1985–86 FA Cup

The 1985–86 FA Cup was the 105th season of the world's oldest knockout football competition, The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup. The competition was won by Liverpool, who defeated local rivals Everton 3–1 at Wembley in the first ever Merseyside derby final. Liverpool thus became only the fifth club to win the league and FA Cup double.

1985–86 FA Cup
Country England
 Wales
Defending championsManchester United
ChampionsLiverpool (3rd title)
Runners-upEverton

First round proper

The first round of games were played over the weekend 16–17 November 1986. Replays were played on the 19th-20th.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Enfield 0–2 Bognor Regis Town 16 November 1985
2 Bournemouth 0–0 Dartford 16 November 1985
Replay Dartford 0–2 Bournemouth 19 November 1985
3 Bury 2–0 Chester City 16 November 1985
4 Rochdale 2–1 Darlington 16 November 1985
5 Yeovil Town 2–4 Hereford United 16 November 1985
6 Reading 1–0 Wealdstone 16 November 1985
7 Walsall 7–3 Preston North End 16 November 1985
8 Gillingham 3–0 Northampton Town 16 November 1985
9 Notts County 6–1 Scarborough 17 November 1985
10 Macclesfield Town 1–2 Hartlepool United 16 November 1985
11 Derby County 5–1 Crewe Alexandra 16 November 1985
12 Lincoln City 0–1 Blackpool 16 November 1985
13 Swindon Town 0–0 Bristol City 17 November 1985
Replay Bristol City 4–2 Swindon Town 20 November 1985
14 Wrexham 3–1 Bolton Wanderers 16 November 1985
15 Tranmere Rovers 2–2 Chesterfield 16 November 1985
Replay Chesterfield 0–1 Tranmere Rovers 19 November 1985
16 Stockport County 0–1 Telford United 16 November 1985
17 Windsor & Eton 1–1 Torquay United 16 November 1985
Replay Torquay United 3–0 Windsor & Eton 19 November 1985
18 Chorley 0–2 Altrincham 16 November 1985
19 Wycombe Wanderers 2–0 Colchester United 16 November 1985
20 Brentford 1–3 Bristol Rovers 16 November 1985
21 Plymouth Argyle 1–0 Aldershot 16 November 1985
22 Southend United 0–1 Newport County 16 November 1985
23 Exeter City 2–1 Cardiff City 16 November 1985
24 Mansfield Town 1–1 Port Vale 16 November 1985
Replay Port Vale 1–0 Mansfield Town 18 November 1985
25 Halifax Town 1–3 Scunthorpe United 16 November 1985
26 Runcorn 2–2 Boston United 16 November 1985
Replay Boston United 1–1 Runcorn 20 November 1985
Replay Runcorn 4–1 Boston United 25 November 1985
27 York City 0–0 Morecambe 16 November 1985
Replay Morecambe 0–2 York City 19 November 1985
28 Bishop's Stortford 2–2 Peterborough United 16 November 1985
Replay Peterborough United 3–1 Bishop's Stortford 20 November 1985
29 Rotherham United 6–0 Wolverhampton Wanderers 16 November 1985
30 Wigan Athletic 4–1 Doncaster Rovers 16 November 1985
31 Chelmsford City 1–0 Weymouth 16 November 1985
32 Nuneaton Borough 2–3 Burnley 16 November 1985
33 Slough Town 2–2 Aylesbury United 16 November 1985
Replay Aylesbury United 2–5 Slough Town 19 November 1985
34 Whitby Town 1–0 South Liverpool 16 November 1985
35 Dagenham 2–1 Cambridge United 16 November 1985
36 Fareham Town 0–3 Maidstone United 16 November 1985
37 Swansea City 2–0 Leyton-Wingate 16 November 1985
38 Farnborough Town 0–4 Bath City 16 November 1985
39 Frickley Athletic 1–1 Halesowen Town 16 November 1985
Replay Halesowen Town 1–3 Frickley Athletic 19 November 1985
40 VS Rugby 2–2 Orient 16 November 1985
Replay Orient 4–1 VS Rugby 19 November 1985

