1983 FA Cup Final

The 1983 FA Cup Final was contested by Manchester United and Brighton & Hove Albion at Wembley Stadium.

Manchester United were the favourites, as Brighton had been relegated from the First Division that season, and had never reached a cup final before. United had finished third in the league that season and already had four FA Cup victories to their name.

The final ended in a 2–2 draw, forcing a replay at Wembley five days later, which Manchester United won 4–0.

1983 FA Cup Final
Event1982–83 FA Cup
Brighton & Hove Albion Manchester United
Final
Brighton & Hove Albion Manchester United
2 2
Date21 May 1983
VenueWembley Stadium, London
RefereeAlf Grey (Norfolk)
Attendance99,059
Replay
Brighton & Hove Albion Manchester United
0 4
Date26 May 1983
VenueWembley Stadium, London
RefereeAlf Grey (Norfolk)
Attendance91,534

The first match

The first match finished 2–2 after extra time. Gordon Smith and Gary Stevens scored for Brighton; Frank Stapleton and Ray Wilkins for United. The first game is famous for the radio commentary by Peter Jones "...and Smith must score" talking about a shot by Gordon Smith, which was then saved by the Manchester United goalkeeper Gary Bailey; the quote was subsequently used as a title for a Brighton fanzine. Bailey's save forced a replay and prevented Brighton from winning the first major trophy in their history.

The replay

The second game, on the Thursday night, started the same way as the first game had, with Brighton taking the game to Manchester United. Although their chances were limited to long-range drives from Jimmy Case, United goalkeeper Gary Bailey had a couple of important saves to make. This all changed on 25 minutes, with United's first real attack. Alan Davies, who had made his FA Cup debut in the first game, set up captain Bryan Robson for a left-footed drive past Moseley into the corner of the net. Suddenly the atmosphere changed and it was the Manchester United fans who were singing loudest. This was compounded in the 30th minute, when United went 2–0 up, giving the team a two-goal cushion for the first time over the two matches. Brighton failed to clear a corner, and Davies crossed for Norman Whiteside to score with a header, making the new 18 year old (just 19 days after his birthday) the youngest player to ever score (current to 2016 Final) in an FA Cup Final. This capped an incredible 12 months for the teenager, who had played in the 1982 FIFA World Cup Finals for Northern Ireland, and who had scored in the League Cup Final defeat to Liverpool earlier in the season.

Brighton were rocked but continued to press, yet went further behind just before half time. Gordon McQueen headed on a free-kick and the ball fell to Robson to tap in at the far post, for his second goal of the game. The scoring was completed in the second half when the Dutch midfielder Arnold Mühren scored a penalty after Robson had been brought down by Stevens in the penalty area. It was the third consecutive year that a penalty had been awarded (and scored) in the Cup Final replay.

This was the first of three times that Bryan Robson captained Manchester United to FA Cup glory; he also achieved the feat in 1985 and 1990.

Match details

Brighton & Hove Albion2–2 (a.e.t.)Manchester United
Smith Goal 14'
Stevens Goal 87'
Report Stapleton Goal 55'
Wilkins Goal 72'
Brighton & Hove Albion
Manchester United
GK 1 England Graham Moseley
RB 2 England Chris Ramsey
CB 6 England Gary Stevens
CB 5 England Steve Gatting
LB 3 England Graham Pearce
RM 11 England Neil Smillie
CM 4 Republic of Ireland Tony Grealish (c)
CM 7 England Jimmy Case
LM 8 Republic of Ireland Gary Howlett
CF 9 Republic of Ireland Michael Robinson
CF 10 Scotland Gordon Smith
Substitute:
MF 12 Republic of Ireland Gerry Ryan
Manager:
England Jimmy Melia
Brighton vs Man Utd 1983-05-21
GK 1 England Gary Bailey
RB 2 England Mike Duxbury
CB 5 Republic of Ireland Kevin Moran
CB 6 Scotland Gordon McQueen
LB 3 Scotland Arthur Albiston
RM 11 Wales Alan Davies
CM 4 England Ray Wilkins
CM 7 England Bryan Robson (c)
LM 8 Netherlands Arnold Mühren
CF 9 Republic of Ireland Frank Stapleton
CF 10 Northern Ireland Norman Whiteside
Substitute:
MF 12 Republic of Ireland Ashley Grimes
Manager:
England Ron Atkinson

Assistant referees:
Colin Downey (Hounslow)
John Pardoe (Kidderminster)
Reserve official:
John Connock (Bristol)

Match rules

  • 90 minutes
  • 30 minutes of extra-time if necessary
  • Replay if scores still level
  • One named substitute
  • Maximum of one substitution

