1985–86 Football League

The 198586 season was the 87th completed season of The Football League.

The Football League
Season1985–86
ChampionsLiverpool

Final league tables and results

The tables and results below are reproduced here in the exact form that they can be found at The Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation website,[1] with home and away statistics separated.

During the first five seasons of the league, that is, until the season 1893–94, re-election process concerned the clubs which finished in the bottom four of the league. From the 1894–95 season and until the 1920–21 season the re-election process was required of the clubs which finished in the bottom three of the league. From the 1922–23 season on it was required of the bottom two teams of both Third Division North and Third Division South. Since the Fourth Division was established in the 1958–59 season, the re-election process has concerned the bottom four clubs in that division.[2]

First Division

In a close three-horse race, Liverpool pipped Everton and West Ham United to the First Division title, while also defeating Merseyside rivals Everton in the FA Cup Final, thereby completing a historic double. Manchester United had been ten points clear in early November after winning their first ten matches; and thirteen of their first fifteen, but injuries, loss of form and ineffective signings had seen them fall away, leaving them still waiting for their first league title since 1967.

Football League, First Division
Season1985–86
ChampionsLiverpool (16th English title)
RelegatedBirmingham City
Ipswich Town
West Bromwich Albion
FA Cup winnersLiverpool (3rd FA Cup title)
1986–87 European CupNo qualifications [notes 1][3]
1986–87 European Cup Winners' CupNo qualifications[notes 1]
1986–87 UEFA CupNo qualifications[notes 1]
Matches played462
Goals scored1,288 (2.79 per match)
Top goalscorerGary Lineker (Everton), 30[4]
Biggest home winWest Ham UnitedNewcastle United 8–1 (21 Apr 1986);
Luton TownSouthampton 7–0 (19 Oct 1985)
Biggest away winSheffield WednesdayEverton 1–5 (3 Sep 1985);
West BromManchester United 1–5 (21 Sep 1985);
ChelseaWatford 1–5 (5 May 1986);
ChelseaWest Ham 0–4 (29 Mar 1986)
Highest scoringWest Ham UnitedNewcastle United 8–1 (21 Apr 1986)
Longest winning runManchester United (10 games)
Longest unbeaten runWest Ham United (18 games)
Longest losing runWest Bromwich Albion (9 games)
Pos Team Pld HW HD HL HGF HGA AW AD AL AGF AGA GD Pts Qualification or relegation
1 Liverpool 42 16 4 1 58 14 10 6 5 31 23 +52 88 League Champions, but excluded from the European Cup[3][a]
2 Everton 42 16 3 2 54 18 10 5 6 33 23 +46 86 FA Cup runners-up, but excluded from the 1986–87 European Cup Winners' Cup.[c]
3 West Ham United 42 17 2 2 48 16 9 4 8 26 24 +34 84 UEFA Cup spot, but excluded
4 Manchester United 42 12 5 4 35 12 10 5 6 35 24 +34 76
5 Sheffield Wednesday 42 13 6 2 36 23 8 4 9 27 31 +9 73
6 Chelsea 42 12 4 5 32 27 8 7 6 25 29 +1 71
7 Arsenal 42 13 5 3 29 15 7 4 10 20 32 +2 69
8 Nottingham Forest 42 11 5 5 38 25 8 6 7 31 28 +16 68
9 Luton Town 42 12 6 3 37 15 6 6 9 24 29 +17 66
10 Tottenham Hotspur 42 12 2 7 47 25 7 6 8 27 27 +22 65
11 Newcastle United 42 12 5 4 46 31 5 7 9 21 41 −5 63
12 Watford 42 11 6 4 40 22 5 5 11 29 40 +7 59
13 Queens Park Rangers 42 12 3 6 33 20 3 4 14 20 44 −11 52
14 Southampton 42 10 6 5 32 18 2 4 15 19 44 −11 46
15 Manchester City 42 7 7 7 25 26 4 5 12 18 31 −14 45
16 Aston Villa 42 7 6 8 27 28 3 8 10 24 39 −16 44
17 Coventry City 42 6 5 10 31 35 5 5 11 17 36 −23 43
18 Oxford United 42 7 7 7 34 27 3 5 13 28 53 −18 42 League Cup winners, but excluded from the UEFA Cup[b]
19 Leicester City 42 7 8 6 35 35 3 4 14 19 41 −22 42
20 Ipswich Town 42 8 5 8 20 24 3 3 15 12 31 −23 41 Relegated
21 Birmingham City 42 5 2 14 13 25 3 3 15 17 48 −43 29
22 West Bromwich Albion 42 3 8 10 21 36 1 4 16 14 53 −54 24
  1. ^ Liverpool also won the 1986 FA Cup.
  2. ^ Oxford United won the 1986 League Cup and therefore should have claimed a place in the 1986–87 UEFA Cup.
  3. ^ Everton were the runners-up in the FA Cup, and Liverpool having won the Double, they should have claimed a place in the 1986–87 European Cup Winners' Cup.

