1984 Democratic National Convention

The 1984 National Convention of the U.S. Democratic Party was held at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, California from July 16 to July 19, 1984, to select candidates for the 1984 United States presidential election. Former Vice President Walter Mondale was nominated for President and Representative Geraldine Ferraro of New York was nominated for Vice President. Ferraro became the first woman to be nominated by either major party for the Presidency or Vice-Presidency. In another first, the 1984 Democratic Convention was chaired by the female governor of Kentucky, Martha Layne Collins.[1] The Democratic National Committee Chairman at the time, Charles T. Manatt, led the convention.

1984 Democratic National Convention
1984 presidential election
Vice President Mondale 1977 closeup
GeraldineFerraro
Nominees
Mondale and Ferraro
Convention
Date(s)July 16–19, 1984
CitySan Francisco, California
VenueMoscone Center
Keynote speakerMario Cuomo
Candidates
Presidential nomineeWalter Mondale of
Minnesota
Vice Presidential nomineeGeraldine Ferraro of
New York
Moscone Center, San Francisco (2013)
The Moscone Center was the site of the 1984 Democratic National Convention

Events of the Convention

Walter Mondale was nominated for President and Geraldine Ferraro was nominated for Vice President.

New York Governor Mario Cuomo gave a well-received keynote speech. Mondale's major rivals for the presidential nomination, Senator Gary Hart and Rev. Jesse Jackson, also gave speeches.

Jackson's speech referred to the nation as a "quilt" with places for "[t]he white, the Hispanic, the black, the Arab, the Jew, the woman, the Native American, the small farmer, the business person, the environmentalist, the peace activist, the young, the old, the lesbian, the gay, and the disabled".[2] It was the first time anyone mentioned lesbians and gays in a national convention address.[3] Jackson also attempted to move the party's platform farther to the left at the Convention, but without much success. He did succeed in one instance, concerning affirmative action.[4]

"AIDS poster boy" Bobbi Campbell gave a speech at the National March for Lesbian and Gay Rights, dying of AIDS complications a month later.[5]

Voting

President

The candidates for U.S. president earned the following numbers of delegates:[6]

Democratic National Convention presidential vote, 1984
Candidate Votes Percentage
Walter Mondale 2,191 (56.41%)
Gary Hart 1,200 (30.92%)
Jesse Jackson 465 (12.00%)
Thomas Eagleton 18 (0.46%)
George McGovern 4 (0.10%)
John Glenn 2 (0.05%)
Joe Biden 1 (0.03%)
Martha Kirkland 1 (0.03%)
Totals 3,882 100.00%

Jesse Jackson unsuccessfully called for the suspension of the party's electoral rules to give him a number of delegates closer to the 20% average share of the vote he garnered during the primaries. The system tended to punish shallow showings as yielding no delegates at all, hence Jackson's smaller delegate count than would be expected (12%).[4]

Vice-President

Geraldine Ferraro was nominated by acclamation on a voice vote. She became the first woman to receive a major party nomination in the US.

See also

References

  1. ^ Ferraro, Geraldine (1986). Ferraro: My Story. New York: Bantam. ISBN 0-553-05110-5.
  2. ^ House, Ernest R. (24 July 1988). "Jesse in 1984: Whites Wept, Blacks Frowned". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  3. ^ Reid, Joy-Ann (8 September 2015). Fracture: Barack Obama, the Clintons, and the Racial Divide (Amazon Kindle ed.). William Morrow. p. 50. ASIN B00FJ3A98G.
  4. ^ a b "The Jackson Factor". The Economist. 1984-07-21. Retrieved 2008-08-28.
  5. ^ GLBT Historical Society (July 15, 1984). Bobbi Campbell speech (1984). YouTube. Retrieved July 19, 2015.
  6. ^ Our Campaigns - US President - D Convention Race - Jul 16, 1984

External links

Preceded by
1980
New York, New York
Democratic National Conventions Succeeded by
1988
Atlanta, Georgia
1983 Libertarian National Convention

The 1983 Libertarian National Convention was held from August 29 to September 4, 1983, at the Sheraton Hotel in New York, New York. The delegates at the convention, on behalf of the U.S. Libertarian Party, nominated David Bergland for the presidency and James A. Lewis for the vice-presidency in the 1984 presidential election.Paul Grant was elected as chairman of the Libertarian Party National Committee, winning out over Sheldon Richman. Grant served as chairman from 1983 to 1985.Libertarians hold a National Convention every two years to vote on party bylaws, platform and resolutions and elect national party officers and a judicial committee. Every four years it nominates presidential and vice presidential candidates.