Replay match details

Brighton & Hove Albion0–4Manchester United
Robson Goal 25'44'
Whiteside Goal 30'
Mühren Goal 62' (pen.)
Brighton & Hove Albion
Manchester United
GK 1 England Graham Moseley
RB 6 England Gary Stevens
CB 5 England Steve Foster (c)
CB 2 England Steve Gatting
LB 3 England Graham Pearce
RM 11 England Neil Smillie
CM 4 Republic of Ireland Tony Grealish
CM 7 England Jimmy Case
LM 8 Republic of Ireland Gary Howlett
CF 9 Republic of Ireland Michael Robinson
CF 10 Scotland Gordon Smith
Substitute:
MF 12 Republic of Ireland Gerry Ryan
Manager:
England Jimmy Melia
Brighton vs Man Utd 1983-05-26
GK 1 England Gary Bailey
RB 2 England Mike Duxbury
CB 5 Republic of Ireland Kevin Moran
CB 6 Scotland Gordon McQueen
LB 3 Scotland Arthur Albiston
RM 11 Wales Alan Davies
CM 4 England Ray Wilkins
CM 7 England Bryan Robson (c)
LM 8 Netherlands Arnold Mühren
CF 9 Republic of Ireland Frank Stapleton
CF 10 Northern Ireland Norman Whiteside
Substitute:
MF 12 Republic of Ireland Ashley Grimes
Manager:
England Ron Atkinson

Match rules

  • 90 minutes.
  • 30 minutes of extra-time if necessary.
  • Penalty shoot-out if scores still level.
  • One named substitute.
  • Maximum of one substitution.

External links

Brighton

Brighton () is a seaside resort on the south coast of England that is part of the City of Brighton and Hove, located 47 miles (76 km) south of London.Archaeological evidence of settlement in the area dates back to the Bronze Age, Roman and Anglo-Saxon periods. The ancient settlement of "Brighthelmstone" was documented in the Domesday Book (1086). The town's importance grew in the Middle Ages as the Old Town developed, but it languished in the early modern period, affected by foreign attacks, storms, a suffering economy and a declining population. Brighton began to attract more visitors following improved road transport to London and becoming a boarding point for boats travelling to France. The town also developed in popularity as a health resort for sea bathing as a purported cure for illnesses.

In the Georgian era, Brighton developed as a fashionable seaside resort, encouraged by the patronage of the Prince Regent, later King George IV, who spent much time in the town and constructed the Royal Pavilion in the Regency era. Brighton continued to grow as a major centre of tourism following the arrival of the railways in 1841, becoming a popular destination for day-trippers from London. Many of the major attractions were built in the Victorian era, including the Metropole Hotel (now Hilton) Grand Hotel, the West Pier, and the Brighton Palace Pier. The town continued to grow into the 20th century, expanding to incorporate more areas into the town's boundaries before joining the town of Hove to form the unitary authority of Brighton and Hove in 1997, which was granted city status in 2000. Today, Brighton and Hove district has a resident population of about 288,200 and the wider Brighton and Hove conurbation has a population of 474,485 (2011 census).Brighton's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, renowned for its diverse communities, quirky shopping areas, large cultural, music and arts scene and its large LGBT population, leading to its recognition as the "unofficial gay capital of the UK". Brighton attracted 7.5 million day visitors in 2015/16 and 4.9 million overnight visitors, and is the most popular seaside destination in the UK for overseas tourists. Brighton has also been called the UK's "hippest city", and "the happiest place to live in the UK".

Graham Moseley

Graham Moseley (born 16 November 1953 in Manchester) is an English retired professional footballer who played in the 1983 FA Cup Final with Brighton & Hove Albion.

Graham Pearce

Graham Pearce may refer to:

Graham Pearce (English footballer) (born 1963), English association football player who played for Brighton and Hove Albion in the 1983 FA Cup Final

Graham Pearce (New Zealand footballer), New Zealand international association football player

Neil Smillie

Neil Smillie (born Barnsley, 19 July 1958) is an English former professional football player and manager. He played for a number of clubs, with the high point of his career being an appearance in the 1983 FA Cup Final for Brighton & Hove Albion.

Steve Gatting

Stephen Paul Gatting (born 29 May 1959) is an English former footballer, who is best known for playing for Brighton & Hove Albion in the 1983 FA Cup Final. He is currently a youth team coach at Arsenal.

The Boys in the Old Brighton Blue

"The Boys in the Old Brighton Blue" was a single released by the English football team Brighton & Hove Albion to commemorate reaching the 1983 FA Cup Final. It reached number 65 in the UK Singles Chart.

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