First Division results

Home \ Away ARS AST BIR CHE COV EVE IPS LEI LIV LUT MCI MUN NEW NOT OXF QPR SHW SOU TOT WAT WBA WHU
Arsenal 3–2 0–0 2–0 3–0 0–1 1–0 1–0 2–0 2–1 1–0 1–2 0–0 1–1 2–1 3–1 1–0 3–2 0–0 0–2 2–2 1–0
Aston Villa 1–4 0–3 3–1 1–1 0–0 1–0 1–0 2–2 3–1 0–1 1–3 1–2 1–2 2–0 1–2 1–1 0–0 1–2 4–1 1–1 2–1
Birmingham City 0–1 0–0 1–2 0–1 0–2 0–1 2–1 0–2 0–2 1–0 1–1 0–1 0–1 3–1 2–0 0–2 0–2 1–2 1–2 0–1 1–0
Chelsea 2–1 2–1 2–0 1–0 2–1 1–1 2–2 0–1 1–0 1–0 1–2 1–1 4–2 1–4 1–1 2–1 2–0 2–0 1–5 3–0 0–4
Coventry City 0–2 3–3 4–4 1–1 1–3 0–1 3–0 0–3 1–0 1–1 1–3 1–2 0–0 5–2 2–1 0–1 3–2 2–3 0–2 3–0 0–1
Everton 6–1 2–0 4–1 1–1 1–1 1–0 1–2 2–3 2–0 4–0 3–1 1–0 1–1 2–0 4–3 3–1 6–1 1–0 4–1 2–0 3–1
Ipswich Town 1–2 0–3 0–1 0–2 1–0 3–4 0–2 2–1 1–1 0–0 0–1 2–2 1–0 3–2 1–0 2–1 1–1 1–0 0–0 1–0 0–1
Leicester City 2–2 3–1 4–2 0–0 2–1 3–1 1–0 0–2 0–0 1–1 3–0 2–0 0–3 4–4 1–4 2–3 2–2 1–4 2–2 2–2 0–1
Liverpool 2–0 3–0 5–0 1–1 5–0 0–2 5–0 1–0 3–2 2–0 1–1 1–1 2–0 6–0 4–1 2–2 1–0 4–1 3–1 4–1 3–1
Luton Town 2–2 2–0 2–0 1–1 0–1 2–1 1–0 3–1 0–1 2–1 1–1 2–0 1–1 1–2 2–0 1–0 7–0 1–1 3–2 3–0 0–0
Manchester City 0–1 2–2 1–1 0–1 5–1 1–1 1–1 1–1 1–0 1–1 0–3 1–0 1–2 0–3 2–0 1–3 1–0 2–1 0–1 2–1 2–2
Manchester United 0–1 4–0 1–0 1–2 2–0 0–0 1–0 4–0 1–1 2–0 2–2 3–0 2–3 3–0 2–0 0–2 1–0 0–0 1–1 3–0 2–0
Newcastle United 1–0 2–2 4–1 1–3 3–2 2–2 3–1 2–1 1–0 2–2 3–1 2–4 0–3 3–0 3–1 4–1 2–1 2–2 1–1 4–1 1–2
Nottingham Forest 3–2 1–1 3–0 0–0 5–2 0–0 3–1 4–3 1–1 2–0 0–2 1–3 1–2 1–1 4–0 0–1 2–1 0–1 3–2 2–1 2–1
Oxford United 3–0 1–1 0–1 2–1 0–1 1–0 4–3 5–0 2–2 1–1 1–0 1–3 1–2 1–2 3–3 0–1 3–0 1–1 1–1 2–2 1–2
Queens Park Rangers 0–1 0–1 3–1 6–0 0–2 3–0 1–0 2–0 2–1 1–1 0–0 1–0 3–1 2–1 3–1 1–1 0–2 2–5 2–1 1–0 0–1
Sheffield Wednesday 2–0 2–0 5–1 1–1 2–2 1–5 1–0 1–0 0–0 3–2 3–2 1–0 2–2 2–1 2–1 0–0 2–1 1–2 2–1 1–0 2–2
Southampton 3–0 0–0 1–0 0–1 1–1 2–3 1–0 0–0 1–2 1–2 3–0 1–0 1–1 3–1 1–1 3–0 2–3 1–0 3–1 3–1 1–1
Tottenham Hotspur 1–0 4–2 2–0 4–1 0–1 0–1 2–0 1–3 1–2 1–3 0–2 0–0 5–1 0–3 5–1 1–1 5–1 5–3 4–0 5–0 1–0
Watford 3–0 1–1 3–0 3–1 3–0 0–2 0–0 2–1 2–3 1–2 3–2 1–1 4–1 1–1 2–2 2–0 2–1 1–1 1–0 5–1 0–2
West Bromwich Albion 0–0 0–3 2–1 0–3 0–0 0–3 1–2 2–2 1–2 1–2 2–3 1–5 1–1 1–1 1–1 0–1 1–1 1–0 1–1 3–1 2–3
West Ham United 0–0 4–1 2–0 1–2 1–0 2–1 2–1 3–0 2–2 0–1 1–0 2–1 8–1 4–2 3–1 3–1 1–0 1–0 2–1 2–1 4–0

