1983 Pro Bowl

The 1983 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 33rd annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1982 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 6, 1983, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 47,207.[1] The final score was NFC 20, AFC 19.[1]

Walt Michaels of the New York Jets led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Dallas Cowboys head coach Tom Landry.[2] The referee was Fred Silva.[1]

Dan Fouts of the San Diego Chargers and John Jefferson of the Green Bay Packers were named the game's Most Valuable Players.[2] A late touchdown pass from Danny White of the Dallas Cowboys to Jefferson provided the NFC margin of victory.

Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000 which were double the payouts of the previous year.[3]

1983 NFL Pro Bowl
1983 Pro Bowl logo
AFC NFC
19 20
Head coach:
Walt Michaels
(New York Jets)
Head coach:
Tom Landry
(Dallas Cowboys)
1234 Total
AFC 9370 19
NFC 010010 20
DateFebruary 6, 1983
StadiumAloha Stadium, Honolulu, Hawaii
Co-MVPsDan Fouts (San Diego Chargers), John Jefferson (Green Bay Packers)
RefereeFred Silva
Attendance47,207
TV in the United States
NetworkABC
AnnouncersFrank Gifford, Howard Cosell, Fran Tarkenton & Lynn Swann

References

  1. ^ a b c "1983 Pro Bowl game book" (PDF). NFL Game Statistics & Information. National Football League. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 31, 2012. Retrieved January 31, 2012.
  2. ^ a b Peters, Ken (February 7, 1983). "White leads NFC over AFC". The Gainesville Sun. AP. p. 1B. Retrieved January 16, 2012.
  3. ^ "NFL Pro Bowl history". CBSSports.com. Archived from the original on January 16, 2012. Retrieved January 16, 2012.

External links

1982 Seattle Seahawks season

The 1982 Seattle Seahawks season was the team's seventh season with the National Football League, which was interrupted by a 57-day players strike, which began on September 21, after the second game.

The Seahawks lost their first two games, and three weeks into the strike, head coach Jack Patera and general manager John Thompson were fired on Wednesday, October 13, and Mike McCormack took over as head coach for the remainder of the season.

After the strike ended in November, the Seahawks won twice to even their record at 2–2, then lost a close game to the Los Angeles Raiders. After beating the Bears the next week, the team was upset 16–0 in the Kingdome by the New England Patriots. Seattle finished at 4–5 and missed the expanded playoffs as the second team out in the tiebreaker.

1983 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 1983 Philadelphia Eagles season was their 51st in the National Football League (NFL). The team followed up their record of 3–6 during the strike-shortened 1982 season with another losing campaign. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the second straight season. The Eagles started off winning four of their first six games, before losing seven consecutive games. The Eagles finished in fourth place with a 5-11 record. Despite the disappointing season, second year wide receiver Mike Quick established himself as a new star by collecting 1,409 receiving yards.

1984 Pro Bowl

The 1984 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 34th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1983 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 29, 1984, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,445. The final score was NFC 45, AFC 3.

Chuck Knox of the Seattle Seahawks led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by San Francisco 49ers head coach Bill Walsh. The referee was Jerry Seeman.Joe Theismann of the Washington Redskins was named the game's Most Valuable Player. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.

Ed Muransky

Edward William "Ed" Muransky (born January 20, 1960) is a former professional American football offensive tackle who played for the Los Angeles Raiders of the National Football League (NFL) and Orlando Renegades of the United States Football League (USFL). He was a member of the Super Bowl XVIII Champion Raiders. Prior to this he was an All-American and Academic All-American athlete who played for the University of Michigan Wolverines during the 1979–1981 seasons.

After retiring from football he became a business partner and advisor to Edward J. DeBartolo Jr., former San Francisco 49ers owner. Muransky testified in the March 2000 trial of Louisiana Governor Edwin Edwards, mainly about what DeBartolo had confided to Muransky. DeBartolo was the only extortion victim who claimed to have been extorted directly by Edwards, but Muransky could not provide direct testimony about private meetings between DeBartolo and Edwards. Muransky has continued to pursue business interests even after the controversies about DeBartolo have waned.

Ensley High School

Ensley High School, located in the Ensley neighborhood of Birmingham, Alabama (United States), was founded in 1901 to serve the then-independent community of Ensley, which was centered on major plants operated by U.S. Steel and the American Cast Iron Pipe Company. It began with classes held at the Old Bush School before the old building, designed by architect David O. Whilldin was constructed in 1908. In 2006, Ensley High School was merged into newly built Jackson-Olin High School.

Jerry Robinson (linebacker)

Jerry Dewayne Robinson (born December 18, 1956) is a former American college and professional football player who was a linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) for thirteen seasons during the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. He played college football for the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and earned All-American honors. Chosen in the first round of the 1979 NFL Draft, he played professionally for the Philadelphia Eagles and Los Angeles Raiders of the NFL.

List of Pro Bowl broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers who have broadcast the National Football League's Pro Bowl throughout the years.

Pro Bowl

The Pro Bowl is the all-star game of the National Football League (NFL). From the merger with the rival American Football League (AFL) in 1970 up through 2013 and since 2017, it is officially called the AFC–NFC Pro Bowl, matching the top players in the American Football Conference (AFC) against those in the National Football Conference (NFC). From 2014 through 2016, the NFL experimented with an unconferenced format, where the teams were selected by two honorary team captains (who are each in the Hall of Fame), instead of selecting players from each conference. The players were picked in a televised "schoolyard pick" prior to the game.Unlike most major sports leagues, which hold their all-star games roughly midway through their regular seasons, the Pro Bowl is played around the end of the NFL season. The first official Pro Bowl was played in January 1951, three weeks after the 1950 NFL Championship Game (between 1939 and 1942, the NFL experimented with all-star games pitting the league's champion against a team of all-stars). Between 1970 and 2009, the Pro Bowl was usually held the weekend after the Super Bowl. Since 2010, it has been played the weekend before the Super Bowl. Players from the two teams competing in the Super Bowl do not participate.

For years, the game has suffered from lack of interest due to perceived low quality, with observers and commentators expressing their disfavor with it in its current state. It draws lower TV ratings than regular season NFL games, although the game draws similar ratings to other major all-star games, such as the Major League Baseball All-Star Game. However, the biggest concern of teams is to avoid injuries to the star players. The Associated Press wrote that players in the 2012 game were "hitting each other as though they were having a pillow fight".Between 1980 and 2016, the game was played at Aloha Stadium in Hawaii except for two years (2010 and 2015). On June 1, 2016, the NFL announced that they reached a multi-year deal to move the game to Orlando, Florida as part of the league's ongoing efforts to make the game more relevant.

Scott Case (American football)

Jeffrey Scott Case (born May 17, 1962 in Waynoka, Oklahoma) is a former safety in the National Football League for the Atlanta Falcons and the Dallas Cowboys. As a Cowboy, he was a part of their Super Bowl XXX champ team that beat the Pittsburgh Steelers. He played college football for the University of Oklahoma.

All-Star Games
NFL Pro Bowls
AFC–NFC Pro Bowls
Draft Pro Bowls
NFL on ABC
Related programs
Related articles
Commentators
Lore televised by ABC
Music
NFL Championship
Super Bowl
Pro Bowl
AFL Championship
Results and standings

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.