1984 Democratic Party presidential primaries

The 1984 Democratic presidential primaries were the selection process by which voters of the Democratic Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 1984 U.S. presidential election. Former Vice President Walter Mondale was selected as the nominee through a series of primary elections and caucuses culminating in the 1984 Democratic National Convention held from July 16 to July 19, 1984, in San Francisco, California.

As of 2017, this is the earliest Democratic primary in which all primary winners (of at least one contest) are still living.

1984 United States presidential election in Illinois

The 1984 United States presidential election in Illinois took place on November 6, 1984. All 50 states and the District of Columbia, were part of the 1984 United States presidential election. Illinois voters chose 24 electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president of the United States.

Illinois was won by incumbent United States President Ronald Reagan of California, who was running against former Vice President Walter Mondale of Minnesota. Reagan ran for a second time with former C.I.A. Director George H. W. Bush of Texas, and Mondale ran with Representative Geraldine Ferraro of New York, the first major female candidate for the vice presidency.

1984 United States presidential election in Indiana

The 1984 United States presidential election in Indiana took place on November 6, 1984. All 50 states and the District of Columbia, were part of the 1984 United States presidential election. Indiana chose 12 electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president of the United States.

President Ronald Reagan of California won the state of Indiana against former Vice President Walter Mondale of Minnesota by a substantial 23.99% margin. Reagan ran for a second time with incumbent Vice President and former C.I.A. Director George H. W. Bush of Texas, and Mondale ran with Representative Geraldine Ferraro of New York, the first major female candidate for the vice presidency.

1984 United States presidential election in Iowa

The 1984 United States presidential election in Iowa took place on November 6, 1984. All 50 states and the District of Columbia, were part of the 1984 United States presidential election. Iowa voters chose 8 electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president of the United States.

Iowa was won by incumbent United States President Ronald Reagan of California, who was running against former Vice President Walter Mondale of Minnesota. Reagan ran for a second time with former C.I.A. Director George H. W. Bush of Texas, and Mondale ran with Representative Geraldine Ferraro of New York, the first major female candidate for the vice presidency.

1984 United States presidential election in Nebraska

The 1984 United States presidential election in Nebraska took place on November 6, 1984. All 50 states and the District of Columbia, were part of the 1984 United States presidential election. Nebraska voters chose 5 electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president of the United States.

Nebraska was won by incumbent United States President Ronald Reagan of California, who was running against former Vice President Walter Mondale of Minnesota. Reagan ran for a second time with former C.I.A. Director George H. W. Bush of Texas, and Mondale ran with Representative Geraldine Ferraro of New York, the first major female candidate for the vice presidency.

1984 United States presidential election in North Dakota

The 1984 United States presidential election in North Dakota took place on November 6, 1984. All 50 states and the District of Columbia, were part of the 1984 United States presidential election. North Dakota voters chose 3 electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president of the United States.

North Dakota was won by incumbent United States President Ronald Reagan of California, who was running against former Vice President Walter Mondale of Minnesota. Reagan ran for a second time with former C.I.A. Director George H. W. Bush of Texas, and Mondale ran with Representative Geraldine Ferraro of New York, the first major female candidate for the vice presidency.

1984 United States presidential election in West Virginia

The 1984 United States presidential election in West Virginia took place on November 6, 1984. All 50 states and the District of Columbia, were part of the 1984 United States presidential election. West Virginia voters chose 6 electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president of the United States.