First Division maps

Locations of the Football League First Division London teams 1985–1986

Second Division

Football League, Second Division
Season1985–86
ChampionsNorwich City (2nd title)
PromotedCharlton Athletic,
Wimbledon
RelegatedCarlisle United,
Fulham,
Middlesbrough
Matches played462
Goals scored1,264 (2.74 per match)
Top goalscorerKevin Drinkell (Norwich City), 22[4]
Pos Team Pld HW HD HL HGF HGA AW AD AL AGF AGA GD Pts Promotion or relegation
1 Norwich City 42 16 4 1 51 15 9 5 7 33 22 +47 84 Division Champions, promoted
2 Charlton Athletic 42 14 5 2 44 15 8 6 7 34 30 +33 77 Promoted
3 Wimbledon 42 13 6 2 38 16 8 7 6 20 21 +21 76
4 Portsmouth 42 13 4 4 43 17 9 3 9 26 24 +28 73
5 Crystal Palace 42 12 3 6 29 22 7 6 8 28 30 +5 66
6 Hull City 42 11 7 3 39 19 6 6 9 26 36 +10 64
7 Sheffield United 42 10 7 4 36 24 7 4 10 28 39 +1 62
8 Oldham Athletic 42 13 4 4 40 28 4 5 12 22 33 +1 60
9 Millwall 42 12 3 6 39 24 5 5 11 25 41 −1 59
10 Stoke City 42 8 11 2 29 16 6 4 11 19 34 −2 57
11 Brighton & Hove Albion 42 10 5 6 42 30 6 3 12 22 34 0 56
12 Barnsley 42 9 6 6 29 26 5 8 8 18 24 −3 56
13 Bradford City 42 14 1 6 36 24 2 5 14 15 39 −12 54
14 Leeds United 42 9 7 5 30 22 6 1 14 26 50 −16 53
15 Grimsby Town 42 11 4 6 35 24 3 6 12 23 38 −4 52
16 Huddersfield Town 42 10 6 5 30 23 4 4 13 21 44 −16 52
17 Shrewsbury Town 42 11 5 5 29 20 3 4 14 23 44 −12 51
18 Sunderland 42 10 5 6 33 29 3 6 12 14 32 −14 50
19 Blackburn Rovers 42 10 4 7 30 20 2 9 10 23 42 −9 49
20 Carlisle United 42 10 2 9 30 28 3 5 13 17 43 −24 46 Relegated
21 Middlesbrough 42 8 6 7 26 23 4 3 14 18 30 −9 45
22 Fulham 42 8 3 10 29 32 2 3 16 16 37 −24 36