Second Round Proper

The second round of games were played over 7–9 December 1985, with replays being played on the 10th.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Blackpool 1–2 Altrincham 7 December 1985
2 Bournemouth 4–1 Dagenham 7 December 1985
3 Bristol City 1–2 Exeter City 7 December 1985
4 Reading 2–0 Hereford United 7 December 1985
5 Gillingham 6–1 Bognor Regis Town 7 December 1985
6 Notts County 2–2 Wrexham 7 December 1985
Replay Wrexham 0–3 Notts County 10 December 1985
7 Derby County 6–1 Telford United 9 December 1985
8 Tranmere Rovers 1–1 Bury 7 December 1985
Replay Bury 2–1 Tranmere Rovers 10 December 1985
9 Wycombe Wanderers 2–0 Chelmsford City 7 December 1985
10 Plymouth Argyle 3–0 Maidstone United 7 December 1985
11 Scunthorpe United 2–2 Rochdale 7 December 1985
Replay Rochdale 2–1 Scunthorpe United 10 December 1985
12 Port Vale 0–0 Walsall 8 December 1985
Replay Walsall 2–1 Port Vale 10 December 1985
13 Newport County 1–1 Torquay United 7 December 1985
Replay Torquay United 2–3 Newport County 10 December 1985
14 Runcorn 1–1 Wigan Athletic 7 December 1985
Replay Wigan Athletic 4–0 Runcorn 10 December 1985
15 York City 3–1 Whitby Town 7 December 1985
16 Rotherham United 4–1 Burnley 7 December 1985
17 Peterborough United 1–0 Bath City 7 December 1985
18 Orient 2–2 Slough Town 7 December 1985
Replay Slough Town 2–3 Orient 10 December 1985
19 Swansea City 1–2 Bristol Rovers 7 December 1985
20 Hartlepool United 0–1 Frickley Athletic 7 December 1985

Third round proper

Most of the third round of games in the FA Cup were played over the weekend 4–6 January 1986. Various matches and replays were played as late as 16 January, however.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Bury 2–0 Barnsley 13 January 1986
2 Liverpool 5–0 Norwich City 4 January 1986
3 Walsall 1–3 Manchester City 4 January 1986
4 Gillingham 1–1 Derby County 4 January 1986
Replay Derby County 3–1 Gillingham 13 January 1986
5 Nottingham Forest 1–1 Blackburn Rovers 4 January 1986
Replay Blackburn Rovers 3–2 Nottingham Forest 13 January 1986
6 Sheffield Wednesday 2–2 West Bromwich Albion 13 January 1986
Replay West Bromwich Albion 2–3 Sheffield Wednesday 16 January 1986
7 Grimsby Town 3–4 Arsenal 4 January 1986
8 Middlesbrough 1–3 Southampton 13 January 1986
9 Sunderland 2–0 Newport County 4 January 1986
10 Everton 1–0 Exeter City 5 January 1986
11 Shrewsbury Town 0–1 Chelsea 4 January 1986
12 Sheffield United 2–0 Fulham 13 January 1986
13 Ipswich Town 4–4 Bradford City 4 January 1986
Replay Bradford City 0–1 Ipswich Town 13 January 1986
14 Newcastle United 0–2 Brighton & Hove Albion 4 January 1986
15 Bristol Rovers 3–1 Leicester City 4 January 1986
16 Coventry City 1–3 Watford 4 January 1986
17 Portsmouth 2–2 Aston Villa 4 January 1986
Replay Aston Villa 3–2 Portsmouth 13 January 1986
18 Manchester United 2–0 Rochdale 9 January 1986
19 Millwall 3–1 Wimbledon 4 January 1986
20 Hull City 2–2 Plymouth Argyle 4 January 1986
Replay Plymouth Argyle 0–1 Hull City 7 January 1986
21 Carlisle United 1–0 Queens Park Rangers 13 January 1986
22 Oldham Athletic 1–2 Orient 6 January 1986
23 Crystal Palace 1–2 Luton Town 6 January 1986
24 Huddersfield Town 0–0 Reading 4 January 1986
Replay Reading 2–1 Huddersfield Town 13 January 1986
25 Charlton Athletic 0–1 West Ham United 5 January 1986
26 York City 2–0 Wycombe Wanderers 4 January 1986
27 Stoke City 0–2 Notts County 13 January 1986
28 Wigan Athletic 3–0 Bournemouth 4 January 1986
29 Peterborough United 1–0 Leeds United 4 January 1986
30 Birmingham City 1–2 Altrincham 14 January 1986
31 Oxford United 1–1 Tottenham Hotspur 4 January 1986
Replay Tottenham Hotspur 2–1 Oxford United 8 January 1986
32 Frickley Athletic 1–3 Rotherham United 4 January 1986