West Virginia was won by incumbent United States President Ronald Reagan of California, who was running against former Vice President Walter Mondale of Minnesota. Reagan ran for a second time with incumbent Vice President and former C.I.A. Director George H. W. Bush of Texas, and Mondale ran with Representative Geraldine Ferraro of New York, the first major female candidate for the vice presidency.

Ann Richards

Dorothy Ann Willis Richards (September 1, 1933 – September 13, 2006) was an American politician and 45th Governor of Texas (1991–95). A Democrat, she first came to national attention as the Texas State Treasurer, when she delivered the keynote address at the 1988 Democratic National Convention. Richards was the second female governor of Texas and was frequently noted in the media for her outspoken feminism and her one-liners.Born in McLennan County, Texas, Ann Richards became a schoolteacher after graduating from Baylor University. She won election to the Travis County Commissioners' Court in 1976 and took office as Texas State Treasurer in 1983. She delivered a nominating speech for Walter Mondale at the 1984 Democratic National Convention and the keynote address at the 1988 Democratic National Convention.

Richards won the 1990 Texas gubernatorial election, defeating Texas Attorney General Jim Mattox in a Democratic primary run-off election and businessman Clayton Williams in the general election. She was defeated in the 1994 Texas gubernatorial election by George W. Bush. She remained active in public life until her death in 2006.

To date, Richards remains the last Democrat to serve as Governor of Texas.

Barbara Marx Hubbard

Barbara Marx Hubbard (born Barbara Marx; December 22, 1929) is a futurist, author and public speaker. She is credited with the concepts of ‘The Synergy Engine’ and the 'birthing' of humanity.

Bobbi Campbell

Robert Boyle "Bobbi" Campbell Jr. (January 28, 1952 – August 15, 1984) was a public health nurse and an early United States AIDS activist. In September 1981, Campbell became the 16th person in San Francisco to be diagnosed with Kaposi's sarcoma, when that was a proxy for an AIDS diagnosis. He was the first to come out publicly as a person with what came to be known as AIDS, writing a regular column in the San Francisco Sentinel, syndicated nationwide, describing his experiences and posting photos of his KS lesions to help other San Franciscans know what to look for, as well as helping write the first San Francisco safer sex manual.He rapidly became one of the leading activists co-founding People With AIDS San Francisco in 1982 and then, the following year, with HIV+ men from across the U.S., he co-wrote the Denver Principles, the defining manifesto of the People With AIDS Self-Empowerment Movement. Appearing on the cover of Newsweek and being interviewed on national news reports, Campbell raised the national profile of the AIDS crisis among heterosexuals and provided a recognizable face of the epidemic for affected communities. He also lobbied Margaret Heckler, Secretary of Health and Human Services in the Reagan administration over both practical issues and stigmatising medical practices affecting people with AIDS. He also continued to campaign for LGBT+ rights, speaking outside the 1984 Democratic National Convention a month before his death from cryptosporidiosis.

Charles Manatt

Charles Taylor Manatt (June 9, 1936 – July 22, 2011) was a U.S. Democratic Party political figure. He was an American lawyer, politician and businessman.

Manatt was chairman of the Democratic National Committee from 1981 to 1985. In those years, he supervised and directed the 1984 Democratic National Convention. He was a delegate, sometimes categorized as a super delegate. He also served as ambassador to the Dominican Republic from 1999 to 2001. He was the founder of the law firm Manatt, Phelps, and Phillips LLP, where his practice focused on international, administrative, and corporate law. Manatt served until June 2008 as chairman of the board of trustees at the George Washington University. His widow is Kathleen K. Manatt.

Manatt was a former chair of the board of directors of the International Foundation of Election Systems. He and his wife Kathleen established the Manatt Democracy Studies Fellowship Program in 1998.

Manatt died on July 22, 2011, at the age of 75.

Cuomo family

The Cuomo family is an American political family. Mario Cuomo and his son Andrew Cuomo both have served as governor of New York.

Mario Cuomo's parents, Andrea and Immacolata Cuomo, both emigrated to the United States from Italy. Andrea emigrated in 1926 and Immacolata immigrated in 1927.