Second Division results

Home \ Away BAR BLB BRA B&HA CRL CHA CRY FUL GRI HUD HUL LEE MID MIL NWC OLD POR SHU SHR STK SUN WDN
Barnsley 1–1 2–2 3–2 1–2 2–1 2–4 2–0 1–0 1–3 1–4 3–0 0–0 2–1 2–2 1–0 0–1 2–1 2–0 0–0 1–1 0–1
Blackburn Rovers 0–3 3–0 1–4 2–0 0–0 1–2 1–0 3–1 0–1 2–2 2–0 0–1 1–2 2–1 0–0 1–0 6–1 1–1 0–1 2–0 2–0
Bradford City 2–0 3–2 3–2 1–0 1–2 1–0 3–1 0–1 3–0 4–2 0–1 2–1 0–2 0–2 1–0 2–1 1–4 3–1 3–1 2–0 1–1
Brighton & Hove Albion 0–1 3–1 2–1 6–1 3–5 2–0 2–3 2–2 4–3 3–1 0–1 3–3 1–0 1–1 1–1 2–3 0–0 0–2 2–0 3–1 2–0
Carlisle United 1–1 2–1 1–2 2–0 2–3 2–2 2–1 1–2 2–0 2–1 1–2 1–0 1–0 0–4 3–1 0–1 1–0 0–2 3–0 1–2 2–3
Charlton Athletic 2–1 3–0 1–1 2–2 3–0 3–1 2–0 2–0 3–0 1–2 4–0 2–0 3–3 1–0 1–1 1–2 2–0 4–1 2–0 2–1 0–0
Crystal Palace 1–0 2–0 2–1 1–0 1–1 2–1 0–0 2–1 2–3 0–2 3–0 2–1 2–1 1–2 3–2 2–1 1–1 0–1 0–1 1–0 1–3
Fulham 2–0 3–3 4–1 1–0 0–1 0–3 2–3 2–1 2–1 1–1 3–1 0–3 1–2 0–1 2–2 0–1 2–3 2–1 1–0 1–2 0–2
Grimsby Town 1–2 5–2 2–0 0–2 1–0 2–2 3–0 1–0 1–1 0–1 1–0 3–2 5–1 1–0 1–4 1–0 0–1 3–1 3–3 1–1 0–1
Huddersfield Town 1–1 0–0 2–0 1–0 3–3 0–2 0–0 1–3 2–2 2–1 3–1 0–3 4–3 0–0 2–0 1–2 3–1 1–0 2–0 2–0 0–1
Hull City 0–1 2–2 1–0 2–0 4–0 1–1 1–2 5–0 2–0 3–1 2–1 0–0 3–0 1–0 4–2 2–2 0–0 4–3 0–2 1–1 1–1
Leeds United 0–2 1–1 2–1 2–3 2–0 1–2 1–3 1–0 1–1 2–0 1–1 1–0 3–1 0–2 3–1 2–1 1–1 1–1 4–0 1–1 0–0
Middlesbrough 0–0 0–0 1–1 0–1 1–3 1–3 0–2 1–0 3–1 0–1 1–2 2–2 3–0 1–1 3–2 1–0 1–2 3–1 1–1 2–0 1–0
Millwall 2–2 0–1 2–1 0–1 3–1 2–2 3–2 1–1 1–0 2–1 5–0 3–1 3–0 4–2 0–1 0–4 3–0 2–0 2–3 1–0 0–1
Norwich City 1–1 3–0 0–0 3–0 2–1 3–1 4–3 2–1 3–2 4–1 2–0 4–0 2–0 6–1 1–0 2–0 4–0 3–1 1–1 0–0 1–2
Oldham Athletic 1–1 3–1 0–1 4–0 2–1 2–1 2–0 2–1 2–1 1–1 3–1 3–1 1–0 0–0 1–3 2–0 1–5 4–3 2–4 2–2 2–1
Portsmouth 1–1 3–0 4–0 1–2 4–0 1–0 1–0 1–1 3–1 4–1 1–1 2–3 1–0 2–1 2–0 1–2 0–3 4–0 3–0 3–0 1–1
Sheffield United 3–1 3–3 3–1 3–0 1–0 1–1 0–0 2–1 1–1 1–1 3–1 3–2 0–1 1–3 2–5 2–0 0–0 1–1 1–2 1–0 4–0
Shrewsbury Town 3–0 2–0 2–0 2–1 0–0 2–1 0–2 2–1 0–2 3–0 0–0 1–3 2–1 1–1 0–3 2–0 1–1 3–1 1–0 1–2 1–1
Stoke City 0–0 2–2 3–1 1–1 0–0 0–0 0–0 1–0 1–1 3–0 0–1 6–2 3–2 0–0 1–1 2–0 2–0 1–3 2–2 1–0 0–0
Sunderland 2–0 0–2 1–1 2–1 2–2 1–2 1–1 4–2 3–3 1–0 1–1 4–2 1–0 1–2 0–2 0–3 1–3 2–1 2–0 2–0 2–1
Wimbledon 1–0 1–1 1–0 0–0 4–1 3–1 1–1 1–0 3–0 2–2 3–1 0–3 3–0 1–1 2–1 0–0 1–3 5–0 2–1 1–0 3–0

Second Division maps

Locations of the Football League Second Division London teams 1985–1986

Third Division

Football League, Third Division
Season1985–86
ChampionsReading (1st title)
PromotedDerby County,
Plymouth Argyle
RelegatedCardiff City,
Lincoln City,
Wolverhampton Wanderers,
Swansea City
Matches played552
Goals scored1,550 (2.81 per match)
Top goalscorerTrevor Senior (Reading), 27[4]
Pos Team Pld HW HD HL HGF HGA AW AD AL AGF AGA GD Pts Promotion or relegation
1 Reading 46 16 3 4 39 22 13 4 6 28 29 +16 94 Division Champions, promoted
2 Plymouth Argyle 46 17 3 3 56 20 9 6 8 32 33 +35 87 Promoted
3 Derby County 46 13 7 3 45 20 10 8 5 35 21 +39 84
4 Wigan Athletic 46 17 4 2 54 17 6 10 7 28 31 +34 83
5 Gillingham 46 14 5 4 48 17 8 8 7 33 37 +27 79
6 Walsall 46 15 7 1 59 23 7 2 14 31 41 +26 75
7 York City 46 16 4 3 49 17 4 7 12 28 41 +19 71
8 Notts County 46 12 6 5 42 26 7 8 8 29 34 +11 71
9 Bristol City 46 14 5 4 43 19 4 9 10 26 41 +9 68
10 Brentford 46 8 8 7 29 29 10 4 9 29 32 −3 66
11 Doncaster Rovers 46 7 10 6 20 21 9 6 8 25 31 −7 64
12 Blackpool 46 11 6 6 38 19 6 6 11 28 36 +11 63
13 Darlington 46 10 7 6 39 33 5 6 12 22 45 −17 58
14 Rotherham United 46 13 5 5 44 18 2 7 14 17 41 +2 57
15 Bournemouth 46 9 6 8 41 31 6 3 14 24 41 −7 54
16 Bristol Rovers 46 9 8 6 27 21 5 4 14 24 54 −24 54
17 Chesterfield 46 10 6 7 41 30 3 8 12 20 34 −3 53
18 Bolton Wanderers 46 10 4 9 35 30 5 4 14 19 38 −14 53
19 Newport County 46 7 8 8 35 33 4 10 9 17 32 −13 51
20 Bury 46 11 7 5 46 26 1 6 16 17 41 −4 49
21 Lincoln City 46 7 9 7 33 34 3 7 13 22 43 −22 46 Relegated
22 Cardiff City 46 7 5 11 22 29 5 4 14 31 54 −30 45
23 Wolverhampton Wanderers 46 6 6 11 29 47 5 4 14 28 51 −41 43
24 Swansea City 46 9 6 8 27 27 2 4 17 16 60 −44 43

