links

1985 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1985 Los Angeles Dodgers won the National League West before losing to the St. Louis Cardinals in the National League Championship Series. Fernando Valenzuela set a major league record for most consecutive innings at the start of a season without allowing an earned run (41).

1985 Montreal Expos season

The 1985 Montreal Expos season was the 17th season in franchise history.

1985 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1985 season was the Philadelphia Phillies 103rd season. The Phillies finished in fifth place in the National League East with a record of 75 wins and 87 losses. It was the first time the team finished below .500 since going 80-82 in 1974.

1985 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1985 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 104th season of the franchise; the 99th in the National League. This was their 16th season at Three Rivers Stadium. The Pirates finished sixth and last in the National League East with a record of 57–104, 43½ games behind the NL Champion St. Louis Cardinals.

1985 San Diego Padres season

The 1985 San Diego Padres season was the 17th season in franchise history. Led by manager Dick Williams, the Padres were unable to defend their National League championship.

1986 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1986 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 57th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 15, 1986, at the Astrodome in Houston, Texas, the home of the Houston Astros of the National League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 3-2 and ended a streak where the NL won 13 of the last 14 games. Boston Red Sox pitcher Roger Clemens was named the Most Valuable Player.

Donruss

Donruss was a manufacturer of sports cards founded in 1954 and acquired by the Panini Group in 2009. The company started in the 1950s, producing confectionery, evolved into Donruss and started producing trading cards. During the 1960s and 1970s Donruss produced entertainment-themed trading cards. Its first sports theme cards were produced in 1965, when it created a series of racing cards sponsored by Hot Rod Magazine.Its next series of sports products came in 1981, when it produced baseball and golf trading cards. It was one of three manufacturers to produce baseball cards from 1981 through 1985, along with Fleer and Topps. In 1986, Sportflics (Major League Marketing) entered the market as the fourth fully licensed card producer, followed by Score in 1988, and Upper Deck in 1989. Since entering the trading card market, it has produced a variety of sports trading cards, including American football, baseball, basketball, boxing, golf, ice hockey, racing and tennis; and has acquired a number of brand names. In 1996 Donruss was acquired by rival Pinnacle Brands, makers of Score and Sportflix.

Donruss produced baseball cards from 1981 to 1998, when then-parent company Pinnacle Brands filed for bankruptcy. Baseball card production resumed in 2001, when then-parent company Playoff Corporation acquired the rights to produce baseball cards. From 2007 to 2009, Donruss released baseball card products featuring players that were no longer under MLB contract after MLB decided to limit licensing options in 2005.

Ernie Whitt

Leo Ernest Whitt (born June 13, 1952) is an American manager for the Canadian national baseball team and a former catcher in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played 15 seasons in MLB, including twelve for the Toronto Blue Jays, and was the last player from the franchise's inaugural season of 1977 to remain through 1989. He has managed the Canadian national team since 2004. Whitt was inducted into the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame in 1997 and the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame in 2009.

Whitt made his MLB debut for the Boston Red Sox in 1976. For eight consecutive seasons from 1982 to 1989, he reached double figures in home runs and 100 hits in each of five consecutive seasons from 1985 to 1989. He was selected as an All-Star in 1985. As manager for the Canadian national team, his competitions include the 2004 Summer Olympics, four World Baseball Classic (WBC) tournaments, and the Pan Am Games, where they won two gold medals in 2011 and 2015.

Minnesota Twins

The Minnesota Twins are an American professional baseball team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The team competes in the Central division of the American League (AL), and is named after the Twin Cities area comprising Minneapolis and St. Paul.

The franchise was founded in Washington, D.C. in 1901 as the Washington Senators. The team relocated to Minnesota and was renamed the Twins at the start of the 1961 season. The Twins played in Metropolitan Stadium from 1961 to 1981 and the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome from 1982 to 2009. The team played its inaugural game at Target Field on April 12, 2010. The franchise won the World Series in 1924 as the Senators, and in 1987 and 1991 as the Twins.

Through the 2017 season, the team has fielded 19 American League batting champions. The team has hosted five All-Star Games: 1937 and 1956 in Washington, D.C, and 1965, 1985 and 2014 in Minneapolis-St. Paul.

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