Mario Cuomo (June 15, 1932-January 1, 2015), unsuccessful candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York (1974); appointed New York Secretary of State by Governor Hugh Carey (1975–1978); unsuccessful candidate in 1977 Democratic primary for mayor of New York City (lost to Ed Koch); unsuccessful Liberal Party of New York candidate in general election for New York City Mayor (1977), again losing to Ed Koch; Lieutenant Governor of New York 1979–1982; Governor of New York (1983–1994); keynote speaker at the 1984 Democratic National Convention in San Francisco.

Matilda Cuomo, wife of Mario Cuomo, former First Lady of New York (1983–1994)

Andrew Cuomo (born December 6, 1957), son of Mario and Matilda Cuomo; United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (1997–2001); New York State Attorney General (2007–2010); governor of New York (2011–present).

Christopher Cuomo (born August 9, 1970), son of Mario and Matilda Cuomo; CNN Anchor; host of "Cuomo Prime Time" evening news program; Former ABC News chief law and justice correspondent; former news anchor for Good Morning America; co-anchor for ABC's 20/20; winner of six national Emmys; picked as one of People magazine's "50 Sexiest People" in 1997.Maria Cuomo Cole, producer of social impact films at Cuomo Cole Prods, Chairman of Help USA. Daughter of Mario Cuomo, married Kenneth Cole, a well-known New York fashion designer.

Mario Cuomo's daughter Margaret I. Cuomo is a medical doctor.

From 1990 to 2003, Andrew Cuomo was married to Kerry Kennedy, daughter of Robert F. Kennedy and Ethel Skakel. Cuomo and Kennedy divorced, and Cuomo currently is dating Food Network host Sandra Lee.

Dianne Feinstein

Dianne Goldman Berman Feinstein (; born Dianne Emiel Goldman, June 22, 1933) is an American politician serving as the senior United States Senator from California. She took office on November 4, 1992. A member of the Democratic Party, Feinstein was Mayor of San Francisco from 1978 to 1988.Born in San Francisco, Feinstein graduated from Stanford University in 1955 with a Bachelor of Arts in History. In the 1960s, she worked in city government, and she was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1969. She served as the board's first female president in 1978, during which time the assassinations of Mayor George Moscone and City Supervisor Harvey Milk drew national attention. Feinstein succeeded Moscone as Mayor of San Francisco and became the first woman to assume the position. During her tenure, she led the renovation of the city's cable car system, and oversaw the 1984 Democratic National Convention.

After losing a race for governor in 1990, Feinstein won a 1992 special election to the U.S. Senate. Feinstein was first elected on the same ballot as her peer Barbara Boxer, and the two women became California's first female U.S. Senators. Feinstein has been re-elected five times since then, and in the 2012 election, she received 7.75 million votes--the most popular votes in any U.S. Senate election in history.Feinstein was the author of the 1994 Federal Assault Weapons Ban which expired in 2004. In 2013, she introduced a new assault weapons bill which failed to pass. Feinstein is the first and only woman to have chaired the Senate Rules Committee (2007–2009) and the Select Committee on Intelligence (2009–2015). To date, she is also the only woman to have presided over a U.S. presidential inauguration. At the age of 85, Feinstein is the oldest sitting U.S. Senator. Upon the retirement of Barbara Mikulski in January 2017, Feinstein became the longest-tenured female U.S. Senator currently serving in the Senate. Having won reelection in 2018 to a six-year term expiring in January 2025, Feinstein will become the longest serving woman Senator in history should she serve her full term.

Harry A. DeMaso

Harry A. DeMaso (February 24, 1921 – January 9, 2015) was an American politician who was a Michigan Republican State Senator from the 20th Michigan District, which comprised the counties of Calhoun and Eaton, and one township in Ingham (Delhi Township). He served as Michigan's Acting Governor during 1984 Democratic National Convention.