Third Division maps

1985–86 Football League is located in Greater London
1985–86 Football League
Locations of the Football League Third Division London teams 1985–1986

Fourth Division

Football League, Fourth Division
Season1985–86
ChampionsSwindon Town (1st title)
PromotedChester City,
Mansfield Town,
Port Vale
Failed re-electionNone
Matches played552
Goals scored1,576 (2.86 per match)
Top goalscorerSteve Taylor (Rochdale), 25
Richard Cadette (Southend United), 25[4]
Pos Team Pld HW HD HL HGF HGA AW AD AL AGF AGA GD Pts Promotion or relegation
1 Swindon Town 46 20 2 1 52 19 12 4 7 30 24 +39 102 Division Champions, promoted
2 Chester City 46 15 5 3 44 16 8 10 5 39 34 +33 84 Promoted
3 Mansfield Town 46 13 8 2 43 17 10 4 9 31 30 +27 81
4 Port Vale 46 13 9 1 42 11 8 7 8 25 26 +30 79
5 Orient 46 11 6 6 39 21 9 6 8 40 43 +15 72
6 Colchester United 46 12 6 5 51 22 7 7 9 37 41 +25 70
7 Hartlepool United 46 15 6 2 41 20 5 4 14 27 47 +1 70
8 Northampton Town 46 9 7 7 44 29 9 3 11 35 29 +21 64
9 Southend United 46 13 4 6 43 27 5 6 12 26 40 +2 64
10 Hereford United 46 15 6 2 55 30 3 4 16 19 43 +1 64
11 Stockport County 46 9 9 5 35 28 8 4 11 28 43 −8 64
12 Crewe Alexandra 46 10 6 7 35 26 8 3 12 19 35 −7 63
13 Wrexham 46 11 5 7 34 24 6 4 13 34 56 −12 60 Welsh Cup winners, qualified for the 1986–87 European Cup Winners' Cup First round[a]
14 Burnley 46 11 3 9 35 30 5 8 10 25 35 −5 59
15 Scunthorpe United 46 11 7 5 33 23 4 7 12 17 32 −5 59
16 Aldershot 46 12 5 6 45 25 5 2 16 21 49 −8 58
17 Peterborough United 46 9 11 3 31 19 4 6 13 21 45 −12 56
18 Rochdale 46 12 7 4 41 29 2 6 15 16 48 −20 55
19 Tranmere Rovers 46 9 1 13 46 41 6 8 9 28 32 +1 54
20 Halifax Town 46 10 8 5 35 27 4 4 15 25 44 −11 54
21 Exeter City 46 10 4 9 26 25 3 11 9 21 34 −12 54 Re-elected
22 Cambridge United 46 12 2 9 45 38 3 7 13 20 42 −15 54
23 Preston North End 46 7 4 12 32 41 4 6 13 22 48 −35 43
24 Torquay United 46 8 5 10 29 32 1 5 17 14 56 −45 37
  1. ^ Wrexham won the 1986 Welsh Cup and thus claimed a place in the 1986–87 European Cup Winners' Cup, Welsh clubs still being allowed to compete in UEFA's competitions.

Fourth Division maps

Election/Re-election to the Football League

As champions of the Alliance Premier League, Enfield won the right to apply for election to the Football League, to replace one of the four bottom teams in the 1985–86 Football League Fourth Division. The vote went as follows:

Club Final Position Votes
Exeter City 21st (Fourth Division) 64
Preston North End 23rd (Fourth Division) 62.5
Cambridge United 22nd (Fourth Division) 61
Torquay United 24th (Fourth Division) 61
Enfield 1st (Alliance Premier League) 7.5

Hence, all four Football League teams were re-elected, and Enfield were denied membership of the Football League.

This was the last season in which the Alliance Premier League champions had to apply for election to the Football League. From the 1986–87 season, when the Alliance Premier League was re-branded as the Football Conference, the champions were automatically promoted, provided that they met the criteria set by the Football League.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ English teams were banned by UEFA from its competitions from the 1985–86 season until the 1990–91 season because of the Heysel disaster in 1985, involving Liverpool fans.

References

  1. ^ "England 1985–86". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 27 January 2010. Retrieved 24 February 2010.
  2. ^ Ian Laschke: Rothmans Book of Football League Records 1888–89 to 1978–79. Macdonald and Jane’s, London & Sydney, 1980.
  3. ^ a b English teams were banned by UEFA from its competitions from the 1985–86 season until the 1990–91 season because of the Heysel disaster in 1985, involving Liverpool fans.
  4. ^ a b c d "English League Leading Goalscorers". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 31 October 2010.
  • Ian Laschke: Rothmans Book of Football League Records 1888–89 to 1978–79. Macdonald and Jane’s, London & Sydney, 1980.