Fourth Round Proper

The fourth round of games were played over the weekend 25–26 January 1986. Replays took place on 28–29 January, or 3–6 February.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Southampton 3–0 Wigan Athletic 25 January 1986
2 Reading 1–1 Bury 25 January 1986
Replay Bury 3–0 Reading 28 January 1986
3 Notts County 1–1 Tottenham Hotspur 25 January 1986
Replay Tottenham Hotspur 5–0 Notts County 29 January 1986
4 Aston Villa 1–1 Millwall 25 January 1986
Replay Millwall 1–0 Aston Villa 29 January 1986
5 Sheffield Wednesday 5–0 Orient 25 January 1986
6 Sunderland 0–0 Manchester United 25 January 1986
Replay Manchester United 3–0 Sunderland 29 January 1986
7 Luton Town 4–0 Bristol Rovers 25 January 1986
8 Everton 3–1 Blackburn Rovers 25 January 1986
9 Sheffield United 0–1 Derby County 25 January 1986
10 Manchester City 1–1 Watford 25 January 1986
Replay Watford 0–0 Manchester City 3 February 1986
Replay Manchester City 1–3 Watford 6 February 1986
11 West Ham United 0–0 Ipswich Town 25 January 1986
Replay Ipswich Town 1–1 West Ham United 4 February 1986
Replay Ipswich Town 0–1 West Ham United 6 February 1986
12 Hull City 2–3 Brighton & Hove Albion 25 January 1986
13 Chelsea 1–2 Liverpool 26 January 1986
14 Arsenal 5–1 Rotherham United 25 January 1986
15 York City 2–0 Altrincham 25 January 1986
16 Peterborough United 1–0 Carlisle United 25 January 1986

Fifth Round Proper

The fifth set of games were intended to be played on 15 February 1986, but due to earlier replays, some of these matches were not concluded until just under a month later.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Southampton 0–0 Millwall 15 February 1986
Replay Millwall 0–1 Southampton 5 March 1986
2 Watford 1–1 Bury 5 March 1986
Replay Bury 0–3 Watford 8 March 1986
3 Derby County 1–1 Sheffield Wednesday 26 February 1986
Replay Sheffield Wednesday 2–0 Derby County 5 March 1986
4 Luton Town 2–2 Arsenal 15 February 1986
Replay Arsenal 0–0 Luton Town 3 March 1986
Replay Luton Town 3–0 Arsenal 5 March 1986
5 Tottenham Hotspur 1–2 Everton 4 March 1986
6 Manchester United 1–1 West Ham United 15 February 1986
Replay West Ham United 2–0 Manchester United 9 March 1986
7 York City 1–1 Liverpool 15 February 1986
Replay Liverpool 3–1 York City 18 February 1986
8 Peterborough United 2–2 Brighton & Hove Albion 15 February 1986
Replay Brighton & Hove Albion 1–0 Peterborough United 3 March 1986

Sixth Round Proper

The sixth round of FA Cup games were played either at the weekend on 8 March or midweek on 11-12 1986. Replays were played in the following midweek fixture.

Tie no Home team Score Away team Date
1 Liverpool 0–0 Watford 11 March 1986
Replay Watford 1–2 Liverpool 17 March 1986
2 Sheffield Wednesday 2–1 West Ham United 12 March 1986
3 Luton Town 2–2 Everton 8 March 1986
Replay Everton 1–0 Luton Town 12 March 1986
4 Brighton & Hove Albion 0–2 Southampton 8 March 1986

Semi-Finals

Liverpool2 – 0 (a.e.t.)Southampton
Rush Goal 99'104' Report
Everton2 – 1 (a.e.t.)Sheffield Wednesday
Harper
Sharp
Report Shutt

Final

Liverpool3 – 1Everton
Rush Goal 56'83'
Johnston Goal 62'
Lineker Goal 27'
Liverpool
Everton

References

1985–86 Birmingham City F.C. season

The 1985–86 Football League season was Birmingham City Football Club's 83rd in the Football League and their 50th in the First Division, to which they were promoted in 1984–85. They finished in 21st position in the 22-team division, so were relegated back to the Second Division after only one season. They entered the 1985–86 FA Cup in the third round proper and lost in that round, at home to non-league club Altrincham, a result that prompted the resignation of Ron Saunders as manager. They were eliminated from the League Cup by Southampton in a third-round replay. John Bond succeeded Saunders as manager.