Mario Cuomo

Mario Matthew Cuomo (; Italian: [ˈkwɔːmo]; June 15, 1932 – January 1, 2015) was an American politician of the Democratic Party. He served as the 52nd Governor of New York for three terms, from 1983 to 1994, Lieutenant Governor of New York from 1979 to 1982, and Secretary of State of New York from 1975 to 1978.Cuomo was known for his liberal views and public speeches, particularly his keynote speech address at the 1984 Democratic National Convention in which he sharply criticized the policies of the Reagan administration, saying, "Mr. President, you ought to know that this nation is more a 'Tale of Two Cities' than it is just a 'Shining City on a Hill.'" The speech brought him to national attention, and he was widely considered a front-runner for the Democratic nomination for President in both 1988 and 1992, though he declined to seek the nomination in both instances. His legacy as a reluctant standard-bearer for the Democrats in presidential elections led to his being dubbed "Hamlet on the Hudson".Cuomo was defeated for a fourth term as governor by George Pataki in the "Republican Revolution" of 1994. He subsequently retired from politics and served as counsel at the New York City law firm Willkie Farr & Gallagher. He was the father of five, including Andrew Cuomo, the current Governor of New York, and journalist Chris Cuomo, currently an anchorman for CNN.Cuomo died of natural causes due to heart failure in Manhattan, New York City, on New Year's Day, 2015. In his obituary, The New York Times called him a "liberal beacon".

Short Sharp Shocked

Short Sharp Shocked is the second album by Michelle Shocked. Originally released in 1988, it was remastered and reissued in 2003 as a two-CD set by Shocked's own label, Mighty Sound. The title is a play on the phrase short, sharp shock. The record title and cover image is similar to that of the 1984 Chaos U.K. album Short Sharp Shock.

The photograph of Shocked that appears on the cover was taken by Chris Hardy of the San Francisco Examiner at a protest in San Francisco during the 1984 Democratic National Convention. The 2003 re-issue de-contextualized the original photograph by closely cropping it to Shocked's face.

Sister Boom Boom

Sister Boom Boom, also known as Sister Mary Boom Boom, was the drag nun persona of astrologer Jack Fertig (February 21, 1955 – August 5, 2012). She was a member of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence.Fertig was born in Chicago, Illinois. Often erroneously credited as a founder of the group, Sister Boom Boom actually joined the Sisters in 1980, several months after its founding. She left the order in the Spring of 1986. Her full name was Sister Rose of the Bloody Stains of the Sacred Robes of Jesus, which would trail into a sing-song cadence and a long fermata. This called for a short nickname.In 1982, Sister Boom Boom ran for a seat on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors with agitprop campaigning tactics bringing humor and raising issues she felt were being ignored in the race. She won 23,124 votes with her occupation listed as "Nun of the Above". Five supervisors were elected; she placed eighth. After she started campaigning for mayor in 1983 against incumbent Dianne Feinstein, San Francisco passed an ordinance requiring candidates to use only their legal names on the ballot. This was commonly called the "Sister Boom Boom law".Boom Boom wrote a theatrical-ritual exorcism of Jerry Falwell and Phyllis Schlafly performed in Union Square on July 13, the Friday before the 1984 Democratic National Convention before a crowd of 2,000. She is one of the characters in Emily Mann's play Execution of Justice about the trial of Dan White for the 1978 Moscone–Milk assassinations. George Moscone was mayor of San Francisco and Harvey Milk was the city’s first openly gay supervisor. In the Broadway production she was played by Wesley Snipes.Jack Fertig retired Sister Boom Boom in 1985, and joined a sobriety program. Born to a Jewish father and a Christian mother, he converted to Islam in 2001. He had previously identified as Roman Catholic and as an Episcopalian.Fertig worked as an astrologer until his death in San Francisco, California, from liver cancer on August 5, 2012.

Walter Mondale 1984 presidential campaign

The 1984 presidential campaign of Walter Mondale, a former Minnesota senator and Vice President of the United States, began on February 21, 1983, when Mondale announced that he was running for president in a speech at the Minnesota State Capitol. Mondale won the Democratic Party's presidential nomination after convincing Frank Lautenberg, a previously unpledged party delegate, to support him. Lautenberg's vote gave Mondale the 1,967 delegate votes needed to become the Democratic Party's nominee. Mondale lost the general election, held on November 6, 1984, to incumbent Republican President Ronald Reagan in a landslide.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.