External links

1985–86 Alliance Premier League

The Alliance Premier League season of 1985–86 (known as the Gola League 1985–86 for sponsorship reasons) was the seventh season of the Alliance Premier League.

1985–86 Associate Members' Cup

The 1985–86 Associate Members' Cup, known as the 1985–86 Freight Rover Trophy, was the third staging of the Associate Members' Cup, a knock-out competition for English football clubs in the Third Division and the Fourth Division. The winners were Bristol City and the runners-up were Bolton Wanderers.

The competition began on 14 January 1986 and ended with the final on 24 May 1986 at Wembley Stadium.

In the first round, there were two sections split into eight groups: North and South. In the following rounds each section gradually eliminates teams in knock-out fashion until each has a winning finalist. At this point, the two winning finalists faced each other in the combined final for the honour of the trophy.

1985–86 Birmingham City F.C. season

The 1985–86 Football League season was Birmingham City Football Club's 83rd in the Football League and their 50th in the First Division, to which they were promoted in 1984–85. They finished in 21st position in the 22-team division, so were relegated back to the Second Division after only one season. They entered the 1985–86 FA Cup in the third round proper and lost in that round, at home to non-league club Altrincham, a result that prompted the resignation of Ron Saunders as manager. They were eliminated from the League Cup by Southampton in a third-round replay. John Bond succeeded Saunders as manager.

The top scorer was Andy Kennedy with just nine goals, of which seven were scored in league competition.

With the team already in the relegation positions, chairman Keith Coombs resigned in December 1985, selling his 70% shareholding to the former chairman of Walsall F.C., Ken Wheldon, who took over as chairman. The club's serious financial situation, not helped by low attendances, led to the departure of several senior administrative staff.

1985–86 Chelsea F.C. season

In the 1985-86 season Chelsea played in the First Division for the second successive season.

It was the first season under the management of John Hollins, who had previously been a member of Chelsea's victories in the 1970 FA Cup Final and 1971 European Cup Winners' Cup Final. On 1 January 1986 Chelsea were second, two points behind leaders Manchester United and in March the club were still in second, four points behind Everton with two games in hand. The two games in hand were lost 4–0 at home to West Ham United and 6–0 away at Queens Park Rangers. After gaining just 9 points from a possible 33 in the last 11 games, Chelsea finished 6th for the second season in succession.On 23 March 1986 Chelsea won the 1986 Full Members Cup Final 5–4 at Wembley Stadium against Manchester City with David Speedie (the club's joint top scorer in the league along with Kerry Dixon on 14 goals) scoring Chelsea's only Wembley hat-trick. Colin Lee scored Chelsea's other two goals. Due to the widespread negativity over English football after the 1985 Heysel disaster, victorious manager Hollins was quoted as saying "If football is dying, I hope it's dying like that".After an away win at Shrewsbury Town in the 3rd round of the FA Cup, Chelsea lost 2–1 at home to eventual Champions Liverpool in the fourth round.In the 1985-86 Football League Cup Chelsea beat Mansfield Town in a two-legged second round but required replays to advance past Fulham and Everton in the subsequent rounds. After drawing 1–1 away to Queens Park Rangers Chelsea lost the fifth round replay 2–1 at Stamford Bridge.

1985–86 Everton F.C. season

During the 1985–86 English football season, Everton F.C. competed in the Football League First Division. They finished 2nd in the table with 86 points.

1985–86 Football League Cup

The 1985–86 Football League Cup (known as the Milk Cup for sponsorship reasons) was the 26th season of the Football League Cup, a knockout competition for England's top 92 football clubs.

The competition began on 20 August 1985, and ended with the final on 20 April 1986 at the Old Wembley Stadium. The cup was won by Oxford United, who beat Queens Park Rangers 3–0 in the final, to win their first major cup silverware. It was Oxford United's first season in Division One. Goals from Trevor Hebberd, Ray Houghton and Jeremy Charles sealed the victory. TV coverage of this competition only began after Christmas following the "blackout" where no club matches were shown for the first half of the season, and there was no UEFA Cup place for the winners as a result of the ban on English clubs that followed the Heysel Stadium disaster.

1986 Associate Members' Cup Final

The 1986 Associate Members' Cup Final, known as the Freight Rover Trophy for sponsorship reasons, was the 3rd final of the domestic football cup competition for teams from the Third Division and Fourth Division. The final was played at Wembley Stadium, London on 24 May 1986, and was contested by Bristol City and Bolton Wanderers. Bristol City won the match 3–0.

1986 FA Charity Shield

The 1986 FA Charity Shield (also known as the General Motors – FA Charity Shield for sponsorship reasons) was the 64th Charity Shield, a football match contested by the holders of the Football League First Division and FA Cup. This edition featured a Merseyside derby between Liverpool and Everton at Wembley Stadium. Liverpool achieved a First Division and FA Cup double in 1985–86 so they faced Everton who finished as runners-up in the League. The match was held on 16 August 1986.