The top scorer was Andy Kennedy with just nine goals, of which seven were scored in league competition.

With the team already in the relegation positions, chairman Keith Coombs resigned in December 1985, selling his 70% shareholding to the former chairman of Walsall F.C., Ken Wheldon, who took over as chairman. The club's serious financial situation, not helped by low attendances, led to the departure of several senior administrative staff.

1985–86 Chelsea F.C. season

In the 1985-86 season Chelsea played in the First Division for the second successive season.

It was the first season under the management of John Hollins, who had previously been a member of Chelsea's victories in the 1970 FA Cup Final and 1971 European Cup Winners' Cup Final. On 1 January 1986 Chelsea were second, two points behind leaders Manchester United and in March the club were still in second, four points behind Everton with two games in hand. The two games in hand were lost 4–0 at home to West Ham United and 6–0 away at Queens Park Rangers. After gaining just 9 points from a possible 33 in the last 11 games, Chelsea finished 6th for the second season in succession.On 23 March 1986 Chelsea won the 1986 Full Members Cup Final 5–4 at Wembley Stadium against Manchester City with David Speedie (the club's joint top scorer in the league along with Kerry Dixon on 14 goals) scoring Chelsea's only Wembley hat-trick. Colin Lee scored Chelsea's other two goals. Due to the widespread negativity over English football after the 1985 Heysel disaster, victorious manager Hollins was quoted as saying "If football is dying, I hope it's dying like that".After an away win at Shrewsbury Town in the 3rd round of the FA Cup, Chelsea lost 2–1 at home to eventual Champions Liverpool in the fourth round.In the 1985-86 Football League Cup Chelsea beat Mansfield Town in a two-legged second round but required replays to advance past Fulham and Everton in the subsequent rounds. After drawing 1–1 away to Queens Park Rangers Chelsea lost the fifth round replay 2–1 at Stamford Bridge.

1985–86 FA Cup qualifying rounds

The FA Cup 1985–86 is the 105th season of the world's oldest football knockout competition; The Football Association Challenge Cup, or FA Cup for short. The large number of clubs entering the tournament from lower down the English football league system meant that the competition started with a number of preliminary and qualifying rounds. The 28 victorious teams from the Fourth Round Qualifying progressed to the First Round Proper.

1986 FA Charity Shield

The 1986 FA Charity Shield (also known as the General Motors – FA Charity Shield for sponsorship reasons) was the 64th Charity Shield, a football match contested by the holders of the Football League First Division and FA Cup. This edition featured a Merseyside derby between Liverpool and Everton at Wembley Stadium. Liverpool achieved a First Division and FA Cup double in 1985–86 so they faced Everton who finished as runners-up in the League. The match was held on 16 August 1986.

Adrian Heath opened the scoring for Everton in the 80th minute when he ran in on goal to shoot right footed to the left of the goalkeeper from six yards. Ian Rush equalised in the 88th minute when he side footed to the net from six yards after a low cross from the right. The match finished 1–1. The two clubs shared the title, thus held the shield for six months each.

1986 FA Cup Final

The 1986 FA Cup Final was the 105th final of the FA Cup. It took place on 10 May 1986 at Wembley Stadium and was a Merseyside derby between Liverpool and Everton. The match was played seven days after Liverpool had secured the league title, with Everton finishing as runners-up. At the time, Liverpool and Everton were widely regarded as the two leading English clubs.

Derby County F.C.

Derby County Football Club () is a professional association football club based in Derby, Derbyshire, England. The club competes in the EFL Championship, the second tier of English football, and has played its home matches at Pride Park Stadium since 1997.