Adrian Heath opened the scoring for Everton in the 80th minute when he ran in on goal to shoot right footed to the left of the goalkeeper from six yards. Ian Rush equalised in the 88th minute when he side footed to the net from six yards after a low cross from the right. The match finished 1–1. The two clubs shared the title, thus held the shield for six months each.

1986 Football League Cup Final

The 1986 Football League Cup Final (known at the time as the Milk Cup) was a football match held on 20 April 1986 between Oxford United and Queens Park Rangers. Oxford won the match 3–0 to capture the League Cup – their first major honour. Trevor Hebberd opened the scoring in the first half, and Ray Houghton added a second. Jeremy Charles scored the third following up when John Aldridge had a shot saved by QPR goalkeeper Paul Barron. The match was played at Wembley Stadium in front of 90,396 spectators.

Because UEFA voted that the ban on English clubs in European competitions (beginning after the Heysel disaster in May 1985) would continue for a second season, Oxford United were denied a place in the 1986–87 UEFA Cup.

Alan Webb (footballer)

Alan Richard Webb (born 1 January 1963) is an English former footballer who played as a right-back. He played 225 league games in an eleven-year career in the Football League. He spent 1981 to 1984 with West Bromwich Albion, and also played on loan at Lincoln City, but spent most of his career at Port Vale. He was voted Port Vale F.C. Player of the Year in 1984–85, helped the club to win promotion out of the Fourth Division in 1985–86, and won the Third Division play-off final with the club in 1989. He was forced into early retirement in June 1992, following a broken leg sustained in October 1989.

Andy Garner

Andrew Garner (born 8 March 1966) is an English retired professional footballer.

Chris Kamara

Christopher Kamara (born 25 December 1957) is an English former professional footballer and football manager who now works as a presenter and football analyst at Sky Sports.

As a player, he was known as a tough-tackling midfielder. He joined the Royal Navy at the age of 16, before being signed up to Portsmouth in November 1974. He spent three years at the club before being sold on to Swindon Town for £14,000. He returned to Portsmouth in 1981 for a £50,000 fee, but was traded to Brentford in October 1981. He spent four years with the "Bees" before leaving the club after picking up a runners-up medal in the Football League Trophy in 1985.

He re-signed with Swindon Town in August 1985 and helped the club to two successive promotions into the Second Division. He moved on to Stoke City in 1988, and a successful spell with the club won him a move to Leeds United in 1990. He helped the club to the Second Division title in 1989–90, but was never a first team regular before being sold to Luton Town for £150,000 in 1991. He had loan spells with Premier League clubs Sheffield United and Middlesbrough, before joining Sheffield United on a permanent basis in 1993. The following year he joined Bradford City as a player-coach.

He was appointed Bradford City manager in November 1995 and took the club from a relegation scrap to promotion out of the Second Division via the play-offs in 1996. He left the club in January 1998 and quickly took the reins at Stoke City, before he left the "Potters" in April 1998. From there he became a broadcaster with Sky Sports and has since appeared as a presenter on numerous other television programmes.

George Foster (footballer)

George Walter Foster (born 26 September 1956) is an English former footballer and manager, who now works as Swansea City's European scout.

He began his career as a full-back, but was later moved into central defence. He began his career at Plymouth Argyle in 1974, and went on to spend eight years with the "Pilgrims", winning promotion out of the Third Division in 1974–75, as well as the club's Player of the Year award in 1978 and 1980. He also played on loan at Torquay United and Exeter City. He was sold on to Derby County for a £40,000 fee in June 1982, before moving on to Mansfield Town the following year. He spent the next decade with the "Stags", and after being named as the club's Player of the Year, was then named on the PFA Team of the Year as he helped Mansfield to win promotion out of the Fourth Division in 1985–86. He also won the Football League Trophy with the club in 1987. He was appointed player-manager in February 1989, and led the club to promotion out of the Fourth Division in 1991–92, but was sacked after failing to keep Mansfield in the Third Division. He ended his playing career with 649 league appearances in a 20-year career in the Football League. He later managed Conference club Telford United from 1993 to 1995, before becoming a professional scout.

Joe McLaughlin (footballer)

Joe McLaughlin (born 2 June 1960 in Greenock) is a retired professional footballer who played for Chelsea for six seasons in the 1980s.

Keith Cassells

Keith Barrington Cassells (born 10 July 1957) is an English retired professional football forward, best remembered for his four seasons in the Football League with Mansfield Town. He also played league football for Watford, Oxford United, Brentford and briefly in the First Division for Southampton. He acquired the nickname "Rosie" during his playing career.

Phil Neal

Philip George Neal (born 20 February 1951) is an English retired footballer who played for Northampton Town, Liverpool and Bolton Wanderers as a full back. He is one of the most successful English players of all time, having won eight First Divisions, four League Cups, five FA Charity Shields, four European Cups, one UEFA Cup and one UEFA Super Cup during his eleven years at Liverpool. He later returned to Bolton Wanderers as manager, leading them to victory in the Football League Trophy before spells managing Coventry City, Cardiff City and Manchester City.