Notable for being one of the 12 founder members of the Football League in 1888, Derby County is one of only 10 clubs to have competed in every season of the English football league system and, in 2009, was ranked 137th in the top 200 European football teams of the 20th century by the International Federation of Football History & Statistics.The club was founded in 1884 by William Morley, as an offshoot of Derbyshire County Cricket Club; it has spent all but four seasons in the top two divisions of English football. Its competitive peak came in the 1970s when it twice won the First Division and competed in major European competitions on four separate occasions, reaching the European Cup semi-finals as well as winning several minor trophies. Additionally, the club was a strong force in the interwar years, winning the 1945–46 FA Cup.

The club's home colours have been black and white since the 1890s. The team gets its nickname, The Rams, to show tribute to its links with the First Regiment of Derby Militia, which took a ram as its mascot. Additionally adopting the song "The Derby Ram" as its regimental song.

Jim Beglin

James Martin "Jim" Beglin (born 29 July 1963 in County Waterford) is an Irish former professional footballer and current co-commentator for RTÉ, BT Sport and NBC Sports.

Kenny Dalglish

Sir Kenneth Mathieson Dalglish (born 4 March 1951) is a Scottish former football player and manager. He made over three hundred appearances for both Celtic and Liverpool and earned over one hundred caps for the Scotland national team. Dalglish won the Ballon d'Or Silver Award in 1983, the PFA Players' Player of the Year in 1983, and the FWA Footballer of the Year in 1979 and 1983. In 2009, FourFourTwo named Dalglish the greatest striker in post-war British football, and in 2006, he topped a Liverpool fans' poll of "100 Players Who Shook the Kop". He has been inducted into both the Scottish and English Football Halls of Fame.

Dalglish began his career with Celtic in 1971, going on to win four Scottish league championships, four Scottish Cups and one Scottish League Cup with the club. In 1977, Liverpool manager Bob Paisley paid a British transfer record of £440,000 to bring Dalglish to Liverpool. His years at Liverpool were among the club's most successful periods, as he won six English league championships, the FA Cup, four League Cups, five FA Charity Shields, three European Cups and one European Super Cup. In international football, Dalglish made 102 appearances and scored 30 goals for Scotland between 1971 and 1986, becoming their most capped player and joint-leading goalscorer (with Denis Law).

Dalglish became player-manager of Liverpool in 1985 after the resignation of Joe Fagan, winning a further three First Divisions, a FA Cup, and four FA Charity Shields, before resigning in 1991. Eight months later, Dalglish made a return to football management with Blackburn Rovers, whom he led from the Second Division to win the Premier League in 1995. Soon afterwards, he stepped down as manager to become Director of Football at the club, before leaving altogether in 1996. In January 1997, Dalglish took over as manager at Newcastle United. Newcastle finished runners-up in both the Premier League and FA Cup during his first season, but they only finished 13th in 1997–98, which led to his dismissal the following season. Dalglish went on to be appointed Director of Football at Celtic in 1999, and later manager, where he won the Scottish League Cup before an acrimonious departure the following year.

Between 2000 and 2010, Dalglish focused on charitable concerns, founding The Marina Dalglish Appeal with his wife to raise money for cancer care. In January 2011, Dalglish returned to Liverpool for a spell as caretaker manager after the dismissal of Roy Hodgson, becoming the permanent manager in May 2011. Despite winning the League Cup which earned them a place in the UEFA Europa League, and reaching the FA Cup Final, Liverpool only finished 8th in the Premier League, and Dalglish was dismissed in May 2012. In October 2013, Dalglish returned to Anfield as a non-executive director, and had Anfield's Centenary Stand renamed after him in May 2017.

Ray Hankin

Raymond Hankin (born 21 February 1956) is an English former footballer. Hankin, a centre forward, played in the Football League for Burnley, Leeds United, Middlesbrough, Peterborough United and Wolverhampton Wanderers. He spent three seasons with the Vancouver Whitecaps of the NASL, had brief spells with Arsenal and Shamrock Rovers, and finished his playing career in English non-league football. Internationally, he was a member of the England youth team that won the 1973 European Under-18 Championship, and was capped three times for England at under-23 level.

Steyning Town F.C.

Steyning Town Community Football Club is a football club based in Steyning, England. The club is an FA chartered community club, affiliated to the Sussex County Football Association. The club are currently members of the Southern Combination Premier Division and play at the Shooting Field.

Seasons
Qualifying rounds
Finals
FA competitions
Football League
Lower leagues
Related to national team
198586 in European football (UEFA)
Domestic leagues
Domestic cups
League cups
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