Neal also had a long career with the England national team, winning 50 caps and playing in the 1982 World Cup. He would go on to be England's assistant manager under Graham Taylor.Phil Neal's nickname whilst at Liverpool was Zico – a reference to the Brazilian play maker and a compliment to Neal, who was known for scoring important goals throughout the club's history. Phil's son, Ashley Neal, also became a footballer.

Port Vale F.C.

Port Vale Football Club is a professional association football club based in Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent, England. The team compete in League Two, the fourth tier of the English football league system. Port Vale is one of the few English league clubs not to be named after a geographical location, their name being a reference to the valley of ports on the Trent and Mersey Canal. They have never played top-flight football, and hold the records for the most seasons in the English Football League (108) and in the second tier (41) without reaching the first tier. After playing at the Athletic Ground in Cobridge and The Old Recreation Ground in Hanley, the club returned to Burslem when Vale Park was opened in 1950. Outside the ground is a statue to Roy Sproson, who played 842 competitive games for the club. The club's traditional rivals are Stoke City, and games between the two are known as the Potteries derby.

After becoming one of the more prominent football clubs in Staffordshire, Burslem Port Vale were invited to become founder members of the Football League Second Division in 1892. They spent 13 non-consecutive seasons in the division, punctuated by two seasons in the Midland League, before they resigned due to financial difficulties and entered liquidation in 1907. The name of Port Vale continued in the North Staffordshire Federation League, and this new club were successful enough to be reinstated into the Football League in October 1919. They spent 16 non-consecutive seasons in the Second Division, punctuated by them winning the Third Division North title in 1929–30, before dropping back into the third tier for a much longer stay at the end of the 1935–36 campaign. The 1953–54 season saw manager Freddie Steele's "Iron Curtain" defence win both a Third Division North title and a semi-final place in the FA Cup. They failed to build on this success however, though went on to finish as champions of the first ever Fourth Division season under Norman Low's stewardship in 1958–59.

The club had little success throughout the 1960s and 1970s, despite being briefly managed by Stanley Matthews, and in fact were forced to apply for re-election after breaking FA rules on illegal payments in 1968. Gordon Lee guided the club to promotion back to the Third Division the following season, where they would remain until relegation at the end of the 1977–78 campaign. John McGrath steered the club to promotion in 1982–83, though he departed after relegation became inevitable the following season. His assistant, John Rudge, stepped up to become the club's longest-serving and most successful manager, leading the club from 1983 to 1999. Under his leadership Port Vale won promotions in 1985–86, 1988–89 and 1993–94, lifted the League Trophy in 1993 and reached a post-war record finish of eighth in the second tier in the 1996–97 season.

After Rudge's reign ended the club entered a decline, slipping into the fourth tier whilst twice entering administration in 2003 and 2012. The decline was arrested when Norman Smurthwaite brought the club out of administration in 2012 and manager Micky Adams achieved automatic promotion from League Two in the 2012–13 season, though they were relegated back into League Two at the end of the 2016–17 season after a failed experiment with a continental staff and playing style.

Steve Bruce

Stephen Roger Bruce (born 31 December 1960) is an English professional football manager and former player who played as a centre-back. He is the current manager of Newcastle United.

Born in Corbridge, Northumberland, he was a promising schoolboy footballer but was rejected by several professional clubs. He was on the verge of quitting the game altogether when he was offered a trial with Gillingham. Bruce was offered an apprenticeship and went on to play more than 200 games for the club before joining Norwich City in 1984, winning the League Cup in 1985. In 1987, he moved to Manchester United, with whom he achieved great success, winning twelve trophies including three Premier League titles, three FA Cups, one League Cup and the European Cup Winners' Cup. He also became the first English player of the 20th century to captain a team to the Double. Despite his success on the field, he was never selected to play for the England national team. Commentators and contemporaries have described him as one of the best English players of the 1980s and 1990s never to play for his country at full international level.

Bruce began his managerial career with Sheffield United, and spent short periods of time managing Huddersfield Town, Wigan Athletic and Crystal Palace before joining Birmingham City in 2001. He twice led Birmingham to promotion to the Premier League during his tenure of nearly six years, but resigned in 2007 to begin a second spell as manager of Wigan. At the end of the 2008–09 season he resigned to take over as manager of Sunderland, a post he held until he was dismissed in November 2011. Seven months later, he was appointed manager of Hull City and led the club to two promotions to the Premier League, as well as the 2014 FA Cup Final, before leaving in July 2016. He took over at Aston Villa four months later but was dismissed in October 2018. He took over as manager of Sheffield Wednesday in February 2019 and left in July that year to take over at Newcastle United.

Stuart Rimmer

Stuart Rimmer (born 12 October 1964, in Southport) is an English former footballer who is Chester City's record goalscorer. He scored 134 league goals in two spells for Chester, and also represented seven other clubs during his professional career.

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